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June 20, 1909

LEAVES THE POLICE FORCE.

Wm. Long, Jailer at Headquarters,
Becomes Hotel Detective.

After more than a dozen years on the police department, William Long, the jailer at police headquarters, resigned yesterday to take a position at the Hotel Baltimore as night house officer. He will serve under H. W. Hammil, former lieutenant in the police department, who resigned to go with the hotel about three months ago.

Long was sent to the "woods" with others who thought that Hayes should have been retained as chief. He was moved back to headquarters five months ago.

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April 4, 1909

PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT.

Sergeant Halligan Rewarded for
Twenty-Seven Years' Service.

Sergeant Michael Halligan of No. 4 police station, for twenty-seven years a popular officer of the force, has been appointed to fill the vacancy made by the resignation of Lieutenant H. W. Hammil from that station last Wednesday. The latter is now a special detective at the Baltimore hotel. The appointment was made Wednesday by the police board, but Mr. Halligan did not receive the good news until yesterday when two of his friends from the city hall passed him in a buggy and called out:

"Congratulations, lieutenant!"

Later the official notice was received at the station and it was up to the newly-made lieutenant to buy cigars for everyone from Captain Thomas Flahive down to the reporters of the afternoon papers.

Lieutenant Halligan was born in County Wexford, Ireland, fifty years ago. He came to Kansas City in 1881 and became a member of the police force the year following. Since the day he was entered on the roll of patrolmen, walking beats out of Central station, he has not missed a day and there are no charges of inefficiency marked against him. Next to Captain Frank Snow and Chief Daniel Ahern he is the oldest officer in point of years of service in the department.

Patrolman J. M. Bottoms from No. 5 station has been named to fill the sergeantcy left vacant by the promotion of Lieutenant Halligan.

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April 1, 1909

HAMMIL WEARIED OF
SITTING ON A BOMB.

GREW NERVOUS THINKING OF
WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN.

Police Lieutenant Resigns to
Become Private Detective for Hotel
Baltimore -- Succeeds Ed Hickman
at the Hostelry.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.

Police Lieutenant H. W. Hammil yesterday resigned to become a private detective at the Hotel Baltimore. Hammil succeeds Edward Hickman, who leaves the hotel to go into business with his brother.

Lieutenant Hammil has been a member of the police department for nineteen years. Seven years ago he was promoted to a seargency and two years ago was made lieutenant. While his advancement may not have been as rapid as many who went on the force after he did, there were reasons for it. He was always averse to turning "crooks" loose because some petty or big policeman requested it and he always did his full duty in spit of who it hurt or what political interests were disturbed. That one thing, more than anything else, mitigated against rapid promotion.

REMOVED FROM HEADQUARTERS.

Hammil was made a lieutenant during the Governor Folk "rigid police investigation," while it was in its incipency, in fact. One day an officer who had made charges against John Hayes, then chief of police, was cursing the chief and Frank F. Rozzelle, then a commissioner, down in Central station. Hammil ordered the man to stop such talk or something "would be doing." As soon as Governor Folk had peremptorily removed Commissioner Rozzelle by wire and the new board had been organized and John Hayes dropped from the department, Hammil was ordered removed from headquarters, where he had served the better part of his life, to No. 4 station at Fifteenth and Walnut streets.

The records will show that while other districts, notably headquarters, have had a full quota of men and more, too, No. 4 has been handicapped with barely half enough men to do proper police duty. Hammil's watch, especially, never had a full complement of men the whole time he was there. It is said that if an officer got sick, crippled or otherwise "defunct," he was detailed to Hammil's watch. Handicapped as he was, however, he always went along with out complaint and kept up his end of the string.

As soon as Hickman resigned from the detective position at the Hotel Baltimore, D. J. Dean sent for Hammil and offered him the place. It is better pay and far more pleasant work -- no more knockers, no politics.

GLAD TO GET AWAY.

"I am sorry to leave some of my old friends on the department," Hammil said yesterday, "but I am glad to get away from a place where you felt all along like you were sitting on a dynamite bomb. If one 'crook' was arrested here would come a kick from his political friend, and when another fell into our hands here would come another 'gang' of political kickers. I always let 'em kick, though they always threatened to get my job."

The board took no action on Hammil's successor yesterday, Commissioner Elliott H. Jones being away hunting ducks. It may be left for the new board to fill.

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August 10, 1908

CHECKS TELEPHONE PESTS.

Lieutenant Hammil Has Made a Most
Useful Discovery.

Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, stationed at the Walnut street police station, has an infallible method of getting rid of the fellow who wants to monopolize the station telephone. When the bothersome fellow gets the receiver to his ear a monologue like the following ensues:

"Hello, is this Mary?"
"Aw, you know who it is."
"Yes, you do."
"Guess."
"Who have you been thinking about most today?" and so forth, ad infinitum.

Last night such a dialogue was started over the 'phone by one of the beardless youths who frequent the station.

"Watch me make him cut that out," said the lieutenant.

Slipping up behind the unwary youth the officer pulled a common pin out of his vest and inserted it into the cloth wrapping around the telephone wires.

"Hello," said the youth.

A long pause and then he repeated the salutation. Evidently something was wrong with the wire and after calling until he was red in the face, the young man desisted, muttering to himself words not loud but deep.

When he had gone the lieutenant explained:

"You merely insert the pin into the cloth and twist it until it touches both wires at the same time. That causes a short circuit and communication is as impossible as if the other person had hung up the receiver. It is an absolutely sure method of cutting short the conversation, and the recipe is free to all who wish to try it."

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May 5, 1908

POLICE FIND OWNERS
OF CANNED JEWELS.

BOY'S DISCOVERY BRINGS GLAD-
NESS TO ONE HOME.

Porch Climber Had Stolen Watches
on December 26, 1906, and
Buried Them in a To-
mato Can.

By a thorough search of police records Fred G. Bailey, secretary to the inspector of detectives, yesterday located the owners for most of the jewelry which was found Saturday night at Nineteenth and McGee streets. The valuables were found by John E. Linings, 317 East Nineteenth street, a boy who was digging for worms. It was all safely planted in an old rusty tin can which, according to the record, had been in the ground just one year, four months and two days when found. The can, which was delivered to Lieutenant Hammil at the Walnut street station, contained four gold watches, one gold cross, one gold cuff button, two brooches, one an old came; one gold and one enamel heart, and one string of three-strand gold beads.

Bailey began at January, 1906, and it was not until he reached December 26 of that year that his efforts were rewarded. On that night porch climbers entered the home of E. H. Stimson, 3145 Broadway, while the family was in the siting room below. The thief or thieves secured two ladies' gold watches, one an open face watch, with E. A. S. on the case in big letters, and the other marked "Emmett to Olive." They also got a long gold watch chain and five gold rings.

On the same evening the home of C. M. Gilbert, then living at 3129 Washington street, was entered, probably by the same "climbers" as it was in a similar manner. There three gold watches were stolen. One, an open face watch, had "1876" engraved on it and there was a long chain to it. Another was engraved "Annie B Gilbert" and the last was undescribed. The thief also got a black seal card case and $40 in cash.

The gold engraved cross, the cuff button, two brooches and two hearts have not yet been identified. Detective Ralph Trueman was sent out to locate the robbed families and tell them of their luck. He found Mr. Stimson still living at the same number but Mr. Gilbert, he said, had left the city. Neighbors said the family had moved to Ohio. They believed it was Dayton. Secretary Bailey will endeavor to locate Mr. Gilbert and make him happy.

Mr. Stimson, who is a real estate man, was very much pleased when told of the find. "I recall the night we were robbed," he said. "It was the night after Christmas and about 8 o'clock. The thieves climbed the front porch and ransacked the two front rooms. The watch marked 'E. A. S.' is the property of my daughter, Edith Aileen Stimson. She will be more pleased than anybody as she was broken hearted over her loss."

Many conjectures have been made as to how and why the can of jewelry was buried in the ground and especially why it was left there. Many police believe that the thief, after burying his loot, fell into the hands of the law and may now be doing time in some prison. Others think the man who put the can there must be dead.

It is not an unusual thing for burglars to bury plunder, especially watches and other jewelry which is easily identified. After it has been buried long enough for the police to cease to look for the lost valuables they can easily be dug up and either sold or pawned with less chance of detection. If the thief is in prison the police believe he would have some day returned and disposed of his loot.

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April 14, 1908

BURNED CHILDREN WITH ACID.

Boys Rubbed It on Their Faces, Caus-
ing Them Much Pain.

Four boys, living in the neighborhood of Fourteenth and Campbell streets, last night took a bottle of carbolic acid and a medicine syringe and spread terror among the girls and smaller children of that section. An alarm reached No. 4 police station and Patrolman T. M. Scott captured one of the boys, Tony Hanson, 1320 Campbell street. His is 11 years old and his companions were about the same age. The names of the others said to have taken part were Chester Cheney, 910 East Fourteenth street; Harry Wintermute, 912 East Fourteenth street and Chester Northfleet, 914 East Fourteenth street.

The boys claimed they secured the bottle in or behind a barn and that they did not know what it contained. Many children were burned by the acid. While one boy used the medicine syringe the others, it is said, would saturate pieces of rag and rub the necks and faces of children they could catch. Ugly burns and much pain followed. Lieutenant Hammil in charge of No. 4 police station did not want to place boys so young in the holdover, so he merely left their names, addresses and other information for Captain Flahive to act upon as he chooses today. Some of the children who were most burned are Florence David, 1431 Campbell street; Winnie Austin, 914 East Fourteenth street, and Edna Barnes, 1425 Campbell street.

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February 27, 1908

HE USED A NOTARY'S SEAL.

As Well as Several Stars to Arrest a
Sober Man.

Armed with a deputy marshal's star, a Missouri Pacific special policeman's badge and a notary public seal, George Miller tried to arrest a man in a saloon at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue last night. Miller walked up to the man and, showing his different badges, told him he was under arrest. Naturally the man arrested wanted to know why, and a series of questioning took place during the course of which Miller told his prisoner that he was charged with having done a "stick-up" two nights before.

Miller insisted that the man go to No. 4 police station with him and there be locked up for further investigation. When they arrived there the prisoner told his story to Lieutenant Hammill, who immediately ordered the man with the badges locked up for safe keeping and teleponed to Marshal Sam McGee at the jail to ascertain whether or not Miller was what he represented. McGee told the officer that no man whose name was George Miller had ever been commissioned by the county, but as for the special policeman's star and the notary's seal, the marshal could not say. The man whom Miller arrested was released.

Miller, who lives at 113 West Fourteenth street, was sent to police headquarters, charged with drinking and impersonating an officer.

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August 3, 1907

KNEW IT WAS COMING

CAPTAIN WEBER MERELY WAIT-
ING ORDER OF DISMISSAL.

When Hayes Was Dropped He Pre-
pared for the Ax -- Other Captains
and Lieutenants Commissioned.
Hammil Is Transferred.
Captain William E. Weber
CAPTAIN W. E. WEBER

Continuing Governor Folk's policy of removing "political enemies" from the police department, Captain Weber was yesterday dropped from the force by Commissioners Gallagher and Jones, Mayor Beardsley voted to recommission the captain. All other captains were recommissioned.

Whitwash spread over the actions of Patrolman Athur who, it was charged, attempted to draw a revolver on former Commissioner Rozzelle at Wednesday's board meeting.

Lieutenant Hammil, who refused to return Patrolman Arthur's club and gun after the overt act until ordered to do so by Acting Chief Ahern, was transferred from headquarters to the Walnut street station. Lieutenant Hammil also took an important part in impeaching Arthur's testimony before the board regarding Arthur's vitriolic attack on Chief Hayes and former Commissioner Rozzelle in police headquarters.

Lieutenant Walter Whitsett, who has been mentioned as a possibility for chief, and who it is said is friendly to the Kemper forces, is given Hammil's place at headquarters. Many believe this is the first step toward making Whitsett chief.

The transfers of Lieutenants Hammil and Whitsett were upon the resolution of Commissioner Gallagher "for the good of the service."

Commissioner Jones, in his first resolution, moved to reappoint James Vincil to serve three more years as secretary to the police board.

Captain William E. Weber has been on the police force since he was appointed jailer November 4, 1889. He was appointed a probationary patrolman the following day and May 30, 1890, was made a patrolman. He walked a beat for five years and won his promotion to sergeant by an act of bravery.

In a fight in Grand avenue, a liquor crazed salesman rushed at an intended victim with a butcher knife. Captain Weber coolly shot the butcher knife from the hand of the would-be slayer. His promotion to sergeant came on September 4, 1895. He was made a lieutenant of police October 1, of the same year, and was recommissioned after serving three years.

To take advantage of the raise in salary, Lieutenant Weber resigned and under the Cleary law, August 15, 1900, was at once appointed to his former rank with the increased pay allowed a law just passed. August 29, 1901, Lieutenant Weber was commissioned captain.

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August 2, 1907

NEW CHIEF IS LAX.

Ahern Returned Arthur's Revolver
Without Making an Investigation.

After the disgraceful proceedings at the meeting of the police board Wednesday, when Chief John Hayes was removed so unceremoniously and Patrolman Harry Arthur had made what many thought was an attempt to shoot former Commissioner Rozzelle, the patrolman remained about headquarters until late in the evening. He was grumbling in an undertone and at intervals, demanding his revolver and club, which had been taken away from him by Chief Hayes and turned over to the board. Mayor Beardsley, in fact, ordered the chief to remove Arthur's revolver after Commissioner Gallagher had requested that "the new chief" be sent for to preserve order, even though several policemen were in the room and a human live seemed in danger.

Arthur demanded his revolver several times of Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, in charge of the desk, but that official would not give it to him. Finally the policeman left the room and returned with Lieutenant Charles Ryan, recently elevated by Mr. Gallagher on request from Governor Folk, and now acting inspector of detectives.

"Give this man his gun," Ryan commanded of Hammil. "The board took no action on the matter, and you have no right to hold it."

"The revolver was sent down to this desk from the board room," said Hammil. "I know nothing of what took place up there. It will not be returned, however, until I get some order from the board or some responsible authority.

Lieutenant Hammil then called up Elliot M. Jones, the new Folk commissioner, who had voted to oust Chief Hayes without hearing one word of testimony.

"Better give it back to him, I guess," the commissioner said. "It is not being held by order of the board."

The revolver was held until after roll call yesterday morning, when it was returned to Arthur. He was told to remain at the station, however, as Acting Chief Ahern wanted to see him. When Ahern was seen he said:

"I heard rumors of what had taken place up in the board room yesterday, and I wanted to get a report from Arthur about it. I held him there thinking that if the board wanted to suspend him him for what he did some action would surely be taken and I would be notified what course to pursue. As no one called me up about the case, however, I let Arthur go after he had made a statement to me regarding his actions in the board room. He said he had no intention of shooting anybody, that his club simply fell on the floor and he had stooped to pick it up."

Acting Chief Ahern said he had examined no other witnesses about Arthur's action in the board room. "I am going to investigate that," he said, finally. "I will look into the matter further and have a talk with the commissioners to get their opinions."

The members of the board were not in the position to see as much of the patrolman's actions as the men who stood nearest to him -- behind him, in fact. Chief Hayes was watching him closely, as Arthur is known to have a violent tempter, so when he saw the club fall to the floor and the man's hand go back under his coat he took the initiative, ran to the man and pinioned his arms to his side and held him, with the assistance of others.

It is not known that Mayor Beardsley had anything to do with the returning of Arthur to work yesterday morning. He said later in the day that Arthur would have to answer to the board for his actions before that body. He also said that at the meeting today he would produce several witnesses who will swear that Arthur tried to draw his revolver at the time he was seized by Chief Hayes.

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August 1, 1907

POLICE FORCE
IS DISRUPTED


Folk's Machine-Building
Results in Most Disorderly
Meeting of Board


LIE IS BANDIED ABOUT


Patrolman Arthur, Chief Folk
Witness, Attempts to Draw
"Gun" on Mr. Rozzelle

HAYES IS REMOVED AS CHIEF

Testifies That Men Were Shifted
on Their Beats on Order of
Commissioner Gallagher
NEW CHARGE OF GRAFT MADE.

Hayes Declares That Gallagher's Son
Got Business on Strength of His
Father's Position -- A Lie
Says Gallagher.


Governor Folk's attempt to turn the police department into a political machine came very near to resulting in bloodshed yesterday afternoon. Prompt action on the part of ex-Chief Hayes in hustling Patrolman Arthur out of the board room probably averted a tragedy. The lie had passed between ex-Commissioner Rozzelle and Arthur, when the latter suddenly dropped his club and reached for his "gun."

The board room was filled with men, many Shannon "rabbits" being in the throng.

Chief Hayes, who did not know he had been deposed, grabbed Arthur.

"Leave that man alone!" shouted Commissioner Gallagher. "You are no longer a police officer."

But Hayes, mindful of his duty, hustled Arthur out of the room.

It was a day fraught with numerous incidents, all tending to show that Folk and Shannon are building an air-tight police machine out of a police department thoroughly demoralized by a "reform" governor.

In the first place Folk's new commissioner voted to supplant Hayes with Daniel Ahern without hearing any evidence. To a Journal reporter last night he admitted that Commissioner Gallagher had shown him the resolution deposing Hayes in the hallway a few moments before the board went into session. Mayor Beardsley voted against the resolution.

His Testimony Disproved.

It was shown that Patrolman Arthur, Mr. Gallagher's chief witness, misstated fact after fact on the witness stand, witnesses and official records disproving the assertions on which Gallagher and Folk hoped to prove Hayes unfit for chief.

Chief Hayes testified that the men on the force were juggled by Gallagher for political reasons. Officers who were alert in closing saloons on Sunday were moved to other beats, on Gallagher's order, the chief said. He gave a list of the men Gallagher had ordered changed to other beats. Gallagher did not deny the chief's statements.

In the lobby of Central police station Patrolman Arthur became so abusive of Rozzelle and Hayes -- who were in an upstairs room -- that Lieutenant Hammil had to order him from the room.

Chief Hayes made the charge that graft existed in the police department to the extent that a son of Commissioner Gallagher had written insurance for the keepers of North end saloons and resorts on the strength of being in position to call the police down on them if they refused to give him business.
Said the Chief Lied.

Gallagher denied the assertion and said Hayes lied. Former Detective Bert Brannon leaped into the room and called Gallagher a ----- ----- liar and said he could prove that young Gallagher had done all Hayes charged against him. Brannon was hustled out of the room. No subpoena was issued for him to delve deeper into the charges.

A more disorderly meeting of a Kansas City police board probably was never held. The one man responsible for yesterday's disgraceful scenes is Joseph W. Folk, the reformer. He has spread the seeds of disruption among the Kansas City police in his efforts to further his candidacy for the senate until today the force is one of the most thoroughly disorganized in the country.

POLICE OFFICERS NEARLY
FIGHT IN THE STATION.


The first row at the police board meeting yesterday was precipitated when Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, in command at police headquarters under Captain Weber, ordered Patrolman Arthur out of the station. Arthur, according to several witnesses whose testimony was afterward used, became abusive and said uncomplimentary things of former Commissioner Rozzelle and Chief Hayes. He called Rozzelle and unprintable name, and Hammil, according to his own statement before the board, ordered him to "shut up."

Lieutenant Hammil was called before the board by Mr. Kimbrell and he detailed the row with Arthur at length. "Arthur said Chief Hayes had dogged him around and was responsible for his reduction in rank and that he will holler on some one if hey don't stay off him."

Arthur, according to his custom, interrupted Lieutenant Hammil. He charged that Hammil did most of the talking and taunted him with the mark that Hammil had said: "There's liable to be a hell of a lot of changes around here today."

Officers Contradict Each Other.

"Hammil told me three months ago," continued Arthur, "that someone has been jobbing me. He said he could very easily use me down town and that he was sorry he had to send me to the suburbs. He said he needed men at the theaters and that over in Broadway thieves were kicking in front doors and $1,000 robberies were of nightly occurrence, but that the chief had given strict orders that I be kept on duty at the theater or sent to an unimportant beat.

"Hammil said, 'Arthur, there is no use of your putting your head into the halter. This fellow Rozzelle has lots of friends and they are going to get you.' "

This statement was made under oath, as were all of the other statements made by Arthur during the day. Lieutenant Hammil was also under oath. He denied positively ever having talked over such matters with Arthur and said he had not spoken to Arthur in three months except in the line of duty. Arthur declared that chief Hayes leaves the station at 3 or 4 o'clock and that Hammil then directs him and assigns his duty. Chief Hayes made Arthur take back his word as soon as uttered and Arthur supplemented his statement by saying that sometimes the chief remains on duty until 5:30 o'clock in the evening.

A. C. Durham, an attorney, who at one time represented Arthur when the latter was preparing charges against Chief Hayes, testified that Arthur told him if they didn't show reason for his reduction in the department he would expose the misconduct in office of Chief Hayes. Durham said he was later dismissed and the charges dropped. He did not know why.

Arthur's Story Discredited.
By this time Lieutenant Hammil had found two witnesses to his row with Arthur and they were sworn. They were Sergeant Eubank and Patrolman Lukehart. Neither heard Hammil say "there might be a hell of a lot of changes in the department," as Arthur had charged, but each testified that he heard Arthur abuse Rozzelle and Hayes and heard annd saw Hammil eject him and order him to "keep his mouth shut."

Arthur boldly stated to the board that Lukehart was testifying to a lie. He stated that Lukehart is sore at him over a judgment for $40, which the court ordered Lukehart to pay him. Secretary Vincil quieted Arthur by stating that the money had long since been paid to him by Lukehart but that Arthur had refused to accept it.

ARTHUR TRIED TO DRAW
"GUN" ON MR. ROZZELLE.

It looked as though a tragedy were about to be enacted in the police board room near the close of the hearing yesterday. Harry A. Arthur had testified against Chief Hayes, but his evidence was discredited by other witnesses and the records. Arthur precipitated a row that threw the meeting into uproar.

Commissioner Rozzelle was on the witness stand at the time. Arthur was disarmed by Chief John Hayes and taken from the board room by patrolmen. It was the second time the services of patrolmen were needed to clear the room during yesterday's session of the police board's investigation of the department.

County Prosecutor Kimbrell, acting as attorney for Chief Hayes, had drawn his net of impeachment tightly about Arthur as the investigation proceeded and lacked by the testimony of one witness to discredit the patrolman's denial that he had ever threatened his chief. This witness was Frank F. Rozelle, the police commissioner removed by Governor Folk by wire on the eve of the recommissioning of John Hayes as chief of police.

In combating the charges brought by Arthur against Hayes, Mr. Kimbrell, in cross examination, secured Arthur's statement that he had never in his life mentioned the name of Chief Hayes to Commissioner Rozzelle and that he had never called the commissioner "crooked." Contrary to the expectations of Patrolman Arthur and Mr. Gallagher, the former commissioner promptly took the witness stand when called by Mr. Kimbrell. Mayor Beardsley explained that Mr. Rozzelle need not give his testimony until the notes of the day's investigation had been transcribed that he might know just what had been said about him by witnesses.

"But I am willing to answer any questions," said Mr. Rozzelle, and Kimbrell's examination proceeded. Harry Arthur was an attentive auditor while the former commissioner was on the stand. He had previously broken into the testimony of other witnesses and his actions throughout the afternoon had been countenanced by Chairman Beardsley who knew the other two commissioners were eager to hear all Arthur had to say.

"Mr. Arthur has testified that he never discussed Chief Hayes with you repeatedly here today," Mr. Kimbrell said to Mr. Rozzelle. "Will you tell the board of any conversation you may have had with Arthur about the chief?"

"Arthur came to me to see about getting a promotion to his former rank," replied Mr. Rozzelle. "He told me if I did not vote for his promotion he would go to Commissioner Gallagher with charges against Chief Hayes. He said the chief had been responsible for his reduction in rank, and that he would get even through Mr. Gallagher unless I voted for his reinstatement."

"I never made such a statement in my life," cried Arthur. "You told me you had heard it, and that you did not believe a word of it."

"Be careful," admonished Mr. Rozzelle, never rising from his seat. "That statement is a falsehood."

Immediately the room was in an uproar. Harry Arthur reached for his club and arose. He was nervous. His eyes protruded and his hands shook. He dropped the club to the floor. Then he reached for his pistol pocket.

Chief of Police Hayes was the first man to realize his duty. He was sitting by his attorney at the other end of the long table. His eye had been quicker than the hand of the angry patrolman. In an instant he had pinioned the arms of the belligerent patrolman and was searching for the pistol. A dozen men started to assist him.

Police Commissioner Gallagher arose and demanded that Chief Hayes release Arthur. His command could be heard throughout the board room.

"That man is not an officer. Take him off!" yelled Gallagher. "Let Arthur alone. You are only a citizen. We have a new chief of police downstairs. Call him to keep order -- if such a course is necessary."

Chief Hayes had disarmed Arthur, who fought his captors and shouted to Commissioner Gallagher: "Well, what do you think of that. I'm not trying to shoot anybody, Mr. Gallagher."

Didn't Know He Was Deposed.

The chief's work was done and he allowed patrolmen, who appeared to be in good standing with the board, t remove Arthur from the room. Then he turned inquiringly toward the commissioners. He had heard for the first time that he had been succeeded in office. The very first action of the board had been to appoint his successor, but the matter was done in an undertone and the chief had not been informed. Even his attorney, Mr. Kimbrell, was dumbfounded. He asked the meaning of Gallagher's statement.

Chairman Beardsley called Chief Hayes to the table, and, for the first time, the head of the Kansas City police department was told that he is no longer a police officer.

"I will have to ask for your emblem of authority," said Mr. Beardsley.

Chief Hayes unpinned the gold badge from his left breast and handed it to the mayor.

"Your successor was named by resolution introduced by Mr. Gallagher, Commissioner Jones concurring," said the mayor. "I guess it is customary to ask for the badge. I really don't know."

Since Chief Hayes has been without a commission since May 4 no action of the board was necessary to remove him from office. When the board met yesterday afternoon Chief Hayes did not last five minutes. But a half a dozen sentences were spoken. Elliot H. Jones, the new commissioner, entered the room and Chairman Beardsley pointed out his seat to him.

"I have two resolutions to introduce," said Commissioner Gallagher. The room was still noisy. Persons who were to appear as witnesses before the board were entering the room and searching for seats. The first resolution, naming Inspector Daniel Ahearn as temporary chief of police and Lieutenant Charles Ryan as inspector of detectives, was passed by him to Mr. Beardsley. The mayor read the resolution and passed to silently to Commissioner Jones, who gave it to the secretary of the board without any notice whatever.

"Do you think he is the proper man for the place?" asked the mayor of Mr. Gallagher.

"He is the ranking officer," volunteered Commissioner Jones, who had not looked at the resolution but apparently was familiar with its contents.

"I move its adoption," said Mr. Gallagher.

"I vote aye," echoed Commissioner Jones.

Mayor Beardsley was silent. He appeared in a deep study. When he was sufficiently recovered to speak, he said: "I am going to vote against the resolution. I will make a minute of my vote and hand it to the secretary. I want it to get in the record."

None of this transaction could be heard a dozen feet from the members of the board and Chief Hayes and his attorney, Mr. Kimbrell, whose seats were at one end of the table, remained ignorant of the resolution until after the meeting and the fight which called for the chief's star.

As Commissioner Gallagher protested against the action of Chief Hayes in disarming Patrolman Arthur, Mayor Beardsley jumped to his feet. "The police board is in control of the room," he said. "Chief Hayes, disarm that man." The mayor did not see the necessity of sending down stairs for the new chief of police to disarm a man who was apparently in the act of attempting to do violence to the witness.

The lie had been passed earlier in the session between Commissioner Gallagher and Chief Hayes and patrolmen had been called to clear the room. Gallagher had taunted Chief Hayes by producing in evidence a letter from Chief Hayes to Sergeant Caskey about changing the beat of a patrolman. The chief had stated on the stand that if he had written the letter he did not recall the language. Gallagher insinuated that the chief was lying several times and finally, referring to various passages in the Arthur testimony, said: "You see how easy it is to impeach the testimony of a witness. I had made you out a liar already. Be careful of the statements you make before this board hereafter."
"If I wrote the letter I did it to shield you," rejoined Hayes, "for you had caused the patrolman to be sent back to his former beat after I removed him because he had been gambling."
Chief Hayes was angry as he stepped forward to the table and faced the board. "I'm tired of exposing the things forced upon my by Mr. Gallagher and then having my word doubted when I probably wrote a letter saying the changing of Patrolman Thomas Park's beat was a mistake merely to shield the commissioner.
New Charges of Graft.
"I wish now to make a further statement. It is an apology to Mayor Beardsley for a statement I recently made. I know the mayor nor Mr. Rozzelle ever thought I was referring to either of them, but I wish now to tell the whole truth of my statement.
"I stated early in this investigation that if there is any graft in the department it is higher up than me. That statement was directed at Commissioner Gallagher. I am in a position to prove that he is guilty, too. Mr. Gallagher's son is using his father's name and office to secure business for his father's firm. He goes about amongst the disorderly houses, saloons and resorts in the North end soliciting fire insurance policies. He tells proprietors that his father is a police commissioner and that they must "come through" with their insurance business or trouble will result in their licenses."
"Any man who makes that statement is a liar," shouted Commissioner Gallagher.
"I have the proofs here," suggested Chief Hayes.
"You are a liar ---" began Gallagher.
At this point in the heated proceedings Bert Brannon, a former detective, burst through the crowd and came inside the railing. Shaking his fist at Commissioner Gallagher, he shouted angrily: "I made that statement to Chief Hayes of the graft you and your sons have built up out of your office. I know it's true. The man who denies it is a --- damned liar."
Mayor Beardsley, always the peacemaker and protector of lives and the pursuit of liberties in the board room, sprung to his feet and summoned patrolmen to remove Brannon.
As Brannon made his charge a man near the entrance chimed in: "I am a saloon man and Gallagher's son held me up for insurance the same way." He said he did not know Brannon and asked a neighbor his identity.

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April 18, 1907

CAME WEST TO KILL BUFFALO.

Virginia Boy, Disappointed, Started
on the Way Home.

Clark Freeland, 13 years old, from New Martinsville, Va., came west to hunt buffalo and fight Indians. He landed here in April 5 and was first brought to the notice of the police when he tried to beat his way over the new inter-city viaduct. He had been told that the buffalo were all on the other side of the river and he had spent the 75 cents with which he landed.

Yesterday a telegram with money for a ticket home came to the police for the buffalo and Indian hunter from his father, Dr. W. P. Freeland. The police went out and gathered in Clark again and last night he was sent back to the effete East, a disheartened boy.

"I hate to go back," he said, "without having killed a single buffalo. And I haven't seen an Indian either."

"The buffaloes are all hibernating now," he was told by Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, "and the Indians are all out trapping and hunting furs for your Eastern people to wear." The boy said that was too bad, and left.

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March 18, 1907

QUARREL OVER COAL.

Police Called Upon to Peacefully
Settle a Knotty Dispute.

"He wanted to fight me becasue the coal man dumped my coal in his cellar," was the complaint made by an Independence avenue second-hand clothing dealer to Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, when the clothing man and a neighbor were taken to police headquarters for disturbing the peace.

"He called me names because I got mad," expostulated the neighbor.

The two men were followed to police headquarters by a half dozen women. After the accusations had been made, the women took up the trouble and among themselves a lively argument arose. It looked for a time as though the women were about to settle the controversy and they were hustled out of the station.

"Well, well, that is the first time I ever heard of a man wanting to fight because another man put coal in his cellar," remarked Lieutenant Hammil.

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February 20, 1907

MONEY WAS IN HIS HAT.

And Harrison Accused a Policeman
of Putting It There.

F. G. Harrison, a switchman, went to police headquarters last night and complained that he had been robbed of $5 by a woman. The woman was arrested and denied the robbery so strenuously that Lieutenant H. W. Hammil thought best to search Harrison to be sure.

When they search a man at police headquarters the man's hat is never overlooked. And so Harrison's hat came in for a search. Lo and behold, snugly ensconced inside of the sweat band was a $5 bill neatly folded. The woman was ordered released and Harrison placed in the holdover for safekeeping.

"Say," said Harrison to Michael McCarthy when the latter took down a prisoner, "who was that feller who took that money out of my hat?"

"That was Lieutenant Hammil," he was informed.

"Well, I don't care who he is," said Harrison, "he had that money crimped up in his hand and put it in my hat himself. I know I was robbed."

McCarthy did not argue the question with him. He knew Hammil was not going to place a $5 bill in Harrison's hat. They are too scarce in the police department.

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