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March 2, 1909

AGED COUPLE KILLED
BY ESCAPING GAS.

FOUND IN THEIR HOME 36
HOURS AFTER DEATH.

Bodies of A. H. Tuttle, Civil War
Veteran, and His Wife, Discovered
in Residence -- Grate and
Heater Burning.

Last night, when Captain Jack Burns of fire company No. 18 entered the house of A. H. Tuttle, 2617 East Twenty-fifth street, and found an aged man and his wife both dead, Tuttle lying on his side on the floor and his wife sitting in a chair in the front room of the house. A gas grate and an overhead gas heater in the room were burning.

The first intimation of a tragedy was discovered by A. M. Weed, a solicitor for the Wells-Fargo Express Company. Captain Tuttle, as he was familiarly called, has been an employe of the express company for the past twenty-five years. When he failed to appear at the depot yesterday morning, for the first time in years, it was thought he was ill. Mr. Weed called at the house about 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and failing to get a response to repeated ringing of the door bell, walked around the house. He questioned a little girl playing in the yard as to whether Tuttle lived the4re, and if she had seen either of them that day. The girl replied that she had not seen either of them since Sunday morning. Weed found the milk on the back porch and the morning papers on the front porch.

FILLED WITH GAS FUMES.

Mr. Weed returned to the office and reported to H. B. Jeffereies, assistant agent, that he suspected something wrong. Mr. Jefferies visited the house at 6 o'clock and after investigating saw the blue flame of the gas heater, which is attached to the gas jet, through a side window. He went to the front porch and putting his hand on the large plate glass window found it to be hot. He called W. W. Hunt, who lives at 2619 East Twenty-fifth street, and after a consultation sent a boy to No. 18 fire station for a ladder. Captain Burns and one of his men responded and entered the house through an upstairs window.

"As soon as I opened the window I could smell the gas fumes and the still more horrible odor of decaying human flesh," said Captain Burns. "It was necessary to light matches to see in the ho use as most of the curtains were drawn. The heat was intense. Coming down the stairs the heat was more noticeable and gas fumes made breathing difficult. In the parlor, off the reception hall, we found the old couple; Captain Tuttle lying on the floor and Mrs. Tuttle sitting in her Morris chair in front of the burning grate, her head over on her breast as if in sleep."

DEAD THIRTY-SIX HOURS.

Mr. Jefferies and Mr. Hunt went into the house and opened the doors and windows. Coroner's physician, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, was called and declared that the death had occurred thirty-six hours earlier. He said that asphyxiation from inhaling carbon monoxide was the cause of death. Carbon monoxide is the fumes from imperfect combustion of natural gas, and is similar to that given off my burning anthracite coal.

Before noon Sunday morning Mrs. Tuttle went to a neighbor, Mrs. Jackson, at 2515 East Twenty-fifth street, and borrowed a cupful of sugar, saying she was going to make a custard pie. This was the last time she was seen alive. Other neighbors had seen the couple earlier in the day.

From the appearance of the house, those acquainted with Captain and Mrs. Tuttle declared that they had evidently just gotten up from the breakfast table. The breakfast dishes had been washed and were on the dining table, covered with a cloth. Captain Tuttle's razor, shaving brush, mug and strop were lying on the kitchen table.

W. L. Cowing, 2506 Montgall, said that Mr. and Mrs. Tuttle were to have gone with him to Shawnee Sunday afternoon to look over some land. "I saw them yesterday morning," said Mr. Cowing last night, "and they both declared they would go. When I came to the house in the afternoon I got no response to my ringing of the doorbell and concluded they had gone ahead of me."

Rev. R. P. Witherspoon, 1601 Belmot avenue, brother of Mrs. Tuttle, was called form the Gypsy Smith meeting and arrived at the house after 9 o'clock. He was shocked at the news. He said that he had never known a happier or more devoted couple.

"My sister and her husband have led an ideal life," he said, "and had it not been for neighbors and friends this thing might have gone unnoticed for days. They loved each other and everyone around them, and were loved by them in turn."

CIVIL WAR VETERAN.

Captain Tuttle served in the Sixteenth Ohio regiment of infantry in the civil war. Shortly after the war he became a director in the Missouri penitentiary at Jefferson City, where he remained several years. He afterwards went to Warrensburg, Mo., and engaged in business. Twenty-five years ago he joined the messenger service of the Wells Fargo Express Company and remained with them until his death.

Promotions came one after another, until he became money deliverer and one of the most trusted employes of the company. His superiors and associates declare that his word was as good as a bond. It is said that the company has offered several times to retire him on a pension, but that he has steadily refused, saying that he must be around and doing something or he couldn't feel right. He drew $36 a month as pension from the government.

Three sons survive the couple. They are Lloyd Tuttle, a salesman for the Ferguson-McKinney Dry Goods Company in St. Louis; Charles P. Tuttle of Coalinga, Cal., and Harry Tuttle of St. Paul, Minn. Mr. Tuttle has a brother living in Creston, O., and Mrs. Tuttle has a sister, Mrs. T. J. Claggett, Marshall, Mo., and two brothers, Charles Witherspoon, Mansfield, Tex., and the Rev. R. P. Witherspoon of this city.

The bodies were taken to Carroll-Davidson's undertaking rooms on Grand avenue. News of the deaths has been telegraphed to the sons and the funeral arrangements will await their arrival in this city.

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January 20, 1909

WIFE WOULDN'T STAY AT HOME.

Mother of Four Children Is Arrested
and Fined for Vagrancy.

Standing in front of the rail in the municipal court yesterday morning was Harry O'Hare, motorman for the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, and his four children, ranging in years from 7 to 14. Next to the father stood the mother, with downcast head and eyes, charged with vagrancy on the complaint of her husband. The family lives at 1517 Montgall avenue.

In a broken voice he informed Judge Harry G. Kyle that his wife failed to stay at home and take care of the children, but paraded the streets. Sometimes, O'Hare said, his wife was away from home for a month or more at a time. She admitted liking the company of other men better than that of her husband, and Judge Kyle fined her $50.

Her case will be taken up by the pardon board. The Humane Society agreed to secure some woman to take care of the children and O'Hare will pay the expense.

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August 30, 1908

MRS. D. B. KIRK JR.
WRECKS POOL HALL

HER FATHER-IN-LAW IS FORE-
MAN OF GRAND JURY.

CATCHES HUSBAND GAMBLING

THROWS BALLS THROUGH MIR-
RORS AND WINDOWS.

David B. Kirk, Sr., Captures Cards
and Chips, and She Sweeps Up
$5 Bill -- All Held as Evidence.

Wondering what attraction her husband found to keep him down town until the wee small hours of the morning, Mrs. David Kirk, Jr., 3120 Euclid avenue, daughter-in-law of David B. Kirk, foreman of the grand jury, started an investigation which culminated last Thursday night in her wrecking a pool hall located at 715 Central street after she discovered her husband in a rear room playing poker.

For some time Mrs. Kirk had been disturbed in mind because her husband had begun to keep late hours and could not give to her any satisfactory reasons for his so doing. A week ago five men were arrested by Detectives Robert Phelan and Scott Godley, who charged them with gambling. In some mysterious way Mrs. Kirk heard that her husband was one of the men, as did also his father in law, David B. Kirk, foreman of the grand jury. When taxed with being arrested Kirk, Jr., denied it to his wife, and she asked the assistance of her father-in-law.

The son was called into the father's office and denied that he had been arrested, but admitted that a friend had been caught gambling in a raid that detectives made on the pool hall and that he had gone to the station and deposited $17 bond for his friend.

David B. Kirk, 3217 Montgall avenue, foreman of the grand jury, was at his desk in his office in the M. K. & T. building about 7 o'clock last evening when he received a telephone call from his daughter-in-law. She said that her husband was not at home and that she was worried about him. She finally left her home, 3120 Euclid avenue, and went to Mr. Kirk's office. He talked to her and endeavored to pacify her and then they started home. She suggested that they stroll down to the suspected pool hall and see if David, Jr., was there. Mr. Kirk said last night that the pool hall was brilliantly lighted, the billiard balls racked, but the room was empty.

SHE CAUGHT THEM AT IT.

Mrs. Kirk refused to be satisfied. She opened the door and walked in. A door at one end of the room led to another beyond. The glass panels were painted white and it was impossible to see what was behind them. Mr. Kirk and his daughter-in-law could hear men's voices, the clicking of chips and the shuffling of cards. She knocked on the inside door as it was locked. A man partly opened it, probably expecting to see another poker player to join the crowd, and that act led to the wrecking of the hall later on.

Mr. Kirk succeeded in getting her foot between the door and the jamb, and, assisted by Mr. Kirk, Sr., she pushed the door open. Inside was her husband and four or five other men. They had attempted to conceal all evidence of the gambling that was going on in the room, but overlooked one $5 bill A man remarked that the money belonged to him, but was surprised as the rest when Mrs. Kirk picked up the bill and said he had evidently made a mistake. She placed the money in her chatelaine bag. Mr. Kirk got some poker chips and cards as evidence.

SHE SMASHES THINGS.

Fearing that the commotion would attract a crowd, Mr. Kirk took his son's wife and started to leave the building. As the two went through the pool hall Mrs. Kirk's anger arose beyond control, and the red and white ivory balls seemed to drive her frantic. Rushing to one of the tables she picked up the balls and began throwing them through the mirrors in the room. Exhausting the supply of balls on the first table she quickly gathered up those on the table next to it and finished all the mirrors in the hall.

Going from one table to another the now enraged woman scooped up the little ivories and pasted them through the plate glass windows and out into the street. After she had thrown every everything she could handle she consented to leave. Mr. Kirk, her father-in-law, says they went to Eighth street and endeavored to find a policeman, but not a sight of one they could catch. Down one block and up another street the two people walked, hunting, searching and looking for a minion of the law, but in vain.

TELL IT TO THE GRAND JURY.

Just as Mr. Kirk, Sr., was calling the grand jury into session Friday morning he was informed that there was an urgent telephone call for him. He answered it and, last night, he said that his son was at the other end of the wire. Young Kirk told his father that Charles W. Prince, owner of the pool hall, was in his office and desired to know what reparation he intended to make for the damage of furniture and building resulting from his wife's actions. The young man wanted his father to tell him what to do. "Mr. Prince wants to talk to you," said the son. The father stated last night that he answered by saying: "If Mr. Prince wants to talk to me, he'll have to do the talking before the grand jury. That was the last Kirk, Sr. heard of Prince. It is not likely that that will be the last Prince will hear of Kirk, Sr., or of the grand jury, either.

When asked what action would be taken by him, Mr. Kirk, Sr., stated that he had called the prosecuting attorney into the grand jury room and told the whole story, shielding no one, asking no mercy for anyone.

Asked if an indictment would be returned by the grand jury against anyone for either gambling or keeping a gambling house, Mr. Kirk stated that the prosecuting attorney had informed the grand jury that Mr. Kirk had not secured enough evidence against anyone to make a conviction in the criminal court. The money, the cards, the chips, the table with its green cloth and white covering were not sufficient evidence, the prosecuting attorney told them. According to Mr. Kirk, to secure a conviction the state would have to have witnesses who could testify that they had seen the men gambling.

David B. Kirk, Jr., is 32 years of age. He is a millers' agent.

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June 26, 1907

THEY SWAM TO PUT OUT A FIRE.

Firemen in East Bottoms Followed
Through Flood by Team.

When hose company No 20, Guinotte and Montgall avenues, responded to an alarm of fire from the Park grain elevator, East Lynne street and Nicholson avenue, at 8 o'clock last night, the firemen found the burning structure surrounded by at least five feet of water, surrounded by at least five feet of water. Near the elevator was a fire plug, just barely covered with water. The team followed them. The wagon floated and the horses seemed to pull it with ease while swimming. When the wagon reached a depth where the wheels touched the ground and the bed with the hose was above water the firemen reeled off a section and the hydrant man made the attachment. The line was crried into the elevator and the fire put out. When it was all over the men, horses and wagon went back the way they had come.

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May 8, 1907

PARK POLICEMAN IS FINED.

Slapped a Boy and Then Drew Re-
volver on Him.
David A. Bateman, a park policeman, was fined $10 in police court yesterday on a charge of disturbing the peace of Ray Welsh, a 15-year-old boy living at 1530 Montgall avenue. He paid the fine and gave notice of appeal.

Welsh said he was passing a pool hall at Fifteenth and Bellefontaine when Bateman came out and made him take a chain off a dog which Welsh was leading. Welsh then went down the street to where there was a blacksmith shop.

"He called me out," said the boy, "then he slapped me, hit me over the head with his club and drew his gun."

A man who did not know Welsh corroborated his statements as to the assault. Bateman said he had a bad cold and took some quinine and three drinks of whiskey, "which seemed to go to my head." Sergeant T. S. Eubanks, who arrested Bateman, said the latter had had trouble in a pool hall and also a store next door, and that his station had been notified to take him away. When he got there the trouble with the boy was on.

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March 28, 1908

SAVED GREEN'S TOMATOES.

Even Though He Had to Call on the
Police for Help.

"I want some of you fellows here to call James Green, the old man, at Twelfth and Prospect, and have him call Jimmy Green, young Jimmy, his son, at Twelfth and Montgall, and have Jimmy tell his wife to go out on the back porch and take in them tomato plants. They'll sure freeze if they stay out all night tonight."

The foregoing request was made by an aged man who strolled into police headquarters last night and announced that he was "in deep trouble and needed some help." The request was so unusual, and as it was made in a drawling tone, the police only laughed. The old man's feelings appeared to be hurt because no one would take him seriously.

"I mean just what I say," he insisted. "I have been making a garden for young Jimmy Green. A short time ago I sowed tomato seed in a box. The plants came up and today I put the box out in the sun and went away and left it. When it began to turn cold a little while ago I thought of them tomato plants and want young Jimmy's wife to take 'em in, so I do. They'll all be ruined if she don't."

When it was seen that the old gardener was serious, James Green was called over the telephone. He said he would tell "young Jimmy" and that he knew young Jimmy would tell his wife. The old man was contented at this information and kindly thanked all who had aided him in saving the tomato plants. He game the name of John Hiltbrunner, and his residence as 309 Walnut street.

"I used to own 200 acres of the best land in Iowa," he said sadly. "My children all grew up, married and left me. After that my wife died. Then I lost my homestead and have virtually been turned out upon the world to make a living at the age of 63 years. Knowing nothing but farming I have been making my way as a gardener and manage to keep the wolf away when the season is on."

When asked why he did not go to live with some of his married children the old man hung his head. "Oh , you know how children are when they marry and settle down for themselves. Sometimes they forget the old folks."

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December 11, 1907

YOUNG SEERESS IN TROUBLE.

Blanche Brewer Takes Up Fortune
Telling and Is Arrested.

Blanche Brewer, 22 years of age, who was arrested on the complaint of a Miss Piper, who lives at 432 North Montgall avenue, yesterday morning, told a pitiful tale of poverty and desolation to the police officers at police headquarters.

Blanche had been going about from house to house trying to make a living for herself and her invalid sister by telling fortunes. The two young girls are orphans and have no relatives who can be found. They came here from Topeka, Kas., about two weeks ago and neither of them has been able to obtain employment. They had no money and no way of making a livelihood.

Becoming desperate, Blanche, the younger of the two girls, hit upon the scheme of fortune telling, though she really knew nothing whatever about the tricks of that trade. She succeeded in bring an average of 50 cents a day home of the sustenance of her sister and herself.

Three days ago, she told Miss Piper's fortune and took as a pledge for payment a shirtwaist suit. Miss Piper says that the garments were loaned to the girl for two days in payment for the seance. Accordingly she telephoned to the police and told them that the girl, Blanche, had stolen the articles. Upon investigation the suit was found in the girls' room at 416 West Thirteenth street. Blanche was arrested and taken to the matron's room, where her sister called last night and substantiated her story.

The police will probably turn the matter over to the Humane Society.

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March 24, 1907

BOY CAPTURES BURGLAR.

SECURES REVOLVER AS MAN
FLEES WITH HIS BOOTY.

Latter Draws a Knife to Fight, but
Yields When Pistol Is Leveled at
Him and Submits to Arrest.

While Mrs. Mary M. Sharon and her son, Forty-fourth street and Montgall avenue, were returning from a drive yesterday afternoon they saw that the front door of their home was open. It had been locked when they left, so they approached the house with caution. When not far away a man was seen to leave the open door, carrying with him a beaver cloak valued at $85.

Young Sharon, the son, waited until the man had disappeard over the brow of a hill nearby, when he ran into the house and returned with a revolver, which the thief had overlooked. He went to the top of the hill and kept watch on the burglar, and saw him hide the cloak in some brush and cover it over carefully. That was some distance from the house. The thief then started off in another direction, while young Sharon maade preparations to head him off. After making a long detour, he came upon the man, and chase began. Away they went, over hill and dale, jumping gulleys and sneaking through underbrush. All the while, however, Sharon had his eagle eye on the fleeing man. When the tired fugitive was completely winded he drew a knife and stood ready to fight, but when he saw that his captor had a revolver, he threw up his hands, dropped the knife and surrendered.

Sharon led his prisoner back to where he got a man to telephone No. 9 station for the police. Mounted Patrolman Joseph Waaters and Joseph Enright took the daylight burglar in tow and locked him up for investigation. The man gave the name of McKenzie. He admitted breaking into the house by a rear window, and said he had opened the front door to facilitate escape. He was not looking for the people home so soon. He told where he had hidden the cloak, but Sharon already knew, as he had witnessed that.

McKenzie lives in the North end.

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