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August 17, 1909

"BAD" MAN BUSINESS
DOESN'T PAY, SAYS COLE.

Former Bandit Tells Politicians It's
Best to Walk the Straight and
Narrow Path.

Less than 5,000 people attended the Lone Jack picnic yesterday, which is a considerable crowd to gather up in the farthest corner of Jackson county, but nothing to the crowds which have gone there in days of yore. On the speakers' list were Congressman Borland, Representative Holcomb, former County Judge George Dodd and Cole Younger. Ex-Criminal Judge W. H. Wallace started for the picnic, going past F. M. Lowe's house in his automobile and inviting that congressional candidate to go with him, but something must have happened for there was no Judge Wallace at the Lone Jack all day. Sam Boyer, county clerk, was the only Republican official who reported, but there was a herd of Democratic officials. Circut Judge E. E. Porterfiled and Thomas J. Seehorn, both of them with records of never having missed the August pilgrimage, were given ovations. the speeches were tame, Cole Younger's being the possible exception. The well known old guerrilla has a lecture he reads, which is a little classic. It is moral in that there is not a cent nor a good night's sleep in being a "bad" man, and the only people who think there is are those who do not know the man who was "bad," while they who do know him always remind him that he was off the reservation once and cannot get all the way back on.

The weather was torrid, hundreds of buggies stopping short of the destination. Automobiles which carried the Kansas City contingent passed derelicts at almost every shade tree on the way. It was 100 in the shade but nobody on the way to the picnic had any shade to get under.

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January 9, 1909

CAN GROW TOBACCO HERE.

Jackson and Cass Counties' Farmers
Experiment With Weed.

LEE'S SUMMIT, MO., Jan 8 -- G. W. Simmons, who lives near Raymore, Mo., and who recently returned from Kentucky as representative of the Harrisonville Commercial Club to investigate and procure practical help for the raising of tobacco, is in Lee's Summit today. Mr. Simmons says there is no doubt but what the soil of Jackson and Cass counties is properly tilled for the growing of tobacco, and this year he will endeavor to have several of the farmers in the different localities of Cass county plant as much as three acres each of the product.

Jackson county will also be given a trial at this new culture by George Shawhan of Weston, Mo., on his farm near Lone Jack. Mr. Shawhan will plant fifty acres, while his son-in-law, James Rowland, will have fifteen acres. A tobacco company has recently offered inducements to the farmers in these localities in order to get them started in this new venture.

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October 1, 1908

POLICE ARE HUNTING
FOR MISSING PEOPLE

FRANTIC RELATIVES THINK
THEY ARE HEADED THIS WAY.

The List of Nine Includes a 75-Year-
Old Farmer Who Forsook
the Plow for Gay
City Life.

The reports made to the police yesterday concerned missing people principally, there being nine in all, whose ages range from 13 to 75 years. E. L. Barrett of Hamilton, Mo., telephoned that his daughter Nellie, 17 years old, whom he described, had left on an early morning train without leaving her future address. He was following on the next train and wanted the police to detain the girl.

For some reason or other George W. Shepard, 75 years old, took French leave of the dear old farm near Lone Jack, Mo., and headed for the gay city with its turmoil and strife. His aged wife was worried about him and, through a friend, asked the police to keep a weather eye out for Mr. Shepard. He is described as "black suit, sandy whiskers, soft black hat and blind in left eye."

Mrs. H. Gunther, 309 Washington avenue, Chicago, Ill., who signs herself "a broken-hearted mother," wants the police to find her son, Georg, 17 years old, who has been missing from home since June 25 last. She gives the police a minute description on which to work.

W. Emerson, 713 Washington street, this city, asks aid of the police in locating his wife. She is 27 years old, he says, five feet four inches tall and weighs 112 pounds. She has dark complexion, dark eyes and hair. Mr. Emerson said she left home with a man whom he names and describes.

The county attorney of Bedford, Ia., telephoned the police to be on the lookout for Fred W. Evans. Among other distinctive features given the poilce to aid in the identification is a "Roman nose that turns up." An officer went to Bedford to take Evans back to Cripple Creek, Col., it is said. He got out on a writ of habeas corpus and left for here. Henry von Pohl, sheriff of Teller county, Col., offers $50 reward for Evans.

W. Harry Walston, pastor of the Christian church at Minnie, Ill., writes that his son, Eugene Walston, 13 years old, left home last Friday with the intention of beating his way to Clearwater, Kas. As he would have to pass through Kansas City, the police were asked to be on the lookout for and detain the boy.

Thomas Atkins, chief of police of Davenport, Ia., wrote that Mrs. Chris Miller, aged 19 years, but looks more like 16, had left home and was headed this way. He gives a very accurate description of the missing woman, from her gold teeth to the four points on her jacket. He does not say w2h y she left home or what is wanted with her, only asking that she be arrested and notice given him.

Mrs. R. D. Curren, 811 Robidoux street, St. Joseph, Mo., said that her boy, Cleo Curren, 14 years old, had been missing since September 21. The Carnival, she thinks, may draw him there.

W. L. Myers, 1313 West Jackson street, Bloomington, Ill., is shy his son, Bert Myers, who has been missing from home for some time. Thinks he may head in here for Carnival week.

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May 16, 1908

THEY WANT LONE JACK PICNIC.

Lee's Summit People Say Their
Town's the Proper Place.

A movement is on foot among the people of Lee's Summit to move the Lone Jack picnic thi syear to a point closer to a railroad, and they have suggested that Lee's Summit would be a good place to bring it. This has caused the farmers around Lone Jack, who have profited by reason of the picnic, to register an objection to the change. They claim that it would lose its significance to hold it anywhere else except near the battleground. The picnic has not been held on the battleground proper for the past twenty years.

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June 24, 1907

AUTO RUN TO LONE JACK.

Fifteen Cars Made the Trip in Two
Hours Each Way.

Fifteen members of the Automobile Club braved the muddy roads yesterday and made the run to Lone Jack, Mo., where they picnicked in the grove. The ball game, which it was intended should be played, was called off because of the rain.

"We had a good run," said W. G. Coumbe, who was in charge of the expidition. "The fifty or sixty cars which were to make the run did not show up at Admiral boulevard and Grand avenue by 11 o'clock, but by 11:30 o'clock fifteen motor cars had made their appearance, and we decided to make the trip. It took us a trifle over two yours to go each way. The muddiest roads we encountered were between here and Independence. Next Sunday the trip which we had planned for today will be made.

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January 30, 1907

MATCH BROKE UP A SERVICE.

Boy Who Disturbed Lone Jack
Worshipers Lectured by Judge

Fred King, 20 years old, stood before Judge Wofford in the criminal court yesterday, charged with disturbing religious services at Lone Jack, his home, last Sunday. Beside him stood the minister of the Baptist church, who had accused him. He had laughed and giggled and scratched a parlor match on the back of another boy's coat.

"Do you think it is smart to disturb religious meetings?" asked Judge Wofford.

"No, sir," said the young man, hanging his head.

"Then why did you do it?"

"I guess I just thought it would be funny."

"Well do you think so now?"

"No, sir."

"You just want to be smart?"

No reply.

"Maybe you thought the girls would think you were smart."

No reply.

"Did you take on e of them home?"

"Yes, sir."

"Did she think it was smart and funny?"

"No, sir."

"Of course she didn't if she was a good, well behaved girl and I have no doubt she was. Girls big enough to "go" with young men your age don't do things like that. They know better. But you don't look like a very bad boy."

"Judge," said the preacher, who was accusing the boy, "I never heard but what this young man was a good boy, only this. He's all right. Maybe this will be a lesson to him."

"Well," said Judge Wofford, "I'll take the risk this time. You take him home and let me know if he ever does it again."

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