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February 3, 1910

ASKS AID FOR PARISIANS.

French Consular Agent Wants Com-
mittee Appointed to Raise Funds.

The co-operation of Mayor Crittenden was asked yesterday by Emile S. Brus, French consular agent in Kansas City, in the appointment of a committee to solicit funds for the relief of the people of Paris who are in dire distress on account of the overflow of the Seine. The mayor expressed full accord with the proposed movement, and will have another interview this morning with W. T. Bland, president of the Commercial Club, and Mr. Brus, to outline a course of action.

Mr. Brus stated that Baron H. De St. Laurent, the consul in Chicago, had urged the taking of subscriptions in Kansas City.

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January 19, 1910

MAYOR CALLS NEGRO HERO.

Modifies Prejudice Against Race and
Will Try to Get Him a Job.

"You are a hero, Washington Johnson, and I take great pleasure in recommending you to Superintendent of Streets Pendergast for a job on the street cleaning gang," said Mayor Crittenden yesterday. Johnson, a negro janitor, was in charge of the Rialto building the night it burned. Risking his life, Johnson awakened sleepers on the several floors.

"For the once I am going to modify my prejudice against the negro in positions that bring him in contact with the public. I'm giving you temporary work until you can find something that will pay you better."

"Thank you, mayor," was Johnson's response.

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January 16, 1910

MAYOR CRITTENDEN
NOT A CANDIDATE.

Makes Formal Statement
That He Will Not Accept
a Renomination.

"I shall not be a candidate for mayor." -- Mayor Crittenden.

This terse and positive statement, stripped of all provisos and conditions, was made yesterday by Mayor T. T. Crittenden.

"I have made up my mind and there is no changing it," he told Alderman James Pendergast, with whom he had a conference. Alderman Pendergast labored long and unsuccessfully in an effort to get the mayor to reconsider his attitude. The same declaration had gone to J. B. Shannon and other leaders of the Democratic party a few days ago and the mayor turned a deaf ear to their pleading to again be a candidate. Men representing civic and commercial bodies also petitioned the mayor to withhold his letter of declination until February 1, but he kindly yet with much emphasis said there was no use.

"I shall not be a candidate for mayor," he repeated and thereupon dictated the following statement:

THE MAYOR SAYS NO.

"No, I shall not be a candidate for mayor. I would not accept the office if it were tendered me without opposition. It is a distinguished honor and should be passed around, and then I can no longer afford to remain away from my business. I have given the city two of the best years of my life. I have worked ceaselessly day and night for the people of Kansas City, at a great financial sacrifice to myself. I have done my duty as I have served without prejudice or favor.

"I did not seek the nomination and only accepted it at the solicitation of friends. When I entered upon my high duties I was ambitious to keep faith with my pledges and make a fight for the upbuilding of Kansas City, and today I can look the world in the face and say that I have kept the faith and fought the fight. No man can truthfully say that I have violated a single political pledge and the work I have accomplished will speak for itself."

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January 15, 1910

MORE SHELTER FOR HOMELESS.

Helping Hand Annex, 401 Wyan-
dotte, Will Be Opened Today.

The Helping Hand Institute annex, 401 Wyandotte street, will be opened at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Addresses will be made by Mayor T. T. Crittenden, W. T. Bland, Rev. Charles W. Moore and Gus Pearson.

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January 9, 1910

WORK AND WAGES FOR
DESERVING UNEMPLOYED.

Mayor Formulates Plan to Provide
Living During Present Cold
Weather for All Worthy Needy.

"Kansas City intends to be kind to the needy and unfortunate temporarily out of work," observed Gus Pearson, city comptroller, yesterday, "but we first are going to find out who is worthy of our time and kindness.

"This wail about the starving and homeless unemployed has been magnified. Investigation shows that on many of the coldest nights of the winter there were a whole lot of vacant beds in the Helping Hand institute, and I have it from the management that they had twenty-four more calls for work for men than could be filled.

"The trouble is that a great many well meaning people are imposed upon and their sympathies wrought up by classes of individuals who are continually preying on the purse strings of the charitable, but will not work unless the work meets with their particular tastes."

Mr. Pearson had a conference yesterday with William Volker, chairman of the pardons and parole board. They discussed the plan proposed by Mayor Crittenden of making an additional appropriation of funds to temporarily tide over the unemployed by giving them work at the municipal stone quarries in Penn Valley park and the municipal farm at Leeds. This will be done as quickly as possible after Messrs. Pearson and Volker have conferred with the heads of charitable institutions and the police in reference to the character of men considered really deserving.

"Bums and loafers who stray into Kansas City just to spend the winter and live off the charitable must move on or go to the workhouse," said Mr. Pearson. "We feel that we have a citizenship of our own who should receive our little acts of kindness in times of distress, and so far as the present city administration is concerned, there will be no deserving man or boy without a place of shelter or a meal."

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December 25, 1909

8,000 KIDS YELL
SANTA GREETINGS.

POLICE IN BATTLE ROYAL WHEN
GIFTS ARE ANNOUNCED AS
READY FOR CHILDREN.

Officials of Mayor's Christ-
mas Tree Well Pleased
With Its Success.

Santa Claus, the magnanimous patron saint of good will, was the hero of the hour in Convention hall yesterday afternoon when 8,000 needy, little children were happy objects of his unbounded generosity.

For the second time the mayor's annual Christmas tree was brought forth loaded with playthings and goodies for the poor youngsters, who otherwise would not know of the joys of the giving spirit of the Yuletide. Every child, irrespective of color or race, was made the recipient of a sack filled with things that gladden the juvenile heart.

By 2 o'clock the bill hall was crowded with boys and girls from every portion of the city, and for fully an hour the expectant thousands were entertained by a band organ, furnished by the Hippodrome, and a clown band which marched about the hall playing the most tuneless tunes imaginable, but doing antics that amused all.

Mayor T. T. Crittenden was slated for a speech, but in the attempt failed, owing to the impossibility of inducing the anxious auditors to desist in their yelling. However, the mayor was able to yell "A Merry Christmas" occasionally during the distribution of presents, and this laconic well-wishing accomplished all that could be asked, for every child left the hall with smiling faces which revealed the joyousness they were experiencing.

MAYOR SATISFIED.

"Isn't this going some?" smiled the mayor as he took a view of the remarkable scene. "Just so every one of these poor children get something, I will be satisfied. It is a grand sigh and a gloriouis manifestation of the great Kansas City spirit, which we all love to see.

"It's a greater success than ever," declared Steve Sedweek, a member of the executive committee. "It is one of the biggest charitable undertakings in the country to care for so many needy children, and I am sure the whole committee feels gratified in noting the remarkable demonstrations in evidence here this afternoon."

At times during the big event it was not an easy task to keep the guests properly marooned for their own safety and comfort. Every child present wanted to get his or her present first and the police, under the direction of Sergeant Charles Edwards, had their troubles, but handled the crowds well. Most of the officers present were attired in Santa Claus make-up. In fact, Saint Nick was there six times strong in the persons of Jack Darnell, S. F. Cox, James F. Campbell, A. D. Royer, Joe McCormick and Elvin Gray.

The idea of having a mayor's tree for the poor children every Christmas was conceived by Steve Sedweek, who outlined his plan at an Eagle banquet over a year ago. Mayor Crittenden forthwith promulgated the scheme, and now the affair is to be annual and of increasing success, no doubt.

Yesterday afternoon there were representatives from twelve different cities of the Middle West present to witness the distribution of gifts to the poor. These men came with the view of seeing how Kansas City made its needy ones happy on Christmas and to take the idea back home in the hopes of starting the same kind of wide-spread charity. The mayor's tree is strictly a Kansas City institution and bids fair to be in vogue in many other cities ere many years.

POLICE WERE BUSY.

It was no easy matter even for a dozen military policemen under the careful personal direction of their drill master, Sergeant Charles Edwards, to keep the 8,000 children in their places in the hall yesterday when the line was formed for the distribution of presents. Between boxes, in which the visitors sat, and the gallery seats, where those really interested in the affair were penned in, was a four-foot fence of iron. It did not look very high to the boys, but it looked even smaller to the cops. To the latter it looked infinitely long, however, for at the first call for gifts a scrambling mass of children swept over it, inundating the boxes below and surging out into the hall. For a space of a minute the line seemed actually in danger. The policemen rushed forward, brandishing their clubs and shouting. A dozen members of the reception committee joined hands and formed a wall near the threatened quarter. The mayor raised his deep bass voice in mild disapproval.

Just then, at the crucial moment, the reserves threw their ponderous weight into the fray and the regiments of insurgents broke for cover like the old guard in the rout of Waterloo. The victorious newcomers were the six big officers doing duty as Santa Claus close to the Christmas trees and their tinsel had a better moral effect than the regulation uniforms or the white committee badges. There were no youngsters in that host who wanted to endanger their good standing with St. Nicholas and his assistants. Not much!

There was just one way in which gifts were classified according to the age of the child receiving them yesterday. The presents were in flour sacks, each bearing the label, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." On the sacks containing gifts calculated for older children the letters were printed in blue, while on the others they were in red. There were eighteen persons at each "gift bench" handing out the sacks.

MOURNER'S BENCHES FOR THE LOST.

A great number of visitors at the mayor's Christmas party wondered why two long benches ere arranged alongside the trees. They were told by ushers that these were the mourners' benches. This was proved to be true later in the day when children who had somehow got lost from their parents or elders lined up from one end to the other. Two little girls, Edith Shoemaker, 2311 Euclid avenue, and Menie Marcus, who said she lived near Eighteenth and McGee streets, were prominent among the mourners.

Edith's tear-stained face and Menie's extraordinary composure seemed to attract the attention of everyone. They had never seen each other before, but they were two lost little girls whose ages were on the tender side of 10 years, and in that circumstance there was union. With arms locked about each other's neck, they sat for an hour until Mayor Crittenden personally took charge of Edith, and Jacob Billikopf of Menie, and sent them home, loaded with presents.

Two wagon loads of toys arrived at the hall after the crowd had been treated and were only partially disposed of. The sum of the donations for the tree amounted to $4,880. It was announced last night by Albert Hutchins, chairman of the finance committee, that $200 of the money has not been used. The presents remaining after yesterday will be distributed at the Grand theater Monday night.

Several instances of highway robbery, in which large boys despoiled smaller ones of their trinkets or tickets were reported to the committee of distribution during the afternoon.

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December 24, 1909

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS
TREE IS ALL READY.

CANDY AND TOYS FOR THOU-
SANDS OF CHILDREN.

Convention Hall Doors Will Swing
Open at 1 o'clock Today to
Admit the Eager
Youngsters.

Nimble fingers, hastened and made dexterous by kind hearts, effected a transformation in Convention hall yesterday, and today the great auditorium is a Santa Claus land for the poor children of Kansas City. At 1 o'clock this afternoon the doors of the hall will swing open for the mayor's Christmas tree, and at 2:30 they will close, while Santa Claus distributes Christmas presents to at least 7,000 little boys and girls who, by force of circumstances, might otherwise have had no Christmas.

Notwithstanding unceasing efforts, the committees of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association have been unable to locate all the poor children in the city to give them the tickets which are necessary to entitle them to gifts, and these children who have been overlooked are asked to apply at Convention hall this morning from 8 o'clock until noon. Tickets will be supplied these children any time between those hours.

The Fraternal Order of Moose caught the Christmas spirit in earnest yesterday and notified the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association that it would have twenty-five wagon loads of coal at Convention hall at noon today for distribution among poor families. Each wagon will contain two tons of coal.

WORKED ALL DAY.

Poor families who need fuel are requested to notify the mayor's office by 'phone or in person up to 11 o'clock this morning. These cases will be investigated and if the applicants be found worthy the coal will be delivered at their homes at noon. The offer from the Order of Moose was made by W. A. McGowan, secretary of the local lodge.

That the Convention hall association is heart and soul in the Christmas tree project was shown when Manager Louis W. Shouse and the directors placed the whole Convention hall force at the disposal of the Christmas Tree Association. As soon as the railroad ball was over Wednesday night, Manager Shouse put a force of men to work taking up the dance floor and before 6 o'clock yesterday morning the building was ready for the decorating committees of the Christmas tree.

Steve Sedweek was the first of the association workers to appear on the scene. He arrived at 6 o'clock and within a short time a large force was at work, setting up the Christmas trees, decorating them and packing the gifts into sacks ready for distribution. The committees worked all day and this morning they will have the hall ready for the great event.

That the people of Kansas City may inspect the work of the "best fellows" a general invitation is extended to any who care to do so to stop into the hall during the morning hours, up to noon today.

THE GIFTS IN SACKS.

Among the busy people at the hall yesterday were Captain John F. Pelletier, A. E. Hutchings, Steve Sedweek, Captain W. A. O'Leary, Hank C. Mank, the Rev. Thomas Watts, Gus Zorn and a Mr. Bennett of Wichita, who is here to gain ideas for a similar event to be inaugurated in his city next year.

Among the most valued workers were the members of the committee of twenty. Their duties consisted of the packing and arranging of the gifts in sacks. They worked from early morning till late at night and ate luncheon and dinner in the hall. Mayor T. T. Crittenden was present at the luncheon and sat at the head of the table, commending the women for their work.

The workers were assisted by seven men from No. 6 hook and ladder company, Thirty-first and Holmes, detailed for the duty by Fire Chief John C. Egner. Chief Egner had intended detailing twenty men, but the fire in the Rialto building made it impossible for him to do so.

The giant Christmas trees, which will be among the objects of chief interest to the children, were decorated in magnificent fashion by the employes of the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Company.

The presents for the children will be arranged in sacks bearing the inscription, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." The sacks for the boys will be placed on the east side of the arena and those of the girls on the west side. The sacks for children up to 8 years of age are printed in blue and those of children from 8 to 12 are printed in red.

Each child will receive two suitable toys and candy, nuts and fruit, all arranged in Christmas style.

A CLOWN BAND, TOO.

The programme for the mayor's Christmas tree will be a simple one. The doors will open at 1 o'clock, when the children can come in to feast their eyes upon the great Christmas trees and enjoy a fine musical entertainment. The doors will close at 2:30, so that it will be necessary for the tots to be in the hall by that time.

Preceding the distribution of the presents, the Eagles' clown band will give a dress concert on the arena and a large electrical organ will also furnish music. Old Santa Claus, who, it is said, resembles very much in appearance Captain John F. Pelletier, will be present and he will have six assistants with him to mingle among the children. At 2:30 o'clock Santa will introduce Mayor T. T. Crittenden, who will make a short talk, and the presents will then be distributed.

"We have plenty of funds and plenty of gifts for all the city's poor children," said A. E. Hutchings, "and if they do not come and get their share it will not be the fault of the committees, which have labored incessantly to get in touch with every child entitled to the pleasures of the tree."

Although it was announced that no more funds were needed, and that no further cash donations would be received, the financial committee of the association was forced to decline donations yesterday to the amount of several hundred dollars.

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December 24, 1909

GAVE THE MAYOR A CAKE.

City Hall Employes Remember His
Forty-Sixth Birthday.

Mayor Crittenden admits that he was 46 years old yesterday. His official family and close personal friends took advantage of the occasion to present him with an ornamented cake weighing twenty-five pounds. It was pyramidal and decorated with cupids, bon bons, and images of flying doves. The pyramid was shaped as a bouquet holder, and this was filled with American Beauty roses, ferns and delicate plants. At the base of the cake forty-six miniature candles were set in the open petals of lillies of the valley.

While the mayor was absent in another part of city hall the cake was smuggled into his private office, and when he returned he was greeted by a host of friends, and Frank Lowe made a facetious speech of presentation, and the mayor responded as well as his embarrassment would permit.

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December 20, 1909

MAYOR LIMPS AFTER ROMP.

Playing With Children, Mr. Critten-
den Injures Big Toe.

While having a romp with his children at his home on Flora avenue Saturday morning, Mayor Crittenden sprained a ligament in the big toe of his right foot.

During the day the mayor went about his official duties, although he suffered a great deal of pain. Yesterday the whole foot became swollen and inflamed, and his physicians ordered him to take absolute rest for a few days. The mayor carries an accident policy.

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December 16, 1909

PROSPERS DESPITE HOODOO.

Speakers at Phantom Club Banquet
Show Steady Growth.

Members of the Phantom Club, organized on Friday, the thirteenth of December, four years ago, gave its second annual banquet last night at the Hotel Baltimore. Mayor Crittenden and prominent men about town were the guests of honor. Festus O. Miller was the toastmaster.

After a vocal solo by Lewis H. Scurlock, A. M. Kathrens, the president, reviewed the history of the club. He spoke of its organization and of its steady growth. It now has its own quarters at 1032 Penn street.

Other sentiments were responded to as follows:

"Phantoms in the Future," K. G. Rennic; "Club Fellowship," James West French; "Club Benefits," Estell Scott; "Good of the Order," Samuel Eppstein; "Topics," Clyde Taylor; "Remarks," Thomas R. Marks; "Narratives," Judge Harry G. Kyle.

Mayor Crittenden also spoke.

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December 6, 1909

CHRISTMAS TREAT FOR
POOR CHILDREN PLANNED.

Large Tree Will Be Prepared in
Convention Hall -- Names Should
Be Addressed to the Mayor.

The Mayor's Christmas Tree association, which was suggested and carried out last year for the first time in the history of Kansas City, is preparing to give the deserving poor children of this city a great treat this Christmas. Elaborate plans are being worked out by the committee. Headquarters have been opened in the Reliance building at Tenth and McGee streets, where contributions will be received, and also the names of the poor. The city will be canvassed during the next three weeks for the names of the children to be placed on the list. Several large Christmas trees will be prepared in Convention hall where the big event is to take place on the night of December 24, and under the direction of the distribution committee the presents will be given to all children who are deemed entitled to receive them.

Names, or suggestions as to distribution of presents, should be addressed to the mayor, and all checks and remittances for the mayor's Christmas tree should be plainly marked and mailed to the city comptroller, Gus Pearson, treasurer of the association for this year.

The members of the executive committee are Thomas Watts, Louis W. Shouse, Jacob Billikopf, M. G. Harman, A. E. Hutchings, Dave McDonnell, Henry Manke, Rev. Charles W. Moore, Steve Sedweek, T. T. Crittenden, John F. Pelletier, Franklin D. Hudson, A. Judah, George F. Damon, Justin A. Runyan, Gus Pearson, H. E. Barker and George C. Hale.

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November 18, 1909

HOTEL MEN IN ARMS
AGAINST 'DEAD BEATS.'

MAY PUT CONTRACT ON EACH
PAGE OF REGISTER.

Meeting of Association Concludes
Today With Lunch at Sexton
and Banquet Tonight at
Excelsior Springs.

If the plans of the Kansas-Missouri Hotel Men's association are carried out, it's not going to be so easy to walk up to the hotel register, sign your name, and then walk out the next morning without paying, giving the simple excuse that you are "broke." The legislators of Kansas and Missouri will be asked at the next session to allow the following brief contract to be printed at the head of each page:

"Any one signing their signature below hereby agrees to pay the bill as charged by this hotel. Failure to do so shall be a violation of this contract and party violating same will be punishable by law. The proprietor of the hotel hereby agrees to fulfill his part of the contract."

Sam B. Campbell of the Sexton Hotel.
SAM B. CAMPBELL,
Clerk at the Sexton. Oldest Clerk in Point of Service in Kansas City.

Though stringent laws have been passed in both states, they are usually evaded. The present law reads that any one securing a room "by fraud or pretext" shall be punishable. In the future, a man will be starting at a contract at the head of each page, and the hotel men think that it will be a more serious matter.

In fact, the whole session, which began yesterday afternoon in the Italian room at the Hotel Baltimore, was one of self-protection. Every speaker dwelt on the fact that the average inn keeper was the most oppressed individual in the community. Means of getting around the wily "bad check man," dead beat," "loafer," and how to get better legislation was discussed, and committees appointed to see that action is taken.

F. P. Ewins of the Savoy Hotel.
F. P. EWINS,
Hotel Savoy.

Yesterday's session was opened with an address of welcome by Mayor Crittenden. He complimented the men on their general appearance. T. L. Barnes, president of the association, made a short reply.

There was a general feeling that the meeting would like to face a hotel inspector, and Thomas L. Johnson, state hotel inspector, was asked to be present and, in fact, had agreed to come and discuss the laws regulating hotels. At the last moment Johnson failed to appear.

C. L. Wood of the Sexton.
C. L. WOOD,
Secretary of the Association and Manager of the Sexton.

Last night's gathering was purely social. A Dutch lunch was served in the grill room of the Sexton hotel, which is managed by C. L. Wood, secretary of the association. A ride over the boulevards will be taken this morning, and after the report of committees this afternoon the entire association will take the train to Excelsior Springs, where a banquet will be held tonight at the New Elms.

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October 30, 1909

CLEAN POLITICS SAFE
IN WOMAN'S HANDS.

MORE CAPABLE TO VOTE THAN
THE AVERAGE MAN.

Ten Years to See Nation-Wide Equal
Sufferage Says Mayor Critten-
den to Woman's Ath-
letic Club.

"I believe the average woman is more capable of clean, honest politics than the average man, and should vote on all local issues. The matter of keeping a city's life clean physically and morally should be entrusted to a woman's hands. It is my firm conviction that within the next ten years this country will have woman suffrage from one end to the other."

These were some of the remarks of Mayor Crittenden before the regular business meeting of the Kansas City Women's Athletic club, in the gymnasium at 1013 Grand avenue, yesterday afternoon. The speech was made on the invitation of Mrs. S. E. Stranathan, president of the club.

"I know that a great many women, as well as the majority of men, are against a suffrage movement or any other movement which would lead the gentler sex into the ungentle game of politics. It has been customary for men to assume that a woman could never understand the tariff; that the value of ship subsidies and river navigation would floor her, and that she is far too impulsive to be of value as a factor in our national government.

"These great issues, however, are not necessarily local. It might take time for the average matron or maid to grasp their details, but give them a few years of experience in town and city or perhaps state politics and it is my opinion that their vote would be as honest and as intelligent as any deposited in the box election day.

"There was a time when I did not believe in women voting, but that was before I held public office and dealt with committees of both sexes."

About seventy-five women, members of the club, heard Mayor Crittenden's remarks and applauded him at his conclusion.

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October 21, 1909

FOR CITY'S TRIBUTE TO SWOPE.

Relatives in Letter to Mayor Thank
Kansas City People.

In a communication addressed to Mayor Crittenden, Mrs. L. O. Swope, sister-in-law of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, yesterday formally thanked the citizens of Kansas City for the public funeral tendered him. Mrs. Swope's letter follows:

"I wish to express to you, and to all of the city officials, on behalf of the Swope family, our high appreciation of the most beautiful tribute of honor and affection shown our dead. We feel that not a stone was left unturned to show him honor and gratitude.

"The services at the church were all that could have been. All the singing was sweet, but the solo, "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," was almost a voice from heaven. Once more thanking you for your great kindness, I remain, very sincerely, MRS. L. O. SWOPE. October 15, 1909."

It is said that the last legal transaction performed by Colonel Swope was the signing of a deed to a piece of property to the city on the north side of Fourth street, between Walnut and Main. It is a part of the square bounded by Walnut, Main, Third and Fourth, to be used for market purposes. There is a three-story brick building on the land, and this will be razed together with the four remaining buildings which the city will soon get posession of. there has been a delay in the formal transfer on account of the city having to deal with heirs.

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October 16, 1909

TO OPEN SANITARIUM TODAY.

Wm. Volker's Gift Means Much to
Kansas City People.

The opening reception of the tubercular pavilion, Twenty-second and Cherry streets, the gift of Mr. William Volker to the Jackson County Society for the Relief and Prevention of Tuberculosis, is to be held at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

As this is a great event in the history of Kansas City, everyone is cordially invited to be present at the dedication of the sanitarium, which is to be presented by Frank P. Walsh, president of the society, to the city, through its mayor, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr.

Addresses will be delivered by Professor Charles Zubelin of New York, Mayor Crittenden, Frank P. Walsh and E. W. Schauffler, medical director of the sanitarium.

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October 13, 1909

BIG PARADE HELD IN
HONOR OF COLUMBUS.

ITALIAN SOCIETIES COMMEM-
ORATE DISCOVERY.

Replica of Santa Maria, With "In-
dians" Aboard, a Feature --
Music and Speeches at
City Garden.

Columbus day, commemorating the discovery of America on October 12, 1492, was celebrated in Kansas City yesterday for the first time. A bill making October 12 a legal holiday passed the last legislature.

As the great "Christopher Colombo" was an Italian, born in Genoa, Italy, the Italians of Kansas City took the lead yesterday in celebrating the day. Ever since July 4 last the representative Italians of the city have been working on a monster parade, and yesterday the people viewed the result of their labors. The parade formed at the Holy Rosary church, Fifth and Campbell streets, and was headed by a line of carriages. In the first were Mayor Crittenden, Justice Michael Ross and Michael E. Casey, the state senator who drew up the bill making October 12 a holiday. Judge Harry G. Kyle, W. H. Baehr, city treasurer, and other city officials were in the other carriages with representative Italian citizens. Following these were members of many Italian lodges and societies.

SANTA MARIA IN PARADE.

The most attractive feature of the parade was a replica of the Santa Maria, the boat on which Columbus sailed to America. On board were sailors and "Indians." Frank Bascone, dressed to represent Columbus, stood in the boat, telescope in hand, apparently searching for land. Four bands were in the line of march.

After forming at Fifth and Campbell the parade went south to Sixth street, east on Sixth to Gillis, north on Gillis to Fifth and west to Walnut street, thus traversing the very heart of the Italian quarter known as "Little Italy." Crowds lined both sides of the street through the entire North End.

The line of march was continued down Walnut street to Sixteenth, on that street to Grand avenue and thence to the City garden, about Nineteenth and Grand, where the real celebration was held. Mayor Crittenden, Senator Casey and Judge Kyle made speeches in English, the best they could do. Speeches in Italian were made by Professor G. G. Langueri, Rev. Father John Marchello and Rev. Maxdano, minister of the Italian Evangelist church.

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October 8, 1909

7,000 HEAR DR. COOK
TELL HIS OWN STORY.

KANSAS CITY AUDIENCE GIVES
EXPLORER AN OVATION.

Tale of Dash to Pole, Experiences
There and Struggle Back to
Civilization Received
With Applause.

An audience numbering about 7,000 people in Convention hall last night cheered for a minute a stereopticon picture of a tiny dome of snow from which floated the Stars and Stripes.

That picture represented the successful conquest of the polar mystery, and the 7,000 people had gathered to see Dr. Frederick A. Cook, the conqueror, and hear him tell of his victory. The story was one of enthralling interest, told in anything but a heroic manner, yet told convincingly, straightforwardly, simply, without dramatic climaxes or rhetorical graces.

It is doubtful if there was an individual in the big audience who doubted for a moment Dr. Cook was telling anything but the literal truth. Certainly it was not a Peary audience, for when the doctor mentioned the name of his rival in connection with the other explorers who had preceded him into the Arctic wilds, there was not the faintest ripple of applause.

TOLD WITHOUT ORATORY.

Dr. Cook's lecture was one of the most interesting features of the week of fall festivities. The doctor cannot be called an orator in the superficial sense. He labored under several handicaps last night, not the least of which was a heavy cold which rendered his voice conspicuously hoarse and which drove him frequently to the ice water.

When Dr. Cook made his first appearance upon the platform he was heartily applauded, and when he arose to begin his lecture, after a brief laudatory introduction by Mayor Crittenden, he received a distinct ovation.

Without prelude he plunged into his lecture, which was delivered in a conversational tone throughout. It was repeatedly punctuated with applause as he narrated some incident more than usually dramatic in its nature or illustrative of the tremendous obstacles overcome.

There was, of course, a special round of applause when he referred to the fact that the pemmican which furnished food for the northward trip was put up by the Armours, and that in all probability some of it came from Kansas City.

ONE MENTION OF PEARY.

The lecture was copiously illustrated with stereopticon views from photographs taken by Dr. Cook himself. Throughout the lecture the orator's characteristic modesty was almost obtrusive, if the paradox may be thus stated. Very rarely was the personal pronoun used and the speaker paid a specially generous tribute to the Eskimos who proved indispensable to the success of the undertaking.

He warmly commended the two young men who went to the pole with him and in the culminating picture showing the flag planted at the pole the only living figures were those of these two Eskimos. Of course Dr. Cook himself could not have been in his own pictures, but it is doubtful if Commander Peary gave his sole companion even this share of the honor. At any rate Cook did.

The only mention of Peary was the one reference to him in the list of polar explorers. No allusion was made to the experiences at the hands of Peary's representative at Etah on Dr. Cook's return and nothing whatever was said as to the controversy between Cook and Peary. Throughout, the lecture was plain narrative of facts, the veracity of which the speaker did not appear to think would be doubted.

Dr. Cook's voice did not carry to all parts of the hall, but few people left before the lecture closed with Dr. Cook's promise to send a ship to Etah and bring back to this country the two companions on the great polar dash. Early in the course of the lecture a song dedicated to Dr. Cook by a local singer.

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October 7, 1909

SWOPE'S BODY LIES IN STATE.

At 9 o'Clock This Morning Public
Will Be Admitted to Rotunda of
Library to Pay Last Tribute.

The body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope, Kansas City's great public benefactor, now lies in state in the rotunda of the public library building, Ninth and Locust streets. The body rests in a massive state casket with deep scroll mountings. The casket, copper lined, is made of the finest mahogany, covered with black cloth. Solid silver handles extend the full length on each side.

At 9'o'clock this morning the public will be admitted and given an opportunity to look for the last time upon the face of Kansas City's most beloved citizen. Last night the body was guarded by a cordon of police commanded by Sergeants T. S. Eubanks and John Ravenscamp. They will be relieved this morning by others. The police will be on guard until the funeral.

At 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mayor Crittenden accompanied by Police Commissioner R. B. Middlebrook and Aldermen O'Malley, Edwards and Wirtman from the upper house and Aldermen Morris and Gilman from the lower house of the council, went to Independence to receive Colonel Swope's body.

It was 4:10 o'clock when Mayor Llewellyn Jones of Independence, accompanied by the city council of that city, made formal delivery of the body. It was carried to the waiting hearse, by G. D. Clinton, J. Wesley Clement, H. A. Major, A. L. Anderson, J. G. Paxon and M. L. Jones, all citizens of Independence.

Ten mounted policemen, commanded by Sergent Estes of the mounted force, acted as convoy to this city. It was at first planned that the Independence officials should accompany the body as far only as their city limits. However, they came to this city and saw the casket placed in state in the library. Those who came from Independence were Mayor Jones and Aldermen E. C. Harrington, J. Wesley Clement. H. A. Major, M. L. Jones, A. L. Anderson and Walter Shimfessel.

Upon arriving at the public library six stalwart policemen removed the casket from the hearse and placed it on pedestals in the rotunda. After giving instructions to the police on guard, Mayor Crittenden and Commissioner Middlebrook left with the members of the council.

Only one relative from out of the city, Stuart S. Fleming of Columbia, Tenn., is at the Swope home in Independence. He arrived yesterday. Colonel Swope was his uncle. Last Friday night, James Moss Hunton, Mr. Fleming's cousin, died at the Swope home. A few hours after he received notice of his death, Mr. Fleming's wife passed away. Sunday night he received notice that his uncle, Colonel Swope, was dead.

"My mother, Colonel Swope's sister, is 77 years old," said Mr. Fleming yesterday. "She is prostrated and was unable to accompany me."

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October 6, 1909

PEOPLE TO JOIN IN
MOURNING FOR SWOPE.

PUBLIC FUNERAL FROM GRACE
CHURCH FRIDAY.

Body to Rest Temporarily in Vault.
Later Suitable Monument Is
to Be Erected Over
Grave.

The body of the late Thomas H. Swope will be brought from Independence at 5 o'clock tonight and lie in state in the Library building, Ninth and Locust, from 9 a. m. Thursday to noon of Friday.

Funeral at 3:30 o'clock Friday afternoon from Grace Episcopal church. Body will rest temporarily in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery.


The body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope is to rest temporarily in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery to await arrangements to be perfected by Kansas City for a final resting place in Swope park.

A monument appropriate to the man who while in life was the city's greatest benefactor and the poor man's friend is to be erected over the grave, and the design in all probability will be a statue. A mask of Colonel Swope's features will be taken at Independence this morning and kept in reserve.

Colonel Swope is to be given a public funeral at 2:30 Friday afternoon, in which the militia, civic and commercial organizations of the city , the governor of the state of Missouri and other distinguished citizens will take part. The tribute from the city will be as free from ostentation as the occasion will permit. There will be no extravagant floral displays, nor flights of oratory. There are to be but two floral offerings at the bier. One will be a blanket of roses for the casket from the family, and the other a broken shaft of choice exotics from the city. It was the colonel's request that there be no lavish display of flowers.

BISHOP ATWILL CELEBRANT.

The simple and beautiful burial services of the Episcopal church will be read by Bishop E. R. Atwill at Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth street, between Broadway and Washington, and the choir will render appropriate music. In arranging the official programme yesterday, the committees representing the city did not fully complete the details for having the children of the public and private schools participate in the exercises. John W. Wagner, who, with Alderman Emmett O'Malley, has in charge the completion of added details, said last night that he will endeavor to have several thousand school children lined along the sidewalks on Eleventh street, west of Wyandotte, and south on Broadway to Thirteenth street, as the funeral pageant moves to the church. The children will probably sing "Nearer My God to Thee." The participation in the services of school children was suggested to Mr. Wagner by S. W. Spangler, business manager for Colonel Swope.

"School children used to come to the colonel's office by hundreds to look at the man who had given Swope park to the city," was Mr. Spangler's explanation.

The body of Colonel Swope will be escorted from Independence by Mayor Crittenden, Aldermen O'Malley, Wirthman and Edwards, of the upper house; Aldermen Morris, Gilman and Wofford of the lower house, and a detail of mounted police. From 9 a. m. Thursday to noon of Friday the body will lie in state at the library, guarded by a detachment of police and state militiamen. Entrance to the building will be by Ninth street and egress by Locust street.

FROM PUBLIC LIBRARY.

The funeral cortege will move from the library building at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon in the following order:

Mounted Police.
Third Regiment Band.
Battery B.
Police on Foot.
Fire Department Detail on Foot.
Civic and Commercial Organizations.
City Officials in Carriages.
Honorary Pallbearers.
Active Pallbearers.
Hearse.
Family in Carriages.
Citizens in Carriages.

MEETING OF THE BOARD.

There is to be a special meeting of the board of education this morning to consider the suggestion that the pupils of the public schools participate in the funeral of Colonel Swope, and to plan arrangements for having the body lie in state at the library.

Last night Mayor Crittenden and John W. Wagner conferred with J. Crawford James, chairman of the board, on the propriety of the pupils being stationed at a point along the funeral march. Mr. James took kindly to the suggestion, and will present it to the board.

Contrary to general belief, Thomas H. Swope did not gain the title of "Colonel" in warfare. A newspaper during an exciting campaign of civic improvement used the title, which did not have the entire sanction of Mr. Swope.

"Now I will have to go through life with the unearned title of colonel," he complained one day to Kelly Brent.

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October 5, 1909

SUGGESTS MEMORIAL
SERVICE FOR SWOPE.

LET PEOPLE PIN ON BADGE OF
MOURNING, SAYS MAYOR.

Swope Park, Philanthropist's Most
Enduring Monument, Discussed
by Park Board as Last
Resting Place.

That a memorial service in honor of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope will be held in Convention hall, and that his body will rest in Swope park, his most enduring monument, seems probable in view of a message sent to the council last night by Mayor Crittenden, at an informal conference of the park board yesterday.

The appropriateness of having the body of Colonel Swope buried in Swope park, and a monument to his memory erected there, was informally discussed at the meeting of the park board.

"I was talking with Judge C. O. Tichenor today," said D. J. Haff, and he expressed the opinion that if the body of Colonel Swope found its final resting place in Swope park it would be carrying out his wishes.

Judge Tichenor spoke to the colonel about it once, and he seemed pleased with the idea but said he would not discuss it.

The board was formally apprised of the death of Colonel Swope by Mr. Haff. He referred to the philanthropist as the greatest benefactor the city ever had. Mr. Haff said the gift of Swope park was of incalculable advantage to the entire park movement and that it had inspired the development of the park and boulevard system.

The two houses of the city council adopted a resolution expressing the grief and the appreciation of the council and the people of Kansas City over the death of Colonel Swope. Aldermen O'Malley, Wirthman and Edwards were appointed a committe from the upper house, and Aldermen Morris, Gilman and Wofford from the lower house to make arrangements for the funeral of Colonel Swope. The committee meets at 10 o'clock th is morning in the offices of the Fidelity building.

Mayor Crittenden, A. J. Dean, president of the park board, and Kelly Brent of the fire and water board go to Independence this morning to formally offer to the bereaved family the city's regrets.

The arrangements for the funeral also will be discussed.

"Colonel Swope should be buried in Kansas City and should be given a public funeral," said the mayor last night.

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September 4, 1909

CITY HALL FLAG HALF-MAST.

Mayor Crittenden Will Suggest That
Council Adopt Resolutions and
City Officials Attend Funeral.

"The city hall flag will be placed at half mast in honor of Colonel Thomas H. Swope and as a work of respect to the memory of the man who did so much in a substantial way for Kansas City," said Mayor Crittenden last night.

"A message from me will go to the council Monday night recommending that befitting resolutions and expressions of the city's regrets of the death of Colonel Swope be adopted and that the mayor, all city officials and the two houses of the council attend the funeral in a body.

"Colonel Swope was the greatest benefactor Kansas City ever had, and the extent of his gifts is evidenced by the beautiful park of 1,354 acres and the five acres on which the new General hospital stands. I will not speak of his private bequests for they were many and in most commendable causes.

"He was a man of great business ability, and not much given to ostentation. He had but very few intimates, but a host of friends and acquaintances who will remember him long for his many splendid services to them. Colonel Swope had his peculiarities, but his heart was in the right place."

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September 28, 1909

A REMINDER OF HIS TRIP.

Mayor Crittenden Receives Framed
Picture of Montreal Scenes.

A pleasant reminder of his visit to Montreal was received yesterday by Mayor Crittenden -- framed pictures of several of the more important buildings of that city, and a separate frame containing the offical badge of the recent convention of American municipalities and a large, highly burnished key, supposed to indicate an invitation to again visit Montreal. The identity of the sender is not known, but the mayor believes it was from E. R. Carrington, manager of Thiels' Detective agency for the Dominion of Canada and the province of Quebec. Mr. Carrington some years ago was connected with the Kansas City police department, and was tireless in his efforts to make the visit of the Kansas City delegation to the convention enjoyable.

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August 26, 1909

MAYOR CRITTENDEN, SPEAKER.

Addresses the League of American
Municipalities at Montreal.

MONTREAL, August 25. -- With 700 delegates from all parts of the United States and Canada in attendance, the convention of the league of American Municipalities opened here today. Mayor Silas Cook of East St. Louis, Ill., in his opening address, advocated greater publicity of municipal work in order to do away with abuses. John McVickar, the secretary and treasurer, scored Ambassador Bryce for the stand which he took in his book, "The American Commonwealth," saying that because of the bad name given office holders in that book every citizen entering the service of a municipality took his reputation in his hands.

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., mayor of Kansas City, and Dr. W. H. Atherton of Montreal, delivered addresses on municipal subjects.

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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August 20, 1909

ICE WATER FOR PRISONERS.

Supt. Murphy Has Refrigeration In-
stalled in Workhouse.

"I cannot get along without ice water in the summer, and it is wrong to deprive those who are so unfortunate as to be sent to the workhouse of a cooling and refreshing drink of water," said Cornelius Murphy, the new superintendent at the workhouse yesterday. During the recent hot spell he had plumbers install refrigeration in the supply pipes in the institution leading to the men's department, and yesterday a similar improvement was installed in the women's section.

Mayor Crittenden, who made a personal inspection of the workhouse yesterday, congratulated Mr. Murphy on his thoughtfulness and also complimented him upon the cleanly appearance of everything about the place. The mayor was accompanied by the city comptroller and the city plumbing inspector for the purpose of determining what it will cost to make the cells sanitary and to improve the general sanitation of the building. The inspector was directed to prepare plans immediately for necessary changes so the board of public works can advertise for bids. Comptroller Pearson promised to provide the revenues.

A change in the illumination of the building is also contemplated. Natural gas is used wholly, and the mayor thinks that besides the product being too warm for summer there is danger from fire. He has ordered the city electrician to prepare an estimate of the cost of connecting cables with the new general hospital electric light plant.

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August 20, 1909

PEOPLE DEMAND MORE MUSIC.

Alderman Lapp Bears a Message to
Mayor From Constituents.

"The people out my way in the Seventh ward are demanding two more weeks of music in the parks," said Alderman J. G. Lapp to Mayor Crittenden yesterday.

"And I am happily in accord with the people not only of the Seventh ward, but in every ward of the city on the band proposition," replied the mayor, "but it is a question of finances. I am not fishing for a deficit in the treasury, and I know the good people of the city are of a like opinion. If I could have my way about it $10,000 would be appropriated ever year for music in the parks, but there are so many things that the city must look after we have to nurse and be careful of the revenues.

"I'm sure if you would use your influence with Gus Pearson, city comptroller, he would dig up the money from somewhere. Two more weeks of band music would cost only $1,026," urged Lapp.

"All right," promised the mayor, "I will see what I can do with the comptroller in the morning. I'm for music in the parks so long as the weather will permit."

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August 10, 1909

NO CIRCUSES ON LABOR DAY.

Council Passes Ordinance Favored
by Mayor in Special Message.

In order to allow members of the trade unions to have the full benefit of "spending money" on Labor Day, Mayor Crittenden last night sent a special message to the council favoring the passage of an ordinance to bar circuses from Kansas City on that day, it transpiring that shows have made it a practice to map out their routes as to be here on general holidays, especially Labor Day. A complaint had been made by the ways and means committee that circuses were taking about $25,000 out of the city each Labor Day.

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July 31, 1909

CORNELIUS MURPHY
SUCCEEDS O'HEARN.

MAYOR CRITTENDEN NAMES
NEW SUPERINTENDENT.

Confirmation at the Hands of the
Upper House of the Council
Is Expected Monday
Night.
Cornelius Murphy, New Workhouse Superintendent.
CORNELIUS MURPHY.
Appointed Superintendent of the Workhouse to Succeed Patrick O'Hearn.

Cornelius Murphy was yesterday appointed superintendent of the workhouse by Mayor Crittenden to succeed Patrick O'Hearn, whose resignation has been demanded and accepted. Mr. Murphy will have to be confirmed by the upper house of the council, and it is thought that this will be done at the meeting Monday night.

Mr. Murphy is a man of good judgment, a fine disciplinarian and thoroughly understands the handling and treatment of prisoners of the stripe that are confined in the workhouse," was the statement given out by the mayor.

For fifty-two years Mr. Murphy has been a resident of Kansas City and during that time has been active in Democratic politics. In the earlier days he was identified with the Marcy K. Brown wing of the party, and later when "the rabbits," under the generalship of J. B. Shannon, put Brown off the political map Murphy cast his lot with the Shannon bunch. He is a brother of Daniel Murphy, a former presiding judge of the county court.

During his political career Mr. Murphy served two terms as county marshal, was superintendent of mails when George M. Shelley was postmaster and for two years was inspector of detectives while Colonel L. E. Irwin was chief of police. In recent years Mr. Murphy has been conducting a livery and sales stable.

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July 27, 1909

O'HEARN MUST QUIT
AT ONCE, SAYS MAYOR.

WORKHOUSE SUPERINTENDENT
TOLD TO RESIGN.

Pardon Board in Charge of Institu-
tion Today -- Crittenden Not
Ready to Announce Suc-
cessor -- Board's Report.

The resignation of Patrick O'Hearn as superintendent of the workhouse, effective this morning, was demanded by Mayor Crittenden in a letter to O'Hearn mailed last night. The letter should be in the hands of O'Hearn when he reports at the institution today. The action of the mayor was based on the official report of the board of pardons and paroles, and the demand that the superintendent be removed without further ceremony.

"I have mailed a letter to Mr. O'Hearn asking for his immediate resignation. He should receive it by the early mails tomorrow," said the mayor.

"But suppose he does not resign?"

"I have no fears in that direction. It will be safe to say that Mr. O'Hearn will not be superintendent of the workhouse after tomorrow morning. The whole thing is a closed incident. Officially I asked the board to investigate workhouse conditions. It has done so, and its verdict is in my hands.

HASN'T NAMED SUCCESSOR.

"The workhouse has been a source of much annoyance and tribulation to every administration. Naturally my administration came in for the share of odium and criticism that springs up regularly year in and year out. I am glad I had the investigation made. It was the means of disclosing conditions at the city's penal institution that should and will be corrected."

"Who is to be O'Hearn's successor?"

"I have several men of integrity and sound judgment who are good disciplinarians under consideration, but I do not know if any of them would accept the position for the salary, which is $150 a month. A man possessed of the requirements to make a satisfactory superintendent of the workhouse is not looking for $150 a month job. He is better employes and better paid."

The mayor said that possibly by tonight or tomorrow he will be able to announce the name of the new superintendent, and that in the meantime the board of pardons and paroles will exercise jurisdiction over the workhouse.

GUARDS TO BE DISCHARGED.

It is thought that most of the guards under the O'Hearn regime will be discharged.

There was talk in political circles last night that Edward Winstanly, city purchasing agent was being considered as O'Hearn's successor, but the report was not taken seriously. It was argued that the man who will be appointed must have had some experience in handling prisoners.

"Everything that belongs to the city will be returned," declared the mayor.

This means an effort will be made to recover the two calves and a black mare, claimed by the city, which testimony at the hearing showed had been sent from the workhouse during O'Hearn's administration.

O'Hearn was appointed superintendent in April, 1908. His wife is matron of the institution, but whether she will be asked to resign has not been determined.

The report of the board of pardons and paroles deals with conditions past and present at the workhouse, and contains many recommendations for improvements.

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July 23, 1909

O'HEARN'S MEMORY
PROVES TREACHEROUS.

SUPERINTENDENT CAN'T RE-
MEMBER SPECIFIC ACT.

Fails to Recall Alleged Whipping of
Negro Girl for Insulting Wife.
Investigating Treatment
of Prisoners.

That men and women prisoners have been kept in the dungeon at the workhouse for periods ranging from eleven to forty-three hours at a stretch is a part of the prison records being investigated by the board of pardons and paroles.

The investigation which Mayor Crittenden requested should be made into affairs at the workhouse was begun yesterday morning in the lower house council chamber. Superintendent Patrick O'Hearn was on the stand both morning and afternoon.

When the afternoon session opened, Frank P. Walsh, attorney for the board, who is conducting the inquiry, asked O'Hearn how many prisoners had been given sentences in the dungeon for stealing food from the dining room table.

"I don't know of any," said O'Hearn, "that was most always used as a threat. When a prisoner was sent to the dungeon it was generally for something else."

"I will read from your own records," said Mr. Walsh. "Do you remember Ed Cox, who was placed in the dungeon on September 2, 1908, for stealing bread from the table and carrying it away in his trousers leg?"

"I remember him," replied O'Hearn. "He fought the guards. I saw that myself."

Walsh -- "Do you recall Paul Tillman, Alice Stark, Sadie Shepherd, Hattie Newton, who served thirteen hours each in there, and Charles Meredith, who served an hour and a half? The records show that each was confined for stealing bread."

O'Hearn -- "I don't recall them in particular; there were so many of them put in there."

Dropping the subject for a moment, Mr. Walsh asked O'Hearn if he had ever sent prisoners out to drive city sprinkling wagons at night, if he had had his own wagons repaired at the expense of the city or if he had shod horses belonging to Mr. Cartright, former guard at Leeds, at the city's expense.

NO CHARGES FILED.

Frank M. Lowe, attorney for O'Hearn, objected. He demanded that he be given a copy of the charges against O'Hearn. He was told that there was none.

"Mr. O'Hearn is not on trial here," explained Mr. Walsh. "Things may crop out which may reflect on Kipple, head guard, some of the other guards or Mr. O'Hearn himself. There have been no specific charges filed. This board is simply making a most searching investigation with a view to bettering conditions at the workhouse. Information has been secured from prisoners, former guards and others. Even rumors are being looked into. What Mr. Lowe asks for we cannot give as we haven't it."

Mr. Lowe was told he would be furnished with copies of the evidence from day to day for his information.

"Do you keep a record of the number of days each prisoner works?" asked Mr. Walsh, resuming the inquiry.

"No," replied O'Hearn, "only the names of the guards were kept. We worked some prisoners one day and another lot the next."

O'HEARN SAYS HE IS BUSY.

Walsh -- Do you make a report to the city comptroller showing the number of days each man works?"

O'Hearn -- "No, I'm not required to. Every day excepting Sundays and holidays is credited as a working day whether the prisoner works or not.

Mr. Walsh tried to get from O'Hearn what his duties were about the institution, but they seemed so varied and even vague that he asked him to describe a typical day's work for himself.

O'Hearn -- Well, I get up early to begin with. On my way to the workhouse I may stop at the quarry for a time. Then I look after the food and general cleaning. I make trips about the yards, the stable, laundry, quarry and spend the rest of the time in my office. I may have to make trips down town after requisitions and see after men working at places on the outside. I always put in a busy day."

Walsh -- Do prisoners gamble in the cell room?

O'Hearn -- I don't think so. That is, I have never seen them.

O'Hearn explained that Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays are visiting days at the workhouse. Fifteen minutes is the time limit set on visitors but they often remain longer when overlooked, he said.

DOESN'T REMEMBER WHIPPING.

During the morning session Mr. Walsh asked of Superintendent O'Hearn: Did you ever whip a negro girl for insulting your wife?"

"I don't remember," replied O'Hearn.

Walsh -- "Did Mr. Burger make a hose for you to do the whipping with?"

O'Hearn -- "I can't remember."

Walsh -- "Well, if you ever did a thing like that you surely ought to recall it. Did you or did you not whip the negro girl as I asked?"

O'Hearn -- "I just can't remember whether I did or not."

SENT WOMAN TO DUNGEON.

Edward L. Kipple, head guard at the workhouse, was questioned about prisoners being sent to the dungeon.

Walsh -- "Ever know of prisoners being sent to the dungeon?"

Kipple -- "Y-e-s, sometimes, when they got unruly they were sent there for ten or twelve hours."

Walsh -- "Ever sent a woman there?"

Kipple -- "Believe I sent one. In all I guess I've sent four or five to the dungeon."

Walsh -- "Who has the authority to send a prisoner there?"

Kipple -- "Only Mr. O'Hearn or myself."

Walsh -- "What do you consider a sufficient length of time in the dungeon?"

Kipple -- "That depends on what they do."

Mr. Walsh then read a list of names from the workhouse record of men and women prisoners who had been kept in the dungeon eleven, thirteen, fifteen, eighteen and twenty-four hours. Three had been kept there for thirty-eight hours, one for forty-one and another for forty-three hours. While in the dungeon, which has only one small opening over the door for ventilation, prisoners are shackled with their hands to the wall, making it necessary for them to stand. The dungeon is said to be in a very unsanitary condition.

Kipple testified that he had never seen nor heard of a prisoner being struck with a club while in the dining room, that blankets were never used twice without washing and that he knew nothing of vermin in the cell rooms. He also swore that he had never known of liquor and drugs being secured by the prisoners or of gambling among prisoners.

Claude Marshaw, known as "Goldie," who served a term for peddling cocaine and was himself then addicted to the habit, said that the drug was often spirited into the workhouse. He said that Mike Green and "Red" Crawford, both now escaped, had gum opium and whisky most of the time.

"Who brought the stuff in?" asked Mr. Walsh.

"I don't know, only that they had it. Green would take up a collection every afternoon to get a bottle and he always got the whisky about 7 p. m."

Walsh -- "How about the food out there?"

Marshaw -- "Bad, very bad. In the morning they always had pan gravy in a rusty pan, coffee in a rusty cup, half a loaf of hard, moldy bread and a small piece of meat.

SAW PRISONERS ATTACKED.

Walsh -- "Ever see a prisoner assaulted in the dining room?"

Marshaw -- "Yes. I saw Dan Mahoney beat a man in the dining room and I saw Mahoney, Foley, Gent and an Italian called Mike beat up another one."

Walsh -- "Was 'Riley, the Rat' there while you were there?"

Marshaw -- "Yes, two or three days, but he never even put on prison clothes. He wore 'cits' all the time, Riley did. He and Green and others gambled, playing 'coon-can' and 'craps.'"

Jesse Cooper, a negress who has had short sojourns at the workhouse, said there was vermin in the negro women's quarter, that blankets were not often washed and that the bread was hard and moldy. She also said she that two negro women had each spent two days and nights in the dungeon while she was there.

John Mulloy, a parole prisoner, told of an assault which he had witnessed on a negro boy in the dining room. It started, he said, because the boy did not step fast enough for Dan Mahoney who jabbed him with a club. The boy grabbed at the stick and was beaten over the head until he bled. Mulloy also condemned the meals.

The hearing will be resumed at 9 o'clock this morning. There are many witnesses to bet examined. By the ordinance, passed Wednesday noon, the board of pardons and paroles now has charge of the workhouse.

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July 20, 1909

MORE POWER TO THE BOARD.

Mayor Would Vest in It Complete
Control of the Workhouse.

Accompanied by a special message, Mayor Crittenden last night had an ordinance sent to the upper house of the council to enlarge the powers of the board of pardons and paroles so as to give it almost complete control of the workhouse, and full control so far as rules of government and their enforcement go. In his message the mayor says "the honesty or efficiency of the superintendent of the workhouse has never been questioned by me, but should an investigation made by the pardon board under their power, as enlarged by this proposed ordinance, prove that he has been faithless, then he, as well as any of his subordinates who are shown to be unworthy, can no longer continue in the city employ."

The ordinance was passed by the upper house unanimously, but referred to the workhouse committee by the lower house, the Republicans voting against the reference. It would permit the pardons board to make all the rules for the management of the workhouse, enforce their observance, try the superintendent or any other workhouse officer for cause. The ordinance would also allow the board to find officials or officers guilty of the evidence should warrant, recommend the dismissal of the offender, which recommendation the mayor is to be bound to act upon.

The ordinance grows out of the recent police developments.

WORKHOUSE HEARING THURSDAY.

President William Volker of the board of pardons and paroles announced yesterday that the investigation which that board is to conduct into affairs at the workhouse will begin at 9 o'clock

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