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January 13, 1910

SOLDIER DICK AND
GIRL ARE PARTED.

"WAIT 'TIL I'M 21" HE SAYS,
"I'LL BE TRUE," GIVES
CHESSIE.

"Mooning" Around Third
and Main When Arrested
by Policeman.
Parted Sweethearts Chessie Nave and Richard Wiliford.
CHESSIE NAVE AND RICHARD WILIFORD.

Chessie Nave is 16, and Richard Wiliford is 20, but they each felt a great deal older and more responsible than when they arrived in Kansas City yesterday morning on an early train, with a wish and a determination to get married. they didn't feel so old nor so responsible last night. This is the way of it:

Last Tuesday the young people ran away together from Lexington, Mo., where the young man is a student in Wentworth Military academy. The girl is just a girl. they were accompanied on their matrimonial excursion by two friends, Grace Nave, a cousin of Miss Chessie, and Calvin Cook of Bartlesville, also a student in the military academy. The plan of the eloping kittens was to get a marriage license in Kansas City, Kas., where officials dealing in Cupid's paper are generally supposed to be gentle and kind. They missed the direction and went "mooning around the vicinity of Third and Main streets at an early hour yesterday morning. There a policeman found them.

The police had been notified that the young people were headed toward Kansas City with some kind of a prank in veiw, and the policeman saw them and happened to remember. He nailed them.
HIS FATHER ARRIVES.

Joel Wiliford, Woodford, Ok., father of Richard, had also been notified of his son's unceremonious leave in company with a little girl in skirts. The old gentleman hopped a train and got to Kansas City about as soon as the elopers. He dropped into central police station about the time that Richard and Chessie, Grace and Calvin were making a botch of trying to argue the police into the belief that while the resemblance was probably great, it was not absolute.

Papa Wiliford tried moral persuasion on his son. Nothing doing. Son was obdurate. What's the use of trying to make a soldier of a fellow, anyway, if you expect him to give up his girl at a mere parental command Richard said a soldier should never surrender. And he further declared he wouldn't. So into the dungeon cell went he, like any real, spicy, belted and buckled Don Juan of old. His good friend Calvin went along with him, but not from choice.

As for the girls, they saw life as it is from the matron's room Thus stood the matter all day. Richard would not desert the principles of academic soldiering, and Chessie vowed she would be as true as "Beautiful Bessie, the Banana Girl, or, "He Kissed Me Once and I Can't Forget." Then came Nash Ruby, brother-in-law of Chessie. He came From Lexington. He looked real fierce.

HERDED BEFORE CAPTAIN.

Forth from the dungeon cell marched Soldier Richard, and friend Calvin. Down from the matron's melancholy boudoir minced Chessie and Grace. They were herded into the office of Captain Walter Whitsett, where more moral suasion was rubbed on.

Richard, during the afternoon, had agreed with his father upon a compromise, bu which he was to return to school and finish his education. Later he took it all back. And w hen he saw Chessie he said:

"I'm going to marry you, Chessie, even if I never become a great general."

"That's where you're wrong," mildly said Papa Wiliford.

Then Chessie put in her word. But it didn't move anybody at all. Unless it was Nash Ruby, Brother-in-Law Nash. "You'll come along home with me, miss," said he. Chessie subsided. But when it came to parting, Richard uttered his defiance. "I'll be 21 before long," said he, "and then we can marry."

"I'll be true to you," sobbed Chessie.

Brother-in-law Nash led her away to catch a train for Lexington. this morning Richard will go to Woodford, Ok., with pa. Friend Calvin went home last night. That's all, except it is said Chessie made a face at her future father-in-law.

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September 20, 1909

J. M. CHANEY, PASTOR
AND INVENTOR, DEAD.

SERVED 53 YEARS IN PRESBY-
TERIAN MINISTRY.

Independence Man Was President of
Elizabeth Aull Seminary at
Lexington, Mo., in 1885 --
Born in Ohio in 1831.
The Reverend James McDonald Chaney.
REV. J. M. CHANEY.

Rev. James McDonald Chaney died late Saturday night at his home, 532 South Main street, Independence, from the rupture of a blood vessel. For several days he was indisposed from acute indigestion.

Mr. Chaney has been in the ministry for fifty-three years, and fifty-one in the Lafayette, Mo., Presbytery of the Presbyterian church. Aside from his ministerial work, he was president of the Elizabeth Aull Seminary, at Lexington in 1885 and later of the Kansas City Ladies' college.

He was born near Salem, O., March 18, 1831. He was graduated from the Princeton Theological seminary, after which he entered the Presbyterian ministry.

SEMINARY PRESIDENT.

He came West to be president of the Elizabeth Aull college at Lexington. He was married to Miss Mary Parke, at Lexington, in 1875. From the Elizabeth Aull college, Rev. Chaney was tendered the presidency of the Kansas City Ladies' college at Independence, Mo., which position he held for several years.

During his connection with the Lafayette Presbytery, Rev. Chaney preached regularly. During his ministry he has had charge at Lamonte, Hughesville, Pleasant Hill, Corder and Alma, Mo.

Rev. Chaney was of a mechanical train of mind, and was interested in various devices, some of them his own patents. His laboratory at home was an attraction for young and old.

Rev. Chaney, after severing his connection with the Kansas City Ladies' college, promoted an academy for young men at Independence, making a feature of higher mathematics.

His son, J. Mack Chaney, is an attorney of Kansas City. A half sister, Mrs. W. B. Wilson, resides at Lexington, Mo.

STUDENT OF ASTRONOMY.

Astronomy was a field of science that fascinated the dead minister and his proclivities in this direction won him much local note. About ten years ago he invented a planetarium whereby an astronomer could determine the relative positions of all the known planets in the solar system, provided he knew the meridian passage or declination. If taken to any part of the earth's surface, the instrument could be made to indicate the movement of the planets, whether north or south of the equator. It was used in a number of schools.

Rev. E. C. Gordon, former president of Westminster college at Fulton, Mo., will conduct the funeral service, which will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the First Presbyterian church, Independence.

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August 31, 1909

LEFT EAST FOR FRISCO
CLAD IN A PAPER SUIT.

"Hobo Harry" Started From New
York to Walk 3,850 Miles
for a Prize.

"Hobo Harry," who left Madison Square garden in New York June 21, clothed only in seven old newspapers fastened on with a ball of string, reached Kansas City last night at 9 o'clock en route on foot and also "on the bum" to San Francisco.

"Harry" says he is walking for a prize of $2,500 offered by a company of New York publishers. Certain restrictions, which the pedestrian has found hard to meet, were laid down as additional barriers. He must not put up at a hotel nor sleep on a bed; he must not work to earn money n or can he buy anything to sell for a profit.

About the only source of revenue left to him is his suit of clothes. He sells space on his coat, hat and even trousers to those who want to write their signatures as souvenirs in indelible ink.

His paper suit lasted his just three hours and ten minutes had he walked through New York, New Jersey, Arlington and Newark clad in nothing but this journalistic raiment. At Newark he solicited a suit of duck clothing from an obscure philanthropist and the first of his great obstacles was overcome. At Columbus, O., he "bummed" a tough suit of khaki and already this is covered by more than 100 signatures. The highest price he ever received for "advertising space" on his khaki suit was a $2.50 gold piece, he says.

"Harry: says he doesn't allow himself more than eight hours' rest at a time. To win the prize he must make the journey in 156 walking days, Sundays and rainy days are not counted. He says he has reached Kansas City about twenty days ahead of his schedule, based on the total distance of 3,850 miles, as calculated by Weston.

"I am going to beat Weston's first record of 139 days," he said. "Dan O'Leary made the trip in 102 days in '97 and Weston made it again in 105."

He left Lexington, Mo., at 3 o'clock yesterday morning and covered the distance of forty-eight miles to Kansas City by 9 o'clock at night. He will resume his journey Thursday morning at 4 o'clock.

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August 28, 1909

DOWN THE RIVER WITH TAFT.

Steamboat Chester Will Carry Kan-
sas Cityans to New Orleans.

At a meeting held yesterday afternoon the directors of the Commercial Club enthusiastically accepted the invitation from St. Louis to send a steamboat representing Kansas City with the flotilla which will escort President Taft down the Mississippi river from St. Louis to the big waterways convention at New Orleans in October. Secretary E. M. Clendening was instructed to send notification of Kansas City's acceptance and to ask that the Kansas City boat be assigned a good place in the formation of the down-river fleet.

The steamboat Chester will carry the Kansas Cityans to New Orleans. It is the intention to begin the trip at the home dock, make stops at the towns down the Missouri river as far as Jefferson City and join the flotilla at St. Louis. This scheme, it is thought, is preferable to making the start at St. Louis and besides it will afford the Kansas Cityans an excellent opportunity to campaign for river improvement at Lexington, Glasgow, Boonville, Jefferson City and the other towns down the Missouri between here and the state capital.

The Chester has capacity for sixty passengers, and from the way applications for berths are coming in it is probable that they will be engaged long before the trip is to be taken. A band will be on board the boat, which will be gaily decorated. H. G. Wilson, transportation commissioner of the Commercial Club, will be in charge of the arrangements.

The boat will probably leave Kansas City on the afternoon of October 21, will reach St. Louis October 25 and will arrive at New Orleans October 31. It will be used as a floating hotel for the Kansas Cityans while at St. Louis and New Orleans.

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June 29, 1909

ON A HUNT FOR WHISKEY.

Mrs. Myra McHenry Would Down
Traffic With a Pen.

Mrs. Myra McHenry, co-worker and one-time associate of Carrie Nation, was here yesterday. Mrs. McHenry is going to Lexington, Mo., where she will visit her sister, Mrs. Thomas Young, and incidentally take a whack at anything that looks as if it needed whacking.

"I am on a hunt for whisky," she said. "There is no more of it in Wichita, and I must find other fields. Mrs. Nation and myself, while we strive to attain the same ends, are not alike. She is a 'hatchet smasher' and I smash with the pen.

Mrs. McHenry has been in jail thirty-three times.

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May 30, 1909

IN HIS OWN WORDS.

Ex-Governor's Life Sketch, as Writ-
ten by Himself.

Here is a brief sketch of the ex-governor's life, as given by himself in his own words:

"I was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky., on a farm near Shelbyville. My father, Henry Crittenden, died when I was two years old leaving my mother a widow with five sons; three daughters had died in infancy; the oldest son was not over 15 years of age. My mother was remarried after a few years to Colonel Murry of Cloverport, K y., and five children were born of this union.

"My education was begun at a small subscription school at Shelbyville and continued until I was old enough to go to Center college at Danville, from which I was graduated in the class that had in it Judge John of this city, Governor John Young Brown, W. P. C. Breckinridge, Boyd Winchester and other noted men. I studied law in Frankfort in the office of John J. Crittenden and married in Frankfort Miss Carrie W. Jackson. Soon afterwards I removed to Lexington, Mo., where I opened my first law office. I remained there till the war broke out, when I assisted John F. Philips in raising a regiment of Union soldiers that was sworn in at Georgetown, Pettis county, in 1862, for three years. The regiment was mustered out April 7, 1865 two days before Lee's surrender. At the close of the war I removed to Warrensburg, as feeling still ran high at Lexington. I formed a law partnership with Frances M. Cockrell, who returned from the Confederate service at the close of the war. We practiced law successfully until I was elected to congress in 1872, but the partnership was not dissolved. It continued until General Cockrell was elected United States senator. I remained in congress until 1878 when I refused to be a candidate for re-election. I was nominated for governor over John S. Marmaduke, who became my successor and John A. Hockaday, who had been attorney general under my predecessor.

TEMPESTUOUS ADMINISTRATION.

"The four years of my administration are known to all the older citizens of the state. Phil E. Chappel of this city was state treasurer during my administration,and no state ever had a more honest, faithful or intelligent official.

"My administration was perhaps the most tempestuous in the state's history. We had so many questions of great importance to settle, which agitated every part of the state. One was the great lawsuit with the Hannibal & St. Joseph railroad; as governor I advertised the road for sale. The state won on every point we raised. My efforts to break up the James gang, the most noted band of outlaws ever known in the United States, are familiar to all.

LIFE IN MEXICO.

"After I left Jefferson City I came to Kansas City, in 1885 and resumed the practice of law. I had been out of law office so often in my life and been out of practice so long that I had lost almost all connection with the law and had got behind in my knowledge of the books. I had virtually lost my disposition to return to practice. But the law is a jealous mistress and will not favor any man who deserts it on all occasions.

"I was given the post of consul general to Mexico by President Cleveland in 1893 and absented myself from my own country for four years. My life in Mexico was very pleasant. There were many charms about such a life then and there are more now. I returned to Kansas City and have been here ever since, living a quiet and pleasant life with my family and friends in one of the greatest young cities in the world."

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May 28, 1909

GOVERNOR CRITTENDEN
STRICKEN BY APOPLEXY.

FALLS FROM SEAT WHILE
WATCHING BALL GAME.

Age and General Ill Health Believed
by Doctors to Render Recovery
Problematical -- Has Not Re-
gained Consciousness.

As the result of a stroke of apoplexy which came upon him yesterday afternoon while watching a baseball game at Association park, former Governor Thomas T. Crittenden is lying at the point of death at his home, 3220 Flora avenue, with physicians in constant attendance.

Slight hope is entertained for Mr. Crittenden's recovery. His age and general ill health are said to be factors against his rallying. Though Mr. Crittenden had not regained consciousness up to a late hour last night, it was ascertained by the attending physicians, Ned O. Lewis and J. C. Rogers, that Mr. Crittenden's entire left side is completely paralyzed. The left side of his face is badly bruised where he struck the benches in front of him when he fell forward at the ball park.

Mr. Crittenden had been sitting in the grandstand near the third base line during the first of the two games which were played between Kansas City and St. Paul. Other spectators who were sitting near him said that he had not displayed any unusual excitement over the game and had been sitting rather quietly.

It was the beginning of the second inning of the second game when Mr. Crittenden was seen suddenly to fall forward and outward into the aisle.

CONDITION IS CRITICAL.

Thinking that Mr. Crittenden had but fainted, his immediate neighbors rushed to pick him up and placed him on the bench, where they attempted to revive him. Dr. Stanley Newhouse, the park physician, was hastily called from the press box, where he had been watching the game. He gave Mr. Crittenden prompt attention, but was unable to revive him.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was summoned from the city hall. He was driven to the park in an automobile, and suggested that he drive his father home in the motor car. Dr. Newhouse advised an ambulance, and one from the Walnut street police station was summoned. Then Mr. Crittenden was taken to his home.

After a long consultation with Dr. Lewis and an examination of Mr. Crittenden, Dr. Rogers stated that while the patient was in a precarious condition and that he was critically ill, there was a little hope for his recovery.

"It all depends upon the size of the hemorrhage on the brain," said Dr. Rogers. "It appears that the hemorrhage is from a ruptured small blood vessel, but we do not know whether or not the flow had been stopped completely. Governor Crittenden has been in poor health for several months. That taken into consideration with the fact that this is the second attack, does not argue well for a speedy recovery."

Dr. Newhouse, who first attended Mr. Crittenden, is not so sanguine as Dr. Rogers. Dr. Lewis remained with his patient all night, and did not make a statement.

HIS SECOND SEIZURE.

Eighteen years ago, while Mr. Crittenden was a practicing lawyer, he had his first stroke of apoplexy. No ill effects resulted from the first stroke, other than to make him more susceptible to the second.

Mr. Crittenden has long been a baseball enthusiast and there have been few games this season, according to his son, that he has missed. It has been his chief recreation, and though his family feared for him to go alone to the games on account of his age and declining health, Mr. Crittenden persisted in doing so. Mayor Crittenden said last night that his family had feared some untoward incident as a probable result of his innocent recreation.

Dr. Newhouse stated last night that he believed the attack was caused from an overwrought nervous condition. He said that it occurred at a lull in the game and excitement, and was the result of a reaction upon the nerves, even though Mr. Crittenden had not appeared excited.

Mr. Crittenden in 77 years of age. He was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky. His father was Henry Crittenden, a farmer, and the former governor was one of eight children. He received his education at Center college, Danville, Ky. Among his classmates were Judge John F. Philips of this city, who was by his bedside last night; W. P. C. Breckenridge, John Young Brown, and other noted men.

LAWYER AND SOLDIER.

Mr. Crittenden studied law at Frankfort. Soon after his marriage to Miss Carrie W. Jackson he moved to Lexington, Mo., where he first practiced law. There he remained until the civil war when he and Judge Philips raised a regiment of federal sondiers, and were engaged in the war for three years. Many of his battles were fought in Jackson county.

At the close of the war Mr. Crittenden formed a partnership with Francis M. Cockrell, afterward United States senator. During that time Mr. Crittenden was sent to congress from Missouri.

In 1878 Mr. Crittenden became governor of Missouri, and the four years of his administration were stormy ones. At the close of his term he moved to Kansas city, where, with the exception of four years, he has resided since. That exception is during the time he acted as consul general to Mexico under President Cleveland.

Mr. Crittenden has three sons, H. H., Mayor Thomas T., both of Kansas City, and William J. Crittenden of Pittsburg, Pa., now in Japan.

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May 12, 1909

TO MARK SANTA FE
TRAIL IN MISSOURI.

BILL APPROPRIATING $3,000 IS
NOW READY FOR GOVERNOR.

Rough Hewn Blocks of Red St.
Francois Granite Will Per-
petuate the Route of
Pioneers.
St. Francois Granite Marker on the Santa Fe Trail
SANTA FE TRAIL MARKER.

JEFFERSON CITY, May 11. -- From Old Franklin, Howard county, to Westport, rough hewn blocks of St. Francois granite will mark the old Santa Fe trail, the path of the pioneers, across Missouri.

By a vote of 98 to 31 the house today passed the bill already passed by the senate, appropriating $3,000 for that purpose, and it now is ready for the governor's signature, which Representative Glover Branch is assured will be appended.

The bill passed today contemplates the erection at intervals from Old Franklin, in Howard county, through Mrashall, Grand Pass, Lexington, Independence and Kansas City, of markers, roughly hewn from blocks of Missouri granite, the red mottled variety, quarried in St. Francois county, with a polished face on one side bearing the inscription:

Santa Fe Trail
1822 - 1872
Marked by the
Daughters of the American Revolution
and the
State of Missouri
1909.

One of the freighters who took ox trains over the trail regularly was H. G. Branch, father of the member who today had the bill passed to have the route of the pioneers perpetuated.

The Path of the Santa Fe Trail in Missouri.
SANTA FE TRAIL ACROSS MISSOURI.

Colorado appropriated $2,000 to mark the trail through the southeast corner of that state, and Kansas appropriated half as much, a sum which is to be increased.

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May 4, 1909

SANTA FE MARKERS LOST?

Kansas City Delegation Is Disap-
pointed in Lack of Interest.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., May 3.-- Kansas City's delegation in the house was greatly disappointed this afternoon when the committee on appropriations sent the Santa Fe trail appropriation bill asking for $3,000 back to the house without recommendation.

The fact that the committee has refused to appropriate anything for the markers will go a long way towards preventing its passage when its time arrives to be voted on.

Representative Glover Branch of Lexington, who introduced the bill, thinks he will be able to get it through, but the Kansas City members think differently.

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April 23, 1909

CROSSED THE PLAINS
TOGETHER IN 1858.

FORMER COMRADES MEET FOR
FIRST TIME SINCE.

George W. Friend and Ferd Smith
Fought on Opposite Sides in War
and Both Were in Battle
of Lexington.

Curiosity on the part of a young man who desired to witness the meeting of two old soldiers of the same war, but who fought under different flags, last night brought together two men who crossed the plains in company in 1858, but who had not heard of each other since. George W. Friend of Anderson, Mo., and Ferd Smith of 3339 Morrill avenue were the principals in the meeting.

It was in 1858 that the men joined the same train of freighters from Kansas City to Fort Union, N. M., and drove teams of oxen and fought Indians on the plains for ninety days. On the return of the freighters to Kansas City they were disbanded and them men went back to their farms. They lost track of each other until last night.

MEET AT HOSPITAL.

An operation being necessary to save the life of his son, George W. Friend came to Kansas City several days ago and took his son to Wesley hospital. About the same time a nephew of Ferd Smith became ill and went to the hospital. The nephew met Mr. Friend and last night when his uncle called to see him the nephew introduced the old men.

"Smith, Smith. You are not the Smith from Lafayette county, are you?" Mr. Friend asked.

"Yes, I joined the Confederate army at Lexington," Smith replied.

"A man named Smith crossed the plains with me in '58," Friend remarked.

"That's me," Ex-Freighter Smith answered.

"What, are you 'Pudd' Smith?" Friend asked, and when he was told that the old soldier was the same man who crossed the plains with him, he led the way to two chairs on the veranda where there was a great talk-fest.

During the conversation the friends discovered that they were both engaged in the battle at Lexington,, one fighting for the Confederacy and the other on the side of the Union.

TRIED TO KILL EACH OTHER.

"I did my best to kill you, Friend," Smith informed his friend.

"Same here, Pete," was the rejoinder made by Friend.

The old soldiers have arranged to see each other every day while Friend is in town. The first t rip across the plains made by Friend was for Anderson & Hays of Westport, in 1857, and he freighted to Fort Union. Thereafter he crossed the plains twelve times, most of his trips being to Fort Union, although he made one to Santa Fe and another to Denver.

Mr. Friend is 71 years old and his friend of the plains is 72 years old.

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April 12, 1909

SOLDIERS GO TO CHURCH.

Third Regiment Attends Services at
Central Methodist Episcopal.

Following its annual custom, the Third regiment of the Missouri national guard attended the morning Easter services at Central Methodist Episcopal church, south, Eleventh street and the Paseo. They turned out about 350 strong under command of Colonel Cusil Lechtman and the regimental and company officers. Dr. G. M. Gibson, president of the Central College for Young Women at Lexington, delivered the sermon.

After the services the regiment paraded in full dress north on the Paseo to Ninth street, west on Ninth to Grand avenue, south on Grand to Fourteenth street and east on Fourteenth street to the armory at Fourteenth street and Michigan avenue.

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February 28, 1909

BABY DIES ON TRAIN.

Emigrant's Infant Daughter Expires
Near Lexington Junction.

On a speeding Santa Fe passenger train near Lexiongon Junction, Mo., yesterday death came to the infant daughter of Mrs. Pupera Vicenyo, an emigrant, en route to Starkville, Col. When Mrs. Vincenyo left Baltimore, Md., last Thursday, the babe, which had been sick for several days, showed signs of improvement, and the trip was undertaken. At St. Louis the child became much worse, and as the train was nearing Lexington Junction the little one expired.

The body was taken in charge on the arrival of the train at Union depot by Santa Fe officials, and arrangements for burial here were made.

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January 5, 1909

FRANK M. HOWE DIES
OF HEART DISEASE.

WAS AN ARCHITECT OF INTER-
NATIONAL NOTE.

R. A. Long Building, Jewish Temple
and Many Other Important Kan-
sas City Structures Were
Planned by Him.

Frank Maynard Howe of the firm Howe & Hoit, an architect of international note whose name is associated with some of the most important buildings in Kansas city, died at his home, 1707 Jefferson street, at 7:30 o'clock last night of heart disease.

Mr. Howe, who was 59 years old, had been quite ill since June last. On July 6, accompanied by Mrs. Howe and their daughter, Miss Dorothy Howe, he toured Great Britain, Holland, Germany and France, in the hope of recovering his failing health, but when he returned October 7 he was but little improved.

Besides the widow, Mrs. Mary E. Howe, and the daughter, Miss Dorothy, there is another daughter, Mrs. Katherine Howe Munger, who lives at the family home. There is one grandchild, Nancy Munger, 3 years old.

When Mr. Howe came to Kansas City in 1885, the architectural firm of Van Brunt & Howe was established, in connection with a similar firm in Boston, Mass. Several years later Mr. Van Brunt came here. At the death of Mr. Van Brunt, seven years ago, the firm of Howe & Hoit was organized.

PLANNED SOME BIG BUILDINGS.

Mr. Howe was the architect of some of very prominent buildings, among them the Electricity building at the Columbian exposition, Chicago, in 1893, where he was also a member of the board of consulting architects. He held a similar position at the Louisiana Purchase exposition in St. Louis in 1904. Among Mr. Howe's first works was the Union station at Worcester, Mass.

He was born in West Cambridge, Mass., now known as Arlington, and was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Some of the well-known home buildings of which Howe was an architect were the following: R. A. Long building, Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Company store, Fidelity Trust Company, United States and Mexican Trust Company, Reliance building, Scottish Rite temple and St. Mary's hospital.

Among the houses of worship he planned were the new Jewish temple, the Independence Boulevard Christian church and he was building the Linwood Boulevard Christian church. He also planned the homes of Kirk Armour, Mrs. F. B. Armour and Charles Campbell.

When Mr. Howe died he was planning to build for R. A. Long a $1,000,000 home at Independence and Gladstone boulevards, which with stables, conservatory and other buildings, will occupy a full block.

Mr. Howe was a member of the Elm Ridge Club and the Knife and Fork Club, and was president of the Philharmonic Society throughout its existence. As a great-grandson of Isaac Howe, who fought at the battle of Lexington, he was selected for membership in the Sons of the Revolution. Mr. Howe's ancestors were English Puritans and came to Massachusetts in the seventeenth century. He was a member of Ararat temple, Mystic Shrine, and a thirty-second degree Mason.

His principal avocations were painting water colors and music. He played the piano and the pipe organ.

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March 4, 1908

CLYDE TURNER IS
HOME AGAIN.

After Attacking Grandmother With
an Ax He Ran Away.

Clyde Turner has been returned to the home of his uncle, George Pack, in Eden park, a suburb of Independence. The boy has run away several times. This time he got as far as Lexington

Because of his queer actions two months ago several doctors performed an operation on him for abnormal development. The operation did not help the boy Yesterday Mr. Pack stated that the boy was liable to do anything at any time and he expected to send him to an asylum for the feeble minded. It is possible that the matter will be brought to the attention of the county court today.

Last Saturday the boy attacked his grandmother with an ax. Neighbors interfered and saved her from injury, and Clyde then ran away.

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December 13, 1907

THIRD OF THEM ARE TRAMPS.

Children Gather at Detention Home
From Many States.

The docket of the detention home last evening resembled a hotel register. Out of thirteen children arrested Wednesday and Thursday, four boys and two girls live outside of Kansas City. There is one from Sugar Creek, two from Independence, one from Lexington, Mo., one from St. Louis and one from Philadelphia. The Pennsylvania lad is Charles Fletcher, 13 years old.

"Nearly a third of the children who get into court are young tramps," says Chief Probation Officer Mathias.

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December 3, 1907

DEATH COMES TO H. J. GROVES.

Physicians Say Blood Poisoning Probably
Was the Cause -- Groves Was Shot
in the Right Hip a Week Ago by
R. C. Horne, Editorial Writer.

H. J. Groves, who was shot by General R. C. Horne, an editorial writer, in the office of the Kansas City Post, a week ago Saturday, died at 7:45 o'clock yesterday morning in the German hospital. Dr. B. L. Sulzbacher, the attending physician, said that death was due to blood poisoning, supposedly from particles of clothing carried into the wound by the bullet. The bullet entered the right hip and had been recovered at the time of death.

A report was circulated to-day that other causes were responsible for the death, but this was denied by Dr. Sulzbacher.

BEGAN TO FAIL LAST NIGHT.

Mr. Groves had shown signs of improvement daily since the shooting, according to reports from the hospital. The first symptoms of blood poisoning, the doctor said, were noticed Sunday afternoon, when the wounded man began to fail rapidly. He rallied about 10 o'clock Sunday night, but the revival was brief. After that he continued to sink.

O. D. Woodward, who was shot and severely wounded by Horne at the same time was sufficiently recovered yesterday to be removed from the University hospital to his home.

Mr. Groves was born near Lexington, Mo., 36 years ago. In 1893 he married Mary Oldham, daughter of the president of the Christian college at Columbia. He left a widow and six brothers, two of whom, Frank S. and John G. Groves, live in this city.

GENERAL HORNE ARRESTED.

Isaac B. Kimbrell, prosecuting attorney, instructed the county marshal this morning to arrest General Horne and hold him without bond. Herman Weisflog, chief deputy marshal, telephoned to the sheriff in Marshall, Mo., to arrest General Horne. Soon afterward General Horne telephoned to the deputy marshal telling him that he would return to Kansas City on the earliest train, arriving on the Chicago and Alton "flyer" at 5:15 o'clock this afternoon. The deputy marshal will meet him at the train and take him to the county jail. The prosecuting attorney said that an information charging murder in the first degree will be filed in the criminal court.

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August 31, 1907

WILL GO IN A PRIVATE CAR.

North End Children to Travel to Lex-
ington in Luxurious Style.

Owing to the failure of the steamer Tennessee to arrive on schedule time a change of mode of transportation of the fifty North end children by the Helping Hand to the battlefield of Lexington, Mo., for a week's vacation has been made necessary. The youngsters, through the liberality of William Voelker, are to ride to their destination in a private car that will leave the Grand Central depot at 5 o'clock this evening. The people of Lexington will assist in entertaining the visitors.

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August 23, 1907

ITALIAN BAND TO GO ALONG.

Professor Cantanzara's Musicians to
Accompany the Sieben Excursion.

Henry Sieven, wharfmaster of the port of Kansas City, and his excursion party, will set sail for St. Louis on the steamer Chester at 4 o'clock next Monday afternoon. The boat will heave anchor at the foot of Delaware street. Mr. Sieven said yesterday that he had received invitations from Lexington, Miami, Boonville, Jefferson City, Hermann, Washington and St. Charles, asking his tourists to visit their towns.

Prof. John Cananzara's Royal Italian band, which is to accompany the excursionists, serenaded the newspaper offices last night. There are twenty eight musicians in this organization and they play excellent music under the capable leadership of Prof. Cantanzara.

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