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January 31, 1910
IN WHITE PLAGUE FIGHT.

Men's Brotherhood to Learn How to
Escape Tuberculosis.

A meeting in behalf of the suppression of tuberculosis will be conducted tonight by the Men's Brotherhood of the Linwood Boulevard M. E. Church at the church, Linwood and Olive. Dr. M. T. Woods of Independence will tell how to escape tuberculosis; Dr. Seesco Stewart, dean of the Kansas City Veterinary college, will describe tuberculosis in the lower animals and how it affects public health. Dr. A. T. Kinsley will present stereoptican views.

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November 19, 1909

HER FRIENDS LOYAL IN DEATH.

Mrs. Healy to Be Interred in a Man-
ner Befitting Her Worth.

"I always had friends," Mrs. Margaret Healy used to say, "Sure, haven't I always been friendly?"

Death as a charity patient in St. Joseph's hospital did not rob Mrs. Healy of friends. Yesterday a funeral was arranged for her that would have satisfied her most exacting wish. The "lay sister" of the West bottoms, whose personal services and sacrifices among her poor neighbors made her of note, is to be laid to rest today by the side of little George Traynor, an orphan whom she took into her care when his parents died, in St. Mary's cemetery.

Father Dalton is to celebrate high mass at the Church of the Annunciation, Linwood and Benton boulevards, at 9 o'clock. Many persons who lived near Mrs. Healy and who since have seen better fortune than she, will attend the services as a mark of respect for her useful life.

Men who knew her and her endless charities will act as pallbearers. Mrs. Ellen Hughes, who cared for Mrs. Healy the last six years of her life, and several men who were adopted as boys by her, will be the mourners. The pallbearers will be: John Kelly, Robert E. Donnely, John Doherty, Bryan Cunningham, John Coffey, Patrick O'Rourke.

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October 18, 1909

FAMOUS SONS UNITE
CHILDHOOD CHUMS.

BOY SINGERS' MOTHERS LEARN
THEY ARE OLD FRIENDS.

Strange Coincidence Revealed at
Convention Hall Banquet Table.
Three Youths Earn Fame
With Remarkable Voices.
Frank Vrooman and Lawrence P. Smith, Boy Singers

Those persons who have followed closely the remarkable careers of Maxwell Kennedy, Frank Vrooman and Laurence Smith, boy singers, are pointing to a remarkable coincidence in the life history of the three boys.

Although reared in widely separated sections of the country, these boys have attained almost international reputations because of the remarkable qualities of their voices. Two of these singers, Laurence Powars Smith and Frank Ellsworth Vrooman, met for the first time at Convention hall in Kansas City, Mo., where they appeared on the programme and held spellbound the great assembly which had gathered to honor the postal clerks of the country.

MEET AT BANQUET.

Sitting opposite each other at the banquet table and sharing equally the congratulations of hundreds of persons who had been thrilled by the remarkable carrying power of their young voices were the boy singers and their parents. For a long time Mrs. Clarence J. Voorman, the mother of Frankie, gazed at the smiling countenance of Mrs. C. G. Smith, the mother of Laurence, seeing there something that carried her back in memory to her girlhood days in Junction City, Kas., when her dearest friend and playmate had been Laura Patterson, a girl her own age.

"I am sure you must be my old schoolmate, Laura Patterson," said Mrs. Vrooman, reaching her hand across the table. "Don't you remember me? Lottie Wood."

The two friends who had not met for thirty years quickly reverted to by-gone days and spoke with wonder of the coincidence that the mothers of the two greatest boy singers should have been playmates in their childhood days. The wonder of Mrs. Vrooman was increased, however, when Mrs. Smith spoke of little Frankie Kennedy, who "turned ropes," "spun tops" and did many other wonderful things for their edification while attending the public school in Junction City. Mrs. Vrooman then learned for the first time that this same little Frank Kennedy is the father of Maxwell Kennedy, the wonderful boy singer.

VOICES GAIN FAME.

Laurence Powars Smith is now 17 years old and was born in Ottawa, Kas. His former rich soprano voice combines a wonderful interpretation with great carrying power and has now developed into a tenor of the highest quality. He is the son of C. G. Smith, president of the People's National bank, Kansas City, Kas. His services are much in demand throughout the country, especially at Chautauquas. He is now engaged as soloist at the Linwood Boulevard Presbyterian church, Kansas City, Mo.

Frankie Vrooman is 13 years old. He is a son of Clarance J. Vrooman, 3114 Washington street, Kansas City, Mo. Frankie is a slight, manly little chap, unaffected; and a typical American school boy. His voice is a rich soprano, and every word is enunciated perfectly, so that the carrying power is remarkable. he has been singing in public three years and has met with much success. On June 13 he sung in the Westminster Presbyterian church of Minneapolis. He is a protege of Walton Holmes, and a brilliant future is predicted. At present he is soloist at St. Paul's Episcopal church, Fortieth and Main streets, Kansas City, Mo.

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April 10, 1909

NEW JEWISH BUILDING.

Impressive Two-Day Ceremony to
Mark Dedication.

Final arrangements have been made for the dedication of the new Jewish educational building, located on Admiral boulevard at Harrison street. The dedicatory services will be held April 21 and 22. Owing to the lack of room in the auditorium of the new building the services on the night of April 21 will be held in the Temple on Linwood boulevard at Flora avenue.

The programme for the first services ill consist of an address by Rabbi H. H. Meyer and a sermon by Dr. E. G. Hirsch of Chicago. Dr. Hirsch's topic will be "Jewish Opportunities."

On the following day the services are to be held in the new institute building. Rev. Isadore Koplewitz will give the dedicatory prayer. He will be followed by A. Rothenberg, chairman of the building committee, who is to deliver the institution to Albert Benjamin, president of the Jewish charities, for its dedicated purposes. Dr. Hirsch and Rabbi Meyer will deliver addresses.

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April 6, 1909

FEAST OF PASSOVER
OBSERVED BY JEWS.

ORTHODOX CHURCH WILL FAST
AND PRAY FOR SEVEN DAYS.

Local Celebration Is in Accordance
With Custom That Has Been Fol-
lowed for Thirty Centuries.
What It Means.

At sunset yesterday evening the orthodox Jews of Kansas City sat down to the tables in their respective homes to observe the anniversary of the "Feast of the Passover," a custom followed in Jewish homes for more than thirty centuries, conducted in accordance with the command as set forth in the twelfth chapter of Exodus and after the manner of the feast immortalized nineteen centuries ago when Christ and his disciples partook of the "Last Supper."

The Feast of Passover is a celebration in remembrance of the exodus of the Jews from Egypt. It symbolizes their freedom form the oppression of those old days. The ceremony lasts seven days, beginning at sundown on the Monday preceding Easter Sunday and ending at sundown on Easter day.

The feast which begins at sundown is called the "seter" and is observed the first and second days of the Passover. At this time all of the good things in the Jewish culinary category are brought to the table. The supper is preceded, anteceded and interspersed with prayers which, according to custom, recall the slavery days in Egypt. The unleavened bread and wine of the Christian communion are a part of the ceremony of this feast.

According to the ancient Jewish calendar the days began and ended with the sinking of the sun and all rites and feasts commenced just as the sun disappeared below the horizon. During the entire seven days the Jews eat only unleavened bread.

At 10 o'clock this morning services will be held at Bnai Judah temple, Flora avenue and Linwood boulevard, when Rabbi Harry H. Mayer will preach the sermon, taking for his subject "The Festive Symbols."

The Festive Symbols, as explained by Rev. Mayer, are the egg, which symbolizes immortality and the rebirth of year or spring, according to the ancient Jewish folk lore; bitter herbs, the reminder of the servitude and oppression of the Jews in Egypt and the unleavened bread, symbolizing the hurried departure of the Jews from the hated country, they having had not time to put leavening in the bread for the feast. The first and last days of the Passover are holy days.

Services will begin at Keneseth Israel temple, 1425 Locust street, at 8:30 o'clock this morning and will continue until noon, Rabbi Max Lieberman presiding.

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April 6, 1909

NEW 30-APARTMENT HOUSE.

In Course of Construction on Lin-
wood Boulevard, and Will Be
Ready October 1.

Work is being pushed on the new thirty-apartment flat building now in the course of construction on Linwood boulevard, covering the entire block from Prospect to Wabash avenue. It is expected it will be completed and ready for occupancy by October 1.

The building is to be three stories high, and constructed of brick and cut stone. Facing on Linwood boulevard, it will have five entrances, each one leading to six apartments. Four large stone columns supporting individual porches line the entrances.

Each apartment will have six rooms, two living rooms, a parlor, a bedroom, kitchen and dining room. This is exclusive of the bath room. The interior decorations are to be of polished oak and mahogany with the exception of the bath and bedrooms, which will be finished in white enamel. The parlors will open onto the porches. Floors in all the apartments are to be of polished oak.

The building, which has not yet been named, is being built by W. H. Collins at a cost of about $100,000. John W. McKecknie is the architect. Already the foundations have been laid and work on the first story will be commenced about the middle of this week.

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December 29, 1908

NO HONEYMOON IN A BALLOON.

Mr. and Mrs. Coey Will Go to Cali-
fornia by Rail.

Charles A. Coey of Chicago and Miss Carrie Hume Lewis of 1809 Linwood boulevard, this city, will be married at the home of Miss Lewis's parents next Saturday night. Mr. Coey is prominent in Chicago automobile circles and an enthusiastic aeronaut. The latter fact caused some of Mr. Coey's friends, who believe in practical jokes, to spread the story that with his bride he would go on a honeymoon trip through the clouds, starting in a large balloon from Kansas City. One Chicago newspaper accepted the yarn as fact and solemnly published it.

"It was an absurd story," said Miss Lewis at her home last night. "Why, we had never even thought of such a thing. We will leave for Los Angeles next Sautrday night, and don't forget to state that we will go by rail. After two months we shall return to Chicago and be at home at the Auditorium Annes."

Miss Lewis is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Lewis.

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December 27, 1908

TREAT FOR JEWISH CHILDREN.

Lecture at Temple B'Nai Jehudah
by Austrailian Traveler.

The children of the B'Nai Jehudah congregation, Flora avenue and Linwood boulevard, were given a treat last night when they listened to a lecture by Alfred Foster of Australia, a traveler of note. The lecture was illustrated by stereopticon views, made from pictures taken by the lecturer in his travels, and included a trip from San Francisco through New Zealand, Tasmania, the Fiji islands and a portion of Australia. All the chief points of interest were illustrated and an entertaining description of the countries and people was given.

At the conclusion of the lecture, the ladies of the Temple Sisterhood distributed boxes of candy to each child present. More than 200 children enjoyed the entertainment.

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July 5, 1908

FOURTH REAPED
SMALLER CROP

NOT AS MANY ACCI-
DENTS AS USUAL.

ONE BOY NEARLY BLINDED.

MYRON KING INJURED BY IM-
PROVISED CANNON.

Toy Pistols, Cannon Cracker and
Gunpowder Claim a Number
of Victims -- Noisy across the Line.

As the result of an untimely explosion of an improvised cannon, Myron King, the 16-year-old son of A. J. King, 1705 Linwood boulvard, received painful and serious injuries about the face yesterday afternoon possibly blinding his right eye. Myron and about fifteen of the neighborhood boys and girls were gathered in the front yard of H. G. Brown's residence, 3219 Highland avenue, shooting off various kinds of fireworks. After all of the firecrackers had become exhausted, some of the boys decided to use a tomato can as a cannon. It was touching off this cannon that the King boy received his injuries.

The can was about half loaded with black powder and slugs, and then plugged with paper. A small priming hole was drilled through the top of the can and firecracker fuses sere used as a fuse. Myrom stooped over the can to light the fuse. As he struk the match the sulphur tip flew off, falling on the powder which had been placed about the priming hole. There was an explosion, and the powder and tin struck the lad full in the face.

Myron staggered back, grasping blindly at the air. His companions ran to him, and the little girls set up a scream which attracted the attention of the whole block. Mothers, whose boys were in the crowd, ran to the scene of the explosion.

Mrs. G. P. Kincade, 3220 Highland avenue, thinking it was her son who had been injured by the explosion, started to run to Mr. Brown's home. She got no further than the front steps of her own home when she fainted in her son's arms. He had come hurrying home to assure his mother that he was safe.

"DON'T SPOIL THEIR FUN"

None of the King family was at home at the time, so the wounded boy was taken into Mr. Brown's home and several physicians were summoned at once. Among them was Dr. J. W. McKee, an oculist. The boy's face was completely blackened by powder and was badly cut in several places. Immediately the physicians and the oculist began to pick out the grains of powder from the lad's face and eyes, and when they had done as much as was possible at one operation, he was taken to his home.

At the time of the accident Myron requested that his parents not be notified until they returned home, saying: "There is no use to spoil their fun today. The accident has happened and it would do no good for them to come home right now." Nevertheless the physicians thought it best that they should be home to take care of the boy as soon as possible, and they were called from Elm Ridge, where they had gone to see the races.

Concerning the boy's condition, Dr. McKee said: "Myron will have a hard fight for the sight of his right eye. It was badly burned with powder and is in a precarious condition. It is impossible to say at this time just what may be the outcome There is still some powder left in the eye and it was not practicable to remove it this afternoon. His left eye is in good condition and it will not take much treatment to make it as good as it ever was."

MAY LOSE ONE EYE.

The physicians who attended the boy say that his condition is not serious. They fear only infection from the can and powder. Most of the particles were removed from Myron's face yesterday afternoon.

According to the physicians and occulist it will be some time before Myron can use his eyes to any extent. It was said that it would take at least three days to determine just the extent of the injuries done to the right eye, and if it can be restored it will take much treatment and a hard fight on the part of the oculist and boy.

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June 6, 1908

B'NAI JEHUDAH BIDS
FAREWELL TO TEMPLE.

IT HAS WORSHIPPED THERE FOR
TWENTY-THREE YEARS.

Splendid New Temple at Flora and
Linwood Avenues Is Almost Com-
pleted, and May Be Dedi-
cated in September.

With impressive ceremonies the congregation B'Nai Jehudah gathered for the last time in the temple at Eleventh and Oak streets last night. It was the farewell service of the congregation in the old temple, after having used the building as a house of worship for twenty-three years. The change of the B'Nai Jehudah congregation to the new temple at Linwood boulevard and Flora avenue is one more instance of the passing of the downtown churches There are now but three churches left in the heart of the business district.

A special programme consisting of addresses by the older members of the congregation had been prepared for the occasion. The present of the congregation, Isaac Bachrach, told of the policy of the church; what it had been and what it now is striving to be. He said that the church had never stood for narrow mindedness, and that its rabbi was always given free scope in his sermons. He touched upon the wonderful progress which the congregation had made during the past twenty-three years.

L. L. Lorie, a member of the first confirmation class in the old church, told of the work which was being done by the confirmation teachers; how the little Jewish boy would attend the confirmation class after his regular school course and learn the Hebrew language. In the knowledge of this language Mr. Lorie believed that a boy was given a purer idea of right and wrong.

Mr. Lorie had telegraphed to all of those men who had been rabbis of the B'Nai Jehuda congregation asking them for words of congratulation or the expression of some sentiment which would be appropriate upon such an occasion. Each of the old rabbis responded and each spoke highly of the work and worthiness of the B'Nai Jehudah congregation.

B A. Fieneman, the oldest member of the congregation, read a paper upon the past history of the church, telling how it had grown from two-score persons to several hundred; how it had progressed from abject poverty to affluence. He told of the work of the members of the church and of the church as a whole in charity, which among the Jews is considered higher than missionary work.

The last address of the evening was made by Rabbi H. H. Mayer, for ten years the rabbi of the congregation. He spoke of the work which the church had done for the individual and of the trials which it had passed through.

"B'Nai Jehudah has now reached such a stage," said he, "that churches of other denominations point at us with wonder and ask how we did it. We are considered the leaders of the churches; we set the pace for every church of other denominations."

The new temple at Linwood Boulevard and Flora avenue will be ready for occupancy, it is thought, during the middle of September. Rabbi Mayer said last night that he hoped to set aside September 18-19-20 or September 11-12-13 for the days during which the dedicatory services will be held.

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May 12, 1908

MAY STOP SIDEWALK SKATING.

Property Owners on Linwood Boule-
vard Complain to Park Board.

At a meeting of the park board yesterday, a communication was received from property owners along Linwood boulevard that roller skaters have taken possession of the sidewalks to the annoyance of pedestrians, and that some of the skaters are real hoodlums in their conduct. The general superintendent was directed to look into the complaint and to devise a method for stopping the alleged nuisance.

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February 27, 1908

CHILDREN ARE ONLY SAVAGES.

And It's in the Blood of Grown-Ups,
Too, Says Brainerd.

"Children are only little savages, and should be treated as such," said Frank G. Brainerd, district superintendent of the Society for the Friendless, in an address at the Linwood Boulevard Presbyterian church last night. "It is not until they have received an education and have absorbed a part of the civilizing ideas of the time that they may be considered as men."

"Because they are savages, most children, if left to themselves, will steal and fight and do other uncivilized things, for which they cannot be blamed, for it is in their nature. And the savage instinct with which we are all born can never be quite outlived."

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