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February 6, 1910

INVASION FROM KANSAS.

Boys Rush by Collector on Viaduct
but Police Intercepted Them.

Lieutenant Kennedy of station No. 2 and his flying squad, consisting of Officers Scanlon and Hogan, repelled an invasion from Kansas City, Kas., by way of the Intercity viaduct about 9:30 o'clock last night. A report was received at the station that over 100 men had rushed past the toll collector of the Kansas end of the viaduct without stopping to pay the customary toll and the flying squad was sent to the Missouri end of the structure to intercept the invaders. Although greatly outnumbered the Kennedy forces allowed only four or five of their adversaries to negotiate a getaway into Missouri without payment of toll . The crowd was made up entirely of boys bent on a charivari.

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February 6, 1910

"DEAD TO WORLD" IN CAR.

Official Hears First Word Over
'Phone and Sends Coroner.

When Arthur Haskell, motorman on the Wyandotte line in Kansas City, Kas., arrived at Riverview station shortly after midnight this morning he ran his car in on the spur and headed for the nearest telephone office. Calling up the car barn of the Elevated line he notified the man in charge that his conductor was "dead to the world," and requested information as to what to do. The man at the car barn acted immediately.

In a few moments Coroner J. A. Davis was informed that a street car conductor was lying dead in his car at Riverview station. The coroner made a record run to the scene and arrived about the time Daniels & Comfort's dead wagon came rattling up. They found the conductor in the car. He was unable to continue his run, but did not need the coroner nor wagon. He was take to the L barn.

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February 5, 1910

BLIND WOMAN WAITED
AT DEPOT IN VAIN.

Hostess Detained by Accident -- Mrs.
Aldrich Writes Literature
for the Blind.

Mrs. Clara Aldrich, totally blind and a stranger in Kansas City, arrived at the Union depot last night from Joliet, Ill. She was expecting friends to meet her at the station, but was disappointed. She told Mrs. Ollie Everingham, matron at the depot, that Mrs. O. P. Blatchley of 220 South Ash street, in Kansas City, Kas., had promised to meet her. The matron called the Blatchley home over the telephone and found that Mrs. Blatchley had fallen on the ice near her home yesterday morning and received injuries which confined her to bed. The matron sent Mrs. Aldrich to the Young Women's Christian Association boarding house for the night.

Dr. O. P. Blatchley said last night that his wife's parents were friends of the parents of Mrs. Aldrich, and that she had arranged to locate her in Kansas City, Kas. Dr. Blatchley said that Mrs. Aldrich for many years has been engaged in writing religious literature for students in the blind schools over the country.

Mrs. Blatchley suffered a dislocated left shoulder and a ruptured artery over her left eye in her fall yesterday.

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February 1, 1910

CAN DISTURB INDIAN GRAVES.

Lyda B. Conley, Kansas City, Kas.,
Woman, Loses Lawsuit.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. -- The fight of Lyda B. Conley, the Indian woman lawyer, to prevent the sale of the burial ground in Kansas City, Kas., where lie the bodies of her ancestors, came to an end adversely to her in the supreme court of the United States today.

The court affirmed the judgment of the lower courts that her bill to enjoin those who proposed to disturb the burial ground be dismissed.

The court ameliorated the decree by directing that the suit be dismissed without cost to Miss Conley. Miss Conley, who is one-sixteenth Wyandotte and a lawyer, claimed the burial ground of Huron cemetery in Kansas City, Kas., was reserved in perpetuity as a burial ground by a treaty in 1855 between the United States and the Indians.

Congress recently authorized the sale of the land and the removal of the bodies. Miss Conley objected to the removal of the bodies of her ancestors to the burial ground of a Methodist church. She asked for an injunction in the case, but the circuit court dismissed her petition for want of jurisdiction. She argued her own case before the supreme court.

"No court decision or legal technicality will avail in any manner to change my firm determination to prevent the desecration of the graves of my ancestors. I will resist even to the death, any attempt to remove the bodies from the old Indian burial ground and if by force of arms they succeed in killing me, my sisters will see to it that my dead body lies with my father and mother in the Huron cemetery."

This was the statement made last night to a representative of the Journal, by Miss Lyda Conley at her home, 1712 North Third street, Kansas City, Kas.

"The public burying place of the Wyandotte Indians, used by them for that purpose as early as 1814, was by the treaty between the United States and the Indians, in 1855, set aside to the Indians and their descendants as a perpetual burying ground. now by what right does the government claim ownership of this ground or the right to dispose of it? I am not a ward of the government but a citizen of the United States. I am not in rebellion as an Indian ward of the government, but am standing up for my rights as a citizen and as a descendant of the Wyandotte Indians."

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January 31, 1910

POPULAR FIREMAN DIES.

"Bob" Hamilton of Kansas City,
Kas., Was "Children's Friend."
'The
LIEUTENANT "BOB" HAMILTON.

" 'Bob' Hamilton is dead." This report yesterday in Kansas City, Kas., brought grief to young and old alike in hundreds of homes in that city, for big, good natured "Bob" Hamilton was the most popular member of the Kansas City, Kas., fire department. His death was due to typhoid fever. Officially he was known as Lieutenant Robert Hamilton of No. 1 hose company, but to the "boys" and to his hundreds of friends he was "Bob." Tributes to his personal bravery and efficiency as a fireman were paid yesterday by his superior officers and the men who worked with him.

Robert Hamilton was 31 years old and had been connected with the city fire department since June, 1906. His record as a fireman is unsurpassed, and his engaging manners and Irish wit won for him hundreds of friends. Little children or women calling at the fire station to inspect the apparatus invariably asked to be conducted about by "Bob" Hamilton. He will long be remembered as the children's friend.

Mr. Hamilton died yesterday at Bethany hospital in Kansas City, Kas. His father, John Hamilton, his mother and immediate relatives were present.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed, although it is probable that the burial will take place in Kansas City, Kas.

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January 30, 1910

GIVES HIS HALF TO
MAHONEY CHILDREN.

JUDGE MICHAEL ROSS, SILENT
PARTNER, DISCLAMES SHARE
WORTH $50,000.

"John Was My Friend and
He Would Have Done That
for Me," He Says.

Judge Michael Ross, John Mahoney's silent partner, yesterday startled the court of Van B. Prather, probate judge of Wyandotte county, by announcing he wished to disclaim a $50,000 share in the Mahoney estate so that it would go to his friend's orphans.

John Manoney was the Kansas City, Kas. contractor who, with his wife and foreman, Thomas F. McGuire, met death in an automobile accident on the Cliff drive Monday afternoon Judge Ross has been justice of the peace in the North End for many years.

One feature about Judge Ross's gift is that he wanted no one except the firm's lawyer to know about it. At the opening of the hearing Judge Prather said he understood that a silent partnership existed in the contracting business between Mr. Mahoney and some one else, and that if such was the case it would be necessary to take different action in the appointment of the administrators than if such a partnership did not exist.

"HE WAS MY FRIEND."

At this announcement Judge Ross arose. He said he had been a full partner of Mr. Mahoney in the contracting business, but that he desired to "wipe the slate clean" and give the children his half of the estate. Judge Prather asked Judge Ross to explain more fully.

"John Mahoney was a good friend of mine," the judge began. "He loved his four children dearly, and I am comfortably situated, and I want those little children to have my interest in the estate. And further, if any of the contracts which Mr. Mahoney left unfinished show a loss when they are fulfilled by the administrators I will give my personal check to make up for it. John was my friend and I know he would have done the same for my family."

When Judge Ross had finished speaking there were tears in the eyes of many in the court room. Judge Prather said nothing for a moment then rising, he reached over and grasped Judge Ross's hand.

"I am 60 years old," Judge Prather said. "I have read of such men, and heard of them, but you are the first of this type whose hand I ever have had the privilege to grasp."

1,000 ATTENDED FUNERAL.

The funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney was held on Friday in Kansas City, Kas. The services were held at the home, 616 North Seventh street and conducted by the Rev. Father James Keegan of St. Mary's Catholic church. It was estimated that more than 1,000 persons gathered about the house during the services. The children at Central school, where the younger Mahoney children attended, stood with bowed heads while the funeral cortege passed.

Nellie Mahoney and her sister, Lillian, age 6, were still in St. Mary's hospital and were unable to attend the services. They were, however, told for the first time of the deaths of their parents. The girls were taken from the hospital to their home in a closed carriage last night. Lillian is now able to walk about, and the attending surgeons say she is recovering rapidly. The girls are being attended at their home by a trained nurse. Mr. Mahoney's sister is in charge of the house.

Judge Prather said yesterday that he would visit the Mahoney home tomorrow morning in order that Nellie might sign a bond and qualify as an administrator.

Mr. Mahoney did not leave a will, at least none has been found.

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January 29, 1910

PICTURE MACHINE EXPLODES.

Patrons of James Street Nickle Show
Cry "Fire" and Stampede.

A loud explosion followed by a tongue of flame, which burst from the operator's room at the "Star" nickle show, No. 8 South James street, Kansas City, Kas., about 8 o'clock last night, caused a panic to spread among the one hundred or more patrons who had gathered for the first performance. The cry of fire was followed by a mad stampede for the rear exits. Men, women and children trampled over each other in their frenzy, and a large gate at the rear of the theater was literally torn from the hinges by the frightened crowd. Luckily no one was seriously hurt in the rush, and aside from a few bruises, the crowd was none the worse for its experience.

Christ Clark, the picture machine operator, did not escape so lightly. When the films of the machine became ignited Clark, in his attempt to extinguish them, was badly burned. He fell from the elevated room where he was working and was treated at No. 2 police station by Dr. Mortimer Marder. Clark lives with his mother at 2012 North Fifth street. The fire department was called, but most of the fire was extinguished by the use of chemicals. The proprietor, Frank Spandle, probably saved the life of Clark. The young man was overcome and had sunk to the floor of the room among the burning films, when he was pulled from his perilous position by his employer.

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January 29, 1910

FRED'S RELIGION DIDN'T STICK.

He Was "Converted" by Hart, but the
Workhouse Caught Him.

Why did Fred Marshall become a backslider so soon? The board of pardons and paroles yesterday tried to solve the problem. Marshall has been in the workhouse twice before, but last Sunday night he "went forward" at the revival being conducted by Evangelist Hart in Kansas City, Kas. He came to this city Thursday and took aboard too much liquor. The result was a workhouse sentence when he could not produce $15 to pay his fine.

Yesterday Marshall's sister appeared with him before the pardons and paroles board at the workhouse. She pleaded for him, and promised to see that he got less religion and more work in the future. He will be released on parole today.

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January 24, 1910

BOY ACCIDENTALLY
KILLS STEPSISTER.

Carries Dying Child Into House
and Runs Mile and a Half
for a Doctor.

Sobbing with grief and carrying in his arms the unconscious form of Elizabeth Baumgarten, his little sister, who was bleeding form a bullet hole in her forehead, Willam Mudder, 16 years old, staggered into the home of his stepfather, Marten Baumgarten, Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon.

Baumgarten, a carpenter, sat by the side of his wife, who is confined to her bed with a 2-weeks-old baby by her side in the bedroom of their little home. A number of old acquaintances were also in the room. It was while they were talking and laughing the boy entered with his burden.

"I didn't mean to do it papa," he shrieked. He hurriedly explained that he had shot the little girl accidentally with a .22-caliber target rifle. Bolting from the room, the boy ran a mile and a half to the office of Dr. David W. Thompson at Nineteenth street and Quindaro boulevard.

"Doctor, I shot my little sister accidentally, and I want you to come to her quick," he shouted as he entered the doctor's office.

Dr. Thompson hurried with the boy to the home. The bullet had entered the middle of the child's forehead and lodged near the base of the brain. She died about twenty minutes after the doctor arrived. Dr. Thompson notified Dr. J. A. Davis, coroner of Wyandotte county, who decided that an autopsy would be unnecessary.

The Mudder lad works during the week for his aunt, Mrs. John Smith, who runs a grocery at Twenty-seventh street and Bell avenue in Kansas City, Mo. He went home yesterday and began a romp with his four brothers and three stepsisters. He took a little target rifle belonging to the step father and, calling the children, started out in the back yard to shoot at a mark. All seven of the children walked down the back stairs from the porch. Elizabeth, 4 years old, was the last. Just as she reached the bottom step, by some unknown means which the lad himself cannot explain, the gun was discharged, the bullet entering the little girl's forehead.

Mrs. Baumgarten was prostrated over the little girl's death. The father, too, was grief-stricken. The Mudder boy was affected more than either. He could not be comforted and paced the rooms of the house back and forth. Dr. Thompson said last night that the boy was nearly crazed when he came to his office.

Martin Baumgarten, the boy's stepfather, said last night that William was absolutely blameless. "I am confident that the shooting was purely accidental," he said. "The boy loved his little stepsister just the same as if she had been his own sister. It was just one of those unfortunate, unavoidable accidents.

Funeral services for the little girl will be held tomorrow morning at the Church of the Blessed Sacramet in Chelsea place. Burial will be in St. John's cemetery.

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January 24, 1910

BLESSES WATERS OF KAW.

Custom of Greek Catholics Carried
Out by Priest.

Clad in the rich silken robes of his office and surrounded by a number of vested altar boys, the Rev. John Markowitch, pastor of the Servian Greek Catholic church of St. George, at First street and Lyons in Kansas City, Kas., knelt before an improvised alter near the middle of the Central avenue bridge yesterday morning and invoked a blessing on the Kaw river. One thousand parishioners attended the ceremony. After blessing the river the priest sprinkled each one of the church members present with water drawn from the river and administered the sacrament to them.

The congregation met in the church yesterday morning and marched from there to the bridge. The procession was led by six vested altar boys, who carried candles. They were followed by the priest, who was dressed in rich robes and carried a crucifix. Following the priest was a brass band which led a column of about 600 men. After the ceremony, which lasted about one hour, the participants marched back to the church.

Later the priest visited the homes of each of his parishioners and sprinkled their door posts with the blessed water. The custom of blessing rivers, while comparatively new in Kansas City, is an old one in Servia. The rivers are blessed there once a year, and the water used for baptisms taken from them.

Father Markowitch, who conducted the ceremony yesterday, is 52 years old. He came to Kansas City, Kas., two years ago, and in January, 1908, performed a ceremony similar to that performed yesterday, which was the first of the kind in Kansas City. The parish has grown from 800 to more than 2,000 communicants since he took charge.

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January 18, 1910

WORK OF BOY, AGED
THIRTEEN.

Never Took Art Lesson.
Sketches Drawn By 13-Year-Old John Woolsey of Kansas City, Kas.
MASTER JOHN WOOLSEY'S IDEA OF AN EASTER HAT.

John A. Woolsey, the 13-year-old son of J. T. Woolsey, 1131 State street, Kansas City, Kas., the author of these sketches, never had a drawing lesson in his life, but ever since he was old enough to write his name he has shown more or less talent and interest in sketching. He has no particular subject for his drawings, but will sketch whatever comes to his mind, one time a farm scene or landscape view, and perhaps the next will be a comic picture or series of pictures along the lines of the comics in the Sunday edition of newspapers. He also takes great interest in making cartoons. Young Woolsey attended the Lowell school until two years ago, when he went with his father to Texas, and remained until a few weeks ago, when they returned to Kansas City. He will be sent to an art school as soon as his other education is finished.

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December 11, 1910

JUDGE TAKES PART
OF RUNAWAY GIRLS.

Homes Have Been Found for
Ava Jewell and Hattie
Hayes.

"I told them 'If you never do anything worse than sit on a rock pile and crack rock for papa you will be queens on a thrown with jewels in your crowns.' "

T. W. Jewell, 920 Cambridge avenue, Sheffield, made this statement in the juvenile court yesterday afternoon after admitting that he had required his daughter, Ava Jewell, 16 years old, and his stepdaughter, Hattie Hayes, 15 years old, to crack rock in his quarry "because they were useless to their mother in the house."

About three weeks ago both girls ran away from their rock cracking work, Ava going to Kansas City, Kas., and Hattie Hayes getting employment at a cracker factory. For the past week she had been working as a domestic in a Sheffield hotel. She was taken into the juvenile court on the request of her mother and stepfather.

"Why did you put these girls, young women, I might say, to work on a rock pile?" asked Judge E. E. Porterfield earnestly.

"It was honest labor," said Jewell, "nothin' of which they should be ashamed. They might o' done far worse. You tell him how it came about, mamma," concluded Jewell, addressing his wife.

"Well, they just wouldn't do the housework right," said Mrs. Jewell. "It kept me continually following them about doing the work over again. I knowed somethin' had to be done to keep 'em busy, so I asked papa if he could use 'em in the quarry on the rear of our lot. 'Yes,' says he, 'I can use 'em breakin' up the small stones. Then he put 'em to work down there. That's all.'

"They was there about two or three weeks," said Jewell, "not over three at the outside, and all the work they done could be did in ten to twenty hours. I built 'em a nice platform on which to work. All they had to do was gather the small rock, carry it to the platform and break it. It sells for $1 a yard, judge. It's valuable."

"You know what they done, judge?" asked Jewell in apparent surprise, "they hammered holes in their skirts and kept me busy putting handles in the stone hammers. They would strike over too far and break the handles, just for meanness. Why, there mamma used to come down there just to encourage them, you know, an' she would crack more rock in an hour than they'd crack in a whole day. Mamma liked to crack rock, didn't you mamma? All the time them girls was a complainin' and talkin' o' runnin' away, an' one day both of 'em up and run away."

"I am surprised that they waited so long," said Judge Porterfield when Jewell had finished his explanation. "They should have gone the first day you put them there. A stone quarry, using a hammer and a drill, as this girl says she had to do, is no place for young women."

It was at this point that Jewell delivered himself of the tender sentiment about "jewels in your crowns."

"That sounds nice," suggested the court, "but it doesn't go with me. Any place on earth for a girl or woman but the rock pile, whether it be for papa or in jail. I do not approve of it. this girl will be made a ward of the court and a place secured for her. Working promiscuously in hotels and factories is not the best place for her, either, so long as she is not remaining in the home."

Hattie, who was 15 in October, was turned over to Mrs. Agnes O'Dell, a juvenile court officer, who will secure a place for her in a private family. Her stepsister, Ava Jewell, has a place as a domestic in Kansas City, Kas.

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January 7, 1910

BITTEN BY DOG, IS
DYING WITH RABIES.

STRAY PUP FASTENED TEETH
IN LIP OF CHARLES W. YOUNG.

Police Ordered to Kill All
Stray Dogs in Kansas
City, Kas.
Charles W. Young, Victim of Hydrophobia.
CHARLES W. YOUNG.

Two deaths within a few weeks, as a result of injuries inflicted by dogs suffering form rabies, has aroused public apprehension in Kansas City, Kas., to such an extent that extra precautions are being taken by the police department to protect the citizens against danger from this source. Orders have been issued by Chief of Police W. W. Cook to kill all stray dogs found in the city and a special officer has been detailed on this work. The general public has been notified to communicate with the police department with reference to any dog running at large.

Charles W. Young, a carpenter living at 436 Everett avenue, was bitten three weeks ago yesterday by a small fox terrier and is now in a critical condition at the Grandview sanitarium, where the attending physician said last night he could not live through the day. Violent convulsions, incident to the last stages of hydrophobia, have convinced the physicians that his condition is the result of the injury inflicted by the fox terrier.

A desire to relieve the suffering of a poorly fed tramp dog prompted him to reach down and pick up a little fox terrier, which promptly repaid this act of kindness by snapping his teeth through the lower lip of his would be benefactor.

The injury was dressed by a physician and Mr. Young continued with his daily work at the Union Pacific railroad shop. On Tuesday of this week he was obliged to quit work because of what he believed to be a severe cold in his throat. Yesterday morning Dr. Albert Huber was summoned and pronounced it a case of hydrophobia. The man rapidly grew worse and last night was removed to the sanitarium.

A small child was bitten several weeks ago by a mad dog in the northern part of Kansas City, Kas., and later died with what the physicians said was hydrophobia.

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December 31, 1909

SILVER CITY TO
BECOME A WARD.

ARGENTINE TO BE MERGED INTO
KANSAS CITY, KAS.,
TOMORROW.

Population 7,000; Its Debts Assumed
and Assets Absorbed -- Will Soon
Have Gas Supply.

At 12 o'clock, noon, tomorrow, Argentine, the Silver City, of which great things were expected in the early '80s, will merge its identity into that of Kansas City, Kas. This additional territory will be known as the Seventh ward and will be represented in the Kansas City, Kas., council by two councilmen to be appointed by Mayor U. S. Guyer. By the annexation of Argentine and the extension of its city limits Kansas City, Kas., will have graduated into the class of metropolitan cities. It is estimated that the additional territory will increase the total population of Kansas City, Kas., to something in excess of 135,000. Steps have already been taken by the city authorities to assume active charge of the former city's affairs. Two police sergeants and eight patrolmen will afford police protection for the new ward.

Argentine was organized as a city of the third class in 1881. The city covers an area of six square miles and has a population of 7,000. It is on the south of the Kaw river and just south and west of the Sixth ward of Kansas City, Kas. The majority of Argentine's residents are hard working, industrious home owners. The city has a bonded debt of about $126,000, in addition to special improvement bonds to the amount of $70,000 and school bonds for a like amount.

There is also $60,000 in outstanding warrants. The consolidated city assumes all these debts. While the new territory is in debt to no inconsiderable amount, there are many advantages to be gained by its annexation. Argentine has two miles of bitulithic pavements and also two miles of macadam paving. In addition to this there are about fifteen miles of paved sidewalks. A fire wagon and a team of good horses, also 3,000 feet of new hose, are among the assets.

HAS FINE SCHOOL EQUIPMENT.

Many commendable things can be said concerning the system of schools in the new ward. There is a high school recently completed and five ward schools averaging eight rooms each. The teachers in these schools will be continued in their respective positions by the Kansas City, Kas., board of education.

Among the industries in the newly acquired territory are the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad shops, the Kansas City Structural Steel Works, the Santa Fe Car Iceing Company and the United Zinc and Chemical Company. Of these the Santa Fe employs the larger per cent of the people of the city. Two of the largest grain elevators in the state are located at the Argentine terminals of the Santa Fe, one with a capacity of 1,000,000 bushels and the other, one-half that size.

COULD NOT GET GAS.

One of the urgent reasons for annexation from the Argentine standpoint was the inability of the people of that city to obtain natural gas. This condition of affairs will be remedied by the merger. The Wyandotte Gas Company will extend its mains to the new ward.

C. W. Green, the last mayor of Argentine, during his four terms in office had much to do with the progressing of public improvements.

As to just what the effect of the Annexation will be on the complexion of politics is problematical. Persons in a position to know declare that the Democrats and Republicans are about evenly divided.

At a special meeting last night of the Kansas City, Kas., council the Democratic members refused to confirm the appointment of C. W. Green and J. W. Leidburg as councilmen for the new ward. Mr. Green is at the present time mayor of Argentine and Mr. Leidburg is a councilman in that city.

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December 21, 1909

POGUE RETURNED TO PRISON.

Escaped From Lansing Penitentiary
in 1906, Surrendered Voluntarily.

James G. Pogue, who surrendered to the Kansas City, Kas., police and signified his willingness to return and serve an unexpired term in the Kansas penitentiary, was taken to the state prison yesterday by John Higgins, parole officer. Before leaving the police station in Kansas City, Kas., Pogue took off his coat and gave it to Louis Robinson, a fellow prisoner, saying he would not need it in prison.

The story of escape from the state prison and his successful efforts to save the mortgaged home of his sister, followed by his voluntary return after accomplishing his purpose aroused interest in the Pogue case. He was convicted in Leavenworth county in 1903, on a charge of of grand larceny and sentenced to seven years in the state prison. In 1906 he disappeared and since that time the authorities have been looking for him.

In speaking yesterday of his adventures, Pogue said he had missed thirty-five days work since he left the prison and that practically all of the money earned during this time had been sent to his sister in Leavenworth.

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December 21, 1909

DENTIST'S BLOWPIPE
EXPLODES; BURNS TWO.

SPREADS BURNING GASOLINE
AND FIRES CLOTHING.

Mrs. Wilhelmina Kimberling, Den-
tist Newton's Assistant, in
Critical Condition -- Heavy
Rug Probably Saved Life.

Presence of mind displayed by Mrs. Wilhelmina Kimberling probably saved her life late yesterday afternoon, when a gasoline blow-pipe exploded in the office of Dr. Frank H. Newton, a dentist at 520 Minnesota avenue, Kansas City, Kas., throwing burning gasoline over her clothing and that of Dr. Newton. She ran screaming for aid from the little work room, where the explosion occurred, to the outer office, where she laid down on the heavy floor rug and folded it about her in an effort to check the flames.

Dr. Newton, whose clothing was also afire, raised a window and shouted for help, in the meantime smothering the fire in his clothes. Leslie Channel, a young man who lives in Quindaro, Kas., and his father Samuel Channel, heard the cries and ran upstairs. Mrs. Kimberling's clothing was still burning when they reached her, and Leslie Channel threw his overcoat about her. Dr. Newton, who sleeps in apartments adjoining his offices, carried a heavy comfort from his bed and folded it about her. The folds of the overcoat and comfort smothered the flames, but not until she had been seriously burned.

WOMAN'S CONDITION CRITICAL.

Drs. J. A. Fulton, W. H. McLeod, E. R. Tenney and J. S. Kline reached the scene of the accident soon afterward. The woman was given emergency treatment, and taken to Bethany hospital where it was said last night her condition was critical. She received severe burns on the arms, chest and legs. Her face was also burned, but the attending physicians said the burns there were superficial.

Both of Dr. Newton's hands were burned, and he also suffered a severe burn on the left leg. He was attended by Dr. Kline.

Mrs. Kimberling for several months has worked in the doctor's office. Her mother lives in Illinois. She has one daughter, Hazel, 5 years old, who lives with friends in Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. Kimberling is 23 years old and lived in apartments in the same building in which the accident occurred.

The gasoline blowpipe, which caused the accident, is used by dentists to melt the gold used in fillings and crowns. Dr. Newton said last night he did not know what caused the explosion, but supposed it was due to a defective connection. The dentist's blowpipe is similar to that used by plumbers for melting solder.

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December 20, 1909

SISTER'S HOME SAVED
BY ESCAPED CONVICT.

THAT TASK ACCOMPLISHED, HE
GIVES HIMSELF UP.

James G. Pogue, Who Says He Left
Lansing Prison in 1906, Tells
How He Lifted the
Mortgage.

Because he could not bear to have his only sister lose her home which had been morgaged to assist in his defense, James G. Pogue in 1906 escaped from the Kansas state prison at Lansing for the purpose of working and saving his money in an effort to lift the mortgage. Having accomplished his purpose, and realizing that he would never be able to make a home for himself or live in peace with the grim threat of recapture constantly before him, Pogue yesterday morning declared his identity to two Kansas City, Kas., policemen, and expressed his desire to return to prison and suffer whatever penalty might be exacted by the law.

NEVER MISSED A REMITTANCE.

During the three years and more of his precarious freedom, Pogue has wandered over almost the whole of the United States. A coal miner, and accustomed to the hardest kind of labor, he worked unceasingly with one object in view of saving the home for his widowed sister. From the harvest fields in South Dakota to bridge building in Arkansas, the hunted man has traveled, but will all his hardships and the difficulty encountered in securing work he has never failed to send his remittance to his sister, Mrs. Ada Tieufel, Fourth street and Marion avenue, Leavenworth. In all, the erring brother has contributed something in excess of $950.

Pogue was convicted in the district court at Leavenworth in November, 1903, on a charge of grand larceny and sentenced to seven years in the state's prison. According to h is story, he was made a trusty and effected his escape on January 15, 1906. A diligent search failed to locate him, and in the circulars sent out from the prison since that time will be found the name and description of James G. Pogue.

IN FEAR OF RECOGNITION.

After making his escape Pogue went to Hutchings, S. D., where he worked for Clyde Carpenter, a sheepman. Later he went to Arkansas and was employed as a trackman on the Kansas City Southern railroad. He had assumed the name of Mike O'Brien, and in his travels about the country went by that name. Returning from Arkansas, he again went to Dakota and worked for a farmer by the name of Jerry Files, near Spencer, S. D.

Three months ago he went to Pine Bluff, Ark., and was employed as pump tender by the Missouri Valley Bridge Company. While working there he recognized among his fellow laborers a man who had known him years ago in Leavenworth. the haunting fear which had followed him at all times after his escape from prison prompted him to quit his job at Pine Bluff because he feared that his old associate would recognize him. The determination to give himself up came as a result of frequent discussions with his sister on the subject.

ANXIOUS TO FINISH TERM.

He knew his desire to take a claim and prove up on it could not be realized with safety so long as he was an escaped convict. Saturday morning he arrived in Kansas City and determined to make himself known. In former years he had lived at 225 North James street, Kansas City, Kas., and the thought came to him that he would deliver himself up to Kansas officers. Early yesterday morning he disclosed his identity to Robert Hooper and Pres Younger, Kansas City, Kas., policemen. He was taken to No. 2. police station and locked up while the prison authorities at Lansing were notified. He probably will be taken this morning to the prison where he will be compelled to serve the remainder of his term.

"I am anxious to make a man of myself," said Pogue last night, as he looked through the bars of his cell at the police station. "I kind of wanted to stay free until after Christmas time, but it would only be putting it off, and the sooner I begin serving my time the sooner I will be able to walk about the streets without hiding my face every time a man passes.

TO MAKE A MAN OF HIMSELF.

"I am glad I got away and helped my sister to save her home, even if I do have to suffer additional time for it. You see I would have been out by this time if I had stayed and now I will have to stay three years or more. I used to drink quite a bit before I went wrong, and I lay most of my trouble to that, but since I went into the prison in December, 1903, I have never taken a drink of liquor.

"I want to serve my time and then take out a claim somewhere and make a man of myself. You see I am only 32 years old now, and that ain't too old for a man to begin to live as he ought, do you think so?"

Pogue's manner and conversation left the impression of sincerity, and his face sh owed signs of pleasure as he talked of his future prospects.

J. K. Codding, warden at the Kansas state prison said last night that his records at the prison showed Pogue to have broken his parole, and John Higgins, parole officer of the institution, probably will go to Kansas City, Kas., this morning to return with the prisoner.

Pogue's wife and 10-year-old daughter are now living in Leavenworth. His father, David Pogue, a retired merchant, he says, is living in Topeka.

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December 20, 1909

BUCKET BRIGAGE AT FIRE.

Kansas City, Kas., House Completely
Destroyed -- Fire Hose Frozen.

The home of John Nilges at 1414 Wyoming street, Kansas City, Kas., was completely destroyed by fire yesterday evening. Practically everything in the house was saved. The loss on the building, a two-story frame structure, is estimated at $2,700. The Nilges family were at home when the fire was discovered and the alarm was turned in at once.

When the firemen responded it was found that a part of the hose which had been in use earlier at a packing house fire, was frozen to such an extent as to render it useless. It was necessary to send for additional hose. In the meantime the firemen and neighbors formed a bucket brigade but it was impossible to save the house.

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December 17, 1909

YOUNG HANSEN TO BOONVILLE.

Master and Faithful Dog May Be
Separated Indefinitely.

"Lawrence Hansen, I am afraid, will have to go to Boonville."

Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, made this statement yesterday when asked what would be done with the Kansas City, Kas., youngster who ran away from his home Monday night with $5 of his mother's money.

"We had him once at the McCune farm, but he ran away. The only place for him, now that he has violated his parole, is the reform school."

"Will he be given back his dog, Jack?" was asked.

The doctor laughed.

"I want to tell you I have been in hot water all day. There was a woman down here at 7:30 o'clock this morning demanding that I give the boy his dog. Several persons stopped me on the street to inquire what I intended to do."

But Dr. Mathias would not say whether he would reunite dog and master. If Lawrence is sent to the reform school by the juvenile court, it will be impossible to keep the two together. Lawrence will be kept locked up at the Detention home until Monday, when Judge E. E. Porterfield will decide his fate.

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December 15, 1909

BOY LEAVES HOME
TO JOIN HIS DOG.

LAWRENCE HANSEN, PAROLED,
CAN'T BEAR SEPARATION.

Leaves at Night by Bedroom Win-
dow and Is Found Next Day
Playing in Street With
"Jack."

When Lawrence Hansen, 10 year of age, was released three weeks ago from the Detention home, where he was placed after being arrested for "playing hookey" from school, agreed to give "Jack," his fox terrier, to a neighbor. To get Lawrence away from his former bad associates, of whom one was his pet dog, Mrs. Hansen removed to Kansas City, Kas.

For two weeks following his parole Lawrence was a model boy. He attended school regularly and minded his mother. Then came the relapse. The separation from "Jack" could not be borne. Last Monday night Lawrence packed a few of his belongings, lowered them from his bedroom window, stole downstairs in his stocking feet and took $5 from his mother's dresser.

The juvenile officers in Kansas City, Mo., were warned Tuesday to be on the lookout for the boy, but not until yesterday could trace of him be found, when word came that the boy was at 410 Troost avenue where he had been seen playing with "Jack." Juvenile Officer Holt arrested the boy yesterday afternoon and took him to the Detention home.

With tears in his eyes Lawrence was taken before Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer. "Jack" had been left behind.

"I want my dog," he pleaded with the juvenile officer. "I want Jack."

When told that he could not have "Jack," he cried his eyes red. And he continued to cry for an hour after being locked up in the detention room. Finally, when told that he would never get to see the dog again unless he quit crying, the boy dried his tears and became his amiable self.

"That boy is a proposition," said Dr. Mathias. "When he has his dog he is a good boy, but he will not be separated. I expect that the dog will have to be returned to him."

"Jack" has neither pedigree nor physical attraction. The boy several months ago picked him up on a downtown street and took him home. But for all his attention, three meals a day and a blanket to sleep on, the dog could never take on the polish of society and culture. He is still an unpedigreed mongrel of the gutter, but for all that, the inseparable chum.

Arrested three weeks ago for truancy, Lawrence told the juvenile officers he would not go to school because he couldn't take "Jack." The boy and his dog were locked in the same cell, where they ate the same food and shared the same bed, three days and three nights. They were companions in misery. That disregard of law and the rights of others, engendered into the dog from his own life on the streets, was bred by association into the life of his little companion.

"Who is responsible, the boy or the dog?" is the question that the juvenile officers are asking.

Lawrence will be given a hearing next Monday in the juvenile court.

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December 14, 1909

BOY COASTER IS KILLED.

Collision on Thorp Hill, Kansas City,
Kas., Fatal to Harry Wollen-
berg, 14 Years Old.

The first coasting accident of the season in Kansas City, Kas., occurred lsat night when Harry Wollenberg, the 14-year-old son of Martin E. Wollenberg of 1137 Locust street in that city, was struck and fatally injured by a loaded bob sled on the long steep Thorp street hill. Harry was coasting down Thorp street, north from Central avenue, and is supposed to have been struck by a sled coming down the same street, south from Grandview. He was picked up by some of the coasters and taken to a house nearby.

Dr. H. P. Clark of 1215 Central avenue was called and found that the boy had received severe internal injuries. Emergency treatment was given and the boy taken to Bethany hospital in a police ambulance, where Dr. Clark and Dr. C. M. Stemen performed an operation. All efforts to save the boy's life proved fruitless, however, and he died at 12:10 o'clock this morning. The body was taken to the undertaking rooms of Joseph Butler.

The accident occurred about 9:30 o'clock, but it was nearly two and one-half hours later when the ambulance reached the hospital. The delay was caused by the icy condition of the streets. Dr. Clark and Patrolman Thomas Shay, who were with the ambulance, were forced to hold the rear wheels to prevent the vehicle from skidding and turning over.

At the hospital the boy said he did not know who ran into him, and inquiry at the scene of the accident did not divulge this information. Harry Wollenberg was in the Seventh A Grade at the Prescott school. His father, Martin Wollenberg, is employed in the tank room at the Swift Packing Company's plant. He has four other children.

The street where the boy was injured was covered with coasters last night. The hill on Thorp street affords one the longest and steepest slides in the city.

Immediately after the accident to the Wollenberg boy, Sergeant P. H. Peterson ordered his men to stop all coasting on hills if the coasters would not content themselves with coasting in one direction. Last winter several young people were badly injured in the northern part of the city in a collision between two bob sleds which were going in opposite directions.

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December 13, 1909

MUD IN THE SUPPLY
DUE TO LOW WATER.

LITTLE HOPE FOR RELIEF UN-
DER PRESENT CONDITIONS.

River Stage Drops Five Feet -- Slush
Ice Adds to Trouble -- Filter
Plant Badly Needed at
Quindaro Station.

"Good morning. Have you taken your mud bath?" were the greetings received yesterday by W. G. Goodwin, general superintendent of water works, from consumers who had been compelled to take their morning dips in a coating of mud and drink a muddy mixture at their tables and in their coffee.

"Yes," good-naturedly responded Goodwin, "I've been there and I expect to be repeating it so long as the river remains low and the pumps bring forth as much mud as water. The stage of the river at Quindaro station is four or five feet below the level recorded some days ago and the water is running with slush ice and also all kinds and assortments of debris.

"I do not look for clear water until conditions change, and there is some cessation in the consumption. In addition to keeping the pumps busy for days, delivering water at the rate of 39,000,000 gallons for twenty-four hours, to meet the demands, we were called upon to do the neighborly act for Kansas City, Kas., and make up a deficit in its ordinary supply.

"This meant an additional 3,000,000 gallons a day to our burden of production, and as a consequence the water had to be forced into the distributing pipes to the consumer from the river, without having time to have the solids precipitated by the customary treatment of lime and alum.

FILTERING PLANT NEEDED.

"But the condition of the water is no worse than it always has been when the river is low, and after a heavy snow storm. and what is more, I do not believe consumers will ever see much change in times like these unless the city installs a filtering plant."

Mr. Goodwin found it necessary yesterday as a source of protection to the water supply, to shut off the 3,000,000 gallons a day that Kansas City, Kas., has been getting.

"Superintendent Riley, of the Kansas City, Kas., plant told me that they could get along without our assistance, as he has about completed arrangements to have his own plant furnish all the water that is needed," said Mr. Goodwin.

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December 12, 1909

BIDS MOTHER GOODBY; DIES.

Samuel Trainor Drank Carbolic
Acid to End His Life.

Samuel Trainor, a packing house employe, living with his aged mother at 1316 Wyoming street, Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon committed suicide by drinking the contents of a three-ounce bottle of carbolic acid. Trainor was 43 years old and had been working steadily.

Mrs. Trainor said yesterday that her son had come into the room where she was sitting about 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon and placed a bottle on the table.

"Well, goodby mother," he said, as he walked from the room. After leaving his mother the man walked into a bed room and lay down on the bed. When found a short time later he was dead.

The body was viewed by the Wyandotte county coroner. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

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December 6, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
IN HOME OF POVERTY.

BOY 2 YEARS OLD AND DOG
KEEP VIGIL OVER BODIES.

Kansas City, Kas., Baker Kills Wife
and Himself as a Result, It's
Thought, of Jealousy Caused
by Use of Morphine.
Mrs. Myra Campbell, Victim of a Drug Crazed Murder.
MRS. MYRA CAMPBELL.

Neighbors entering the home of Joseph Campbell, 2952 North Seventeenth street, Kansas City, Kas., at 9 o'clock yesterday morning found the dead bodies of Mr. Campbell and his wife on the floor of the stuffy little room which served the double purpose of sleeping and living room. Clasped in the right hand of the man was a revolver. He evidently had murdered his wife, then committed suicide. Crouching down against the bed in one corner or the room, benumbed with cold and fear, was the little white robed figure of a boy, 2 years old, whose crying through the night and early morning attracted the attention of the neighbors and led to the investigation which resulted in the finding of the bodies.

GUN IN MAN'S HAND.

Charles Phillips, 18 years old, who lives next door to the Campbells, and C. R. Lumsdon, another neighbor, were the first persons to make the discovery. The sobs of the baby induced the two men to knock at the door. Receiving no response after repeated knocking they broke the lock and opened the door enough to obtain a view of the interior of the room. The body of the woman was almost against the door. She had remained in a kneeling posture, the head to one side. A bullet had entered below the left breast, passing entirely through the body and lodged under the skin on the right side. The man lay in almost the same position against the south walls of the room and behind the woman. His arms were folded across his breast and the revolver was held tightly against his body. The bullet had passed through the heart. Campbell was a baker. He was 32 years old.
WIFE SOUTH MISSOURI WOMAN.

He was married about three years ago in southern Missouri, where he became acquainted with the girl, Miss Myra Matthews, who became his wife. She was 20 years old. Although worn and haggard she bore the traces of having been beautiful. Insane jealousy on the part of the husband is the reason attributed for the murder. The bodies were viewed by the coroner and taken to the undertaking rooms of Fairweather & Barker.
Joseph Campbell, Who Killed His Wife and Then Himself.
JOSEPH CAMPBELL.

The killing of the innocent wife and the subsequent suicide of the murderer was but the logical climax of the events which mark the life of Joseph Campbell. Although for weeks Campbell has spoken of domestic troubles, even going so far as to consult Chief of Police W. W. Cook, and on numerous occasions threatening to buy a revolver and "end it all," it is believed by those who knew him best that these troubles and the consequences had their inception in a drug filled brain.

KNOWN AS "MORPHINE JOE."

That the murderer had been addicted to the use of morphine for many years is known, in fact so common was this knowledge that for at least fifteen years he has been known to hundreds of persons in Kansas City, Kas., as "Morphine Joe." A bottle half filled with the drug was found on a chair near the bed.

The police are at a loss to determine at what time the tragedy occurred. The family of William T. Kier, 2950 North Seventeenth street, say that the Campbells were heard pumping water from the cistern as late as 9:30 o'clock last night, but they heard no shots. The family of William Brocket, whose rooms are over those of the Campbells, did not return until about 11 o'clock at night, and no shots were heard by them. Daniel Galvin, a carpenter, living a few doors north, said that he heard a shot around 10:30 o'clock but thought nothing of it.

CHILD AND DOG WITH DEAD.

A scene of utter desolation was witnessed by the men first entering the room. On every side was the evidence of extreme poverty. The ragged covers of the bed, which had not been slept on, were folded neatly back. A few little, cheap pictures adorned the unplastered walls. Despite the cheapness and the poverty there was the touch of a woman's hand, which transformed the scantily furnished room into a home.

The little boy, Earl, crying by the bed where he had stood in the cold during the entire night, and a large dog which stood guard over the dead body of his mistress, were the only living beings in the place of death. The child was hurried to the home of Mrs. C. R. Lumsdon and placed in ht blankets, but the dog growled savagely at the intruders and would not submit to being moved until petted by a neighbor whom he knew.

THE CAMPBELL HOME, KANSAS CITY, KAS.

The news of the murder and suicide spread rapidly over the neighborhood and hundreds of persons gathered about the house. The police were notified and after the bodies had been taken away a guard was set about the house to prevent persons from entering.

The orphan boy will be cared for by his father's mother, Mrs. James B. Grame of 2984 Hutchings street, Kansas City, Kas.

"The news of this awful deed came as a shock to all of us," said Mr. Grame last night. "The fear that something like this would happen has been in our minds for years." The awful condition of Campbell, crazed by drugs, has added twenty years to the age of his mother, who has clung to him through all his troubles.

"It is a matter I cannot discuss, but harsh as it may sound, it is better for the world and better for himself that his life is ended. The thing that hurts me the most is the thought of that poor innocent girl a sacrifice to his drug crazed brain."

Persons living in the neighborhood say that Campbell has made numerous threats against his wife. Mrs. M. J. Cleveland, 2984 Hutchings street, said yesterday that Campbell came to her home Saturday morning and told her that he was going to get a gun and kill the whole outfit, meaning his wife. Practically every person living near them were afraid of the man and it was said that he constantly carried with him a gun and a butcher knife. He had recently secured work at the Armour packing plant.

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December 5, 1909

ART IN A CROATIAN CHURCH.

Beautiful Paintings Now Adorn Edi-
fice of St. John the Baptist.

While the nuns were saying their evening prayers before the alter in St. John the Baptist Croatian Catholic church, at Fourth street and Barnett avenue in Kansas City, Kas., last night, workmen were busy in the rear of the church tearing away a great wooden scaffolding The scaffold has been used during the last six weeks by Oton Tvekovic, an artist, who has been decorating the church after the manner of the Catholic churches in Croatia.

In the alcove above the alter the artist has painted the figures of Jesus and the prophets Jeremiah, Isias and Elias. The figures are somewhat larger than life size and are skillfully executed. In the north alcove of the church the artist has executed a painting thirty-eight feet in length, which represents the prophets, Cyril and Methodus, on their presentation to Prince Rastislav of the Slavonic peoples. Thee picture tells the story of these two apostles who first carried the Christian religion to the Slavs at the close of the eighth century.

An unfinished picture in the south alcove will, when completed, represent the birth of Christ. In the ceiling of the church the pictures of the twelve apostles will be executed. Mr. Tvekovic is a native of Agrin, Croatia. He is a graduate of the Fine Arts institute in Vienna, and is a professor of art in the fine arts schools of Karlsruhe and Munich. He is staying with the Rev. M. D. Krmpotich, pastor of the church. Besides being a portrait painter, Mr. Tvekovic is a landscape artist of note. He has several sketches which he will place on display soon at 416 East Eleventh street, Kansas City, Mo.

Father Krmpotich said last night that his church was the first Croatian church in America to be decorated as are the churches in the mother country. Besides the pictures of the Biblical characters, the church has been decorated in the national colors of Croatia. Several designs peculiar to Croatia have been worked into the decorative scheme, and when finished the interior of the church will present a picturesque and pleasing appearance. Father Krmpotich organized St. John the Baptist parish seven years ago. Since that time a substantial brick church, a rectory and a school have been built. The parish now comprises more than 150 Croatian families, and is in a flourishing condition.

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November 30, 1909

HAS AN OLD HALF DOLLAR.

Charles Mussman's Coin Is Dated
1834 and Unmilled.

Charles Mussman of Twenty-sixth and Orville streets, Kansas City, Kas., has a half dollar dated 1834. The edge is not milled. The eagle's wings on the back are shields and not flags, as the coins of recent date. The denomination of the coin is stamped on the edge. The market value of this coin is not known. It is thought to be the oldest half dollar owned by any person in Kansas City.

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November 27, 1909

NO TYPHOID GERMS THERE.

Epidemic in Kansas City, Kas., Not
Due to City Water.

The epidemic of typhoid cases in Parkville, Mo., is not the direct cause of the spread of typhoid cases in Kansas City, Kas., according to Dr. C. C. Nesselrode of that city. the theory was advanced that because the outlet of the Parkville sewer is just above the intake of the Kansas City, Kas., waterworks the water being furnished the people of Kansas City, Kas., was impregnated with typhoid germs. Dr. Nesselrode, who is an eminent bacteriologist, has made exhaustive analysis of the city water and he said last night that he found nothing to substantiate such a theory.

"The water is not pure or anything like it," said Dr. Nesselrode, "but that is the fault of the waterworks plant, which is not equipped with settling basins of sufficient capacity. The water should receive chemical treatment and should stand at least forty-eight hours in the basins before being pumped to the consumer."

The board of health of Kansas City, Kas., waterworks commission have promised that new equipment and new apparatus will be installed as rapidly as possible. New settling basins are to be constructed and everything in connection with the plant put in first-class shape.

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November 26, 1909

SOURCE OF TYHPOID CASES.

Analysis Being Made of Kansas City,
Kas., Water by Expert.

The contention of the board of health of Kansas City, Kas., that the typhoid fever cases, which are becoming general in that city, are due to impure water furnished by the city water department is being investigated by Dr. C. C. Nesselrode, who is making an analysis of the water.

It has been suggested that the epidemic of typhoid fever at Parkville, Mo., is responsible for the spread of the disease in Kansas City, Kas., inasmuch as the intake of the Kansas City, Kas., water works is just below the outlet of the Parkville sewers.

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November 26, 1909

ILLNESS REUNITES COUPLE.

Married Twenty-Seven Years, Di-
vorced Three, Will Again Wed.

A marriage license issued yesterday in Kansas City, Kas., to Henderson James and Ella James is of more than passing interest to ones familiar with the story of their lives. It is a story of twenty-seven years of married life, then an interval of three years as divorcees, an application for a marriage license and the prospective reunion of two persons who began life as husband and wife on Thanksgiving day just thirty years ago in Lawrence, county, Ind.

The illness yesterday of Mrs. James, who is at the home of her son, Guy Henderson James, 305 Shawnee avenue, Kansas City, Kas., prevented the marriage of the couple, but it will be performed just as soon as she is convalescent. Four grown children will be made happy by the reconciliation of their parents.

"We decided it was all a mistake and determined to forget all about it," said Mr. James yesterday.

Mrs. James has been living at 53 Lombard street until recently, when she moved to her present address. She became sick a few days ago and her former husband, who is employed at the stock yards, came to take care of her. After talking the matter over they decided that they could not get along without each other. Mr. James is 51 years old and his prospective bride is 48.

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November 23, 1909

RAID WEDDING CELEBRATION.

Five Men Arrested, Including Bride-
groom, and Beer Confiscated.

Sheriff Al Becker. of Wyandotte county, with a force of deputies, raided a Croatian wedding celebration at Loscke's hall, Third street and Barnett avenue, in Kansas City, Kas. Five men were arrested, and ten kegs were confiscated. The five men arrested can speak but little English.

Their names as the jailer spelled them are as follows:

Mike Stepson, 318 Ann avenue; Paul Medleck, 23 Water street; Mike Balaska, 25 Water street; Mat Milsco, 31 Dugarro avenue; and Paul Pihel, the bride groom, of 310 North James street.

The men were arrested after persons living in the neighborhood had made a complaint. The Austrians in Kansas City, Kas., have held wedding celebrations in Kansas City, Kas., for years. They are accustomed to having beer in the old country, and can't understand why it should be denied them in Kansas.

They do not sell the beverage at the celebrations, but a bartender stands behind an improvised bar, and hands out large schooners to the dancers.

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November 21, 1909

BOYS RUN DOWN BY
FIRE AUTOMOBILE.

CHARLES COLE, 12 YEARS OLD,
MAY DIE OF INJURIES.

Two Kansas City, Kas., Lads, Coast-
ing, Collided With Machine
While Latter Is on
Test Run.
Earl Sheirel, Injured in Collision With Fire Automobile.
EARL SHEIREL.

Charles Cole and Earl Sheirel, aged 12 and 13 years, were run down yesterday by a combination hose and chemical fire automobile at Armstrong avenue and Seventeenth street in Kansas City, Kas., and received injuries which may result fatally in the case of the little Cole boy. The boys were seated on a small coasting wagon, riding north on Seventeenth street, which has a gradual slope for several blocks. The fire automobile, which has recently been undergoing tests in Kansas City, Kas., with the prospect of being purchased by the city, was going the same direction, being driven by S. O. Harpster. Stories of the collision which occurred between Ann and Armstrong avenues, differ. The Cole boy was seated on the rear of the little wagon and the heavy fire wagon passed entirely over his body, rolling along the asphalt pavement. The Sheirel boy was thrown to one side and a wheel of the wagon crushed a thumb on the right hand.

Following the accident the occupants of the motor wagon picked up the unconscious boy and removed him to the home of his father, J. B. Cole, 1604 Minnesota avenue. The Sheirel boy, who lives at 1606 Minnesota avenue, refused to ride in the wagon, and walked to his home, where he was treated by Dr. W. H. McLeod.

S. O. Harpster, a representative of the Anderson Coupling and Fire Supply Company, A. Zertman, of the Zertman-Tiller Motor Car Company, and a Mr. Lamb, of Bowling Green, Ohio, the occupants of the car stated that they were in no way to blame for the accident.

Charles Cole, Whose Injuries May Be Fatal.
CHARLIE COLE.

"We were several blocks behind the boys when we first saw them," said Mr. Harpster. "I had intended to turn east on Armstrong avenue and had the car going about five miles an hour and under perfect control. We were ringing the bell constantly. When we neared the boys I started to pass them on the right side. They turned to the right and then when I turned to the left they appeared to become confused and as we started to pass they ran into us. I stopped within a car length of where we struck the boys."

This version of the accident differs materially from that told by eye witnesses to the accident. Mrs. R. Carpenter of 1619 Armstrong avenue said yesterday that the automobile was traveling at a high rate of speed.

"I tried to warn the boys, but the rattle of their wagon drowned my voice," she said. "It seemed to me that the automobile just ran right into them. The car ran at least 100 feet beyond the place where the boys were struck before it was stopped. The little coasting wagon was broken into small pieces."

A number of laborers who were working near the scene of the accident examined the tracks of the car and the little wagon, and they stated yesterday that the coasting wagon was within eight feet of the left-hand curbing when it was struck.

Dr. W. R. Palmer, who attended the injured boy, stated last night that his condition was serious. He sustained a broken collar bone, a possible concussion of the brain and severe cuts and bruises over his head and body. One particularly painful bruise is over the spine. J. B. Cole, father of the injured boy, is bailiff of the Wyandotte county court.

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November 13, 1909

MONEY WAITING FOR HIM.

Police Look for John E. McCullough,
Heir to $50,000 Estate.

John E. McCullough, formerly of Eastport, Me., who is the beneficiary by his brother's will of an estate valued at $50,000, is thought to be in Kansas City, Kas., working under an assumed name. W. W. Cook, chief of police of Kansas City, Kas., yesterday received a letter from Mrs. George L. Ferguson, a sister of McCollough, in which she asks the assistance of the police in locating her brother, who left his home eleven years ago.

The missing man is described as being 46 years old, 5 feet 9 inches in height, dark complexion and weighing about 160 pounds. He is said to be apt at several trades, among them that of machinist, and probably will be found about some packing plant or railroad shops. In his efforts yesterday Chief Cook found a woman who believes that she knew the missing man three years ago in Ottawa, Kas.

Information from Ottawa last night stated that the man wanted had left there several months ago and was now in Kansas City, Kas.

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November 13, 1909

"MAJOR," FIRE DOG, DEAD.

Mascot of Number 6 Station Killed
While on Duty.

"Major," the mascot of No. 6 fire station in Kansas City, Kas., is dead. He was only a dog, was "Major," a little white bulldog of uncertain pedigree, but he had bee the constant companion and playfellow of the boys at "Six" since the days of his puppyhood, and his tragic death yesterday under the wheels of the fire wagon he loved so well, cast a gloom over the station. "An ordinary dog with perhaps a little more than the ordinary intelligence," you would have said, had you seen him plying about the station. Had you carried your investigation farther eager friends would have imparted to you many wonderful tales of the sagacity and almost human intelligence displayed by the mascot.

The ordinary trick dog seen on the stage would have died of envy could he have witnessed the "stunts" performed by "Major" for the edification of his friends, the firemen. Long hours of patient training had perfected him in every trick known to "dogdom," but it was as a shortstop on the baseball diamond that "Major" gained the greatest laurels.

"The greatest dog shortstop in the world," he has been called on numerous occasions. Hundreds of boys and girls, yes, and grown folks too, have watched "Major" as a ball was batted or thrown from some distant part of the field, only to find a lodging between the jaws of the mascot who judged the ball with the accuracy of a major league star.

Always the first to respond to an alarm of fire, sometimes running by the side of the wagon, at other times riding on the footboard or in the basket, Major was a familiar figure at all the fires in the Armourdale district. About a year ago a can of acid was overturned an d some of it burned the mascot's foot. Since that time he has been unable to run any considerable distance and accordingly has ridden on most of the "runs."

It was while returning from a fire yesterday that in some unaccountable manner he was caught under one of the wheels and his hip crushed. Every attention was paid to him and when it was found that he could not live the fire boys brought chloroform and administered it in the hopes of alleviating his sufferings. Later it was found necessary to shoot him in order to end his misery, and an officer was called from No. 3 police station.

Passersby may wonder at the little mound in the rear of the fire station and smile when told that it is the grave of a dog, but to the fire boys, who knew his love and devotion, it marks the resting place of a friend.

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November 12, 1909

JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS
COME TO TOWN TODAY.

COMMERCIAL CLUB ROOMS DEC-
ORATED FOR RECEPTION.

Five Women Members of Party Will
Be Guests of Honor at Country
Club Luncheon -- Omaha
the Next Stop.

Kansas City will be the host today to the Honorary Commissioners of Japan, consisting of forty-three of the leading business men and educators of the Oriental empire, who, together with five Japanese women, are touring the United States. No efforts will be spared to entertain the foreign guests during their stay here, which will be from 9 o'clock in the morning until 11 o'clock at night.

Following the arrival here the party will breakfast in their special train. At 9:30 the men of the party will be met in automobiles by the members of the Commercial Club and the next hour and a half will be spent in a reception in the club rooms. The club rooms have been decorated with palms and ferns, the stars and stripes, the Japanese national flag, the mikado's coat of arms, and the Japanese man-of-war emblem. Judge W. T. Bland, president of the club, will head the receiving line, and in it will be the forty-three Japanese commissioners, the officers off the Commercial Club and all former presidents of the club.

WILL VISIT HIGH SCHOOL.

At 11 o'clock the party will be taken to the Westport high school, where Baron Kanda, head of the school of the nobility in Tokio, will make a short speech. Baron Kanda speaks English fluently and is a graduate of Amherst college. The address will be followed by a drive through Swope park and a stop at the Evanston Golf Club for a buffet luncheon.

After the luncheon the party will be driven through the city, up and down the principal streets, over the boulevards and through the leading parks.

The first place of interest to be visited will be the Bank of Commerce. This will be followed by an inspection of the Burnham-Munger overall factory. A drive to Kansas City, Kas., is next in order, where the party will be shown through the plant of the Kingman-Moore Implement Company. These will be the only places visited during the day.

While the men are being entertained by the members of the Commercial Club the five women in the party, Baroness Shibusawa, Baroness Kanda, Madame Midzuno, Madame Horikoshi and Madame Toki will not be forgotten. A committee composed of the wives of the Commercial Club directors and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Clendening will entertain them. A visit to the Westport high school, a noon lunch at the Country Club and a tea at the home of Mrs. W. R. Nelson will be the events of the day which have been mapped out for the women.

DINNER AT THE BALTIMORE.

At 6:30 o'clock in the evening a dinner will be served to the men in the banquet room at the Baltimore hotel. At the same time a dinner will be given for the women in the Japanese room of the hotel. At the conclusion of their dinner the women will repair to the banquet room, where the entire party will listen to the addresses by David R. Frances, Senator William Warner, Baron Shibusawa and Baron Kanda. Judge Bland will act as toastmaster.

This will conclude the events of the day. The visitors will be taken back to their train, and will leave for Omaha, from where they will work west to San Francisco, from which port they will sail for Japan, November 30.

LEADING FINANCIER.

The Japanese arrived in Seattle from Japan September 1, and when they leave will have spent eighty-eight days in America, visited fifty-two cities, and traveled more than 11,000 miles. During this time they have visited plants and institutions representing nearly every American industry. Many of Kansas City's leading industries will not be visited, as the party has been to similar ones in other cities.

Baron Elighi Shibusawa, who is the head of the commission, is one of the leading men of Japan, being both a statesman and a financier. His individual efforts have raised the status of business men in this country. In 1873, Baron Shibusawa organized the first national bank in Japan under the capital stock system, and has been connected since with all leading banking institutions in Japan.

One Pullman dynamo car, a baggage car, a Pullman dining car, four ten-compartment sleepers, one twelve-section drawing room car and a six-compartment observation car comprise the equipment of the special train that will bring the Japanese to Kansas City over the Burlington railroad. The train will be in charge of W. A. Lalor, assistant general passenger agent for the Burlington at St. Louis.

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