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January 24, 1910

DEAD MAN'S HOARD
HIS LAST PILLOW.

FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS
IN SECURITIES IN CASHBOX
UNDER HIS HEAD.

Body of Oscar Schoen, Aged
70, Found Amid His
Savings.

With his head pillowed on a cash box containing $15,000 worth of negotiable securities, mostly government bonds and money orders, Oscar Schoen, a retired shoemaker, 70 years old, was found dead in bed in a squalid room at Missouri avenue and Main streets yesterday morning.

The old man's hand clutched a half emptied phial of morphine tablets while at his side lay a loaded 38-caliber revolver. One of the cartridges had been snapped but had failed to ignite.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky, who was summoned, stated that death was due to morphine poisoning, whether taken as an overdose or with suicidal intent he was unable to state. He ordered the body taken to Freeman & Marshall's undertaking establishment.

MONEY ALSO IN ROOM.

Although Schoen had occupied the same room in which he was found for over two years, little or nothing was known about him by the owner of the rooming house. He was last seen alive on Thursday morning by Guy Holmes, the janitor of the premises. He told Holmes that he was feeling sick and that if it were not for the expense he would visit a doctor. He used to retire regularly at 6 o'clock every evening and rise at 8 in the morning, when he would go out and buy the daily papers, return and stay in his room. Rarely he made trips up to town.

Police headquarters was notified of the old man's death and Patrolman John P. McCauley, who was sent to investigate, made a further search of the room. Concealed behind an old stove in which Schoen had done his cooking was found $60 in bills and silver, and in an old carpetbag apparently discarded and thrown under the bed, the officer located several abstracts and deeds to Kansas City property in the vicinity of Thirty-first and Troost avenue, which are supposedly of considerable value.

WILL IN POCKETBOOK.

Schoen's last will and testament was also found in an old pocketbook. By its provisions all his property is bequeathed to relatives by the name of Goetz living in Kempsvile, Ill. Charles A. Schoen, a brother at Darlington, Ind., was named as executor. The police have telegraphed to all parties concerned.

One of the witnesses of the will was the manager of a local real estate firm, through whom Schoen had conducted his business. He stated that he know that the old man owned a great deal of property. Schoen at one time conducted a cobbler's shop at 2442 Broadway, but left there about four years ago, giving his reason for selling out and moving the fact that robberies were too common in that part of town.

Naturalization papers dated 1872 and taken out at Darlington, Ind., were found among Schoen's effects, together with several applications to different German provident associations.

Schoen had lived in Kansas City about twenty-two years. He has a sister, Mrs. Bertha H. Goetz, at Kempsville, Ill., and a niece, Mrs. Agnes Yak Shan, residing in Alaska.

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January 21, 1910

NO LOVE NOTES IN
THIS GIRL'S SUIT.

Cigar Stand Manager, Young
and Pretty, Sues Rich
Saloon Keeper.

Miss Mabel Reeder, young and pretty, manager of the cigar stand in the lobby of the Savoy hotel, yesterday filed a suit in the circuit court against John E. Johnston, a saloon keeper at 810 Main street, demanding damages in the sum of $25,000 for alleged breach of promise of marriage. Johnston is said to be well-to-do.

It was on December 1, 1905, Miss Reeder asserts in her complaint, that Johnston promised to marry her. Since then, she alleges, he has discontinued his attentions and has informed her that he does not intend to marry her.

According to the complaint, the engagement of Miss Reeder and Johnston became publicly known and, it is set forth, Johnston's failure to perform his part of the agreement embarrassed, humiliated and wounded her "in feelings, affections, womanly pride and sensibility," and, it is added, her "prospects for life and eligible marriage are blasted."

"This isn't one of those love letter cases," said Miss Reeder last night in her rooms at the Tomlinson apartments, Eleventh and Broadway, "because I haven't any love letters to present. I would just love to give you a story, but I can't for several reasons. One is that my lawyer, Frank P. Walsh, tells me not to talk.

KNEW HIM IN WICHITA.

"You see, Mr. Johnston and I are from the same town, Wichita, Kas. We have known each other a long time and it was there that we became engaged. He was the proprietor of a hotel and I was working at the cigar stand in the hotel. We both came to Kansas City a couple of years ago and Mr. Johnston started a saloon here.

"I am unable to tell you why Mr. Johnston broke off his engagement with me. I don't know whether there is another girl in the case. He has known that I contemplated bringing this suit, because he was notified. Really, now, there isn't anything sensational about this case, and I want to escape all the notoriety I can."

Johnston refused last night to discuss the action brought against him by Miss Reeder.

"Let Miss Reeder do the talking now," he said, "and I will have my say later."

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January 13, 1910

SOLDIER DICK AND
GIRL ARE PARTED.

"WAIT 'TIL I'M 21" HE SAYS,
"I'LL BE TRUE," GIVES
CHESSIE.

"Mooning" Around Third
and Main When Arrested
by Policeman.
Parted Sweethearts Chessie Nave and Richard Wiliford.
CHESSIE NAVE AND RICHARD WILIFORD.

Chessie Nave is 16, and Richard Wiliford is 20, but they each felt a great deal older and more responsible than when they arrived in Kansas City yesterday morning on an early train, with a wish and a determination to get married. they didn't feel so old nor so responsible last night. This is the way of it:

Last Tuesday the young people ran away together from Lexington, Mo., where the young man is a student in Wentworth Military academy. The girl is just a girl. they were accompanied on their matrimonial excursion by two friends, Grace Nave, a cousin of Miss Chessie, and Calvin Cook of Bartlesville, also a student in the military academy. The plan of the eloping kittens was to get a marriage license in Kansas City, Kas., where officials dealing in Cupid's paper are generally supposed to be gentle and kind. They missed the direction and went "mooning around the vicinity of Third and Main streets at an early hour yesterday morning. There a policeman found them.

The police had been notified that the young people were headed toward Kansas City with some kind of a prank in veiw, and the policeman saw them and happened to remember. He nailed them.
HIS FATHER ARRIVES.

Joel Wiliford, Woodford, Ok., father of Richard, had also been notified of his son's unceremonious leave in company with a little girl in skirts. The old gentleman hopped a train and got to Kansas City about as soon as the elopers. He dropped into central police station about the time that Richard and Chessie, Grace and Calvin were making a botch of trying to argue the police into the belief that while the resemblance was probably great, it was not absolute.

Papa Wiliford tried moral persuasion on his son. Nothing doing. Son was obdurate. What's the use of trying to make a soldier of a fellow, anyway, if you expect him to give up his girl at a mere parental command Richard said a soldier should never surrender. And he further declared he wouldn't. So into the dungeon cell went he, like any real, spicy, belted and buckled Don Juan of old. His good friend Calvin went along with him, but not from choice.

As for the girls, they saw life as it is from the matron's room Thus stood the matter all day. Richard would not desert the principles of academic soldiering, and Chessie vowed she would be as true as "Beautiful Bessie, the Banana Girl, or, "He Kissed Me Once and I Can't Forget." Then came Nash Ruby, brother-in-law of Chessie. He came From Lexington. He looked real fierce.

HERDED BEFORE CAPTAIN.

Forth from the dungeon cell marched Soldier Richard, and friend Calvin. Down from the matron's melancholy boudoir minced Chessie and Grace. They were herded into the office of Captain Walter Whitsett, where more moral suasion was rubbed on.

Richard, during the afternoon, had agreed with his father upon a compromise, bu which he was to return to school and finish his education. Later he took it all back. And w hen he saw Chessie he said:

"I'm going to marry you, Chessie, even if I never become a great general."

"That's where you're wrong," mildly said Papa Wiliford.

Then Chessie put in her word. But it didn't move anybody at all. Unless it was Nash Ruby, Brother-in-Law Nash. "You'll come along home with me, miss," said he. Chessie subsided. But when it came to parting, Richard uttered his defiance. "I'll be 21 before long," said he, "and then we can marry."

"I'll be true to you," sobbed Chessie.

Brother-in-law Nash led her away to catch a train for Lexington. this morning Richard will go to Woodford, Ok., with pa. Friend Calvin went home last night. That's all, except it is said Chessie made a face at her future father-in-law.

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December 8, 1910

SKYSCRAPER FOR
"PETTICOAT LANE."

Northeast Corner of Main
and Eleventh Leased
for 198 Years.

By the leasing of the northeast corner of Main and Eleventh streets for 198 years, plans were made yesterday of a skyscraper, twelve stories of concrete and steel, to be built on the expiration of the old lease, February 1, 1911. The consideration was $18,000 a year, a total of $5,544,000 for the entire lease.

Hoyt-Ballentine-Kelley Investment Company acted as agent. John O. Patterson of is the lessee from the May-Stern Realty Company.

The rental of the ground, although of considerable size, is in reality less, per annum, than the rentals accruing from the out-of-date improvements now on the land. The property was purchased five years ago by the May-Stern Realty Company for $325,000, and just recently the firm refused an offer of $500,000 for it. The lot faces Main street with a frontage of forty-eight feet and runs back on Eleventh street for 115 feet.

"The new building will be equal in construction to any in the city," said Mr. Patterson. "The first four or five stories will be used for retail purposes and the upper eight stories will be entirely for commercial and office use. The building will be arranged that every office room in it will be exposed to light, and air." Mr. Patterson's offices are at present diagonally across the street from this corner.

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January 4, 1910

BURGLARS LEAVE A NOTE.

Thank Proprietor of Store For Not
Disturbing Them.

The burglars who visited the grocery store of W. B. Mumford at 2901 Main street, Sunday night, left a note addressed to the proprietor, pinned to his rifled cash drawer. It was written on a piece of wrapping paper and read:

"Dear sir, thank you very much for not disturbing us as we robbed your store, yours truly, M. E."

"M. E." and his friend got away with $3 in small change and about $16 worth of cigars.

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December 24, 1909

TEXAN SUSPSECTED OF
KANSAS CITY MURDER.

M'CLINTOCK DUNLAP'S SLAYER
MIGHT BE DALHART MAN.

Clyde Charles Confesses He Killed
Kansan Near Larned -- Says He
Was With Restaurant Em-
ploy Here Oct. 18.

LARNED, KAS., Dec. 23. -- Clyde Charles, confessed murderer of George B. Neptune of Larned, now is suspected of the murder of Mark Dunlap, a Dalhart man, at Kansas City, October 18. Alfus H. Moffet, of the Moffet National bank, and Jake Garmater, both of Larned, are in Dalhart making examination and recovering stolen property that belonged to Neptune.

Neptune was killed at his farm home near Larned September 18, soon after Charles shipped a number of his horses and other property to Dalhart. He then went to Kansas City, where he spent several days.

Charles and Dunlap met in Kansas City. They had known each other before. Dunlap had been working in a restaurant in Dalhart. He was well liked. His life was insured for $1,000. Charles, two other men and Du nlap were known to have been together in Kansas City a few nights before Dunlap was killed.

CAME WITH CATTLE.

Dunlap went to Kansas City with a car of cattle. He had $100. Charles, who acknowledged that he was with Dunlap at the time of the killing, claimed that four men had rushed out of an alley and one had struck Dunlap. He says the men made no attempt to rob. He also claims that Dunlap did not have any money.

Charles told the same story at Dalhart, although the restaurant keeper where Dunlap had worked claimed that Dunlap had more than $120 when he started. Charles's sister, however, corroborated Charles in the statement that Dunlap had no money when he was in the city. How she knew is not known.

It is thought t hat there was a plan to get the life insurance money by some means. But this theory is now disregarded as it is the belief that the man was murdered for the small sum of money he had.

At Larned the officials today are "sweating Charles. Charles confessed to the Neptune killing, but has as yet refused to divulge anything more.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle thinks that Clyde Charles, sentenced to a life term in the Kansas penitentiary for the murder of George B. Neptune at Larned, Kas., is the man who killed Mark Dunlap in Kansas City on October 18.

Dunlap met his death in a fist fight at Sixth and Main streets. Many passersby saw the killing. The police were able to obtain a very accurate description of the man who struck the blow, and officers who worked on the case says that it coincides with the description of Charles, which has been given out by the Kansas authorities.

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December 7, 1909

BOILER KILLS FOUR,
RIPS BUILDING OPEN.

DRIVER THROWN FROM PASS-
ING WAGON, DIES.

Explosion Occurs While Steamfitters
Are at Work -- Other Men In-
jured -- Pickets Blown Off
Fence Across Alley.
Results of a Boiler Explosion at 908-10 Broadway.
EXPLOSION WHICH COST FOUR LIVES.

By the explosion of a boiler in the basement of the six-story building at 908-10 Broadway at 11 o'clock yesterday morning, Michael Frawley and James Cox were killed outright, and Andrew Meyer and Essie Williams, a negro porter, so badly burned and otherwise injured that they died before nightfall. Two others were badly hurt, and three stories of the rear portion of the building were wrecked. Considerable damage also was done to adjoining structures.

Within two minutes business men and pedestrians in the neighborhood ventured to enter the front door of the building bent on rescuing those who were hurt. The flooring on the first and second stories had been splintered and a heavy partition in the middle of the building had toppled over. Every window glass on two stories had been blown out. Heavy timbers, torn from their places, hung over overhead, and for a time a general collapse of the rear section of the interior of the structure was feared.

The cause for the explosion is not known. Steamfitters employed by Val Wagner & Co., 3918 Main street, were adjusting a steamcock on the boiler, and were preparing to clean out the pipes. They had started to work last Saturday and yesterday morning they put fire under the boiler in order to do the cleaning. There was no forewarning of anything being wrong with the apparatus, and when the explosion occurred Michael Frawley, one of the steamfitters, was on top of the boiler. The boiler had not been in use for some time, and it is supposed that this is accountable for the very bad condition it was in when the workmen began the repairing.

ONE DRIVER IS KILLED.

James Cox, a driver for the Stewart Peck Sand Company, happened to be driving through the alley and had just reached the building when the explosion occurred. He was thrown bodily from the wagon and dashed to death against the brick pavement. C. R. Misner, another driver in the employ of the same firm, sat beside Cox. He too was hurled from the seat, but escaped with a fractured shoulder. Essie Williams, a negro porter, was in the boiler room at the time of the accident, and he was scalded from head to foot by the escaping steam. H e was hurried to the General hospital and died at 3:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Andrew Meyer and W. H. Straubmeyer, plumbers, were at work on the boiler. Both seemed at first to have received minor injuries but Meyer was suffering from shock so he was sent to St. Mary's hospital. He did not rally, and it later developed that he was internally injured. He died at the hospital at 5:40 o'clock.

WHO THE DEAD MEN ARE.

Michael Frawley, 2040 Madison avenue, was unmarried, an orphan, and 28 years old. He has lived in this city all his life. Two brothers, John and Emmett and two sisters, Mary and Kate Frawley, survive. His body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

Meyer, Forty-third and Hudson streets in Rosedale, was well known in Atchison, Kas., where he had worked as a steamfitter off and on for many years. He came to Kansas City recently and went to live with a brother at the Hudson street address in Rosedale. He was 45 years old and unmarried. His body was also taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

If James Cox, 1416 Central street, has relatives living they were not found last night, and it is almost certain they do not live in this city. He was about 35 years old. It is said he was single, but there is another rumor that he has a wife and child somewhere.

Edward Booker, business manager of the local steamfitters' union, said last night that none of the men killed or injured bore union cards. Frawley, he said, was merely a steamfitter's helper. He had once applied for a card in the union, but did not keep up with the requirements, and his membership was finally cancelled.

Essie Williams, 505 East Sixth street, the negro porter, was also a fireman. The whereabouts of his survivors have not yet been ascertained. His body was taken to the Countee undertaking rooms.

The wrecked building is the property of the Homestead Realty Company and is in the charge of David Bachrach, who as the agent, had the renting of the rooms. The block had been unoccupied recently, but the H. K. Mulford Company of Philadelphia was preparing to move its stock in on the third floor.

"It was a terrific shock which seemed to shake the foundation of our building from under us," said C. M. Lyon, president of the Lyon Millinery Company, which occupies the building adjoining on the south. "Several plate glasses crashed and I ran to the front door and out on the street fearing that possibly a second explosion might occur. the damage we suffered was comparatively small, but the fright we were given was large."

The picket fence surrounding the home of Mrs. Thomas E. Moran, 916 Bank street, just across the alley from the wrecked building, was partly demolished by the concussion and many pickets were torn from the fence and blown several feet away.

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November 23, 1909

TERMINAL DIRECTORS
ACCEPT DEPOT PLAN.

KANSAS CITY'S UNION STATION
TO COST $5,750,000.

Great Structure Will Have Every
Facility for Handling Trains
and Travelers -- Dirt to Fly
in a Few Months.
New Union Passenger Station Faces on Twenty-Third Street and Has a Frontage of 512 Feet.
SOUTH ELEVATION OF NEW UNION PASSENGER STATION.

Five million, seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars will be the cost of Kansas City's new Union passenger station.

The plans prepared by Jarvis Hunt, a Chicago architect, were accepted yesterday by the board of directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. As soon as the stockholders of the several railroads that are to use the depot ratify the action of their representatives, work will begin on the structure. This consent is expected to be immediate. In a few months dirt will be flying and construction under way.

GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURE.

The main entrance to the station will face south. It's exact location will be twenty-five feet south of Twenty-third street, and 100 feet west of Main.

The frontage of the main building is to be 512 feet. The train sheds are to be 1,400 feet long, and are to be constructed so that trains east and west can run through.

The exterior will be of stone, concrete and steel. The roof will be rounding or barrel shape. The general lobby is to be 350 feet long and 160 feet wide, and the decorations and accommodations will be rich and elaborate.

Especial care has been taken in lighting and ventilation; the ceiling will be arched, and will be 115 feet high. The interior walls will be of marble, and massive columns will grace each side of the passageway into other parts of the building.

The center of the lobby will be the ticket office. Adjacent will be the baggage room, where passengers can check their baggage and not be annoyed with it again until they reach their destination.

ON THREE LEVELS.

In a space of 75x300 feet off the lobby will be the restaurants, lunch rooms, waiting rooms, men's smoking rooms, and other utilities. Telegraph and telephone stations, a subpostal station and other accessories will also find places within this space.

On the upper floors will be located the offices of several railroads using the depot together with rooms for railway employes.

Space has been set apart for dining and lounging, reading, and billiard rooms.

From the center of the lobby and above the track will extend the main waiting room, on either side of which there will be midways or passages leading to the elevators to carry passengers to the trains. Smoke and gases from the locomotives will be s hut out from the station by a steel and glass umbrella shed.

There will be three levels to the depot. These are to be known as the passenger level, the station proper; the train service level, from where passengers take the trains, and which is connected with the midways by eight big elevators on either side, and also, stairways; and the level on which are the baggage rooms, express and postal service.

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November 19, 1909

PICTURE MACHINE LETS GO.

Only Four in the Audience When
Explosion Took Place.

Frank Tierney, of 320 West Thirteenth street, was burned about the face and hands in an attempt to extinguish a fire that started from the explosion of a moving picture machine at the cozy theater, 1300 Main street, yesterday afternoon. There were four persons in the audience at the time.

Tierney was attended by Dr. Hamilton and sent to his home. The damage to the theater was slight.

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November 18, 1909

PROPOSE $14,000 HOME FOR
THE CRITTENTON MISSION.

Fireproof Building at Thirtieth and
Woodland Will Be Ready by Next
Summer.

Captain J. H. Waite, at the head of the Florence Crittenton mission and home, located in an old dwelling at 3005 Woodland avenue, made the statement last night that by next summer the institution hopes to be in a new fireproof building. It is to be erected, he said, on the corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue, where they own 156 feet fronting on the latter street.

"The foundation should be laid within the next ninety days," said Captain Waite, "so that work on the super-structure may begin in the spring. We have planned a building to cost between $10,000 and $14,000. As we want to make it absolutely fireproof and of reinforced concrete, we anticipate that the cost will be nearer $14,000. It is a grand institution and has done and is doing the noblest kind of work."

The Florence Crittenton Mission and Home for unfortunate girls was started in this city on February 4, 1896, with an endowment of $3,000 from Charles N. Crittenton, the millionaire philanthropist of New York, who died suddenly in San Francisco Tuesday. It first was situated on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main streets in a large three-story brick building which now has been torn down to make space for a city market.

After being at the original location for a short time it was decided to abandon the downtown mission work and establish a home. The institution then moved to Fifteenth street and Cleveland avenue into rented property. In June, ten years ago, the property at the southeast corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue was purchased for the home.

"A debt hangs over our heads for some time," said Miss Bertha Whitsitt, superintendent of the home yesterday, "but now we have 156 feet frontage on Woodland avenue on which we expect soon to erect our new building.

"Since the beginning of the mission and home," continued Miss Whitsitt, "we have cared for 582 young women, the majority of them with children. Just during the last year we cared for twenty-eight young women and twenty-three children. When totaled the number of days spent in the home by all of them amounts to 4,612, which we record as so many days of charity work."

Captain J. H. Waite, who has been at the head of the home for many years, said that Mr. Crittenton had given the home and mission $3,000 to start on. When the property at 3005 Woodland was purchased the National Florence Crittenton Home at Washington gave about $1,500 toward buying and improving the property.

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November 15, 1909

CRIES OF MURDER FROM
A HACK THAT VANISHED.

Patrolman's Shots Fail to Stop Car-
riage on Main Street - Near Po-
lice Headquarters.

Cries of murder and help, from an owl hack, and a chase by the police, with shots fired at the jehu of the four-wheeler, caused considerable excitement ont he streets of the downtown district early yesterday morning, and has given the police a mystery outrivaling that famous old query as to "Who hit Billy Patterson?"

The trouble started about 3 o'clock when police headquarters was disturbed by cries apparently of a woman for help. The shrieks were punctuated by a bass voice yelling murder. A half dozen police and other attaches dashed from the station to the street and as they reached the sidewalk a cab driven at breakneck speed went south on Main street.

Patrolman Kartman opened fire when no attention was paid to the command to halt, but the officers were soon outdistanced by the carriage. A general alarm was sent out to various stations to watch for the driver, his vehicle and its occupants, but no trace has been found.

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November 14, 1909

ARCHBISHOP GLENNON LAYS
ST. TERESA CORNER STONE.

St. Louis Prelate Puts in Two Busy
Days in Kansas City -- Enjoyed
Every Moment.

Several hundred Knights of Columbus were present at the reception given in honor of Archbishop Glennon at their new hall at Thirty-first and Main streets Friday. After renewing many old friendships the archbishop left for St. Louis at 11 o'clock that night.

"It has been a busy two days," he said last night, "but I have enjoyed every moment of my visit. I only wish that I could remain longer. I thank the Lord for the good that He has enabled me to do in Kansas City."

As the result of the prelate's appeal to the public to aid the work that is being carried on by the House of the Good Shepherd, in his lecture at Convention hall last Thursday night, over $5,000 has been collected, and more has been pledged.

Yesterday morning Archbishop Glennon went to the old St. Teresa's academy at Twelfth and Washington streets and celebrated mass. After visiting Loretto academy he returned to St. Teresa's, where a musicale was given in his honor. In the afternoon he laid the corner stone of the new St. Teresa's academy building at Fifth street and Broadway. It rained hard throughout the whole service but over 300 people stood bare headed in the mud while the archbishop put the stone in place and blessed the building.

In the evening Archbishop Glennon was the guest of honor at a dinner given at the home of Hugh Mathews, 1014 West Thirty-ninth street, and attended by Bishop Hogan, Bishop Lillis, Brother Charles and Father Walsh. The party then attended the Knights of Columbus reception.

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November 13, 1909

NOT CARL ORIN'S GHOST.

Des Moines Man Believed Killed in
Wreck, Is in Kansas City.

"Hello, Harry, is that you? This is Carl -- Carl Orin. Can't you understand -- C -A-R-L, O-R-I-N of Des Moines, Ia. Don't you know we came here together several years ago?"

"Not much you are not Carl Orin. He was killed in a wreck out in Wyoming nearly a year ago. Everybody knows that he's dead."

The foregoing telephone conversation took place about 6 o'clock last night between Harry Ensminger, foreman at the Gump truck factory, Ninth and Main streets, and Carl Orin, who just had arrived here from Oklahoma City.

"If you don't believe I am Carl Orin," said the first speaker, "I will just show you, so long as you are in Missouri. I am coming right over to see you."

"If you do you are Orin's ghost," insisted Ensminger, "for I tell you I know that he is dead. I know his mother is mourning him as dead."

"Quit your kidding," came back from the man at the telephone. "You must be trying to hand me something."

A few minutes later when Carl Orin, alive and well and unmistakably genuine, walked into the presence of Ensminger the latter was astounded. Orin was at once informed that his mother was at 211 Maple street, Des Moines, was at that very moment wearing black, believing him to be the victim of a disastrous railroad wreck which occurred out in Wyoming about ten months ago. One of the badly mangled victims of the wreck, from something on his person, was identified as Carl Orin of Des Moines and his people notified. Since that time, the live man was told his mother had spent a considerable sum of money sending representatives out into Wyoming to get the story of the wreck, and, if possible, make some kind of settlement with the railroad company.

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November 6, 1909

ASKS $300 FOR SIX DRINKS.

Mrs. Carson Says Saloonkeeper Sold
Her Son That Number.

Suit for $300 damages, brought by Mrs. I. M. Carson against the Kansas City Breweries Company and James Meany, a saloonkeeper at Sixth and Main streets, was begun yesterday afternoon in Judge John G. Park's division of the circuit court.

Mrs. Carson alleges that her son, Claude, 18 years of age, was sold six glasses of beer at Meaney's saloon, one year ago. The Missouri statute allows the parents of a minor who is sold drinks in a saloon to recover $50 for each drink.

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November 5, 1909

CITY'S UNEMPLOYED
TO HAVE NEW HOME.

HELPING HAND INSTITUTE AC-
QUIRES ADKINS HOTEL.

With Aid of Four Story Building
1,000 Men Can Be Cared For --
Plenty of Light, Baths --
Has Disinfecting Room.
New Helping Hand Institute Building.
NEW QUARTERS AT FOURTH AND WYANDOTTE STREETS.

With the acquisition of the old Adkins hotel at the southeast corner of Fourth and Wyandotte streets, the Helping Hand Institute has solved the problem of taking care of the city's unemployed. Carpenters are now at work overhauling the four-story structure and by the beginning of cold weather it is believed that the building will be ready for occupancy.

With the old building at 408 Main street, where the main offices are located, the Helping Hand institute will be prepared to take care of more than 600 men without the least crowding. In extremely cold weather little difficulty will be experienced in caring for 1,000 men.

Current Helping Hand Location.
PRESENT HOME OF THE INSTITUTE.

But the new building will have many features not possessed by the old quarters on Main street. Plenty of light, the best of ventilation, high ceilings, a laundry, shower baths and disinfecting room will make it very little inferior to the municipal lodging house in New York city. On the north side of the building are forty-one windows which makes the light and ventilation problem easy.
INSTALLING SHOWER BATHS.

But the main feature is the shower baths and disinfecting room. On the lower floor the plumbers are at work installing baths that will accommodate twenty-five men at one time. No one will be allowed to go to bed without first taking a bath and allowing his clothes to be placed in the disinfecting room, where they will remain over night. The laundry in the basement will keep the linen clean and eventually save the institution hundreds of dollars. Particular care will be exercised in guarding against tuberculosis. Before the year is over it is hoped that a physician will examine every man who applies for a bed.

Without doubt Kansas City will have as good a system for taking care of her unemployed as any municipality in the country. It is true that many of the large cities in the East, particularly New York and Philadelphia, have larger municipal lodging houses but they suffer disadvantages. In most cities bread lines are formed and the man without employment does not feel obliged to work for a night's lodging. In Kansas City, however, the city and county have made the Helping Hand an official charity institution.

WORK IS PROVIDED.

Men are not allowed to sleep in saloons or in other public places where the conditions are not sanitary. There is no other avenue for the unemployed man but to go to the Helping Hand institute, where he is given a chance to work for his meals and lodging. The mere fact that he must work keeps the professional "moocher" from making his headquarters in Kansas City.

The credit for the acquisition of the Adkins building belongs mainly to William Volker, one of the directors of the institute. Mr. Volker clearly recognized the need of more room for the institute, and believing that the employment system is the best, he used his influence in getting the building. E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the Helping Hand, is directing the work.

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October 27, 1909

TURNING OVER THE LEAVES.

Metropolitan Train Crews Attach
Sacks to the Car Fenders.
Keeping Leaves Off The Tracks.
BATTLING WITH AUTUMN LEAVES.

"I have seen brooms, brushes and even scoops attached to fenders of street cars at different times in various cities of this country but it remained for Kansas City to give me the jar of my life this morning," said P.O. Vandeventer, an insurance adjuster, who is stopping at the Hotel Baltimore.

"I have a habit of taking a walk after breakfast and when I got down on Main street, I was surprised to see portions of what had apparently been old cement bags and other pieces of duck died to the fenders and dragging along the tracks. After the second car passed I determined that the rags had been placed there by orders of company officials and asked a few questions.

"A motorman suggested that I ride along with him and I would see the object. Half a mile from the business district and and along the streets which have made Kansas City famous because of the beauty of their foliage, the streets were covered with leaves. These leaves, so the conductor told me, fell so rapidly that they could not be cleaned off fast enough by the white wings and when a street car passed over them on the grades that it was just like applying oil to the wheels and track.

"The rags, I was told, provided the most effective plan for ridding the tracks of the leaves."

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October 21, 1909

FOR CITY'S TRIBUTE TO SWOPE.

Relatives in Letter to Mayor Thank
Kansas City People.

In a communication addressed to Mayor Crittenden, Mrs. L. O. Swope, sister-in-law of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, yesterday formally thanked the citizens of Kansas City for the public funeral tendered him. Mrs. Swope's letter follows:

"I wish to express to you, and to all of the city officials, on behalf of the Swope family, our high appreciation of the most beautiful tribute of honor and affection shown our dead. We feel that not a stone was left unturned to show him honor and gratitude.

"The services at the church were all that could have been. All the singing was sweet, but the solo, "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," was almost a voice from heaven. Once more thanking you for your great kindness, I remain, very sincerely, MRS. L. O. SWOPE. October 15, 1909."

It is said that the last legal transaction performed by Colonel Swope was the signing of a deed to a piece of property to the city on the north side of Fourth street, between Walnut and Main. It is a part of the square bounded by Walnut, Main, Third and Fourth, to be used for market purposes. There is a three-story brick building on the land, and this will be razed together with the four remaining buildings which the city will soon get posession of. there has been a delay in the formal transfer on account of the city having to deal with heirs.

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October 19, 1909

SLUGGER WALKS AWAY
AS CATTLE MAN DIES.

ONE BLOW KILLS MARK DUN-
LAP OF DALHART, TEX.

Only Identification Is Three-Car
Shipment Receipt Signed by
Commission Company -- No
Arrest is Made.

The identity of the mysterious slugger who struck a man supposed to be Mark Dunlap, a Dalhart, Tex., stockman, who came here from Maple Hill, Kas., at Sixth and Main streets, killing him instantly about 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon, is still a mystery. Though the incident was witnessed by a half dozen persons and a good description was furnished the police department, not a single arrest was made yesterday afternoon.

It is believed that the man escaped on one of the late trains last night.

The man who is supposed to have been Dunlap, from a receipt of a three-car cattle shipment in his pockets, signed by the Fowler-Todd Commission Company, first was noticed near Sixth and Delaware streets. Two men were talking with him at the time and as the three walked east, their conversation drifted into an argument. On the corner, the largest of the two men, who was dressed in gray trousers, dark coat and black slouch hat, reached in his trousers pocket and struck Dunlap a terrific blow.

SLUGGER WALKS AWAY.

He then turned away slowly with his companion, while the victim staggered and fell to the sidewalk.

A half dozen men lifted the injured man from the sidewalk and found that he was bleeding from the contact with the sidewalk or from a pair of "knuckles." The police are inclined to think it was the latter. None of the spectators paid any attention to the slugger and his companion who were soon lost in the crowd at Fifth street.

The ambulance arrived fifteen minutes later with Dr. George Ringle in charge. He pronounced the man dead and notified Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, county coroner, who directed the body be sent to a local undertaker's establishment.

BODY LEFT ON WALK.

The ambulance left before the arrival of the undertaker and the body was left on the sidewalk surrounded by a morbid crowd. It took several policemen to restrain the curious ones from trampling on the body.

The police rounded up the witnesses of the killing and attempted to get information on the whereabouts of the slugger. Van Stillwell, 23 West Missouri avenue; Clarence Brume, 1706 Bristol avenue; Alfred Freeman, 907 Forest avenue; William Single, 544 1/2 Main street; W. G. Smith, 511 1/2 Campbell street; Fred Murray, 517 Delaware street; Peter Stalzer, Sixth and Main streets, were all sent out with different detectives to help in the search.

Dunlap was about 50 years old. When searched by the coroner it was found that he had no money in his pockets.

WAS A COOK.

ALMA, KAS., Oct. 18. -- Mark Dunlap came from Dalhart, Tex., Saturday with cattle for W. J. Todd. He had been a cook at Dalhart and was not known at Maple Hill.

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October 18, 1909

FAMOUS SONS UNITE
CHILDHOOD CHUMS.

BOY SINGERS' MOTHERS LEARN
THEY ARE OLD FRIENDS.

Strange Coincidence Revealed at
Convention Hall Banquet Table.
Three Youths Earn Fame
With Remarkable Voices.
Frank Vrooman and Lawrence P. Smith, Boy Singers

Those persons who have followed closely the remarkable careers of Maxwell Kennedy, Frank Vrooman and Laurence Smith, boy singers, are pointing to a remarkable coincidence in the life history of the three boys.

Although reared in widely separated sections of the country, these boys have attained almost international reputations because of the remarkable qualities of their voices. Two of these singers, Laurence Powars Smith and Frank Ellsworth Vrooman, met for the first time at Convention hall in Kansas City, Mo., where they appeared on the programme and held spellbound the great assembly which had gathered to honor the postal clerks of the country.

MEET AT BANQUET.

Sitting opposite each other at the banquet table and sharing equally the congratulations of hundreds of persons who had been thrilled by the remarkable carrying power of their young voices were the boy singers and their parents. For a long time Mrs. Clarence J. Voorman, the mother of Frankie, gazed at the smiling countenance of Mrs. C. G. Smith, the mother of Laurence, seeing there something that carried her back in memory to her girlhood days in Junction City, Kas., when her dearest friend and playmate had been Laura Patterson, a girl her own age.

"I am sure you must be my old schoolmate, Laura Patterson," said Mrs. Vrooman, reaching her hand across the table. "Don't you remember me? Lottie Wood."

The two friends who had not met for thirty years quickly reverted to by-gone days and spoke with wonder of the coincidence that the mothers of the two greatest boy singers should have been playmates in their childhood days. The wonder of Mrs. Vrooman was increased, however, when Mrs. Smith spoke of little Frankie Kennedy, who "turned ropes," "spun tops" and did many other wonderful things for their edification while attending the public school in Junction City. Mrs. Vrooman then learned for the first time that this same little Frank Kennedy is the father of Maxwell Kennedy, the wonderful boy singer.

VOICES GAIN FAME.

Laurence Powars Smith is now 17 years old and was born in Ottawa, Kas. His former rich soprano voice combines a wonderful interpretation with great carrying power and has now developed into a tenor of the highest quality. He is the son of C. G. Smith, president of the People's National bank, Kansas City, Kas. His services are much in demand throughout the country, especially at Chautauquas. He is now engaged as soloist at the Linwood Boulevard Presbyterian church, Kansas City, Mo.

Frankie Vrooman is 13 years old. He is a son of Clarance J. Vrooman, 3114 Washington street, Kansas City, Mo. Frankie is a slight, manly little chap, unaffected; and a typical American school boy. His voice is a rich soprano, and every word is enunciated perfectly, so that the carrying power is remarkable. he has been singing in public three years and has met with much success. On June 13 he sung in the Westminster Presbyterian church of Minneapolis. He is a protege of Walton Holmes, and a brilliant future is predicted. At present he is soloist at St. Paul's Episcopal church, Fortieth and Main streets, Kansas City, Mo.

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October 16, 1909

ENGINE STRIKES WAGON,
FATALLY INJURING MAN.

Harlem Farmer Meets With Acci-
dent at Missouri Pacific Crossing.
Family Narrowly Escapes.

Despite the warning of the flagman at First and Main streets last night, A. D. Buyas, a farmer living a mile northeast of Harlem, drove across the Missouri Pacific tracks at that point and was struck by an eastbound passenger train which was coming at a high rate of speed.

Buyas, who was accompanied by Hobert, his 11-year-old son, was struck on his head on one of the rails when he was thrown from the wagon and received fatal injuries. The boy, aside from slight bruises, was not seriously injured.

Buyas came to the city yesterday morning with Mrs. Buyas, Hobert and Pearl, the 14-year-old daughter. Before starting to the ferry at the foot of Main street to get across the river, Mrs. Buyas and Pearl decided to walk.

"Somehow, I feel that something is going to happen," she told her husband. "I'm going to get out. I feel lots safer, anyway."

As the man started down the steep incline toward the river the team seemed unable to hold back the weight. It was almost dark and the flagman with his red lantern could be seen at the crossing. Suddenly he began to wave the red light frantically, but it was too late. Though Buyas in desperation tugged at the lines he was on the track, with the train only a few feet away. The horses passed to safety but the engine struck the rear part of the wagon.

Both occupants were thrown high in the air and the wagon completely shattered. The boy arose, but the father lay moaning, and was found to be unconscious. the train did not slacken its speed.

The ambulance was called from police headquarters, with Dr. F. C. LaMar hurried to the scene of the accident. The injured man and the frightened family were placed in the ambulance and taken to the Emergency hospital. It was found that Buyas had received a fractured skull, a broken left arm and right leg. The physicians had little hope that the injured man would live until morning.

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October 6, 1909

WHY SWOPE NEVER MARRIED.

John C. Gage Talks of the Younger
Days of Kansas City's Benefactor.

When John C. Gage came to Kansas City in 1859 Colonel Swope had been here two years. From about 1862 to 1866 they had offices together in Colonel Swope's building on the east side of Main street between Third and Fourth streets. The building, with others in the block, has recently been torn down to make room for a city market.

"Although Colonel Swope was a lawyer and a graduate of Yale," said Mr. Gage yesterday, "he never practiced law. Even as a young man he was often depressed in spirits and used to go for days at a time and never speak to his nearest friends. When it was over, however, he was the most affable of men. He suffered greatly from indigestion and stomach trouble as a young man, and we used to attribute his depression to illness.

"Many persons have wondered why Tom Swope never married. I always attributed it to his physical infirmity at a time of life when men most consider matrimony. He was very restless and irritable at times and he knew it.

"Tom Swope was the most farsighted man I ever knew. He seemed determined to get rich when a young man, and showed great ability in picking his investments, not all of which were in this city, by any means. He had investments in St. Louis, Chicago, Kentucky, Tennessee and in the mountains. He made few that did not bring him great gain.

"Many persons thought the habit he had of talking to himself came with old age. As a young man I have heard him talk to himself time and again. He had a habit, which he carried to his old age, of arguing with himself after he had made an investment. At such times he was very severe in his critical arraignment of himself."

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October 4, 1909

ESTATE WORTH $3,000,000.

Much in Kansas City and Nearby
Realty -- Gifts to City More Than
$1,500,000.

It is conservatively estimated that Colonel Thomas Swope's estate amounts to more than $3,000,000. With keen foresight he acquired many years ago lands in what is now the heart of the business section of Kansas City, and it is in such properties that the greater part of his fortune was made and is now invested.

Some of the more important properties included in the estate are:

The lot and block at the southeast corner of Eleventh and Grand, occupied by the Keith Furniture Company; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut, occupied by McClintock's restaurant and other business firms; the Majestic theater building; the three-story building at 915 Walnut, the two-story building at 1017-1019 Main street, occupied by the Carey Clothing Company and other firms. The business blocks at 916-918-918 1/2 Main, occupied by the Snyder Dry Goods Company and the Seigelbohm Jewelry Company; the seven-story building at the southeast corner of Eighth and May, occupied by the Burnham, Hanna, Munger Company, the three-story building at 419 Walnut, occupied by a commission firm; the two-story building at 1012 East Fourth street, occupied by a commission company; the building at the southeast corner of Union avenue and Mulberry streets, occupied by the Union Avenue bank; the five-story warehouse at the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh; the two-story brick building at the southeast corner of Twelfth and Hickory, used as a warehouse.

OUT OF TOWN REALTY.

There are other and less important properties in various parts of the city, beautiful family homes at Independence, Mo.

The out-of-town property owned by Colonel Swope consists of the 240-acre tract occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, bounded on the east by Swope parkway, the north by Sixty-third street, the west by Prospect avenue and the south by Sixty-seventh street, a 320-acre tract east of and adjoining Swope park, a 50-acre tract on the north of the park, a 400-acre farm near Columbia, Tenn., improved property in Knoxville, Tenn. and Middleboro, Ky, and vacant property in Syracuse, N. Y., Lawrence, Kas. and Topeka, Kas.

Colonel Swope also owned some mining claims near Butte, Mont., the value of which cannot be estimated. He recently said that if he were a young man, he could take one of the claims and dig a fortune out of it. He evidently believed that the claims were very valuable.

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September 27, 1909

TELLS A WEIRD LIFE STORY.

Waif Picked Up by Police Gives
Account of Himself.

To justify his presence in Kansas City, Theodore Kautz, 14 years old, picked up yesterday by the police in an alley between Walnut and Main streets, Tenth and Eleventh, and placed in the Detention home, told a weird life story of melodramatic interest.

While the family, consisting of his parents, his baby sister and himself, lived in Coffeyville, Kas., eight years ago, Theodore said, a woman nurse left in charge of the baby, angered because the child would not sleep during the mother's absence, shoved it into the oven of the kitchen stove, put on her bonnet, left the house, and was never heard of again.

The mother, he said, drew the baby out of the oven alive, but it died after a few days., and the woman within a year was a maniac. The father, he said, placed her in the asylum and disappeared, leaving the boy to drift.

Coffeyville officials, he said, sent him to the Christian orphans' home in St. Louis, where he lived until a short time ago when, dissatisfied with the treatment, he ran away.

Theodore told the police he rode most of the way from St. Louis to Kansas City in the caboose of a freight train, coming in here on top of the cars. He was ill clad and suffering from cold and hunger. Mrs. Joan Moran, the police matron, gave him an overcoat.

Theodore says he came to Kansas City because he heard his mother was here in an asylum. Probation officers will investigate his story.

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September 18, 1909

KILLS SELF ON "HOBO HILL."

Jesse Skarling, Despondent Because
of His Wife's Illness.

Under a tree on "Hobo Hill," an elevation overlooking the Missouri river near the foot of Main street, Jesse M. Skarling, a painter, killed himself yesterday afternoon by swallowing about four ounces of carbolic acid. Depression on account of his wife's illness is thought to be the cause. Beside him was a note which furnished the only identification.

"My name is Jesse Skarling," the note read. "My dear wife's name is Ida Skarling. My mother lives at Muskogee, Ok. Goodby, friends."

The man evidently had thought about committing suicide for several hours. Beside his body were dozens of cigarette stubs and the grass indicated that he had moved several tim es as the sun shifted. There was no label on the bottle and no indication where the acid was purchased.

After viewing the body, Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky ordered it sent to O'Donnell's undertaking rooms.

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September 15, 1909

CLOSE CALL FOR WATCHMAN.

Police Pull Charles Brown From Bed
in Burning Barn.

In a fire that destroyed a sales stable conducted by John Kirby and H. A. Thompson at Nineteenth and Main street early yesterday morning, in which forty-eight horses perished, Charles Brown, a night watchman who was asleep in the building barely escaped being burned to death.

Patrolman Cummings and Duteman, whose beat is in the neighborhood of Nineteenth and Main, passed the barn at 2:30 o'clock yesterday morning. At that time they did not notice a fire. About five minutes later they passed the corner again and noticed a small blaze near the ground on the south side of the barn. They turned in an alarm and returned to awake Brown. Cummings fired three shots in the effort, but only succeeded by breaking in his door and pulling him out of bed. By that time the fire was well under way, and it was too late to save any of the horses. Several buggies were also destroyed.

The building was a one-story frame valued at $2,200. John P. Lynch of the Lynch-Watkins Lime and Cement Company, owner of the building, said it was insured for $800.

Mr. Thompson estimated his loss at $10,000, partly covered by insurance. The barn will be rebuilt.

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September 13, 1909

USED DIAMOND ON
THE STORE WINDOWS.

PLATE GLASS CUT FOR BLOCKS
ON MAIN STREET.

J. E. Stivers Arrested on Charge of
Damaging Property from Fifth
to Thirteenth Street --
Denies He Is Vandal.

All records in plate glass window cutting were broken last night by J. E. Stivers, a candymaker for the Loose-Wiles Cracker and Candy Company. In years past the record in Kansas City has been a few straggling windows, entailing a cost of from $300 to $400, but Stivers's cutting began at Thirteenth street and Grand avenue and he carried the line of march to Main street and down that street to Fifth, where he was arrested. In all, Stivers damaged sixty-three plate glass windows. If the glass has to be replaced, the total cost would not fall short of $5,000, it is estimated. Most of the places which suffered most carry plate glass insurance.

Edward Clark, recently appointed a Gamewell operator at the Walnut street police station, saw Stivers when he made his first cut on a plate glass window at the Ayres Clothing Company, 1309 Grand avenue. He followed him to Main street, along Thirteenth and down Main to Fifth, seeing him use a 1/4 karat diamond ring on all of the most valuable windows along Main street. It did not occur to Clark to make an arrest. The arrest took place while Stivers was making a final slash at a large window of the Hub Clothing Company at Fifth and Main streets. Herman Hartman, a police officer, chanced to be passing and arrested the culprit.




After leaving Thirteenth and Grand, Stivers made his way to Main street, where he wrote his initials on a glazed monument of the M. H. Rice Monument Company at that point. It was shortly after 9 p. m. when he reached Jones' Dry Goods Company's store and many persons were on the street so he succeeded in cutting but seven of the valuable windows. Some of them are cut so deeply that a tap would knock out part of the glass.


Stivers' route from here was made by jumps, he evidently passing some places on account of the night crowds. He missed most of the stores in the block between Eleventh and Twelfth streets on Main. Altogether, he damaged the windows of more than thirty clothiers, milliners, saloons, flower shops, fortune tellers and other retailers and unoccupied buildings.

When Stilvers began by the Jones Dry Goods Company, when his diamond was in good working order, he appears to have done the greatest damage.

When seen in the holdover after his arrest, Stivers was awakened from a stupor. He told who he was and said he had been working for the Loose-Wiles company for twenty years. He is now 22 years old.

"If any of those windows are damaged I did not do it," he said.

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August 24, 1909

GIFT FOR CARL BUSCH.

Composer Presented With Oil Por-
trait of Himself Yesterday.

A number of the friends of Carl Busch, the Kansas City composer, who recently returned from Denmark, where he conducted an orchestra on American day at the exposition of Aarhus, assembled in Mr. Busch's studio in the Studio building early yesterday morning. When Mr. Busch arrived he was presented with a finely executed oil portrait of himself by J. H. Nelson, an artist at 918 Main street. Mr. Busch was traditionally surprised and declared that the portrait was a speaking likeness. It represents Mr. Busch seated and was painted from a photograph. It will be exhibited for a week at Jenkins' music store.

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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August 8, 1909

TO RAISE $700 FOR THE
HOUSE OF GOOD SHEPHERD.
Irish-American Athletic Club Will
put on Benefit Baseball Game
With Kansas Team.

The city, when it cut the street through at Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue, took forty feet of the property of the home of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd. And that was not all. The sisters are now called upon to pay $700 and the Irish-American Athletic Club has undertaken to raise the money for the home by holding a benefit game at its athletic field at Forty-seventh and Main.

The game will be between the Edgerton, Kas., team, and one of the Irish-American Athletic Club teams. The Kansas team volunteered its services, and as this is considered one of the best baseball organizations in Kansas, considerable interest is shown in the contest.

One of the directors of the Irish-American Athletic Club, who formerly lived at Edgerton, says that when the Edgerton baseball team plays at a neighboring town Edgerton moves with the team. The advance sale of tickets is very encouraging to the club.

A thirty-two page programme will contain the pictures and the line-up of both teams, also a brief history of the Irish-American Athletic Club of Kansas City, portraits of some of their athletes, their officers and directors, the objects and purposes of the club, is being published. These programmes will be distributed to the members of the club and to all who attend the game next Saturday afternoon.

The athletic field of the Irish-American Club is an ideal location. The club has erected a covered grand stand; the entire ground is fenced and the baseball diamond is one of the best in the country.

It is proposed to have a quarter-mile track, handball courts, tennis courts, bowling alleys and every facility for outdoor sports and games of all kinds.

The club now has about 700 members. All are entitled to the privileges of the grounds, excepting when there is a special event of some kind. At these events everybody pays, and all who attend will put up the 25-cent admission for the grandstand seats at the game for the benefit of the Home of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd.

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August 7, 1909

HE LONGED TO BE A LOBSTER.

But When Suit Case Was Stolen, C.
W. Hawkins Changed Mind.

He longed to be a lobster and even went so far as to carry that longing in print within his suitcase, did C. W. Hawkins from Kansas, and last night his longing came to an end. Mr. Hawkins, or Squire Hawkins, struck town at supper time, carrying with him a suit case containing clothes and other things, among which was the printed legend: "I'd rather be a lobster than a wise guy."

Walking on Main street just south of Eighth street Mr. Hawkins from Kansas spied a restaurant. He entered, placed his suit case near the door and thereby had his longings gratified for within ten minutes the suit case was gone. Mr. Hawkins, greatly perturbed, reported his loss to the police last night.

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July 27, 1909

SHE DIDN'T INTEND TO KILL.

Mary O'Neill Pleads Not Guilty to
Charge of Husband.

Mary O'Neill, who took a shot at her husband, Frank P. O'Neill, in the general office of the Muehleback Brewing Company at Eighteenth and Main streets Monday evening, was arraigned in the justice court of James B. Shoemaker yesterday afternoon.

She pleaded "not guilty" to the charge of assault with intent to kill preferred against her by her husband. Hearing was set for 2 o'clock in the afternoon of August 5.

The defendant was released on $700 bond.

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July 26, 1909

STRANGE ADVENTURES
OF TWO SMALL BOYS.

SAW SIGHTS AND FRIGHTENED
THEIR PARENTS.

Johnny and Tommy, 10 and 8 Years
Old, Respectively, Had High
Time While Folks Had
Visions of Kidnaping.

TOMMY BEELS.

Without permission of their respective parents, Johnny Sinclair, 10, and Tommy Beels, 8 years old, took a day off from home and spent the whole of Saturday night and Sunday in wandering about the towns and parks surrounding Kansas City, much to the consternation, grief and anxiety of their families.

When the boys were missed Saturday night it was learned that they had gone with an employe of Electric park. Mont Shirley, 29 years of age, who has a longing for the companionship of small boys, being evidenced by his having led other urchins on several days' tours of the surrounding country on previous occasions.

Johnny Sinclair is the only son of Aaron Sinclair, janitor of the Boston flats, 3808 Main street. Johnny's father gave him a dollar Saturday noon and told him to do what as he wanted with the money.

BOYS WENT TO PARK.

Barefooted and without his coat, Johnny looked up his younger friend, Tommy, youngest son of H. T. Beels, 107 East Thirty-ninth street, and proposed a trip to Electric park. Tommy was willing and thought it best not to go into the house for his hat and coat, for his mother might thwart their schemes. So the boys left the Beels home about 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

When 5 o'clock came Mrs. Beels missed her son. Within a few minutes, however, he telephoned his mother that they were at Electric park and were going to take a boat ride with a man whom they had found congenial. Mrs. Beels told the boy to come home immediately.

Tommy had other views in the matter and when Shirley suggested an extensive tour of the city, to include Kansas City, Kas., Lansing, Leavenworth, Forest, Fairmount, Swope and Budd parks and all at his own expense, the boy readily fell in with the plan. Mothers were not interviewed.

Dire thoughts of drowning, kidnaping and disaster beset Mrs. Beels when her boy did not materialize at supper time. Persons in charge of the park were questioned and it was learned that the two boys had gone away from the park with Shirley. None knew where.

SEARCH PARTIES ORGANIZED.

Mrs. Beels, at midnight, went to the Sinclair home and inquired there for her son and learned that Johnny Sinclair was also missing. That was the first idea of Johnny's whereabouts which the Sinclairs had. Search parties were organized and the park secured.

Yesterday morning a young man went to the Sinclair home and told that he had seen the two boys and Shirley at the Union depot and that they were going to St. Joseph and H. L. Ashton, a friend of the Beels family, who is well acquainted with the mayor of that city, called him over long distance 'phone and had the town searched for the runaways. Then came a telegram that the three had been seen early Sunday in Leavenworth.

Meanwhile Mrs. Sinclair and Mrs. Beels were beside themselves with fear and anxiety for their children. They secured the promise of the park authorities to drag the lake in the park this morning, and the search for the missing increased in strength and vigilance each hour.

Shirley's family had been notified of the disappearance, and Charles J. Blevins, Shirley's brother-in-law, hastened to Leavenworth, hot on the trail. He returned empty-handed.

TELL OF JOLLY TIME.

About 11 o'clock last night the boys returned home, dusty, wet and tired. They had a wonderful story to tell of their trip and adventures. They had been through every park in the city, and seen the National cemetery and Soldiers' home at Leavenworth from a car and had a jolly time in general. Saturday night was spent in Kansas City, so Tommy Beels says, and the three went to a rooming house. He did not know the location. Late last night Shirley gave the two boys their carfare and put them on a Rockhill car at Eighth and Walnut streets and left them.

Shirley is said to have a habit of giving young boys a good time at his own expense. Two years ago, it is claimed, he took two boys to Leavenworth and stayed there for three days, after which the boys returned safe and sound.

Shirley works in the park and every Saturday he has been in the habit of spending his week's wages upon some boys whom he might meet. His brother-in-0law, Mr. Blevins, said that Shirley is nothing but a boy himself. When he was 4 years of age, according to relatives, Shirley fell upon his head, and he has remained stunted, mentally, ever since. Shirley longs for the companionship of children, and he is attractive to them since he plays with them and talks with them as though he were 9 rather than 29 years of age.

INTERVIEW CUT SHORT.

Johnny Sinclair, nervous, excited, scared and tired, last night told a clear and fairly consistent story of how Shirley and Tommy Beels and he passed the time between Saturday at 2 p. m. and 11 o'clock last night, when the boys returned home.

In the main details Johnny clung to his story. He fell asleep while being questioned by his father, and that ended the questioning. In substance, he says:

"Shirley invited Tommy and me to go to Swope park, while were were at Electric park, where he was working. We went to Swope park with him and in the evening we went down town and went to several nickel shows.

"Then we went out to Swope park again, but late that night. Shirley wanted to go down town to cash a check. When we got down town the saloons were all closed, and we finally went to bed at a place near Eighth and Main streets.

SAW LEAVENWORTH SIGHTS.

"The next morning we had a nice breakfast of beefsteak and potatoes and coffee, and then we went over to Kansas City, Kas., and there we took a car for Leavenworth. We saw the penitentiary and the Soldiers' Home from the car, and the National cemetery, but we didn't stop there.

We went to Leavenworth and spent the time just running around. That's all we did. I was never there before, and it was fun. We had a dinner of bologna sausage and cheese, and about 8 o'clock we started for home."

Besides the fright which was occasioned the two families of the boys no harm was done, except one of the boys was forced to take a hot bath and swallow a dose of quinine after he reached home. Johnny's original $1, which started the trouble, remains intact. Shirley stood the expense on his pay of $12, which he drew from the park on Saturday afternoon.

Shirley lives one block southeast of the park.

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