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September 8, 1909

FALLS IN LOVE WITH
ICE MAN AND ELOPES.

YOUNG GIRL CAUGHT BEFORE
KNOT CAN BE TIED.

Kitchen Romance of Ruth Risley
and Otis Pemberton Ruthlessly
Shattered by Father Send-
ing the Girl Away.

A romance that commenced in the visits of the ice man this summer to the home of G. M. Risley, a dentist at 2628 Myrtle avenue, ended yesterday when Ruth Risley, the 17-year-old daughter, eloped with Otis L. Pemberton, 23 years old. The young couple went to Kansas City, Kas., but on account of the youthful appearance of the girl, the marriage license was refused. When Dr. Risley heard the news and located his daughter, he promptly sent her to Butler, Mo., to join her mother.

"It won't do any good," the girl said firmly when she was placed aboard the train. "It won't be much more than six months until I'm 18 and then I can do as I please."

It wasn't exactly love at first sight, for the young man had tramped through the kitchen several times before the daughter of the household realized that he was good looking and that he was more cheerful than the average ice man who grumbled when he had to carry ice to the far end of the ho use. The ice man's visits were sometimes prolonged and in time the young folk began to converse in a friendly manner.

ELOPEMENT IS PLANNED.

Miss Risley discovered to her satisfaction that the young man talked in a pleasant manner, and was in no way inferior to her classmates at the Manual Training High School.

Evening calls followed and the family began to notice that the well dressed young man who was so attentive bore a striking resemblance to the ice man who came every morning. When the parental storm broke, plans for an elopement were made.

"We can get married in Kansas," was Pemberton's comforting assurance. "Just say that you are 18, and it will be all right."

It wasn't so easy when they faced the man in the recorder's office.

"Yes, I'm 18," said the girl, falteringly.

The man behind the desk grinned in a tantalizing manner and expressed his doubts. Then a lot of questions followed, and in the end Miss Risley admitted she was only near-18. There was nothing to do but return to the Missouri side, which the young couple did.

"Perhaps my mother will help us," said the young man, so they went to his home at 2717 East Fifteenth street. A strange man met them at the gate.

"I AM A DETECTIVE" -- FOILED!

"My name is L. D. Jennings, city detective," explained the stranger. "Sorry that I have to take you to the police station."

It didn't do any good to remonstrate and the would-be elopers accompanied the officer to police headquarters, where they were met by Dr. Risley, who wasn't in an altogether amiable frame of mind.

"You will join your mother at once," he said when he was told that they had not succeeded in tying the wedding knot. "No more of this foolishness."

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September 10, 1908

STOLE GLASSES OFF HIS NOSE.

Unusual Robbery of a Skater at For-
est Park Rink.

"He just reached around from behind when I was not looking, took my gold eyeglasses off my face and walked away." Paul J. Drescher, 2415 Myrtle avenue, so reported to the police last night, and the report constitutes one of the most unusual robberies ever recorded in the police annals of Kansas City.

According to Drescher, he was in the skating rink at Forest park when the robbery occurred. Drescher says he was skating around the rink and having a good time. He says the man approached him from behind, and although he did not get a good look at him, owing to the absence of the glasses, he was able to give a partial description of the thief.

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May 11, 1908

FATHER SAW HIS
BOY GO TO DEATH.

CARL RUEHLE FALLS FROM RAP-
IDLY MOVING CAR.

CLOTHING CAUGHT IN FENCE.

UNFORTUNATE LAD DRAWN UN-
DER HEAVY WHEELS.

Parent Tried to Save Him, but the
Boy's Coat Gave Way and
His Life was Quickly
Crushed Out.

While returning with his father after an afternoon spent in Fairmount park, Carl Ruehle, a 16-year-old boy, was dragged from the front step of a crowded car by his coat catching in a picket fence beside the track at Twelfth street and Mersington avenue last evening about 7 o'clock, and thrown beneath the rear trucks, and instantly killed.

The approaching rain caused a rush to the incoming cars at the park, and young Ruehle and his father, G. C. Ruehle, a blacksmith at Twelfth street and Highland avenue, had been barely able to force their way on the car, the father standing upon the platform, and the boy gaining a foothold on the step. Irvin Menagerie, the motorman, put on full speed soon after he left the park, and the boy leaned far out to get the breeze full in his face, saying that he enjoyed it.

"Be careful, Carl," the father said when he leaned particularly far out. "You might hit your head against a post or fall off. Perhaps you'd better get up here on the platform with me."

"There's not room on the platform," the boy replied. "I'll be careful."

This conversation took place but a minute before the accident. Between Myrtle and Mersington avenues the street car track goes through a cut about four feet deep, and on each side is built a fence to deep persons from driving into it from the road. The car was going rapidly, and young Ruehle once more leaned out to catch the breeze, bystanders say, and before his father could again warn him the car had reached the cut.

The boy's coat was not buttoned, and the wind caught it in and bellied it out. Before young Ruehle could draw his coat back one of the pickets had caught in a fold of the cloth, and was dragging him from the step. He cried out, and clung to the rail with all his might but could not keep his hold.

At his son's cry the boy's father grasped at him, and succeeded in getting hold of part of his clothing. He clung until the cloth parted, the back of his right hand being deeply cut and bruised from striking against the sharp corners of the car in trying to hold on.

The boy was instantly killed. He was an employe of the Hallman Printing Company, and lived with his parents at 1313 Lydia avenue. The body was taken to Newcomer's morgue after an examination by the coroner.

The father was taken to D. V. Whitney's drug store, at Twelfth street and Cleveland avenue, and his wound dressed. Lynn Turpin was the conductor and Irvin Menagerie the motorman on the car, which is No. 234.

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July 8, 1907

LATE LOCATING FIRE.

Department on Scouting Tour finds
Burning House in Ruins.

The dwelling of Charles Bosley, 3211 Myrtle avenue, was almost totally destroyed by fire together with its contents, just before midnight last night. The family were absent in Kansas on a visit and when neighbors discovered the flames the structure was doomed.

A remarkable feature of the fire was that while many people telephoned fire headquarters that a fire could be seen in the southeast part of town, all who phoned said they were not near it and could not give its location. William Rothrum, fire alarm operator, could do nothing but send out a scouting company to try and locate it. Hose company No. 18, of Twenty-sixth street and Prospect avenue, was given the task, and on finding the location also found it useless to call for help as the house was six or seven blocks outside of the fire zone and was beyond saving. The total loss was estimated at $2,500.

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