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February 3, 1910

FIRST COFFEE FROM MEXICO.

Received at Customs House; Ameri-
cans Establish Plantations.

G. W. Clarke, surveyor of customs at the port of Kansas City, issued his monthly statement yesterday showing a gain of 58.5 per cent in the receipts of his office in customs duties over the month of January, 1909. In January of last year the receipts amounted to $48,541.39, while for the month just past they amounted to $77,367.12, a difference of $28,825.73. Every month this office has shown a gain over the like month of the year before.

"We received our first shipment of coffee from Mexico today," said Mr. Clarke. "The shipment reached nearly 50,000 pounds. It was unusual, as heretofore most of our coffee has been imported from Brazil. Americans have bought vast tracts in Mexico, however, and have begun raising coffee there."

There are no import duties on coffee and tea, but they have to pass through the custom house just the same. A separate report is kept of the free and dutiable imports. Coffee and tea is examined by experts to see that it is good. All tea shipped here is opened and samples sent to Chicago to be tested. Not long ago an entire wagon load was ordered dumped into the river as unfit for use. There is no such chance to cheat in shipments of coffee as there is in tea, but the government tries to protect the consumer by ordering both examined by men who know the goods.

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December 26, 1909

DIRECT LINE TO
CITY OF MEXICO.

ORIENT CONTRACTS FOR CONNEC-
TIONS WITH INTERNATIONAL
RAILWAY OF MEXICO.

Work Will Be Started Feb-
ruary 1, and Will Be Com-
pleted by June, 1911.
Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway Gets Direct Line to Mexico City.
MAP SHOWING ORIENT LINE TO DEL RIO, WHICH WILL CONNECT WITH THE I. R. OF M. FOR CITY OF MEXICO.

WICHITA, KAS., Dec. 25. -- Announcement was made here today that contracts for the right of way from San Angelo, Tex., to Del Rio, Tex., have been signed by the Orient railroad and the local municipalities and actual work on the construction of a branch to connect with the International Railroad of Mexico will be commenced February 1. This will give Wichita, Kansas City and intermediate shipping points a direct line to the City of Mexico. The contract provides that the road is to be completed June 1st, 1911.

Simultaneously the information was given out here today that the Mexican government has agreed to spend $6,000,000 and a Mexican capitalist $4,000,000 on irrigation projects in Northern Mexico along the line of the International road. Millions of acres there will be transformed into veritable truck beds.

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December 17, 1909

MILLION IS RAISED
FOR ORIENT SYSTEM.

Result of Recent Trip of
Officials and Capitalists.

The sum of $939,000 in subscriptions for the promotion of the work on the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway is the result of the recent trip conducted by President A. E. Stilwell and Edward C. Dickinson, vice president of the railroad company. The trip was taken the first of this month, lasted fifteen days, ending the first of this week. Mr. Dickinson was accompanied by a party of Eastern business men and capitalists. He pronounces the trip a success from a business standpoint as well as in every other way. Before the trip was completed $789,000 had been subscribed by the men of the party and since then the other $150,000 has been sent in.

The trip started at Chicago, the party being taken in a special train. Th intention was to go straight to El Paso and down to the City of Mexico directly from there. However, storms, washouts and swollen streams made that particular rout out of the question. So the party had to give up the idea of going over that section of the company's tracks. The trip South was therefore by way of Chillicothe, Fort Worth, San Antonio and Laredo to Mexico City. The latter part of the trip was made over the Orient lines.

The return trip took the party over the Mexican Central to El Paso, over the Texas Pacific to Sweet Water and on into San Angelo. The Kansas City, Mexico & Orient line was then followed as far as Altus where the Frisco was traveled to St. Louis. At the last mention place the party disbanded. Mr. Dickinson returned directly to Kansas City, disappointed in only one thing -- the party had not been able to travel over as much of the company's tracks as had been desired.

The work on the road is to be pushed as fast as possible and all of the improvements contemplated will be made in both roadbed and rolling stock.

When asked in regard to the personnel of the party Mr. Dickinson said he preferred not to give out the names yet because of reasons which also he didn't care to make public. However, he said that John F. Wallace, former chief engineer of the Illinois Central railroad and chief engineer of the Panama canal, who is also a vice president of the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient railway, was one of the party. Mr. Wallace, said Mr. Dickinson, has only recently been made vice president of the road to fill the place of George Crocker, recently deceased. Further that the above Mr. Dickinson said he could say nothing for publication.

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December 3, 1909

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
IN CONSULAR SERVICE.

LEON GOMEZ NOW COMES TO
KANSAS CITY.

In 24 Years He Has Found no City
That Suits Him Better and
He Would Like to Stay.
Acting Mexican Consular Leon Gomez.
LEON GOMEZ.

Leon Gomez, until recently stationed at Cagilari, Island of Sardinia, is the acting Mexican consul to this city, filling the office of M. E. Diebold, now at St. Louis. Mr. Gomez is commissioned as consul to St. Louis, but he said yesterday that in his twenty-four years of consular service he had found no city that suited him quite so well as Kansas City and that he hopes to be recommissioned here.

"A city of beautiful boulevards and avenues," he said. "What drives in the summer time! Not in Old Mexico or France or Italy is better to be found. If I can so arrange I will spend a few years here so as to give my family a rest. It will be good for them and me. We of the consular service are nomads, senor."

Personally, Mr. Gomez is of striking appearance. He is about 55 years old, short and well built. His iron gray hair is roached straight back from his forehead. The nose is Roman, the chin and cheekbones equally prominent.

In full dress uniform with his left breast covered with badges of high orders, his pictures (face views) might pass for that of General Diaz. This effect is considerable heightened by the heavy, drooping gray mustache and the absence of the chin whiskers which adorned his features up until a few weeks ago.

WOULD FILL A BOOK.

In keeping with his distinguished appearance is the new consul's experience in government affairs. Unlike the great president, who speaks none but his own tongue, Mr. Gomez is fluent in English, French and Italian, as well as Spanish.

A complete record of this Mexican's travels and experiences would fill a book. He was first appointed as consul to San Diego, Cal., from Guadalajara. After seven y ears there he was changed to Tuscon, A. T., for seven months, then to Panama for three years, back to California for three years, to Texas for a short time, to Belize or British Honduras for fourteen years, to Italy for a year and now to this point awaiting a post in St. Louis.

Mr. Gomez's diplomacy and education has made him a favorite wherever he has been stationed and his knowledge of languages, customs and laws of foreign countries seems to have kept him in good standing with the Diaz government. In 1894 he won a place in the international history as secretary of the international commission which established forever and beyond possible dispute of the boundary line between Mexico and the United States by planting a line of stone monuments from El Paso to the California coast.

On the subject of travel the new consul is an interesting talker, his knowledge of the countries where he has beeen stationed by his government being minute, even in statistics.

CONSIDERS IT UNWISE.

"Every people has its virtues," he says. "By the same token ever people has its faults that are peculiar and found nowhere else under the sun. If a man is to judge a country let him go to it and live five years, speak its language, follow its customs, obey its laws, eat, sleep and think with its inhabitants.

"The United States bids fair to be the greatest nation in the world because it is cosmopolitan. The most enterprising and energetic of all nations naturally migrate here because it is new and promising. Mexico -----"

But Mr. Gomez does not talk much about Mexico; it is more diplomatic not to draw comparisons. There are views which Mr. Gomez undoubtedly could express about his own country beside all others on the sphere, but he does not consider it wise apparently, saying instead:

"Mexico is a great country, too. Growing just like everything and destined sometime to be a power with the rest. It is great in territory, population and in national heart. It is rich in natural resources and its capitol has walks and drives rivaling those of Kansas City itself!"

It is commonly asserted that the fashionable parades of the City of Mexico are equal to those of Paris and the most beautiful on the continent, but Mr. Gomez would rather be excused from saying so in the United States.

"Always, everywhere, I say to the young man: 'Go to Mexico to live.' The people are warm in their hospitality toward strangers and there is money to be made. It is a big country. The laws are congenial and friendly to foreigners. The girls are -- ah, beautiful, senor. It is a most agreeable place in which to live and bring up a family. I say all this to them because it is true and because Mexico can stand a population as cosmopolitan as that of the United States."

With Mr. Gomez when he came here to Kansas City were his wife and three children, who have followed him about the map into all sorts of climates and among widely different kinds of people. They say they have enjoyed themselves everywhere they have been but like California the best.

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November 27, 1909

ORIENT MAY ENTER
NEW UNION STATION.

THE STOCKHOLDERS WILL MEET
WITH MR. HARMON TODAY.

Special Train With Pres. Stilwell,
Vice Pres. Dickinson and East-
ern Financiers Will Be
Here For Hours.

When the main line of the Kansas City, Mexico and Orient railroad is completed into Kansas City, it is likely that the Orient trains will enter the new Union passenger station. At least efforts to this end will be made this morning.

A. E. Stilwell, president of the road, and E. Dickinson, vice president and general manager, will arrive in Kansas City this morning with a party of Eastern capitalists and stockholders. The party will arrive in a special train of seven sleepers over the Rock Island, at 8 o'clock. While here there will be a meeting with President H. L. Harmon and other officials of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company, and admittance to the organization will be sought.

The Orient officials have but little doubt that satisfactory arrangements can be made as there is no real opposition to the plan. It is not known as yet just how the Orient will enter the city, whether on their own tracks or those of one of the other roads, or the exact location of on their own tracks. The right of way from Wichita to Kansas City has not been secured. The company, however, expects to be operating trains from Kansas City within the next four years, probably by the time the Union depot is completed.

Mr. Stilwell and his party will remain in Kansas City until noon, leaving for Wichita over the Rock Island. From Wichita and inspection of the system will be made, as far as the present tracks are built.

The greater part of the Orient system is already in operation. From Wichita, Kas., to San Angelo, Tex., is a stretch of track 510 miles in length over which three through trains each way are to be operated daily.

From Marquez, Chihuahua, 300 miles southwest of San Angelo, there is another completed stretch of track 287 miles in length extending to Sanchez, Chihuahua. A train each way is operated daily over this portion of the system.

After another uncompleted stretch of 200 miles the Orient is complete from Fuerte, Sinaloa, to Topolobampo, the terminus of the system on the Gulf of California, over which daily train service is provided.

The only other uncompleted portion of the system is from Kansas City to Wichita, 208 miles, making in all about 500 miles of the system and 1,659 miles yet to be completed.

The Orient party headed by Messrs. Stilwell and Dickinson will spend a month in the United States and Mexico inspecting the system and making whatever arrangements are necessary to hasten its completion.

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October 22, 1909

MEXICANS SEE KANSAS CITY.

On Way to Chicago "Paying Back
Visits of American Travelers."

Dr. M. Hernandez, of the City of Mexico, was in Kansas City on his way to Chicago. With him was a party of business and professional men, of the Mexican capital.

"We're just paying back the many visits Americans make us in the winter," Dr. Hernandez said. "We waited in El Paso to see President Taft and President Diaz meet. From the cordiality displayed, we think the United States is friendly with Mexico.

"The increasing investments made in our country by Americans cause us to believe that the two nations will have much in common in the future."

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October 12, 1909

WIDOW AFTER MINING STOCK.

Court Order Necessary for Her to
Get $7,260,500 Shares.

The county coroner has $7,260,500 in mining stock locked up in his vault. There are 72,605 shares in a Mexican mine with a par value of $100. They were found in the suit case of Thomas Stables, who was found dead September 24 in a bathroom at the Sexton hotel.

Mrs. Stables was in the city yesterday. She came all the way from Stables, La., her home, to get this stock. The coroner was powerless to act. A court order must be obtained by Mrs. Stables's attorneys before these securities can be given up. Meanwhile the county keeps millions in mining stock locked in the vaults at the court house.

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September 23, 1909

SLEPT IN WATER AND
LIVED ON GOAT MEAT.

KANSAS CITYANS MAROONED
NINE DAYS IN MEXICO.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller and
Frank W. Hager Tell of Ad-
ventures in Great Monterrey
Flood and Hurricane.

Huddled with a score of Mexican refugees in a shack fourteen by sixteen feet for over thirty-one hours, while the wind blew with an average velocity of 100 miles an hour and the rain fell i n torrents, and standing during this time knee deep in water was the thrilling experience of Mrs. Robert Miller, a Kansas City bride of a few days on her honeymoon trip in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, during the recent hurricane and unprecedented floods there.

Mrs. Miller, who was Miss Anna Belle Schell, her husband, Robert Miller, and Frank W. Hager of Kansas City, who are interested in a big land grant, and John B. Demaras and Demosthenes Lapith of Kansas City, Kas., were the only white persons in that territory for several weeks. During nine days of that time the party, cut off by the floods from roads and communication with the outside world, killed goats and subsisted on goat flesh.

All reached Kansas City early yesterday morning, none the worse for their experience, and Mrs. Miller declares that she is ready to go again.

The party experienced delightful weather until they got well into Mexico. Then it began to rain. They began having trouble at Victoria in getting to Soto La Marina valley, their objective point, which is about eighteen miles from the Gulf of Mexico. they arrived at the village of Soto La Marina on August 27 after riding for some ten miles through water breast deep on the horses. The path was picked up by a native who several times had to swim with his horse.

RACE WITH FLOOD.

On their arrival at Soto La Marina it became apparent that the town would be flooded by the rapidly rising river. It was raining heavily and the only refuge was on the hills west of the town. It would have been impossible to have returned to Victoria, so Mr. Miller and his party joined the native refugees. A quantity of food was hastily gathered and as the water began to fill the streets the inhabitants abandoned the town. The trip to the hills, about fourteen miles, was accomplished with difficulty. Frequently the horses would splash into holes and all of the riders were soaked to the skin.

"When we arrived at the shack near the junction of the Palma and the Sota La Marina river, which is the location of a proposed townsite, the rain was coming down in torrents, and the word torrent means just what the dictionary says it does down there," said Mr. Hager, one of the members of the party. "There were several adobe huts and to these the Mexican refugees hastened for shelter. Some joined us in the shack, which was built of up-ended logs with the chinks plastered with mud and a thatched roof, tied down with the native cord, formed of pieces of stringy bark.

"The way the house was tied together is about the only thing that saved us from the merciless wind and rain that night. It began to blow up about 11 p. m.

WIND GAUGES BROKEN.

"Wind gauges at government stations broke after recording velocities of 124 miles an hour, and I believe that the wind traveled just a little faster where we were.

"There were a score of us in the shack. The water swept through from the hillside until we stood almost knee deep. We had no light nor fire. We had some tortillas which kept us alive. About 7 a. m. the wind died down and for half an hour there was a perfect calm.

"Suddenly with a shriek the wind turned from north to south and blew as strong or stronger from that direction. Of course there was no such thing as sleep. The natives prayed constantly and the women bemoaned their fate. We knew of course that we were in no immediate danger, but we were in constant fear of our little shelter being blown from off our heads. All that day and the next night the storm continued. About 6 a. m. the sun came out the greater part of our stay there.

DINED ON GOAT STEAK.

"When the storm abated we began to look for food. Someone espied some goats on a hillside. We gave chase and an hour later had a nice goat roasting on a spit. That meal was the best I had eaten for some time.

"We were on a slight knoll, and after the meal we started to look around. We were practically surrounded by water, except for one outlet around an almost impassible mountainside dense with tropical verdure. We could do nothing but wait for these waters to subside. We slept on the ground. Saddles were our pillows. For nine days we lived the lives of savages, subsisting almost entirely on goat meat. I thought at one time I liked goat meat, but I got enough to do me the rest of my life.

SLEPT IN THE WATER.
"We finally made the start South. Natives went ahead and with knives and axes cut a path along the mountainside. A forty-mile ride under those circumstances was not the most enjoyable pastime in the world. When we arrived at Paddua there was but one hotel there, and it had one room which had been left with a roof.

"This room, of course, went to the bride and the bridegroom. The rest of us made ourselves comfortable on cots with the blue sky overhead.

"About midnight I was awakened by the patter of rain drops on my face. I was sleepy and pulled the blanket over my head and slept until I found myself resting in several inches of water. The rain ceased an hour or so later and after dumping the water out of the cots we all went back to sleep. It was much easier from there on home, as we found good accommodations at Tampico.

THRIVED AND GREW FAT.

"One of the most remarkable things to us is the fact that although the five of us were wet to the skin for two weeks and slept out on the ground during the greater part of that time, not one of us felt any ill effects. We were chilly at times, it is true, but that wore off and not one of us caught the slightest cold or felt any inconvenience. I gained four pounds. Mr. Demaras gained eight pounds and the others in the party all put on some flesh.

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September 17, 1909

MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY.

Reception Commemorating 99th An-
niversary Given by J. E. Gonzalez.

A reception commemorating the ninety-ninth anniversary of independence in Mexico was given to a small party of prominent Mexicans and newspaper men at the office of J. E. Gonzalez, acting consul for the Southern republic yesterday afternoon. Among the guests were L. L. Cantu, J. J. Journee, A. E. Pradillo and L. B. Moreno.

Toasts to the present chief executive of Mexico, and to the memory of Padre Miguel Hidalgo Y Costilla, the great liberator, were drunk by the gathering. All present wore the national colors, red, white and green, signifying the three guarantees of Hidalgo, liberty, religion, equality.

"The big celebration will be in the City of Mexico next year," said Mr. Gonzalez. "It will be the centennial of the first independence day and the whole nation will turn out to do it honor. The result no man can now tell, but it will be surpassingly grand as our countrymen are great celebrators and every state will contribute to an exposition illustrating the progress of Mexico during the interim.

"Every true Mexican who has the time and the money should be there to lend his shout to the applause due the grand old man, who has made Mexico what it is today."

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September 14, 1909

CURTAIN RUNG DOWN
ON MEXICAN ROMANCE.

MISSING HUSBAND APPEARS;
SENORA HOBBS IS HAPPY.

American Street Preacher, Who
Wedded Heiress, Was Driven
From City, But Returns to
Claim Wife and Child.

A wife's faith in her husband was vindicated yesterday when John Hobbs, a Seventh Day Baptist street preacher and incidentally a watchmaker, came to Kansas City from Dorchester, Neb., to claim his wife and child, whom he supposed to be in La Crosse, Kas., but who have been at the Helping Hand institute since August 29. Mrs. Hobbs, a pretty Mexican woman, came here in search of her husband practically in a destitute condition. Her 6-months-old babe was ill and the grief-crazed wife refused to eat or sleep during the first few days, believing her missing husband either was ill or dead.

The husband believed his wife and child were in La Crosse, where he left them, when he came to Kansas City in search of work. He traced them from the Kansas town here. Mrs. Hobbs is one of eight heirs to an estate in Mexico, said to be worth $1,000,000. During her search she refused to communicate with her relatives, or ask for financial aid.

WAS A MEXICAN ROMANCE.

"Didn't I tell you that he would find me," excitedly exclaimed the little Spanish senora over and over again to Mrs. Lila Scott, the matron, and Mrs. E. T. Brigham the assistant superintendent at the Helping Hand, when her husband with a package of letters and telegrams he had sent her, appeared at the institute.

About a year and a half ago pretty Amelia Lastra of Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico, met and fell in love with John Hobbs, an American missionary of the Seventh Day Baptist church in Mexico. Their religions differed and her family objected to the marriage but that counted for little. After the ceremony the young couple moved to another part of Mexico. While there Mrs. Hobbs learned that her father, Felippe Lastra, who owned two silver mines, was dead. Under the Mexican law the estate can not be divided until all of the heirs have given consent. Mrs. Hobbs is one of eight heirs.

Hobbs and his bride finally went to La Crosse, Kas., where the husband worked for a few weeks and then came to Kansas City where he expected to make a home for his wife and child. From that time until yesterday all trace of him was lost.

FORGOT FORWARDING ADDRESS.

When Hobbs found his wife he carried a bundle of letters. They had been sent to La Crosse, Kas., where he had gone to find out why his wife did not reply to his letters or to the telegrams he had sent her. He said he had been preaching on the streets in Kansas City and was one of the street preachers arrested the latter part of August. He said he was given hours to leave the city and as he had no money had to walk. He made his way to Dorchester, Neb., where he got work and then sent for his wife.

It developed after he had explained his absence that Mrs. Hobbs had failed to notify the postoffice in La Cross her forwarding address. The couple left for Nebraska last night.

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September 8, 1909

CONSULAR AGENT OBJECTS
TO PENCIL WRITTEN NOTE.

Turns Down Clint Wilson, Who Was
Seeking Information, and
Gets Stinging Reply.

Clint Wilson's experience, with Charles D. Taylor, United Stated consular agent at Guaymas, Mexico, has not increased his respect for the consular service.

Mr. Wilson has several thousand dollars to invest. Some time ago he concluded to investigate the culture of the maguay plant, which is raised in Old Mexico and the extreme southern part of Arizona and New Mexico in the arid lands.

"Recently," said Mr. Wilson yesterday, "I was told that the maguay plant was being cultivated about Guaymas, Mex., and someone advised me to write to Consular Agent Taylor for full particulars."

He went on to say that he wrote hurriedly to Mr. Taylor on a piece of neat tablet paper, but wrote with a lead pencil. Yesterday he received the following reply from the consular agent:

"American Consular Agent, Guaymas, Mex., September 1, 1909.
Mr. Wilson -- Sir: Your pencil note of August 26 has had my notation. Judging from your use of a lead pencil, and the grade of paper you have selected, I imagine that the matter is of slight importance, therefore, I cannot give it the consideration which matters of importance would deserve. Would refer you to the publication, "Modern Mexico," published in New York City. Hurriedly, CHARLES D. TAYLOR, Consular Agent."

Later in the afternoon Mr. Wilson sought out the same tablet on which he had written his previous letter and penciled the following:

"Judging from the tone of your letter of September 1 you are unfit to represent an American citizen.

"Say, Taylor, the government pays for your paper, and, incidentally, I help pay your salary -- and for the paper, too. I had about concluded to lay your communication before our worthy president but will refrain from doing so until I hear from you again. I never knock unless I have to, but I am from Missouri and you'll have to show me.

"Will you kindly write on the subjects asked for in my last letter? And, say, don't let the quality of this paper or the lead pencil bother you or disturb your aesthetic equilibrium. It is the same kind of paper I used before and the same pencil -- only it has been sharpened. Don't let anything deter you from giving me a courteous reply.

"In closing, I wish to inform you that there are many good citizens of the United States who cannot afford monogram paper and a stenographer. But many of these good citizens have the coin and some of them have lots of it. Before going further in this matter I await a decent reply from you. I will not sign this "Hurriedly," as I am not in a hurry as you seem to have been. Respectfully, CLINT WILSON."

Mr. Wilson said he intended to place his money in the hands of the consular agent for investment, as the country's representative there.

Until a year ago Mr. Wilson was manager of the Majestic theater.

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August 29, 1909

LOSES HUSBAND AND APPETITE.

For Two Days Patient Mexican
Woman Has Been Unable to Eat.

For two days, or since she has been at the Union depot, not a particle of food has crossed the lips of pretty Senora Hobbs, the wife of John Hobbs, watchmaker and preacher of the Seventh Day Baptist faith. Standing on the balcony of the women's waiting room at the Union depot, rocking the cradle wherein lay her sick 6-months -old baby, the weakened woman kept unceasing vigil, scanning every person who entered the waiting room, hoping against hope almost that any minute would bring her word of her husband, from whom she had not heard for eight days.

Matron Everingham looked after the baby to the extent of seeing that it was supplied with fresh, pure milk, and she volunteered to see that the Mexican woman got food. "I do not feel like eating," she told the matron, when Mrs. Everingham asked her if she did not want to eat something. "I only want my husband. He must be here, and I will find him."

Yesterday Morning Mrs. Hobbs visited the postoffice where she learned that the letters which she had written her husband from La Crosse, Kas., had not been called for by him. She also visited the store where her husband had been employed. They could give her but little information. Her plea for help to locate the man she married in Mexico has roused half a dozen of the attaches at the Union depot and all possible assistance was given the little blackeyed woman from the South in locating Hobbs yesterday. So far as could be learned Hobbs had not done any preaching in the streets in Kansas City. Where he roomed has not yet been learned. At Morino's store, he said that he had lost his watchmaker's tools but the wife says that he had them when he left LaCrosse.

It developed yesterday that Hobbs had been out of communication with his wife for two weeks on a previous occasion. This was when he left Chihuahua for the states. He went to San Antonio and his wife, failing to hear from him for two weeks, got on a train and found him ill at a hotel in the Texas city. There she says she sold her camera and photographic outfit.

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June 9, 1909

BRADY SAYS HE SHOT
IN DEFENSE OF HOME.

CLAIMS FLANAGAN TOOK AD-
VANTAGE OF WIFE.

Board of Education Draughtsman
Tells of Circumstances Which Led
to Killing -- Woman in the
Case Testifies.

Leon H. Brady, charged in the criminal court with murder for the second degree killing of Joseph E. Flanagan, went on the stand yesterday as a witness in his own behalf. The case will go to the jury today. Brady testified that he was 31 years old, had come to Kansas City at the age of 5, graduated from the public schools here and had taken a mining course in Columbia university, New York city; that afterwards he had worked for a copper mining company in Butte, Mont., had been engaged as engineer in a geological survey of Northern Montana and later had gone to Mexico to work in the Guggenheim smelters at Acientos and other places. He returned to Kansas City in April of last year and has since been a draughtsman for the board of education.

"When was the first time you heard of Flanagan pressing his attentions upon your wife?" he was asked.

"It was a couple of weeks before Flanagan was shot. My wife told me she could not go out of her room but that Flanagan was dodging around. I said to her:

" 'He hasn't said anything out of the way, has he? If he has, let me know. I can't call him down for standing around in the halls. That's only bad manners.' "

"When was the next time your wife complained?"

WARNED BY TELEPHONE.

"The Sunday preceding the shooting I was called from dinner to the telephone. A voice, which said it was Flanagan's, asked me if I wanted to take a walk that afternoon. I said I was going to my father's. After I had been at his home a time with my baby, a woman called me by telephone and said: 'You'd better come home and see what's doing.' "

Brady said that as soon as he returned to the Angelus boarding house at 1014 East Fifteenth street, where he lived at that time, he found Flanagan had appeared there almost as soon as he had departed. This was three days before the killing, which occurred Wednesday, March 24.

On Monday, said Brady, he asked his wife to explain a statement that Flanagan had threatened her on Sunday, and she began to cry.

"I've been in torments for two months," she told him.

She then told the husband, according to his story, that Flanagan had mistreated her twice, and had threatened her if she did not keep still. She said she had been afraid to tell before that time.

The next evening Brady met Flanagan at Twelfth street and Troost avenue. They walked down town and back to the Paseo before separating at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue. Brady was armed. Mrs. Brady was not mentioned.

"Why didn't you ask Flanagan to explain?" he was asked.

"I wanted to. My idea was to get at the thing somehow. I did not want to shoot him down in the street, but I did not know how to bring up the subject."

Tuesday evening the men went walking together again. They talked about revolvers, but not of Mrs. Brady.

"I thought I might see some way out of it all without a scandal or a tragedy," said the witness.

Telling of the events leading up to the shooting and of the happening itself, Brady said:

"When I came home Wednesday noon for lunch, Flanagan, who had moved away from the Angelus for a month, was back again. We talked. Mrs. Brady was ill and I took her lunch upstairs to her. I told my wife Flanagan was back. Then I went on to my work, two blocks away.

"But I could not work. As I had passed out of the house I had seen Flanagan sitting in the parlor, grinning at me sarcastically, as I believed. I went back to the house and up the rear stairs to our room. I asked Mrs. Brady whether she had been bothered, referring to Flanagan, and she said no. For fifteen minutes I remained, playing with the baby. I had put the revolver I carried on the dresser.

WENT WILD WITH RAGE.

"Presently Mrs. Brady said she was going downstairs. Almost immediately after the door had closed behind her I heard her cough. The thought flashed through my mind that Flanagan must be there. I jumped up and grabbed the revolver as I heard my wife say, 'No! No! No!'

"When I jerked the door open I saw my wife with her back to the door. Flanagan had hold of her shoulders and she had her hands up as if to push him away. I went wild with rage and turned loose on him with the gun at once. I suppose before he could have let go of her.

"At the first shot Flanagan fell. He started to get up, and I fired three times more. Then he ran to his room. He was running, and I thought he might get a gun, so I reloaded the revolver.

"Did you say to Mrs. Brady, 'If I didn't kill him I'm going to?' "

"I don't remember saying that."

Mrs. Belle L. Bowman, owner of the boarding house, had previously testified that she heard Brady use such words.

On cross-examination Brady said his wife did not call for him, but only said, "No, no, no."

Mrs. Mary Rosanna Brady, whose story to her husband caused the killing, preceded her husband on the stand. During the morning session of court she had been excluded from the room on account of being a witness. As soon as she had testified, she went to the prosecutor's office and remained there until the evening adjourment was taken.

TOLD OF BRADY INDIGNITIES.

Only once while she was on the witness stand did Mrs. Brady cry. That was when she told of the killing.

"I was born in Fort Madison, Ia.," said Mrs. Brady, "and in 1903 went to Mexico with my parents. July 4, 1905, I met Mr. Brady, and September 29 of the next year we were married. We have a boy 22 months old.

"I first met Flanagan in October, 1908, when I came to Kansas City. We grew to have a speaking acquaintance in the latter part of December. It was not until the Monday before the tragedy that I told Mr. Brady of the indignities Flanagan had heaped upon me. I have suffered from asthma since I was 3 years old. If it an unusually severe attack, morphine has to be administered. This leaves me in a helpless condition.

"About two weeks before the shooting I told Mr. Brady that Flanagan was spying on me. On the Monday afternoon I mentioned I told him that, on January 11, Flanagan had come to my room and taken advantage of me while I was helpless from drugs. He came into the room and took the baby while the doctor was there. As soon as the doctor had gone he took me into his room. I resisted and he said I would be foolish to tell Mr. Brady, as it would only make trouble. On February 27, he did the same thing."

The witness said that on the Sunday preceding the killing, while Brady was visiting his father, Flanagan had come to her room and had asked if everybody was gone and if she was expecting anybody. She said she had closed the door in his face. He told her, she said, that he "would do her dirt" and that he put his hand to his pocket.

CALLED HER A "BLUFFER."

"On Tuesday he came to the room again and said, 'Did you tell Brady anything?'

"I said 'yes,' and he said: 'You are a great bluffer. I was out walking with Brady last night and your name was not mentioned.' "

Relating the details of the shooting, Mrs. Brady said:

"It happened in front of my door. About 1:20 o'clock that afternoon Mr. Brady returned home. I told him I was going to the bathroom, and went out. I still had hold of the doorknob when I met Flanagan. He bade me the time of day and said: 'Won't you invite me in?'

"I said: 'Of course not. We are no longer friends.'

"He said: 'I want your friendship even if you no longer want mine.'

"I asked him why, and he said, taking hold of me in spite of my efforts to tear away: 'Because I love you. I'm jealous of you. I want you all to myself.'

"Then," said the witness, "Mr. Brady opened the door." She wept violently for a moment.

"As the door was opened," resumed Mrs. Brady, "he let go and I fell back against a trunk that was standing in the hall. Mr. Brady shot as soon as the door was open. I think he shot four times. Then I went downstairs with him and the baby, and telephoned for his sister. Then they took him away."

On cross-examination the attention of Mrs. Brady was called to discrepancies between her testimony on the stand and the statements she made to the prosecuting attorney soon after the shooting. She said was excited when she made the statement. On the witness stand she said that her friendship for Flanagan ceased after he had mistreated her. In her statement she had said they continued on friendly terms. She said also that she was in possession of her faculties at the time of the attack January 11, and that she could scream. Flanagan did not carry her into his room, she said. She remembered being there fifteen minutes and that the door was locked.

NOT A WOMAN IN COURT ROOM.

Also, she said she and her husband had discussed Flanagan before the shooting on the same afternoon, but later modified her statement.

W. S. Gabriel, assistant prosecuting attorney, who with Ruby D. Garrett, is conducting the prosecution, produced a note signed "Mary," and asked the witness if she had written it to Flanagan. She said the note was not written by her.

Mrs. Brady told her story with her face to the jury. She seemed hardly conscious of the presence of her husband, for she glanced in his direction but seldom. There was not a woman in the courtroom to hear her story and and hardly two rows were filled by spectators. She told her story without emotion. Mrs. Brady wore a white waist, a gray walking skirt and a small black hat trimmed in red. Her heavy veil was lifted when she testified.

Among other witnesses for the defense called during the afternoon was Dr. William T. Singleton, who treated Mrs. Brady January 11 and February 27 for asthma by giving her a hypodermic injection of morphine and atrophine. He said the drugs were sedatives, but would not necessarily effect the use of the vocal organs.

Joseph L. Norman, secretary of the board of education, and J. M. Greenwood, superintendent of schools, both old friends of the Brady family testified to the defendant's good character.

SAYS HE WAS LURED INTO TRAP.

The state rested its case at noon. According to the opening statement by Mr. Gabriel, it had proposed to show that Flanagan had been lured into a trap.

Among the state's witnesses were: Dr. Ralph E. Shiras, surgeon of the emergency hospital staff; Dr. James Moran and Dr. J. Park Neal of the general hospital, and G. E. Marsh and W. T. Latcham, patrolmen. Dr. Moran was present when Mr. Garret took Flanagan's dying statement, in which he declared himself innocent of wrongdoing. Only that part of the statement in which Flanagan said Brady shot him without saying a word was permitted to go to the jury. The wounded man died at the general hospital a few hours after the shooting. Every bullet took effect.

The state's chief witness was Mrs. Bowman, who conducts the boarding house. She said Flanagan and Mrs. Brady were frequently alone on the third floor of the house, where both had rooms, but that Flanagan did not seem to be there more when Brady was gone then at other times.

It was Mrs. Bowman who said that Flanagan tried to descend the stairs after he was shot. The witness said she heard Brady say: "Let him come. If I haven't killed him I will."

SHOT IN DEFENSE OF HOME.

The witness said that Mrs. Brady, when under the influence of opiates, was at times almost unconscious.

Gen. Milton Moore opened the afternoon session by briefly outlining the defense. His main argument was that Brady shot in defense of his home.

Statements by both state and prosecution led to the belief that the arguments summing up the testimony will be brief and will consume less than two hours. This will not be because of limitation by the court, for Judge Ralph S. Latshaw, before whom the case is being tried, seldom limits murder trial arguments.

The jury with which Brady's fate will rest is made up of the following: James A. Wood, 4315 Main street; C. C. Wagoner, 3202 Gillham road; J. J. Ronham, 2852 East Seventh street; William H. Hand, 1229 Cherry street; Michael Bresnahan, 1831 Oak street; E. E. Esslinger, 3902 Belleview avenue; Charles J. Lewis, Mt. Washington; F. O. Hartung, 3006 Garfield avenue; J. B. Ralph, 3513 St. John avenue; Alfred Simpson, Independence avenue; Jesse Robertson, 6216 Peery avenue; D. J. Biser, 1933 Montgall avenue.

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May 30, 1909

IN HIS OWN WORDS.

Ex-Governor's Life Sketch, as Writ-
ten by Himself.

Here is a brief sketch of the ex-governor's life, as given by himself in his own words:

"I was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky., on a farm near Shelbyville. My father, Henry Crittenden, died when I was two years old leaving my mother a widow with five sons; three daughters had died in infancy; the oldest son was not over 15 years of age. My mother was remarried after a few years to Colonel Murry of Cloverport, K y., and five children were born of this union.

"My education was begun at a small subscription school at Shelbyville and continued until I was old enough to go to Center college at Danville, from which I was graduated in the class that had in it Judge John of this city, Governor John Young Brown, W. P. C. Breckinridge, Boyd Winchester and other noted men. I studied law in Frankfort in the office of John J. Crittenden and married in Frankfort Miss Carrie W. Jackson. Soon afterwards I removed to Lexington, Mo., where I opened my first law office. I remained there till the war broke out, when I assisted John F. Philips in raising a regiment of Union soldiers that was sworn in at Georgetown, Pettis county, in 1862, for three years. The regiment was mustered out April 7, 1865 two days before Lee's surrender. At the close of the war I removed to Warrensburg, as feeling still ran high at Lexington. I formed a law partnership with Frances M. Cockrell, who returned from the Confederate service at the close of the war. We practiced law successfully until I was elected to congress in 1872, but the partnership was not dissolved. It continued until General Cockrell was elected United States senator. I remained in congress until 1878 when I refused to be a candidate for re-election. I was nominated for governor over John S. Marmaduke, who became my successor and John A. Hockaday, who had been attorney general under my predecessor.

TEMPESTUOUS ADMINISTRATION.

"The four years of my administration are known to all the older citizens of the state. Phil E. Chappel of this city was state treasurer during my administration,and no state ever had a more honest, faithful or intelligent official.

"My administration was perhaps the most tempestuous in the state's history. We had so many questions of great importance to settle, which agitated every part of the state. One was the great lawsuit with the Hannibal & St. Joseph railroad; as governor I advertised the road for sale. The state won on every point we raised. My efforts to break up the James gang, the most noted band of outlaws ever known in the United States, are familiar to all.

LIFE IN MEXICO.

"After I left Jefferson City I came to Kansas City, in 1885 and resumed the practice of law. I had been out of law office so often in my life and been out of practice so long that I had lost almost all connection with the law and had got behind in my knowledge of the books. I had virtually lost my disposition to return to practice. But the law is a jealous mistress and will not favor any man who deserts it on all occasions.

"I was given the post of consul general to Mexico by President Cleveland in 1893 and absented myself from my own country for four years. My life in Mexico was very pleasant. There were many charms about such a life then and there are more now. I returned to Kansas City and have been here ever since, living a quiet and pleasant life with my family and friends in one of the greatest young cities in the world."

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May 28, 1909

GOVERNOR CRITTENDEN
STRICKEN BY APOPLEXY.

FALLS FROM SEAT WHILE
WATCHING BALL GAME.

Age and General Ill Health Believed
by Doctors to Render Recovery
Problematical -- Has Not Re-
gained Consciousness.

As the result of a stroke of apoplexy which came upon him yesterday afternoon while watching a baseball game at Association park, former Governor Thomas T. Crittenden is lying at the point of death at his home, 3220 Flora avenue, with physicians in constant attendance.

Slight hope is entertained for Mr. Crittenden's recovery. His age and general ill health are said to be factors against his rallying. Though Mr. Crittenden had not regained consciousness up to a late hour last night, it was ascertained by the attending physicians, Ned O. Lewis and J. C. Rogers, that Mr. Crittenden's entire left side is completely paralyzed. The left side of his face is badly bruised where he struck the benches in front of him when he fell forward at the ball park.

Mr. Crittenden had been sitting in the grandstand near the third base line during the first of the two games which were played between Kansas City and St. Paul. Other spectators who were sitting near him said that he had not displayed any unusual excitement over the game and had been sitting rather quietly.

It was the beginning of the second inning of the second game when Mr. Crittenden was seen suddenly to fall forward and outward into the aisle.

CONDITION IS CRITICAL.

Thinking that Mr. Crittenden had but fainted, his immediate neighbors rushed to pick him up and placed him on the bench, where they attempted to revive him. Dr. Stanley Newhouse, the park physician, was hastily called from the press box, where he had been watching the game. He gave Mr. Crittenden prompt attention, but was unable to revive him.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was summoned from the city hall. He was driven to the park in an automobile, and suggested that he drive his father home in the motor car. Dr. Newhouse advised an ambulance, and one from the Walnut street police station was summoned. Then Mr. Crittenden was taken to his home.

After a long consultation with Dr. Lewis and an examination of Mr. Crittenden, Dr. Rogers stated that while the patient was in a precarious condition and that he was critically ill, there was a little hope for his recovery.

"It all depends upon the size of the hemorrhage on the brain," said Dr. Rogers. "It appears that the hemorrhage is from a ruptured small blood vessel, but we do not know whether or not the flow had been stopped completely. Governor Crittenden has been in poor health for several months. That taken into consideration with the fact that this is the second attack, does not argue well for a speedy recovery."

Dr. Newhouse, who first attended Mr. Crittenden, is not so sanguine as Dr. Rogers. Dr. Lewis remained with his patient all night, and did not make a statement.

HIS SECOND SEIZURE.

Eighteen years ago, while Mr. Crittenden was a practicing lawyer, he had his first stroke of apoplexy. No ill effects resulted from the first stroke, other than to make him more susceptible to the second.

Mr. Crittenden has long been a baseball enthusiast and there have been few games this season, according to his son, that he has missed. It has been his chief recreation, and though his family feared for him to go alone to the games on account of his age and declining health, Mr. Crittenden persisted in doing so. Mayor Crittenden said last night that his family had feared some untoward incident as a probable result of his innocent recreation.

Dr. Newhouse stated last night that he believed the attack was caused from an overwrought nervous condition. He said that it occurred at a lull in the game and excitement, and was the result of a reaction upon the nerves, even though Mr. Crittenden had not appeared excited.

Mr. Crittenden in 77 years of age. He was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky. His father was Henry Crittenden, a farmer, and the former governor was one of eight children. He received his education at Center college, Danville, Ky. Among his classmates were Judge John F. Philips of this city, who was by his bedside last night; W. P. C. Breckenridge, John Young Brown, and other noted men.

LAWYER AND SOLDIER.

Mr. Crittenden studied law at Frankfort. Soon after his marriage to Miss Carrie W. Jackson he moved to Lexington, Mo., where he first practiced law. There he remained until the civil war when he and Judge Philips raised a regiment of federal sondiers, and were engaged in the war for three years. Many of his battles were fought in Jackson county.

At the close of the war Mr. Crittenden formed a partnership with Francis M. Cockrell, afterward United States senator. During that time Mr. Crittenden was sent to congress from Missouri.

In 1878 Mr. Crittenden became governor of Missouri, and the four years of his administration were stormy ones. At the close of his term he moved to Kansas city, where, with the exception of four years, he has resided since. That exception is during the time he acted as consul general to Mexico under President Cleveland.

Mr. Crittenden has three sons, H. H., Mayor Thomas T., both of Kansas City, and William J. Crittenden of Pittsburg, Pa., now in Japan.

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April 25, 1909

PRESIDENT STILWELL
RETURNS FROM MEXICO.

With English Stockholders, He Paid
a Visit to President Diaz -- Good
Progress Being Made.

A. E. Stilwell, promoter and president of the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway, returned to Kansas City yesterday after a trip over the right of way of the Orient and a visit to President Diaz with his party of English capitalists. The party arrived at the Union depot at 6 o'clock last night over the M. K. & T. in a special train.

"There is nothing much to say," said Mr. Stilwell last night. "We went over the Orient and found things progressing as always. The result of our interview with President Diaz had no unusual features. We made a purely social call upon him and received his congratulations upon the progress we have made."

H. J. Chinnery, one of the English financiers and a heavy investor in Mr. Stilwell's railway, was enthusiastic.

"We are more than ever delighted with the prospect," said he. "The reception accorded us at the hands of the president of the Mexican republic has given us encouragement far greater than we ever contemplated. It seems as if there is nothing in Mexico that Mr. Stilwell cannot have if he will ask for it. Our faith and confidence in that gentleman's ability as a railroad promoter and builder is only exceeded by that of Diaz.

"He gave us ever assurance of encouragement and help from the republic. Already he has done much to aid the road by using his influence in our behalf. The idea of a direct line of railroad from New York to Mexico and the gulf is not only a future possibility, but a reality, and the future is not a great way off.

"The work on the road between Sweetwater and San Angelo is already well under way and will be completed by September. This extension will connect Kansas City direct with one of the richest countries in America. It is hard to believe that any better or more fertile soil exists anywhere than in the territory of San Angelo. Most of the early vegetables, strawberries and fruits come from this section, and the completion of the track between San Angelo and Sweetwater means considerable difference in freight rates and time by a cut of more than 100 miles, it being necessary now to come up by way of Fort Worth, Tex."

After dinner at the Hotel Baltimore last night Mr. Stilwell, Mr. Chinnery and Mr. Hurdle left for Wichita, Kas., to look over terminal possibilities. The party will then go to Boston for a conference with Eastern investors, when the Englishmen will return to Europe.

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April 17, 1909

SOUGHT HEALTH IN MEXICO.

Ingalsbee Found It and Incidentally
Made a Fortune.

Twenty years ago a young man, A. B. Ingalsbee, went to the City of Mexico as a representative of a furniture company of Chicago. Primarily he was in search of a climate that would benefit his health. He introduced into Mexico the first school desks of United States manufacture ever sold there. Today he has accumulated a snug fortune as president of one of the largest real estate companies of the Southern republic.

"My success is nothing to brag of," said Mr. Ingalsbee at the Baltimore hotel yesterday. He is just returning from a busines and pleasure trip to New York city.

"I went to the City of Mexico a clerk, but you must remember that the country has grown some under Diaz's administration.

"Why, when I went, there wasn't but one plate glass window on San Francisco street, the principal business street of the city. Now, of course, that street looks like any other big business thoroughfare."

"How does the growth of the Mexican capital compare with that of Kansas City?" Mr. Ingersoll was asked.

"Oh, about the same," he replied. "There aren't any vacant residence buildings to speak of in either city. I think, in the City of Mexico there are even fewer empty store buildings than here.

"You will find in Mexico," he continued, "an up-to-the-minute country where you don't have to know the language to succeed. Where you always get an even break before the law, and where you will enjoy society just as select as that of any American or European city.

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April 10, 1909

STILWELL AND PARTY
TO TALK WITH DIAZ.

Aged President of Mexico Makes It
Easier for the Orient to Build.

Before President Arthur E. Stilwell of the Orient and his part of officials, directors, stockholders and investors return from their inspection of the system, which they will begin today, they will have had an audience with Porfirio Diaz, the veteran president of Mexico, through which republic so much of the Stilwell road runs. There are matters concerning the relations of the Orient with the Mexican government that will come up for discussion at this meeting.

President Diaz has extended every possible encouragement to the officials of the new line, and it was only recently through his influence the time limit for the completion of the road in Mexico was extended five years. By his recommendation to the Mexican congress, Diaz has secured a substantial increase in the freight and passenger rates of the Orient, which will swell its revenue, while in the process of construction. Naturally such an increase is very welcome to the owners of the line, which is stretching steadily toward the Gulf of California without the help of Wall street.

By permission of the national legislative body of the country, the road can now charge 5 cents a mile for first class passengers, and 3 1/2 cents for second class. The third class is abolished. Formerly first class passengers rode for 3 cents. Moreover, the freight rate there has been increased about 25 per cent.

There are about forty-two who will leave on the special train this afternoon over the Rock Island for Wichita. President Stilwell and W. W. Dickinson, vice president and general manager, will be among the number. From Wichita to Sweetwater, Tex., they will go over their own line. At Sweetwater they will take the Texas & Pacific for El Paso, and thence over the Mexican Central to Chihuahua, where they will strike their own line again. They will run out each way from Chihuahua, and inspect the road thus far completed and will not get any farther west than Sanchez, about 225 miles from Chihuahua. Mexico City will then be visited and the meeting with President Diaz held.

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April 6, 1909

STILWELL PARTY TO BEGIN
ORIENT INSPECTION APR. 10.

Will Reach Here From
New York This Week.

President A. E. Stilwell of the Orient and a party of English stockholders who recently arrived at New York city from Europe, are expected to reach Kansas City this week in order that they make the trip of inspection which is scheduled to begin Saturday, April 10. The party includes H. J. Chinnery and F. Hurdle.

Mr. Stilwell and his wife have been absent in Europe since last June and in that time he has enlisted Dutch, French and English capital for the completion of his road. Bonds to the amount of $3,000,000 have been placed in Holland, France and England and an order was recently given by the company for the steel with which to complete the gap bettween Sweetwater and San Angelo, Tex. E. E. Holmes, vice president of the United States and Mexican Trust Company, went to New York and conferreed with him soon after his arrival from Europe. A complete inspection of the line from Wichita, Kas., to Topolobampo on the Gulf of California will be made by the Stilwell party.

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March 31, 1909

MEXICANS LOVE THE IRISH.

Is the Foreigner Most Welcome
Whether He Be Rich or Poor.

"The foreigner most welcome to my country whether he is rich or poor, is the Irishman," said J. E. Gonzalez, the acting Mexican consul in this city, yesterday.

"I don't know exactly why, but there is a natural sympathy between the Mexicans and South Americans and the Irish which keeps them in harmony, and the pretty Mexican girl of fortune and blue blood is always willing to mate with an eligible Irishman, although she shies at Americans and Englishmen.

"In Mexico City we have such names as Don Ignacio O'Brien, Ernesto Murphy and Miguel McCarty. Sometimes there is a slight change in the last name to make it Spanish and then McCarthy appears McCarthi, Murphy turned out to be Murphi and like as not the good Hiberian name of O'Brien will be distorted conveniently into Briano.

"There are great settlements in Mexico made up of Irish and they are the country's pride. You will remember that Admiral O'Higgins was an Irishman who went to Chile and became its greatest sea fighter. Today there is a battleship belonging to that country named after him. In my country red hair is reverenced from the fact that it is so often worn by sons of the old sod and freckles the size of a 10-cent piece are at a premium there.

"The last Spanish viceroy in Mexico was named O'Donoju and his ancestors were plain O'Donohos in Ireland. As in the United States every battlefield since the revolution was made rich with the blood of patriotic naturalized Irishmen.

"How much the Irish lean toward the Mexicans is illustrated by this historical incident. When the American troops were storming over a certain height near the City of Mexico, several Irish companies deserted and came over to our ranks. They asked for a position nearest the firing line and died nearly to the last man, fighting. They had come from their island, it is said, expressly to fight, and asserted that in that case they should take the weaker side."

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March 25, 1909

KILLS HIS FRIEND
IN JEALOUS RAGE.

JOSEPH FLANAGAN TOO ATTEN-
TIVE TO MRS. LEON BRADY.

Husband, Returning From Office,
Finds Attentions Being Forced
on His Wife -- Fires
Three Shots.

Opening the door of his room to find his wife struggling to free herself from the grasp of another man, Leon Brady of 1014 East Fifteenth street, a mechanical draftsman in the employ of the board of education, shot and fatally wounded Josehp Flanagan, a land promoter of El Hito, N. M. The shooting occurred at 1:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the hallway of the boarding house at 1014 East Fifteenth streeet, where both Flanagan and the Brady family lived.

Upon arriving at his office at 1526 Campbell street shortly after lunch yesterday afternoon, Brady "felt that something was wrong at home." He went immediately to the East Fifteenth street boarding house and found the door of his room locked and his wife inside. His wife responded to his knock.

"After I had been in the room a few moments, my wife went out and down to the second floor. I shut the door and waited for her to return. In about five minutes I heard her cough. I listened and she coughed again. Then I went to the door and waited. I could not hear anything at first, but in a moment I heard someone whispering and it seemed excited. Then I heard my wife say: 'No! No! No!' in a half frightened, half sobbing tone.

RELOADED HIS REVOLVER.

"I cannot explain my action and I cannot tell how I feel about it now. I saw my wife struggle and I knew the man. I was white with rage and I could not control myself. It was that kind of a situation about which little is remembered and nothing is clear."

Brady rushed to the bureau and grabbed his revolver. Throwing the door open he saw Flanagan and his wife. Then he fired.

Flanagan fell at the first shot. Mrs. Brady uttered a cry and her husband fired twice again at his victim. Flanagan then arose and groped his way to his own room, while Brady went back and put two more cartridges in his revolver. Mrs. Brady, at her husband's request, went to the telephone and notified the police.

Flanagan was taken to the general hospital, where he died two hours later. In his statement to Assistant Prosecutor Garrett, he said he realized he was about to die and had given up all hope. He declared that his relations with Mrs. Brady had never been otherwise than friendly.

At the Walnut street police station where Brady surrendered he stated that Flanagan had persistently attempted to force his attention upon Mrs. Brady. "Flanagan was under the influence of liquor a week ago and he came to our room in that condition. He called my wife by her first name, Rose, and this impression of intimacy with my wife angered me," he said.

"Last Sunday I went out to my father's house at 3115 Benton boulevard, and took Billy, my year-old son, with me. While there someone called me on the telephone, and a woman's voice said, 'You had better come home and see what is doing.' I immediately returned to the boarding house.

BRADY CAN'T EXPLAIN.

"My wife told me when I arrived at the house that Flanagan had come to her room after I left and said to her, 'You are expecting someone.' She told me she was offended by his talk and manner, and asked him why he had taken advantage of my absence to come and see her. He told her that I need not know about it, and my wife told him that she would tell me. Flanagan was angry at that, and said to her, 'I'll fix you if you do. I'll do you dirt.' "

According to the statements of both men, they were out walking together the two evenings before the shooting took place. Both say that on no occasion had Mrs. Brady ever been mentioned by them.

Yesterday at noon when Brady came to lunch he found Flanagan already at the table and sat down with him. They talked during the meal and afterward Brady carried a lunch up to his wife, who is ill and confined to her room.

In an ante-mortem statement Flanagan said Mrs. Brady came out of the room in to the passageway, and following her, Brady appeared and shot him without saying a word. "I fell after the first shot," said he, "and then he fired twice more. I said, 'Oh Brady, Brady, Brady! Why have you done this?' His wife said nothing; simply stood there.

"We had always been good friends and he had never spoken to me about her. She told me to look out for him two days ago. I did not know anything was wrong or that he had anything against me until his wife told me. I ate lunch with him today and and boarded at the same house with them. I have known both of them about four months."

THE BRADY ROMANCE.

Brady is a graduate of the engineering department of Columbia university in New York and is the son of J. H. Brady, chief engineer of the board of education of Kansas City. He was yesterday elected president of the National Association of Heating and Sanitary Engineers in New York. Young Brady is said by his classmates to have been exceptionally bright and stood high with his teachers and others.

Leaving school he went to Mexico as a mining engineer. While riding on the cowcatcher of one of the small locomotives employed about the mines, the engine struck a burro standing in the tracks. The animal fell on Brady and the force of the impact broke his leg in two places. The injured man was taken to the house of the mine superintendent and nursed back to health by the daughter of the household. During the days when he lay helpless on his bed, he and the girl formed a friendship that gradually ripened into love and they were married three years ago. Since that time a son has been born. The son is a little more than a year old and at the boarding house on East Fifteenth street was the universal favorite.

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February 22, 1909

MEXICAN THROWS BOUQUETS.

Signor di Vazquez Says Nice Things
About the United States.

That the finest horses and cattle in the world are to be procured in the United States is the assertion of Arturo LaTour di Vazquez, a Mexican mining expert and cattle buyer of Mexico City, now at the Blossom house. with him is Dorocco Fernandez, whose card bears the inscription of "dealer and importer of pure live stock."

"Mexico is one of the best customers that this country has," said Signor di Vazquez. Annually we import nearly $50,000,000 worth of cattle and grain from this country to ours. But American tourists in Mexico also spend great sums of money there. It may be that one will equal the other.

"Another thing you may not know is that Americans pay taxes in my country on nearly $800,000,000 of property."

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January 15, 1909

SOCIALISTS WILL PROTEST.

Call Mass Meeting to Discuss Status
of Political Refugees.

Handbills calling a protest mass meeting to be held in the Commercial Travelers' hall at Twelfth and Central streets Sunday afternoon have been issued by scholastic bodies of Kansas City.

The object of the meeting will be, as described in the circular, to protest against the deportation of certain political refugees from Russia and Mexico. The handbill is made up of an appeal to the American's love for justice and liberty and prays protection from the "autocracy of the tsar and of Diaz of Mexico."

The bill is signed by the Kansas City Socialist Club, the Workingmen's Circle and the Workingmen's Hebrew Progressive Self-Education Club.

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January 14, 1909

CHILDREN IN MEXICAN JAILS.

Casimir Welch Says Hundreds Are
There With Mothers.

Some interesting information on Mexican jails has been gathered by Casimir J. Welch, chief jailer at the county jail. Mr. Welch has just returned from a trip to the City of Mexico and some of the other towns of that republic.

"There are Mexican jails which compare favorably with those in the United States," said Mr. Welch yesterday, "and then, again, there are others which are infinitely worse. The penitentiary at the City of Mexico is modern in many of its appointments, while the jail there reminds one of a pig pen. In the jail, which is only partly roofed, the prisoners are huddled together. In the daytime they are under the open sky, should they wish to leave their shelter. At night they get under a sort of shed, where they sleep as best they may. Of some 4,000 prisoners we saw, 700 were women, a third of them with small children in their care.

"In the penitentiary on the other hand, each convict is given a daily bath and calisthenic exercises. The men sent up for ten years or longer are put in solitary confinement for the first two years and may not even speak to the guards. In the penitentiary are workshops to keep the convicts busy and also a school which they must attend.

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December 21, 1908

LEGEND OF THE
MEXICAN EAGLE.

Device on the Flag Comes From an
Aztec Tradition.

American people take things very nearly as they find them, and avoid asking unnecessary questions if the subject under discussion does not directly concern them. In Mexico it is different, according to Jose Dosal, representing that country as consul to Kansas City.

"A Mexico City boy wants to know the meaning of every stripe in the American flag as soon as it is shown to him the first time. What is the meaning of Chicago, Michigan, Nebraska? He takes a keen interest in the names and the symbols. In our country there are many beautiful legends woven about commonplace names. The eagle on the central field of the flag has a history that is semi-mythological and very romantic. Many of the great streets of the capital have gruesome tales connected with their names, which suggest them."

Mr. Dosal then told t he story of the origin of the eagle device in the Mexican flag. Only a few hundred years after the Christian era, the Aztec tribes started on a long journey south from some point, probably now in the United States.. They traveled year after year, stopping a season at a time to cultivate crops. Finally they arrived in the beautiful valley of Mexico.

At a spot not far from the present site of the capitol the Aztec emperor consulted the astrologers and was told to follow the flight of the first eagle seen from the camp to its first resting place, and there build the city.

One day an eagle was sighted. Scouts were detailed to follow the bird and in the middle of Lake Texcoco they saw it light on a cactus growing on an island. When the scouts approached they saw it held in its talons a snake, which it was devouring.

The device of an eagle eating a snake, profile,, was adopted as the Aztec coat of arms by Montezuma II. The Mexican republic likewise adopted the eagle and the snake to use on its flag, making the picture face view. The present flag of Mexico was adopted by the Cura Miguel Hidalgo y Costello, at 11 o'clock, night, September 15, 1810. There is a story told to the effect that the colors were suggested by an Italian in the rebel army, who made them the same as those of his native country.

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November 7, 1908

CHINAMAN SMUGGLED IN
MEETS MYSTERIOUS DEATH.

Found Along Railroad Tracks Near
Birmingham, He May Have
Been Thrown From Train.

The body of a Chinaman, decomposed almost beyond recognition and clothed in American costume and the Oriental accouterments, was found along the railroad tracks at Birmingham early yesterday morning. From all the evidence obtainable it is believed that the Chinaman met with foul play en route to Chicago. The fact that no bones were broken lends evidence to the belief that he may have been murdered and thrown from a passing train, although there are no marks of violence on his body.

Workmen found the body early yesterday morning and immediately placed it on a train and sent it to Liberty, where it is in the possession of Sharp Bros., undertakers, pending an inquest this morning.

From all appearances the man had been dead two or three days when found in a secluded spot along the railroad tracks. When the body was searched at Liberty yesterday morning letters were found in his pocket which indicated his name, also his destination and the point from which he traveled.

Wong Chee Tock is his name. The address of the Quong On Lung Company, 317 South Clark street, Chicago, is given on a letter head which was found in his pocket, also the address of a firm or company in Juarez, Mexico.

An altogether probable theory is that Wong Chee Tock was en route to Chicago, having been smuggled into this country over the Mexican line, and that he fell under the displeasure of some of his countrymen.

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October 1, 1908

ORIENT TRAINS REACH
CHILLICOTHE, TEX.

Kansas City's New Railroad
Making Good Progress.

Chillicothe, Tex., is now the terminus of the Northern section of the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient railroad, which will eventually reach from Kansas City to Topolobambo, Mexico, on the Gulf of California. An extension of twenty miles from Elmer, Ok., across the Red river, by means of a recently completed bridge into Texas was finished last week and train service has been installed between Wichita and Chillicothe. A northern extension has been made on the section running northward from Sweetwater, Tex., to the new terminus at Crowell, Tex., thus leaving a gap of but twenty-three miles between Chillicothe and Crowell. When this gap is closed a line from Wichita, Kas., to Sweetwater, Tex., will have been completed and will be 535 miles in length. Construction is still being pushed forward on the remaining portions of the line on both sides of the Rio Grande.

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September 24, 1908

GOOD NAME GONE;
NEIGHBORS SHUN HIM.

NONE OF THEM WOULD GO ON
JOHNSON'S BOND.

Finally Lawyers Came to Rescue of
Man Who Is Accused of Forgery
and Attempted Wife
Murder.

After much delay and no little impatience on the part of the many curious spectators who crowded the court room at Buckner, Mo., yesterday morning, W. A. Johnson, on trial on a charge of attempted wife murder, waived his preliminary hearing. He was bound over to the criminal court in $4,000 bond. Justice James Adams, before whom the case was called, at first placed the bond at $5,000.

"Your honor, don't you think that is a little stiff," asked T. A. J. Mastin, who represented the defendant. Our client can hardly raise $1,000."

After some argument, the matter being satisfactory to the state, the bond was lowered to $4,000. Then time was asked that the defendant might secure bondsmen. The judge granted one hour.

FRIENDS GONE -- ATTORNEYS HELP.

For several days previous to the trial Johnson had circulated among those who had been his friends in Buckner and Independence, trying to secure someone who would sign his bond. But when Tuesday came and he had no success he went among those in Buckner with whom he had never had business transactions, but to no avail. Sentiment in his home town is strongly against the man, and no one would give him help.

It was soon decided that no bondsmen could be secured and his attorneys, Mr. Masten and W. S. Fournoy, expressed their willingness to sign the bond. Immediately Johnson was released on bond he was rearrested on the charge of forgery, his wife declaring that he forged her name on a deed in January, 1908. As the warrant for his arrest on that charge had been sworn out in Independence, he was taken there by the marshal and the justice of the peace sought.

ARRESTED ON FORGERY CHARGES.

The party arrived at the court room late in the afternoon and the judge was not present; consequently the state expressed its willingness to let Johnson have his freedom under guard until the bond could be fixed this morning. Johnson's attorneys have signified their intention of signing the bond.

Johnson has aged remarkably within the past month. His extreme nervous manner has increased, and while the complaint which charged him with having struck his sleeping wife with the desire to kill her was being read by the judge, the defendant nervously fingered his hat and his hands trembled violently.

Mrs. Johnson, the victim of the assault, has been improving rapidly and is no longer confined to her bed. Yesterday afternoon in the presence of Prosecuting Attorney I. B. Kimbrell; his assistant Will Carmody, and her attorney, J. G. Paxton, she reviewed the whole case. Once, in telling of her endeavors to win Johnson from the kind of life which he had been leading, the woman, now wrinkled and still suffering from her severe wound, broke down and sobbed.

MRS. JOHNSON IN TEARS.

"Oh, why did he do it? He knew that he was breaking my heart." It was some minutes before she regained control of herself. The story of the life which she had been forced to endure within the past two years moved her vastly, and she could scarcely talk at times.

"When I first learned that he was associating with a Mrs. Howard of Kansas City, I went to him and begged him to leave her and come back to me," she said. "But he would not do it, and he tried to deceive me. It was always business that called him to the city every morning, and it was business that kept him there almost all of every week.

"In February of last year he insisted that I go to our ranch in Mexico. I did not want to go, but he was so urgent that I finally gave in to him, as I always did. He gave me $8 to spend on that month's trip, and I did not hear from him but once. I did not know then that he had been in Colorado with this other woman, but the night that I got home I heard that he had returned the day before.

SEARCHED HIS POCKETS.

"Something made me go through his pockets that night, and I found a receipted bill from the Savoy hotel in Denver made out to W. A. Johnson and Mrs. Howard of Kansas City. The bill was a very large one. I have it now.

"The next day I asked him how long he had been in Denver and hinted that I knew all about it. He did not say anything at all. But from time to time he would go away on long business trips and take this woman with him. In Mexico, where he usually went, I had friends, and they recognized him and Mrs. Howard. They told me about it, but I could not say anything to Dode (her husband's nickname) about it. Finally things got so bad that I told him I was going to leave him after threshing this fall and that we would divide up the property equally and he would go his way and I would go mine. Nothing was said by him to that proposition.

"When the wheat crop was in he got about $1,800 for it. I asked him for $25 to buy a new dress, and though he always promised it, he gave me less than half of the $25. Most of that I spent for things for him.

"But before then he had signed my name to a deed which transferred $1,000 worth of property. I never saw one cent of that money. He promised that he would make it all right, but he never did. I never threatened him with exposure, but he knew that I knew of the forgery. It made him afraid.

"Less that a month before that night (she referred so to the night of the assault) Dode came to me and told me he was going back to Mexico to settle up the ranch business. I told him that he would have to take me. He did not want to do so, but I said that I would follow him on the next train if he went without me. He wouldn't be able to lose me like he did his little niece whom I sent to Mexico to take care of him last fall. But he did not go and nothing more was said about the trip up to that night."

BOUGHT HOUSE FOR WOMAN.

Such, in part, is the story which Mrs. Johnson told her attorneys. She told about other women in Kansas City with whom Johnson had lived, one in particular. She said thatJohnson bought an expensive house for this woman on Bales avenue and furnished it luxuriously, with chairs which cost $150 apiece. But Johnson did not pay the bills he contracted in Buckner, she said. She always opened his mail and knew, for he could not read.

The prosecutor and those associated with him have no doubt that they can convict Johnson on both charges. They say that the forgery is a clear cut case and there is no way out of that. Though the assault case is purely circumstantial, Mr. Kimbrell believes that Johnson's own statement will convict him.

The state is very anxious to get the assault case to trial within the next two weeks and will make every effort to do so. Meanwhile, in Buckner, W. A. Johnson, once the most respected man in the community, walks the streets and is shunned by those who once called him their friend. He said yesterday that he intended spending the greater part of his time on his farm near the town.

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