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December 7, 1909

BOILER KILLS FOUR,
RIPS BUILDING OPEN.

DRIVER THROWN FROM PASS-
ING WAGON, DIES.

Explosion Occurs While Steamfitters
Are at Work -- Other Men In-
jured -- Pickets Blown Off
Fence Across Alley.
Results of a Boiler Explosion at 908-10 Broadway.
EXPLOSION WHICH COST FOUR LIVES.

By the explosion of a boiler in the basement of the six-story building at 908-10 Broadway at 11 o'clock yesterday morning, Michael Frawley and James Cox were killed outright, and Andrew Meyer and Essie Williams, a negro porter, so badly burned and otherwise injured that they died before nightfall. Two others were badly hurt, and three stories of the rear portion of the building were wrecked. Considerable damage also was done to adjoining structures.

Within two minutes business men and pedestrians in the neighborhood ventured to enter the front door of the building bent on rescuing those who were hurt. The flooring on the first and second stories had been splintered and a heavy partition in the middle of the building had toppled over. Every window glass on two stories had been blown out. Heavy timbers, torn from their places, hung over overhead, and for a time a general collapse of the rear section of the interior of the structure was feared.

The cause for the explosion is not known. Steamfitters employed by Val Wagner & Co., 3918 Main street, were adjusting a steamcock on the boiler, and were preparing to clean out the pipes. They had started to work last Saturday and yesterday morning they put fire under the boiler in order to do the cleaning. There was no forewarning of anything being wrong with the apparatus, and when the explosion occurred Michael Frawley, one of the steamfitters, was on top of the boiler. The boiler had not been in use for some time, and it is supposed that this is accountable for the very bad condition it was in when the workmen began the repairing.

ONE DRIVER IS KILLED.

James Cox, a driver for the Stewart Peck Sand Company, happened to be driving through the alley and had just reached the building when the explosion occurred. He was thrown bodily from the wagon and dashed to death against the brick pavement. C. R. Misner, another driver in the employ of the same firm, sat beside Cox. He too was hurled from the seat, but escaped with a fractured shoulder. Essie Williams, a negro porter, was in the boiler room at the time of the accident, and he was scalded from head to foot by the escaping steam. H e was hurried to the General hospital and died at 3:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Andrew Meyer and W. H. Straubmeyer, plumbers, were at work on the boiler. Both seemed at first to have received minor injuries but Meyer was suffering from shock so he was sent to St. Mary's hospital. He did not rally, and it later developed that he was internally injured. He died at the hospital at 5:40 o'clock.

WHO THE DEAD MEN ARE.

Michael Frawley, 2040 Madison avenue, was unmarried, an orphan, and 28 years old. He has lived in this city all his life. Two brothers, John and Emmett and two sisters, Mary and Kate Frawley, survive. His body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

Meyer, Forty-third and Hudson streets in Rosedale, was well known in Atchison, Kas., where he had worked as a steamfitter off and on for many years. He came to Kansas City recently and went to live with a brother at the Hudson street address in Rosedale. He was 45 years old and unmarried. His body was also taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

If James Cox, 1416 Central street, has relatives living they were not found last night, and it is almost certain they do not live in this city. He was about 35 years old. It is said he was single, but there is another rumor that he has a wife and child somewhere.

Edward Booker, business manager of the local steamfitters' union, said last night that none of the men killed or injured bore union cards. Frawley, he said, was merely a steamfitter's helper. He had once applied for a card in the union, but did not keep up with the requirements, and his membership was finally cancelled.

Essie Williams, 505 East Sixth street, the negro porter, was also a fireman. The whereabouts of his survivors have not yet been ascertained. His body was taken to the Countee undertaking rooms.

The wrecked building is the property of the Homestead Realty Company and is in the charge of David Bachrach, who as the agent, had the renting of the rooms. The block had been unoccupied recently, but the H. K. Mulford Company of Philadelphia was preparing to move its stock in on the third floor.

"It was a terrific shock which seemed to shake the foundation of our building from under us," said C. M. Lyon, president of the Lyon Millinery Company, which occupies the building adjoining on the south. "Several plate glasses crashed and I ran to the front door and out on the street fearing that possibly a second explosion might occur. the damage we suffered was comparatively small, but the fright we were given was large."

The picket fence surrounding the home of Mrs. Thomas E. Moran, 916 Bank street, just across the alley from the wrecked building, was partly demolished by the concussion and many pickets were torn from the fence and blown several feet away.

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July 20, 1909

ROBBED WHILE AT CHURCH.

Two Families Lost Money and Jew-
elry Sunday.

While the family of D. T. Morris, 2410 Cherry street were at church Sunday morning, a thief broke open the front door and stole $20 in currency besides a diamond ring.

J. J. Kallig of 1429 Madison avenue had practically the same experience. When the family returned from church the house had been entered and $78 had been taken.

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March 20, 1909

GIRL WIFE SHOT BY
HER BOY HUSBAND.

SHORT WEDDED LIFE OF HUNT-
ERS HAD BLOODY END.

Madly Jealous Because She Went
With Another man, Charles
Hunter Wounds Wife at
Parents' Home.

The short wedded life of Charles Hunter, 19 years old, and his wife, Myrtle Hunter, 17 years old, came to a probably tragic end yesterday morning when in a quarrel, the boy-husband shot his wife with a derringer at the home of her parents, 1713 Madison avenue.

Mrs. Hunter lies at the general hospital, where the physicians say she will not live until morning. The husband gave himself up yesterday afternoon to the police, and is in the matron's room at police headquarters where he will not make a statement to the prosecuting attorney.

No one was at the home of the girl's parents except the young couple. They had been married since Christmas, but had not lived together for several months. On several occasions Hunter had visited his wife, but on each occasion the interview generally ended in a quarrel. About 11 o'clock yesterday morning, neighbors heard a shot, and a moment later Mrs. Hunter rushed out of the house and ran to the home of Mrs. Emma Hodder, 1715 Madison avenue. The front of her kimono was covered with blood.

"HE SHOT ME," SHE SAID.

"He shot me," she gasped, and sank to the floor. She carried the derringer in her hands. The Walnut street police ambulance was called, and after giving her emergency treatment, Dr. Ralph A. Shiras took her to the general hospital.

In the meantime Hunter rushed out of the house into the alley, and it was three hours before the police were able to locate him. At last Albert F. Drake, an attorney with offices in the Scarritt building, called police headquarters and said Charles Hunter was ready to give himself up. Charles McVey, desk sergeant, took Hunter from the Scarritt building to police headquarters. In the chief's office he was questioned by an assistant prosecuting attorney, but would sign no statement.

NEVER HAPPY TOGETHER.

"We haven't' been happy since our marriage," Hunter said later as he sat in a cell in the matron's room. His hands were folded across his breast, and he looked the picture of despair. He is small and looks a mere boy. "She has been going with other fellows," he continued, "and last Wednesday I saw her with someone. That made it more than I could bear. Last night I called on her and we quarreled. When we parted I walked the streets until morning, and in a sort of a trance I went back this morning.

"I don't know how I came to shoot her. I do know that I had a derringer, and that I must have aimed it at her. As soon as I shot I clasped her in my arms and then ran out.

I went down the street a short distance and then determined to go back. I backed out and then walked downtown. I went to Mr. Drake's office, who laughed when I told him that I had shot someone."

MOTHER FEARED FOR HER.

At the general hospital the youthful wife laid the blame on her husband.

"I'm going to die," she said faintly about the middle of the afternoon, "but I don't care very much. Charley and I have never been happy. He called this morning and commenced to quarrel. Suddenly he pulled out a pistol and shot me.

" 'Tell them that you did it,' he whispered as he took me in his arms and rushed out doors."

Mrs. Frank Scanlon, the mother of the girl, says that Hunter entered the house after she had left in the morning. She said that he had often threatened Myrtle, and that she was afraid to leave alone.

"I felt like something was going to happen when I left this morning," she said.

Hunter has been employed at the Hippodrome at odd times. He lives with an uncle, Claude Rider, at 1728 Troost avenue.

At the general hospital last night, the youthful wife lay on one of the beds in the surgical ward. She was suffering intense pain but still retained all of her faculties.

"Did they get Charley?" she asked. "Well I'm glad they did for he meant to shoot me."

Mrs. Scanlon, the girl's mother, was at her bedside all night.

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