Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

February 5, 1910

SQUATTERS STAY IN JUNGLE.

Attempt to Oust From Bottoms Re-
sults in Non-Suit.

A patch of jungle 400 feet long by 300 feet deep, near the Star elevator in the East Bottoms, was a matter of dispute between a whole colony of squatters and the Kansas City Southern Railway Company in Judge Thomas's division of the circuit court yesterday. While many settlers of the place were involved, only one, Lewis Warner, was named in the petition. Warner had lived in his lean-to close to the Missouri river bank and on the alleged right-of-way of the railroad for many years.

In answer to the demand of the railroad that he move his effects to other shores, Warner stuck the closer to his home in the tall reeds and willows. He was of the staying kind, and then there were others just as deep in the mud as he was in the mire. He put it up to the road to move the entire colony.

But even the patience of a corporation can become exhausted. Cyrus Crane, lawyer for the Southern, served notice on Warner that he must move or stand trial, and then brought suit to oust him.

When the case was called Warner was there with his witnesses. The latter were mostly neighbors of the defendant and denizens of the tract claimed by the railroad. In the court room yesterday they answered to the names of "Dump Bill," "Silver Bill," "Sleepy Sue," Louis Lombardo and Mrs. Louisa Sarah Koffman.

Lombardo is the janitor at the city hall. He was one of the first witnesses for the company.

"I was once in the vicinity of the patch of ground where Warner lives," said he. "There I saw an old negro man come out of the willows with a basket of vegetables on his arm. I looked at where he came from and saw nothing but bullrushes and willows.

" 'Where did you get those vegetables?' I said to him, and he answered that he got them back in the bushes. I followed the trail he was on and came upon one, two, three houses with truck patches. I felt like Christopher Columbus."

"Did the Kansas City Southern get you your job at the city hall?" was asked of Lombardo by Attorney Crane in direct examination.

"No, I got it by making a speech on a beer keg for the Democratic party," the witness promptly replied, while the whole court room laughed.

Some of the older witnesses said they had been living at their present location since 1890. One of these was Mrs. Koffman, who described the flora of the acreted land in this way:

"It is covered with trees except where there is bushes and willows and that's about all over the place.

"How large are the trees?" was asked.

"Oh, of different sizes. Some of them are as large as a gallon pail, and others no bigger than a pint measure. I don't know how you can't describe them because there are some littler and some bigger than others."

Attorney Crane entered an involuntary non-suit in the case and it was dismissed.

Labels: , , , , , ,

March 6, 1909

EXPORTERS OF WALNUT LOGS.

Rates Were Excessive to European
Points, Says Penrod Co.

Some interesting facts about Kansas City as an export center may be found in a suit filed yesterday in the circuit court. The Penrod Walnut and Veneer Company is asking $293.00 from the Kansas City Southern railway, alleged to represent freight overcharges on export shipments of walnut lumber. The lumber was shipped last summer, four cars going to Manchester, England; two cars to St. Petersburg; one to Belfast, Ireland, and one to Glasgow, Scotland. It is alleged by the Penrod company that the rates were quoted as follows: To Manchester, 36 1/2 cents; St. Petersburg, 43 1/2 cents; Belfast, 37 1/2 cents, and Glasgow, 38 1/2 cents. More than the rates mentioned were charged, asserts the Penrod company.

Labels: , , , , ,

February 10, 1909

POLICE "ARREST" MENAGERIE.

Elephant and Giraffe as Well as Ten
Human Beings In Haul.

The police department yesterday "arrested" a menagerie, which included one elephant, one giraffe, one zebra, one hungry-looking tiger and ten human beings. The arrest was made under the orders of the sheriff of Mena, Ark., and the Kansas City department faithfully carried out the instructions, though no one yet knows the reason for the arrest.

"When Detectives James Todd, David Oldham, Ralph Trueman, John Farrell and Samuel Lowe went to the Kansas City Southern yards they found a weather-beaten circus car with more than half of the windows broken. The inmates, consisting of five men, two women and three children, all shivering, seemed to be glad to be arrested. The animals seemed satisfied when the car was run into the Kansas City Southern roundhouse under the orders of the inspector of detectives.

"We are waiting for further instruction," said Inspector Ryan last night.

Members of the company said that they were on their way to Santa Cruz, Cal., and that they did now know why they were being detained. The women and children remained in the matron's room, while the men were locked up in the holdover.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

February 9, 1909

WANT MYSTERIOUS SHOWMAN.

Police Asked to Arrest Eleven Men,
One of Whom Is Wounded.

Who is the mysterious showman who has committed a crime at Mena, Ark.? Two telegrams were received from Thomas C. Wingate, sheriff of that county, last night, asking that the police department of Kansas City watch all Kansas City Southern trains for a party of eleven persons who were connected with a show. One of the men, the sheriff said, was suffering from a gunshot wound and would attempt to go to a sanitarium. A reward of $100 was offered for the arrest of the entire company.

The police were watching the trains last night, but no arrest was made.

Labels: , ,

October 11, 1908

BRYAN GREETED
BY THOUSANDS.

DEMOCRATIC LEADER GETS GLAD
HAND IN KANSAS CITY.

HE APPEALS FOR
MORE FUNDS.

ADDRESSES GREAT GATHERING
IN THE OPEN AIR.
After Speaking in Independence He
Is Brought Here in Automobile.

It was a madly driven string of flag-bedecked automobiles that dashed over to Independence yesterday and whisked Candidate William Jennings Bryan to the Parade. Speaches were made at both ends of the trip by the Democratic leaders, adn it all took place within two hours.

It was a regular honk, honk affair, and thirty cars containing at least 150 persons made the trip. On the return, it was a veritable race and several times the pike was blocked with chugging machines, each trying to extricate itself and get to Kansas City first.

Little groups of suburbanites stood at every rural mail box and cheered as the flying autos went by with Mr. Bryan, and then they stayed to cheer the tail of the gasoline propelled comet. It is certain that those who live on the south side of the intercity road will have to clean house today for clouds of dust were stirred up by the wheels of the whizz-wagons. It is also certain that Mr. Bryan, in all the campaign, has never been treated to a more strenuous trip than when he was born over the Jackson county hills by Kansas City's flying automobile squadron.

WHEN BRYAN ARRIVED.

William P. Borland, congressional aspirant, was holding the crowd of perhaps 2,000 when the Bryan special arrived at Independence. The presidential candidate was led to an auto and taken to the courthouse square, where he was greeted by cheers. He did not speak more than fifteen minutes and when he broke off he told the corwd that he would come back and finish his speech if they would elect him.

"I wish I had the power of Joshua," said Mr. Bryan, "that I might make the sun stand still and talk to you, without encroaching on Kansas City's time. Although I have not the power to control the movements of the sun, I can make the Republicans move.

They have reason to show fright, for the people are now coming to believe that the Democratic party is the one source of relief from present conditions and that through it alone can freedom of speech,, conscience and of the individual to use what he earns, be assured. The Republicans have nurtured predatory wealth which allows the few to prey upon the many. Our creed is that this should be corrected by suffrage, and we plead for an honest election. To get it we must have publicity of campaign contributions that the people may konw the sources of financial influence in carrying on our campaign."

OFF FOR KANSAS CITY.

When he finished speaking, a flying wedge formed around Mr. Bryan and broke the way through the crowd to his automobile in the court house yard. It seemed that the chauffeurs hardly took time to crank up, for in a trice the honk-honk procession was off for Kansas City.

"There's another proof that the corporations are agin' us," remarked a Democratic autoist savagely as a long Kansas City Southern train rolled leisurely across the roadway and cut about half of the flying procession from further progress for seven maddening minutes. Nearly twenty cars reluctantly obeyed the stop lever and stood trembling with nervous rage, spitefully repeating all the cuss words in an autombile's vocabulary of profanity. One owner vowed that his French car was chugging, "sacre bleu!" At last the train passed, the gates lifted and just in time to miss being hurdled and the autos dashed forward.

THOUSANDS GREET HIM.

Ten thousand persons must have been awaiting the candidate at the Parade where he made an appeal for more contributions to the campaign fund.

"We have already raised from $160,000 to $180,000 by contributions from the people, in addition to the $40,000 left over from the sum subscribed in Denver to pay for the convention. We have fixed the limit of single contributions at $10,000 but find that we have placed it unnecessarily high. But two or three gifts have been made amounting to more than $1,000. I believe it is better for an administration to owe its election to all the people than to a few favor-seeking corporations. We need at least $100,000 more between now and election day, and Democrats ought to raise it."

"If elected, I promise to call a special session of congress to enact legislation whereby United States Senators shall be elected by a direct vote of the people. I believe there should be a department of labor, with its head in the president's cabinet. The laborers are entitled to it, and I want a representative of labor with who m to consult in the event that I am made president."

After taking a few facetious raps at President Roosevelt on the strength of his proposed African hunting trip, and at Longworth for expressing the wish that his father-in-law may be elected eight years hence, Mr. Bryan stopped, and was whirled through the downtonw streets in his auto to the Hanibal bridge, where he deaprted for St. Joseph.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

September 20, 1908

ROLLED FROM HOBO HILL.

Patrick Bulger Fell to Street Car
Tracks and Was Hurt.

Hobo hill, near Second and Walnut streets, where so many men have gone to sleep and then rolled down onto the street car tracks in front of cars, came near claiming another victim last night. Patrick Bulger, 28 years old, a citizen of Independence, Mo., had gone down to take the interurban train for home. He missed it and fell asleep on the fatal hillside.

Presently a Holmes street car came bowling along and Bulger awoke with a start. He started so far that he rolled to the tracks and against the car just in time to be caught under the coat by rear steps. He was scraped along the spine, lost several square inches of skin and was dragged thirty feet to the tracks of the Kansas City Southern railway. The ambulance took him to the emergency hospital, where his injuries were dressed. A pint bottle of whiskey which Bulger carried in his coat pocket was not even cracked.

Many men have been killed and many injured at this very point. On the afternoon of September 5 Frank Nugent, a citizen of anywhere his hat was allowed to hang, performed the sleeping, waking and rolling feat. He lost his left leg just above the ankle and is now in the general hospital.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

August 7, 1908

LOSES LIFE IN RIVER?

Coat and Hat of Newspaper Solicitor
Found on Bank of Blue.

Harry Taylor, a newspaper solicitor of 1514 Washington street, is thought by the police to have lost his life in the Blue river, near the Kansas City Southern railroad bridge, some time yesterday. A coat and hat which afterwards were identified by Mrs. Taylor were found on the river bank by a policeman. A bottle of phenol was found in one of the pockets. An effort is being made to find the body.

Labels: , , , , ,

June 27, 1908

LANDS IN MRS. EDSON'S LAP.

Bicyclist Catapulted by Motor Car
Driven by Kansas City Woman.

DENVER, COL., June 26. -- (Special.) While on his bicycle at Sixteenth and Larimer streets, and trying to dodge a car yesterday afternoon, Joseph Skega, an employe of the Denver Fire Clay Comapny, had a head-on collision with the automobile of Dr. W. L. Hess, breaking the glass of the wind shield and driving completely through it into the lap of Mrs. J. E. Edson, wife of the president of the Kansas City Southern railroad, who was driving an d was sitting in the seat beside the physician.

Mr. Edson and his family had just reached the city in a private car. They are friends of Dr. Hess, who received them in his automobile at the union station. In the machine, besides Mr. and Mrs. Edson, were his daughters, Mrs. K. P. Williams, wife of the quartermaster at Fort Leavenworth, Kas, an d Miss Geraldine Edson.

The front wheel of Skega's bicycle struck the hood of the automobile, throwing the rider over the handlebars and against the glass of the wind shield. Jagged edges of the glass cut the victim's face and neck in a dozen places, while his bicycle was wrecked. Mrs. Edson's dress was bespattered with blood from his wounds. Dr. Hess placed Skega in the automobile, and after reaching the city hall assisted Police Surgeon Ackley in dressing his wounds, later conveying the injured man to his home.

Labels: , , ,

May 22, 1908

GAME LEG SPOILED HIS FUN.

Fireman Says He Can't Dance in
Time With It.

"I used to go to all the dances, but I can't hit a lick with my game leg. The last dance I attended was in Lamar in the winter of 1907. I was so awkward that I couldn't get a partner. So I quit for good."

J. B. McQuillen told this to a jury in Judge E. E. Porterfield's division of the circuit court yesterday afternoon. McQuillen was a locomotive fireman for the Kansas City Southern until February 24, 1906, when his hip was crushed while he was at work. He is suing for $10,000.

Labels: , , , , ,

March 22, 1908

HE WENT HUNTING THE CARS.

And Little Leo, Just a Baby, Wan-
dered Into Railroad Yards.

"What are you doing down here?"

"Oh, des tum down on treet tar to see choo-choo tars."

The foregoing dialogue took place shortly after noon yesterday in the yards of the Kansas City Southern Railroad Company between a railroad man and a tiny "Buster Brown" boy 2 1/2 years old.

The little wanderer was taken to police headquarters and turned over to Mrs Joan Moran, matron. When asked where his mother was he indicated that she had gone on a "treet tar." His name could not be understood.

After the baby boy had been at the station a couple of hours a frantic mother, followed by two other boys, appeared at police headquarters looking for a lost boy. She was directed to the matron's rooms The police told her that a boy of her description was there.

"Oh, Leo, Leo, where did you go?" the mother cried as she snatched the little Buster Brown boy to her breast.

"Oh, mamma," he replied gleefully, "I seen all big choo-choo tars an' a man took me away."

The mother, Mrs. Abraham Rubenstein of 1417 Harrison street, said that shortly after noon she was entering the Jones dry goods store with her three boys -- Harry, 7; Marion, 5 1/2, and Leo, 2 1/2 years old. When she reached an elevator she missed Leo, the baby.

The little fellow is believed to have taken a street car to Third and Main streets, from where he walked down into the railroad yards. When found he was in among box cars and engines, but looking with wondering eyes at all that was going on. It was then that a railroad man found him and took him in charge.

Labels: , , , , , ,

August 9, 1907

TAKES CHICKENS TO WORK.

Remarkable Devotion of Railroad
Employe for Pet Fowls.

Lovers of animals are common, but for extreme cases a story as told by Patrolman Joseph Dolan of a man who took his chickens to work with him probably heads the list. According to the officer, an employe in the Kansas City Southern railroad yards has a dozen blooded chickens. He works at night, and each evening before starting to work he goes into his chicken yard, calles each hen and the one rooster by name and one by one they climb into a obx he stes on the ground. The box is then placed in a cart and with a small black pony a slow drive to the railroad yards is made.

At the railroad yards the chickens are liberated, and they scratch and pic up grains of ceral that fall from the grain cars. When it begins to grow dark they all return to the cart, on which they roost until morning. At the break of dawn each day they begin to stir. breakfast is foraged, and on the return trip of the owner, the chickens and the pony follow.

Labels: , ,

July 26, 1907

FINDS CORPSE SITTING UP.

Laborer Shoots Himself Leaning
Against Freight House.

W. C. Hopke, on his way to work at the Interstate Ice Company at 5 o'clock yesterday morning, found the body of a dead man sitting upright against the north side of the Kansas City Southern freight house at Second and Wyandotte streets. The police ambulance was summoned and Dr. Ford B. Rogers found that the man had evidently shot himself. A bullet from a 45-caliber Colt's revolver had entered the right temple, come out at the left temple and imbedded itself in a wooden timber at the dead man's side. The revover was still clutched in the right hand.

Coroner George B. Thompson sent the body to Stine's morgue, where it has remained so far unidentified.

The dead man, who has the appearance of having been a laborer above the common class, appears to be between 47 and 50 years old. He is six feet tall and weighs probably 200 pounds. His complexion is dark, his hair and mustache and eyes are brown and the head is bald. He had only four teeth remaining in the upper jaw. He wore a blue shirt and dark clothes.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory