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April 3, 1909

ASKED THE MAYOR FOR $300.

Aged Man Said Roosevelt Had Left
Money at the Hall for Him.

An elderly man wearing a beard that reached nearly to his waist, walked into the offices of Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., yesterday. He could not speak English.

Through an interpreter the man's mission was learned.

"He says he is down here after that $300 you have for him," said the interpreter.

"The old man says he received a Marconi telegram this morning from Theodore Roosevelt saying he had left $300 for him with the mayor, and he wants it."

The old man was taken to Colonel Greenman. Later it was learned that he is a wealthy German and lives on Mersington. He was put in charge of relatives who explained that he has been irresponsible of late.

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March 1, 1909

ROBBED PINKERTON
CHIEF'S HOME.

Burglars Steal Jewelry From Resi-
dence of W. B. Laughlin.

Thieves apparently believe members of the Pinkerton detective agency "easy pickings," as two have suffered at the hands of burglars within the last three days. Pinkerton Patrolman H. A. Stafford lost his revolver by having a burglar take it away from him. Yesterday a sneak thief entered the home of W. B. Laughlin, 1213 Troost avenue, superintendent of the agency, and stole a lot of jewelry. Articles missing reported to the police were two solitaire diamond rings, one string of gold beads, one gold locket and one gold watch.

Burglars entered the residence of Mrs. Alice Woodard, 1522 Lydia avenue, Saturday night and stole one gold watch, chain, locket, $11 in old coins and a quantity of wearing apparel. Entrance was gained by breaking the lock on a rear door.

Clothes were stolen by a sneak thief from the home of Mrs. G. W. Taylor, 2325 Mersington avenue, late Saturday night.

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May 11, 1908

FATHER SAW HIS
BOY GO TO DEATH.

CARL RUEHLE FALLS FROM RAP-
IDLY MOVING CAR.

CLOTHING CAUGHT IN FENCE.

UNFORTUNATE LAD DRAWN UN-
DER HEAVY WHEELS.

Parent Tried to Save Him, but the
Boy's Coat Gave Way and
His Life was Quickly
Crushed Out.

While returning with his father after an afternoon spent in Fairmount park, Carl Ruehle, a 16-year-old boy, was dragged from the front step of a crowded car by his coat catching in a picket fence beside the track at Twelfth street and Mersington avenue last evening about 7 o'clock, and thrown beneath the rear trucks, and instantly killed.

The approaching rain caused a rush to the incoming cars at the park, and young Ruehle and his father, G. C. Ruehle, a blacksmith at Twelfth street and Highland avenue, had been barely able to force their way on the car, the father standing upon the platform, and the boy gaining a foothold on the step. Irvin Menagerie, the motorman, put on full speed soon after he left the park, and the boy leaned far out to get the breeze full in his face, saying that he enjoyed it.

"Be careful, Carl," the father said when he leaned particularly far out. "You might hit your head against a post or fall off. Perhaps you'd better get up here on the platform with me."

"There's not room on the platform," the boy replied. "I'll be careful."

This conversation took place but a minute before the accident. Between Myrtle and Mersington avenues the street car track goes through a cut about four feet deep, and on each side is built a fence to deep persons from driving into it from the road. The car was going rapidly, and young Ruehle once more leaned out to catch the breeze, bystanders say, and before his father could again warn him the car had reached the cut.

The boy's coat was not buttoned, and the wind caught it in and bellied it out. Before young Ruehle could draw his coat back one of the pickets had caught in a fold of the cloth, and was dragging him from the step. He cried out, and clung to the rail with all his might but could not keep his hold.

At his son's cry the boy's father grasped at him, and succeeded in getting hold of part of his clothing. He clung until the cloth parted, the back of his right hand being deeply cut and bruised from striking against the sharp corners of the car in trying to hold on.

The boy was instantly killed. He was an employe of the Hallman Printing Company, and lived with his parents at 1313 Lydia avenue. The body was taken to Newcomer's morgue after an examination by the coroner.

The father was taken to D. V. Whitney's drug store, at Twelfth street and Cleveland avenue, and his wound dressed. Lynn Turpin was the conductor and Irvin Menagerie the motorman on the car, which is No. 234.

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January 20, 1908

LOSS OF LOVE
CAUSES SUICIDE.

EARL LEMMON SHOOTS HIM-
SELF IN THE HEAD.

GIRL BREAKS ENGAGEMENT.

"Do Not Trifle With a Man as If He
Were a Dog," the Last
Words by Lem-
mon.
Earl Lemmon.
EARL LEMMON.

Because Nellie Hickey, 2521 Myrtle avenue, had broken her engagement to marry him, Earl Lemmon, 24 years old, killed himself in his room at Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets yesterday afternoon. Less than two hours after he had bed Miss Hickey a cheerful adieu, his body was found lying across a bed in his room, a 38 caliber pistol lying beside it and a wound in the head revealing the course of the bullet. Upon a table near by the coroner found the following letter:

To All of My Friends. Please forgive me for what I am about to do. I have suffered as no one knows in the last four or five months, but cannot stand it any longer. You will find my plicey at Mrs. Hanifin's. One deed to a lot at Thirty-third and Brighton, a deed to two lots on Leeds road in that box also. If hell is any worse than what I have went through with, I am willing to welcome it.Mr. Cook, you will find a few bills unpaid. If my brothers care for me, they owe me enough to pay all my bills. Give my watch to Mr. Cook and my ring to Nellie. You don't konw what I went through with for you, and you shall never know. But be square next time. Do not trifle with a man as if he was a dog, because they bite back. I must stop now. God bless you. Love and best wishes to Nellie. (Signed) EARL.
(P. S.) God forgive me for this. Goodby all. What money I had I lost some six or seven months ago in a freind-turn-you-down-style.


TWENTY KISSES FOR NELLIE.

Beside this letter was found a souvenir postcard with the photograph of a girl upon it. Upon this card, scrawled in the dead man's handwriting, were the words: "Twenty kisses; goodby, Nellie. Be a good girl."

Young Lemmon was employed by Clayton E. Cook of the Home Produce Company at 2446 Cleveland. He roomed in the home of Clarence Stumpff, a fellow employe, in a cottage near Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets. During the eighteen months he had been in the employ of Mr. Cook he was said to have been a sober, industrious, hard working young man. He had managed to save a little money which he had invested in real estate.

Early yesterday morning he called at the home of Miss Hickey. About n oon he returned to his room and ended his life.

Miss Hickey is the daughter of Lawrence Hickey, a Missouri Pacific switchman. She was very much distressed at the news. When she was seen at her home several hours after the suicide, her eyes were swollen with weeping.


JEALOUS OF THE GIRL.
Miss Nellie Hickey, Lost Love of Earl Lemmon.
MISS NELLIE HICKEY.
For the Loss of Whose Love Earl Lemmon Ended His Life.

"Earl and I have been sweethearts from childhood," she said. "We have been betrothed for several years. But he was insanely jealous of me, and several months ago I broke off the engagement on that account. At that time he threatened to kill himself, but I never thought he would do it. He seemed very much grieved because I had received attentions from other young men, but I didn't think ghe took it so much to heart. This morning he called upon me and we chatted pleasantly. When he started home, he called out, 'Goodby Nell,' very cheerfully. There was nothing in his manner that indicated he was thinking of killing himself.

The story was corroborated by Mr. and Mrs. Hickey. Both said there had never been any parental objections to the affair between their daughter and Lemmon, and that ever since the engagement was broken off the young man had been on terms of close friendship with the family.

Lemmon has a brother, bert Lemmon, who lives at the home of a Mrs. Hanifin at 3315 East Twenty-second street. He has four other brothers, a foster sister, who lives in Armourdale, and his father, who lives in California.

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May 17, 1907

POISONED BY PINEAPPLE.

Two Laundry Girls Unconscious
After Eating Canned Fruit.

"Pie Grated Pineapple" in a tin can came near causing the death of two young women at the Gate City laundry, 215 West Tenth street, yesterday afternoon. About 2 o'clock the ambulance was summoned from police headquarters and Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital accompanied it. Upon arrival he found Miss Myrtle Hayes, 20 years old, and Miss Blanch Steele, 21 years old, in an unconscious condition.

Dr. Gist worked with the young women for some time and succeeded in getting them beyond the danger line. They were turned over to a physician, who remained with them until late yesterday afternoon, when they were removed to their homes. Miss Hayes lives at 2915 Mersington and Miss Blanch Steele at 2919 Fairmount avenue.

The physicians were not certain whether the young women suffered from ptomaine or metallic poisoning. The can with over half of the "grated pineapple" was taken to the city hall and turned over to Dr. Walter M. Cross, city chemist. An analysis will not be made of the contents until some time today.

The young women said they bought the can from a grocery Wednesday noon for lunch. "We did not eat much of it then," one said, "and put it away for your lunch today. The can remained open during the interval. We were taken ill after partaking of the pineapple today."

The young woman cashier said, "The girls ate from the can yesterday, but did not experience any bad results. After eating from it today they also went out and ate some ice cream sodas and other truck -- I don't know what. Miss Steele seemed to be the worst affected. She did not regain consciousness until about 4 o'clock and both were still in a dazed condition late in the afternoon when taken home.

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