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December 16, 1909

HUGHES ADMITS TWO WIVES,
BUT PLEADS NOT GUILTY.

Arraigned Before Justice Remley,
and Trial on charge of Bigamy
Set for January 11.

Benjamin Franklin Hughes, admitted bigamist and real estate agent, was arraigned yesterday morning in Justice Theodore Remley's court on the charge of bigamy. He pleaded not guilty, and was released on $1,000 bond. His trial was set for January 1.

In a statement made to Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Mr. Hughes admitted that he had two wives living.

"I confess I have two wives," said Mr. Hughes. "The first one I married in Osborne, Mo. Rev. James E. Hughes, my uncle, a pastor in the Baptist church, married us. I have never been divorced from this wife.

"Seven days ago, December 7, I married Miss Valerie Wiler of Kansas City. Judge Prather of the Wyandotte, Kas., probate court married us."

Why did Mr. Hughes marry Miss Wiler and expect to escape prosecution? This question cannot be answered by the prosecuting attorney's office. It is said that he was advised not to, before it was known that he had a wife living. Mrs. Clay, matron of the industrial school for girls at Chillicothe, is quoted as saying she advised him not to, and so did other persons connected with the case. When Mrs. Clay brought the girl here from Chillicothe December 3, to meet Hughes and plan the marriage, the girl was kept at the detention home. It was after an investigation of the case that the advice against marrying was given.

The report was brought to Mrs. Clay that Miss Wiler was in love with another man. Hughes was told that if he married her that she would probably leave him soon and marry the young man who kept company with her, after she and Hughes became acquainted.

Hughes, so it appears from the statement made by Miss Wiler, had a second affinity after he became enamored with her. He rented a flat at 807 Troost avenue, early in August, and he and Miss Wiler lived there together three days and two nights. It was at this juncture Mrs. Cora Westover, the girl's mother, heard of her daughter's wrongdoing and had her sent to the industrial school in Chillicothe.

"After I was taken away," says Miss Wiler in her statement to the prosecuting attorney, "Mr. Hughes got another woman to live with him. They occupied the flat together for some days following."

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December 2, 1909

CONFUSING HORSE DEAL.

Animal Twice Stolen, Alleged Thief
Almost Escapes Prosecution.

Charged with stealing the same horse twice, Henry Tobin, who was arrested yesterday on a warrant from Justice Theodore Remley's court, can be prosecuted only on a minor charge of obtaining money under false pretenses.

On November 22, Tobin is charged with having stolen a horse from E. T. McElroy and the following day selling it to W. E. Edwards.

Subsequently McElroy, who had searched the city for his horse, decided to offer a $5 reward for the animal's return. Tobin, it is charged, hearing of this, went to Edwards's stable, stole the horse he had sold only a few days before, returned it to McElroy and was given the $5 reward.

When Tobin was arrested yesterday, McElroy refused to prosecute. But as the stolen horse which had been sold to Edwards did not belong to the latter, Edwards cannot prosecute for horse stealing. The only charge remaining is that of obtaining money under false pretenses.

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August 18, 1909

STRUCK WIFE, CHOKED BABY.

On This Charge Judge Remley Fines
Man $500.

For swearing at his mother, striking his wife and choking his baby, J. H. Hamilton, Twenty-second and Chelsea streets, was arrested and yesterday appeared in the municipal court, where Judge Theodore Remley fined him $500, the maximum allowed by the law.

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June 10, 1909

CLAIM HE HYPNOTIZED
ATHENAEUM WOMEN.

SIX MEMBERS CAUSE ARREST OF
AFFABLE BOOK AGENT.

A. W. Johnson Alleged to Have In-
duced Them to Give Up Money
and I. O. U.'s Totaling $120.
Held by Justice.

Six members of the Athenaeum Club went to the prosecutor's office yesterday and on behalf of themselves and three others declared that A. W. Johnson, a book agent, had hypnotized them into giving up money and I. O. U.'s totaling $120.75.

The women who complained to M. M. Bogie, assistant prosecuting attorney, were the following: Mrs. Anna S. Welch, wife of a physician; Mrs. E. T. Phillips, wife of a physician, residence the Lorraine; Mrs. Paul B. Chaney, 3446 Campbell street; Mrs. George S. Millard, 4331 Harrison street; Mrs. W. W. Anderson, 2705 Linwood avenue; Dr. Eliza Mitchell, 1008 Locust street.

Besides these, the following complained of Johnson, but did not appear yesterday: Mrs. Willard Q. Church, 3325 Wyandotte street; Mrs. Wilbur Bell, 200 Olive street, and Mrs. S. S. Moorehead, 3329 Forest avenue.

The women confronted Johnson in Mr. Bogie's office. It was declared that he had exercised hypnotic power. Said Mrs. M. H. Devault, 3411 Wabash avenue, prominent in the Athenaeum:

"This man sold a set of books called 'The Authors' Digest' to these members of the Athenaeum on representation that I had purchased the volumes and had recommended them. They bought largely on this recommendation."

"Yes, and we were hypnotized," said the women.

In addition to the books, Johnson sold a membership in the "American University Association." This, the women say he told them, would enable them to buy books, and especially medical works, at less than the usual price. After correspondence it was found that the lower prices could not be secured.

From all but one woman named, except Mrs. Devault, Johnson secured $5.75 and an order for $115. From Mrs. Millard he got $20 in money.

Johnson, a well dressed, affable young man, was arraigned before Justice Theodore Remley on a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a bond of $500. He said he had an office in the Century building.

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May 28, 1909

JAMES SHARP TELLS
A RAMBLING STORY.

PREACHES ON WITNESS STAND
BUT PASSES UP KILLING.

Arguments in Riot Case With
Instructions to Jury Including
Manslaughter and Par-
tial Insanity.

Cost of the Sharp trial to Jackson county $1,500.
Duration of trial (if ended today) twelve days.

By noon today or shortly after 12 o'clock the fate of James Sharp will be in the hands of the jury. All the testimony was finished yesterday afternoon and the instructions were read to the jury.

If Sharp meant to convince the jury he is not in his right mind, his counsel let him do the best possible thing by allowing him to ramble on the witness stand as he did yesterday morning. One of his impromptu sermons lasted for nearly twenty minutes and might have been two hours had the court not stopped it. All through Oklahoma, Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, the Northwest and Canada he rambled.

DEFENSE SCORES POINT.

But when, in the course of his ramblings, he got to Kansas City, his flow of language dried. He was not allowed by his counsel to tell even who fired the first shot in the riot, and, not having been examined as to the details by his own counsel, could not be cross-examined on such points.

In many words Adam God told of the revelations he had:

"It was revealed to me, after I had been preaching for two years, that I was a chosen vessel. I received it as the messenger of the fifth angel in the ninth chapter of Revelations -- the angel who opened the bottomless pi pt and out of the pit came locusts and they had tails.

"I am Jesus Christ. This knowledge that is in me is God. I claim to be the father of the Lord, yet he is my mother. I am the father of Jesus Christ raised up again out of David. This revelation came to me in Fort Smith, Ark. Since then I have found more proof in the Scripture all the time. Two years ago it was revealed to me that I was David."

"Will you ever die?"

"I preached that I would never die and that my body would never see corruption. Anyhow, I will be reincarnated."

JEALOUS OF ADKINS.

But in all of Sharp's statement, from the time the meteor fell on his farm in Oklahoma until the time of the riot, through the tears that masked but could not stop the flow of words, though whatever emotion he may have felt, there was in it all , t the culminating moment, the note of jealousy. For John Adkins, the Adkins who led the naked parade, was a greater preacher than Adam God.

"From the time Adkins joined us until we were arrested in Oklahoma City he was the leader," Sharp testified. "The time he was converted he preached as no man has ever preached before nor since. We stood dumbfounded. Tears streaming down his cheeks, Adkins told us of things we had never heard of; things that were not in the Bible. He made men weep and women cry. Often I myself have wept as I preached, but I couldn't make others cry. But Adkins could. He was a great preacher."

It was Adkins who told Sharp, according to the defendant's story, that he was Adam, Mrs. Sharp, Eve, and the boy, Cain or Abel. There is confusion in the testimony as to the child's name. It was Adkins, too, according to the defendant, who said three times to the police, when they started to interfere with the naked parade: "Get the behind me, Satan." And Sharp said the police got.

NO SENSE OF SHAME.

Of this orgy Sharp told with no sense of shame. He appeared amused when he related his wife's endeavor to shield herself from the public gaze after her arrest and omitted no detail. In marked contrast to this was his testimony about selling his home because he feared he would get attached to it instead of god.

"An evil spirit leapt out of Holt and on me," said Sharp, telling of the controversy at the mission in the North end. I became unbalanced and pushed him out. I called him a foul name, but did not swear. I struck Holt with a pistol against my will. From that time on I was like a blind man and all through the fight I can't remember. I never was in such a fix since I was born. I know I said: 'Come on, we'll hold a meeting if we don't get killed. This is a free country and we'll preach anyhow.'

"I meant to show my humility with guns and thought perhaps they'd let me alone. I was watching for the police. the first officer told me to go over to the station and I started to talk to him when a man in citizen's clothes came up beside the officer and put a pistol in my face and told me to drop my knife. Then I heard a shot fired.

"Did you fire that shot?"

"No."

At this point the direct examination stopped. Sharp's counsel would not let him tell who fired the first shot, but turned him over to the state for cross-examination. Then the religious ramblings ceased and Sharp was brought back to his earlier life with a jerk.

WAS SHORT-CARD GAMBLER.

""Yes," said he in answer to questions from Mr. Conkling. "I was a gambler from the age of 14 for almost thirty years. I played cards for money. I was a short card gambler and played poker, seven-up, casino and other games. About all I looked for was to swindle. I got so I could run up high hands, but played square when I had to."

Under a fire of questions Sharp admitted that he had no title to the farm on which he lived, as it was a claim and he had lived there only two and a half years. He said he sold his relinquishment for $250 and paid off debts of $22. He didn't give the poor over $125, he said.

But after he quit gambling, Sharp took moral bankruptcy. He never made restitution to the people whom he had swindled.

"Gambling was the devil working through me. The money I had swindled people out of I just charged up to the devil, and let it go at that."

"Did you preach the Ten Commandments?"

"The Commandments were law in their day, but Christ came along and changed the law."

Pursuing questions about the evil spirit he said Holt brought the defendant, Mr. Conkling asked:

"Did you get the evil spirit first, or the gun?"

WAITED FOR TROUBLE.

"I carried the gun all the time. I never was in such a fix. Just think of a man going out and doing what I did -- "

"Did you tell the others to bring their revolvers?"

"They had them with them all the time. I was not hunting trouble. I was waiting to see it come. I was expecting it after what had happened."

"When the officer said, 'Drop that knife,' where was the weapon?"

"In my hand, open. We were holding a meeting and I was watching to keep them off if they interfered. I was armed with faith. Besides that, I had a gun and a knife which the children not of God could understand. Of course they could not recognize the spirit."

The sharp fire of cross-examination, calling for quick thought and feats of memory by the defendant, did much to dispel any belief of insanity which he may have instilled on his direct examination.

MRS. SHARP HYSTERICAL.

There were certain inconsistencies which hardly could have been lost on the jury. For instance, Sharp testified that he learned to read largely through his perusal of the Bible. He gave the impression that this was about his only means of education. Yet Sharp, it was pointed out, writes a fair hand.

Mrs. Melissa Sharp, sobbing and talking in the voice of hysteria, preceded her husband on the stand. She seems devoted to her husband, aside from religion and told of the falling star and of her conversion in Oklahoma in a voice that expressed the profoundest conviction.

Her recital of how the Sharps wept and prayed for weeks after Adam saw the star was dramatic. When she had finished amid tears of her own and of Mr. Martin of her counsel, she was taken back to her cell without cross-examination.

ARGUMENTS ARE BEGUN.

The argument was begun at 7 o'clock in the evening by William S. Gabriel, assistant prosecuting attorney, who presented the case for the state. He was followed by A. A. Bailey of the defense and Harry Friedberg for the state. After these addresses court adjourned until 9 o'clock this morning. The morning A. E. Martin will argue for the defense and Virgil Conkling, prosecutor, will sum up for the state. How soon after that there will be a verdict is for the jury to say.

About twenty-five instructions offered by the state and defense were given to the jury by Judge Ralph S. Latshaw. Under them, Sharp may be convicted of murder in the first or second degree. The maximum penalty for the last mentioned offense is two years' imprisonment. The jury may acquit on the ground of self-defense or on the plea of insanity.

The instructions cover partial insanity, the presumption of guilt raised by flight after the crime. There is an instruction covering the supposition that Sharp was insane at the time of the crime and has since recovered, and another that supposes he was insane then and is so now. The court instructed the jury that it was not necessary that Sharp should have fired the shot that killed Michael P. Mullane in order to convict him, but that it was sufficient if proved anyone acting in concert with him did the deed.

For the first time during the trial of the case, A. A. Bailey of Sharp's counsel took the active part yesterday. His adroit questioning strengthened the defendant's case materially, so far as it was possible to do so in light of the damaging evidence Sharp gave against himself. A. E. Martin, the other attorney, was late at both morning and afternoon sessions, and was lectured each time by the court.

COVER PARTIAL INSANITY.

After the Sharps had told their story in the morning, or at least as much of it as Mr. Bailey shrewd questioning allowed to be revealed, the afternoon was devoted to expert insanity testimony and to rebuttal evidence by the state.

Dr. S. Grover Burnett heard a 4,000-word hypothetical question and was asked: "Assuming that all this is true, is it your belief that Sharp is insane?"

"It is indicative that he is insane. He is suffering form a form of mania of insanity classified as paranoia religiosa."

The hypothetical question, easy for Dr. Burnett, was too much for a spectator, who fainted and was carried from the room.

Dr. Burnett modestly admitted that he had pronounced 15,000 persons insane and had never, so far as he knew or was able to find out, made a mistake. He was the only expert put on by the defense.

In rebuttal, the state introduced Harry Hoffman, a deputy county marshal, who would not say whether he believed Sharp sane or insane. It also called to the witness stand Theodore Remley, justice of the peace, before whom Sharp had two preliminary hearings. Justice Remley testified that, at neither of these hearings did Sharp make any interruption, nor did he n or his wife carry a Bible. The same facts were testified to by Clarance Wofford, stenographer of the criminal court, who reported the preliminary hearings.

John S. Steed, sheriff of Johnson county, Kas.; Hugh I. Moore, a reporter for The Journal, who talked to Sharp soon after his arrest; John M. Leonard, editor of the Olathe Register; Edwin G. Pinkham, a reporter for the Star, all testified they believed Sharp sane.

The statement made by Sharp after he had been returned to Kansas City was read. In it the fanatic said it had been revealed to him that Kansas City was the town he was going to take. His band, he said, was singing "Babylon is Falling" just before the riot started. Also in his statement, Sharp said he fired the first shot.

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April 14, 1909

BERT BRANNON DISCHARGED.

Justice Says State Had No Case
Against Ex-Deputy Marshal.

"Not guilty," was the verdict rendered by Theodore Remley, justice of the peace, yesterday morning at the conclusion of the preliminary hearing of Bert Brannon, ex-deputy marshal. Brannon was arrested on April 6 by Detectives J. H. Farrell and Denver Mitchell, and charged with receiving and concealing stolen property.

One diamond pawned by Bert Brannon to Edward Costello, a saloonkeeper, was the "property" the police claimed had been stolen from L. V. Reichenbach on April 3.

Reichenbach and Henry Metzger, who had sold the diamond to Reichenbach, testified that the stone was identical with the one Reichenbach lost. Captain Walter Whitsett was not allowed to testify as to the conversation he had with Costello previous to the arrest of Brannon and left the court room in an indignant mood.

Brannon testified that he purchased the diamond from a pawnbroker, S. R. Alisky, 540 Main street, for $65 on March 29. It was bought "on time," he said. The diamond, Brannon said, was pawned to Costello on the same day for $35. Costello, the pawnbroker, and his clerk corroborated Brannon's testimony, and the pawnbroker produced his receipt book with Brannon's signature in it as evidence.

Judge Remley said the evidence produced by the state was not sufficient and he discharged Brannon. A "bum steer" on a horse race Brannon said was the cause of the "little inconvenience" which he suffered for one night in the city holdover.

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April 8, 1909

GOING TO GET EVEN,
BERT BRANNON SAYS.

Arraigned on Charge of Receiving
Stolen Property, Former Deputy
County Marshal's Out on Bond.

Bert Brannon, no longer deputy county marshal, entered police headquarters yesterday afternoon shortly after his arraignment on a charge of receiving stolen property and his release on bond, and secured his possessions in custody of the police. He calmly loaded his revolver and placed the deputy marshal's star in his pocket. He talked with several friends in the lobby.

"Did you ever hear of such a joke?" he asked. "Why, I have the receipt in my pocket from the jeweler who sold me the diamond. But I'm going to get even with the man who started this," and he nodded significantly at Captain Walter Whitsett's office. "Some people will wish they had never heard of me."

Brannon was arrested Tuesday evening and kept in the holdover at headquarters until yesterday afternoon, despite the efforts of political friends to secure his release. He was arraigned yesterday afternoon before Justice Theodore Remley on a charge of receiving stolen property, pleaded not guilty and was released on a bond signed by his attorney, T. A. J. Mastin, and Alderman James Pendergast. Brannon's preliminary hearing will be had before Justice Remley this morning at 9 o'clock. The property in question is a diamond stud.

An attorney made an attempt to speak to Brannon yesterday morning while he was held on an "investigation" charge, and was refused permission. He immediately went to the prosecuting attorney and demanded that a warrant be issued for the chief of police and Inspector Ryan, charging a violation of the statutes for holding Brannon "incommunicado" for more than twenty-four hours. The warrant was not issued.

Joel B. Mayes, county marshal, yesterday called in the commission of Brannon, who had been a deputy marshal. Mr. Mayes said he wanted no unpleasant comment on the men connected with his office. The fact that he let out this deputy, he said, should not be construed as meaning that he was convinced of Brannon's guilt or innocence. Mr. Mayes dictated a statement to this effect.

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December 16, 1908

MRS. PRATT TO BE TRIED
ON A CHARGE OF MURDER.

After Being Discharged by a Justice,
Information Was Filed by
Prosecutor.

Informations charging murder in the first degree were filed yesterday by I. B. Kimbrell, prosecuting attorney, against Mrs. Della Pratt and William Enghnell, members of the band of fanatics headed by James Sharp. Mrs. Pratt and Enghnell had a preliminary hearing Saturday before Justice Theodore Remley and yesterday the justice ordered their release. However, both are in the county jail awaiting trial upon the informations filed by the prosecutor.

Sharp, his wife and the two others accused of first degree murder, will not be tried before January. It would be almost impossible to have the cases ready for trial before that time, so attorneys and prosecutors agree.

While the adult members of the band are in jail, the four Pratt children are having the time of their lives at the Detention home. Under the guidance of J. K. Ellwood, superintendent, they are imbibing knowledge at a rapid rate. In eight days the larger ones have learned to read and write.

Requests from person who wish to adopt the children continue to come to the probation officers. George M. Holt received a letter yesterday from G. H. Walser of Liberal, Mo., asking for all the children. He promises that they shall not be separated and offers to provide the best of care. This application is only one of twenty.

Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, said last night that the inquest of all five victims of the riot would be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock. The inquest will include an inquiry into the death of Lulu Pratt, who was killed while attempting to escape in a boat in company of her mother.

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December 12, 1908

FOUR MUST FACE
MURDER CHARGE.

Religious Fanatics Are Ar-
raigned for their crimes.

Murder in the first degree is the charge that four members of the religious fanatics who shot and killed two policemen and a citizen during a riot Tuesday afternoon, will have to answer in the criminal court. Late yesterday afternoon James Sharp, Melissa Sharp, Della Pratt and William Engnell were taken before Justice of the Peace Theodore Remley and arraigned.

William Engnell, Facing Murder Charge
WILLIAM ENGNELL.
Youth Charged with Complicty in Police Murders Last Tuesday. He Was in the Houseboat With Mrs. Pratt When Lulu Was Killed. He Was Armed With Two Revolvers.

The four prisoners were driven to the justice court in a police ambulance, guarded by twelve policemen. They were later taken to the county jail, where they will be held until they are tried.

After taking the statement of James Sharp, the leader of the band, the prosecuting attorney decided to hold the four on a charge of murder in the first degree, and place the children of Mrs. Pratt under control of the juvenile court. Edward Fish will be held by the police as a witness. He was not arraigned because the other members said he was not of the same faith, but was simply drifting down the river with them.

Submissive and remorseful, James Sharp made a statement yesterday that is wonderful for its sensational admissions. Sharp not only lost faith in his religion, but in his powers of leadership.

The onetime gambler who won hundreds of dollars by showing a bad temper during poker games, is now a tame and submissive man, remorseful and sorry for his last actions, and who expects to be killed for his crimes.

WILL HE RISE? DOUBTFUL.

The once powerful leader of the religious sect still hangs to a faint ray of hope that he is not entirely wrong. Expecting to die for his murderous assault upon the police, Sharp has retained some hold upon the belief that when he is killed he will again appear upon earth. But he is growing doubtful of that.

Not so with the poor family of Pratt children, whom he led into so much trouble. All of them have given him up, and his teacher. Their desire now is for the future. Education and the pleasant days of school life is the bright spot in their future. Mary, the brightest one of the family, told her mother yesterday morning that if they had gone to school they would not have been led astray by Sharp.

After taking counsel with her four children, Mrs. Della Pratt yesterday morning asked to be taken to her daughter, Lulu, who had been killed. The police sent the entire family to the undertaker's in a carriage. Kneeling beside the coffin of Lulu, Mrs. Pratt prayed for forgiveness until she was lifted up and taken away by attendants.

The little brothers and sisters broke down and cried. Neither wife nor children were much affected at the sight of Pratt's body.

NO CHARGE AGAINST THEM.

The children will not have to answer to any criminal charge. Even Lena Pratt, the girl who shot Sergeant Patrick Clark, will not have to answer for her deed to the criminal authorities. Like her sisters and brother she will be taken care of by the juvenile court.

"Wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction," was printed on slips of paper found yesterday in the houseboat formerly used by the Sharps and Pratts. Mrs. Pratt said yesterday afternoon, when shown the paper, that she believed her way led to destruction.

The men and women of the sect were separated by the police and have not been allowed to talk to each other. When placed in the patrol wagon yesterday afternoon to be taken to the justice court was the first time they had been together since their arrest.

The four prisoners were first brought together in the lobby of the station. An officer attended each prisoner, and no attempt was made of any of them to speak to the others while in the station. Mrs. Pratt did not even look at the leader, but cast an appealing glance at Mrs. Sharp.

"I wish I had never heard of Sharp," Mrs. Pratt said yesterday. "But he was mighty gentle with us all and treated everyone with consideration," she added.

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August 16, 1908

BUT SHE REALLY WAS SICK.

Owner of a Hotel Said His Manager
Was Shamming.

A hotel proprietor at 1205 Charlotte street appeared in police court yesterday to prosecute Mrs. Hattie Daschner, his manager, alleging that she disturbed his peace. Witnesses said that the woman was too ill to appear. the proprietor insisted that she was not, that she was hale an hearty and only shamming.

Justice Theodore Remley, sitting for Harry J. Kyle, police judge, issued a bench warrant for Mrs. Daschner and ordered the police to have her in court at 1 o'clock. In the meantime she was to be released on a $200 cash bond.

At the appointed hour the police returned empty handed. But they had made an investigation, they said. "That poor old woman is 70 years old," one said, "and she is certainly down sick in bed. We could not take her from there."

Justice Remley advised the proprietor to see if the matter could not be adjusted out of court.

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July 17, 1908

JACK GALLAGHER
IN THE WORKHOUSE.

TO REMAIN ONE YEAR UNLESS
HE PAYS $1,000 FINE.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern's Luna-
cy Commission Quickly Decides
That Gallagher's Troubles
Are Temper and Booze.

Before a lunacy commission consisting of four physicians Jack Gallagher, notorious circumventor of justice, was yesterday adjudged sane. It took the commission only an hour and a half to hear all of the testimony and to make its physical and mental examinations; then they went into executive session and within five minutes had returned its verdict, which reads:

"We submitted Jack Gallagher to a personal, mental and physical examination, and heard the testimony of witnesses, and from the evidence of such mental and physical testimony and examinations offered, we find that Jack Gallagher is sane, and responsible for his actions."

After the commission, consisting of Dr. J. O. Hanawalt, Dr. St. Elmo Saunders, Dr. O. L. McKillip and Dr. J. S. Snider, had been informed of its duties and the result its decision would have upon the cases which were then being held in suspension by the police court, it called Jack Gallagher as the first witness.

Gallagher walked into the room accompanied by an officer. The slugger' demeanor was somewhat tame compared with his previous actions. As Dr. Hanawalt began to question the prisoner he dropped his eyes and nervously moved his hands and feet. The preliminary questions relative to age and residence were all answered in a quiet manner.

IN SALOON BUSINESS THREE YEARS.

"In what business were you engaged as a boy," was the first question.

"I did not go to school further than the fourth grade. Then I worked like any other kid."

"When did you first enter the saloon business?"

"Three years ago, in Kansas City."

"What is your general condition of your health?"

"Good."

"Did you ever have any serious illness?"

"No, just kid's diseases. Dr. Snider always treated me."

"Do you ever have any trouble articulating?"

Gallagher did not understand the word, and after it was repeated to him three times he replied:

"I didn't get past the fourth grade in school and I don't know what that big word means."

When its meaning was explained he answered in the negative.

"How tall are you and what do you weigh?"

"I am 6 feet one inch and a fraction and weigh about 170 pounds."

"Did you ever weigh more than that?"

"Yes, several years ago I weighed 190 pounds

"What caused you to lose weight?"

"Worry over my business, and I have had to do a lot of that."

Then followed the physical and mental tests given by the physicians. During the physical examination Gallagher called attention to a small bruise on his left ankle, which he charges was made by a blow from Albert King's cane. Gallagher told the physicians that he had never been troubled with his eyes, having passed an examination for the United States army and also for the police department.

"Is your memory good?" questioned Dr. St. Elmo Saunders.

"Yes," and after some hesitancy he added, "There have been times when I have overlooked my mail for a day or two, but they were mostly bills."

"Do you remember all of the events which happened yesterday?"

"If you mean the events which led up to me being arrested and my appearance in the police court, yes."

"Tell me the facts which led up to your going to Mr. King's rooms."

"I don't care to answer that question."

"But you remember them well?"

"Yes."
75 GLASSES A DAY.

J. F. Richardson, representing Mr. King, then questioned the witness.

"Do you drink intoxicating liquor?"

"Yes."

"Do you ever get drunk?"

"Yes. I have drank whisky ever since I was 20 years old."

"Did you take any whisky on the night before you went to Mr. King's rooms; and if so, how much had you drunk?"

"I drink every day from sixty to seventy-five glasses of whisky; Tuesdays as well as any other day. I was under the influence of whisky when I was arrested."

"Were you responsible for your actions in King's room?"

"I think I was, but I won't answer any more questions like that."

Colonel J. C. Greenman, Humane officer, said that they must have witnesses to help them in their decision as to whether or not Gallagher was insane. Then Dr. Saunders questioned Dr. Snider relative to the medical attention which he had given Gallagher. Dr. Snider replied that Gallagher had never been seriously ill, and that in his opinion he is sane and always had been.

"You have never seen him act insane before?"

"No, never. When he is drunk, as he frequently is, he is always able to take care of himself."

"Is he a good business man?"

"From what I know of him I would say yest."

Tom Gallagher, brother of the prisoner, was called to the stand.

"Would you believe from your brother's conversation Tuesday night that he was drunk?"

"HE'S SANE," SAYS TOM.

"Yes, I think he was, but he knew what he was doing."

"Do you think your brother is sane or insane?"

"Sane."

These questions satisfying both parties to the investigation, Tom Gallagher was dismissed and Miss Mayme Lefler, Mr. King's nurse, who was with him at the time Gallagher attempted to assault him Wednesday morning, was called to the stand.

Miss Lefler went over the story of the assault in a very concise manner, stating at the close that she believed Gallagher to be sane. Miss Lefler, in getting her training as a nurse, had to spend a certain part of her time in the insane ward at the general hospital, and from her knowledge of insanity she pronounced Gallagher as being sane, but a man of violent temper. She stated that Gallagher seemed to have been drinking before he entered Mr. King's room Wednesday morning.

Mrs. Etta Condon, proprietor of the hotel at which Mr King is staying, was called to the stand and told the same story as did Miss Lefler. "Do you think he was insane?" she was asked.

"No, not a bit of it."

"Would you know an insane person if you saw one?"

"I think I would, but Gallagher seemed to be more drunk than anything else. And he has a violent temper."

QUARRELSOME WHEN DRUNK.

J. J. Spillane, a street inspector and a particular friend of Gallagher's had been present throughout the hearing and at Tom Gallagher's request he was called to the witness stand.

Spillane told of his acquaintance with Gallagher, which dated back twenty years. He said that he did not believe that Gallagher was insane, or that he ever was insane.

"Is he quarrelsome when under the influence of liquor?"

"Not any more than any other man is; he would always stick up for himself."

Captain Frank Snow of police headquarters was called to testify. He had known Gallagher for ten or fifteen years. During that time, according to the testimony, Gallagher's conduct had been of a very erratic nature. He had engaged in several controversies at various times.

"Do you think that Jack is insane?"

"No, indeed. Jack would not have any trouble if he would let the booze alone. Every man, or almost every man, who has owned a saloon on East Fourth street, has gone crazy, and Jack will go the same way if he keeps up his present pace."

"So you think drink was responsible for all his trouble?"

"Yes, I do."

W. K. Latcham, the arresting officer for the second offense committed by Gallagher Wednesday morning against Albert King; Gus Metzinger, patrolman in charge of No. 4 police station, and who released Gallagher on $11 bond, and Dr. E. L. Gist all testified that it was their belief that Gallagher was sane. The testimony was becoming long drawn out and immaterial. The case for insanity was lost within the first five minutes of examination and the commission decided to put an end to the needless investigation.

After taking the testimony of John McCarthy, one of Gallagher's bartenders, the investigation adjourned and the commissioners met in secret session. They remained in session long enough to cast one vote and dictate their decision to the stenographer.

GOES TO THE WORKHOUSE.

Gallagher was sent to the workhouse in the daily crowd which is sent from the police court. His fine is $1,000 or one year in the workhouse. If he does not pay his fine he must remain for one year unless pardoned by the mayor.

The lunacy commission proceeding was instigated by Chief of Police Daniel Ahern, who conferred with Judge Theodore Remley of the police court and Colonel J. C. Greenman of the Humane office. It was the opinion of the three that Gallagher was too dangerous a man to walk the streets of Kansas City. It was the fear that he would be able to pay his fine and get out of the workhouse a free man, that led Chief Ahern to take such steps in having the lunacy commission appointed, he says.

"It means," said the chief, "that Gallagher goes to the workhouse His time limit for appeal is over and he will have to serve out his time or pay his fine. He is a dangerous man and should be kept in custody. I believe the fellow is insane."

It was suggested to acting Police Judge Remley by Cliff Langsdale, city attorney, that the time for appeal bond in Gallagher's case had elapsed. Judge Remley said that he would not countenance an appeal bond at any rate. He said that it would be necessary for Gallagher to go to courts above his jurisdiction before he could keep himself from the workhouse any longer.

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July 16, 1908

WAS HIS OBJECT MURDER?

Jack Gallagher Calls on King
and Creates a Disturbance.
Jack Gallagher, Bully and Attacker of Albert King.
JACK GALLAGHER
(From a sketch made in the Police Matron's Room at Central Station Yesterday Afternoon

Following his vicious inclinations, Jack Gallagher attempted to assault Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, who is lying seriously injured as the result of a previous attack made upon him by Gallagher, in Mr. King's apartments at 720 East Fifteenth street yesterday morning at 5 o'clock. Failing in his first attempt to satiate his brutal desires because of arrest, Gallagher returned to Mr. King's rooms after having been released on an $11 bond, and again tried to force entrance into the room, uttering violent threats while trying to break in the door. Again he was arrested, but this time he was held without bond, because he was taken before a police officer who knew his duty.

Shortly after 5 o'clock yesterday morning Gallagher went to the hotel in which Mr. King is staying and asked Mrs. Etta Condon, the proprietress, to show him to Mr. King's room. Mrs. Condon replied that it was too early for visitors, especially too early for a sick man to be awakened. Gallagher and a friend who had gone to the hotel with him insisted, saying that they were very intimate friends of Mr. King from St. Louis, and that they only had an hour to stay in Kansas City.

Mr. King, who is well known in Kansas City, had been receiving many visits from friends since he was injured; so Mrs. Condon said that she would see if Mr. King would see them.

NURSE ORDERED HIM OUT.

Gallagher did not wait until she had awakened the injured man, but brushed past her and stood over his bedside. Mr. King was aroused and turning in bead, saw his former assailant.

"Hello, Albert. How do you feel about it?" asked Gallagher.

"I feel pretty tough since you got through with me," replied King, "and I don't want to talk to you. Get out of here."

"I want to introduce my friend, Mike O'Brien, to you before I go," replied Gallagher, beckoning to the friend who had remained in the doorway. "You remember Mike, don't you, Al?"

King replied that he might have seen O'Brien before but did not recall the circumstance. Then he ordered them out of the room, saying that he did not wish to have anything to do with them. By this time Miss Mayme Lefler, Mr. Kin's nurse, had returned to the room. Noticing that her patient did not treat his visitors in a cordial manner, she bent over them and asked who they were.

Upon being told that one of them was Jack Gallagher she ordered them from the room. Gallagher stood and laughed at her until she finally pushed him towards the doors.

"Oh, I'll step outside and let you all talk it over for a minute," said he; "but I'm goin' to stay here till I see your finish," addressing the last remark to Mr. King.

Once the bully was out of the room, Miss Lefler locked the door and writing a note for passers-by, telling them to call the police station for help, she slipped to the open window ready to drop it out on the street.

Meanwhile Mrs. Condon had gone downstairs to a telephone and called the police. She was followed by O'Brien.

PACED THE HALLWAY.

Mrs. Condon returned to her hotel and saw Gallagher pacing up and down the hallway, bellowing out his mad threats to the closed door. Soon he stopped his loud talking and hid behind a turn in the hall. Every time a door would open or close he would hasten to Mr. King's door to see if King had left the room or if he might be caught in the act of leaving. Mrs. Condon tried to argue with Gallagher, but her words had no effect. Then she tried threats and told Gallagher that if he did not go she would call for help.

"Don't you dare call for help you--" he rasped between his closed teeth. "If you do I'll fix you," and he shook his fist in Mrs. Condon's face.

Just then Officer James Mulloy was seen hurrying across the street. He had been notified by the operator at No. 4 police station that Gallagher was threatening Mr. King. Miss Lefler called out to him and the officer hastened up the steps. When he reached the hallway he heard Gallagher threaten Mrs. Condon. Approaching Gallagher, the patrolman told him to come with him to the police station.

"It will take four of you to take me there," boasted the bully, as he began to beat and kick on Mr. King's door.

"Not this morning," said the officer as he dragged Gallagher to the head of the stairs. There they were met by three officers who had gone to the house with the patrol wagon from the Walnut street police station. Once in the patrol wagon Gallagher quited down.

When he was taken before Patrolman Gus Metzinger, acting desk sergeant, he was charged with disturbing the peace and locked up. His friend, O'Brien, pleaded with Officer Metzinger for his release on bond, saying that he would see that Jack went directly home and did not bother King again. The officer graciously complied and made the bond $11, which Gallagher himself deposited.

Twenty minutes afterwards Gallagher was back at Mr. King's door, demanding entrance. As Gallagher hurried up the hotel steps he was healed by Mrs. Condon, who tried to get him to go back. Finding that her p leas were of no avail she called out in a loud voice so that King could just hear her, "Jack Gallagher, you get out of this house at once."

KING WAS ARMED THIS TIME.

But Gallagher thrust her aside and went directly to the door of King's room. Miss Lefler had locked the door and helped King to a sitting posture in the bed. Armed with a large revolver which had been secured after the first disturbance, King sat ready for his assailant should he manage to break through the door.

Gallagher was demanding entrance, but he got no answer from behind the door. Through the door Mr. King and his nurse could hear Mrs. Condon pleading with him to desist in his bestial endeavors, saying that Mr. King was not in the room and that he had gone home immediately after Gallagher's first visit.

But Gallagher would not be satisfied. He demanded that the door be unlocked. Mrs. Condon replied that the maid had the keys and that he would have to wait until she could be found.

Inside the room, Albert King sat in bed with the revolver pointed at the door.

"I am going to shoot through the door at him," he told his nurse.

"No, don't do that," she cautioned, "you might hit Mrs. Condon. You can't tell just where she might be standing.

As a matter of fact, Mrs. Condon was standing between Gallagher and the door, keeping him from reaching the knob as he had attempted. For five minutes they stood at the door and argued whether or not King was in the room.

"Haven't you enough trouble already?" asked the woman of Gallagher.

"Yes, but King and The Journal have given it all to me, and now I'm going to give King his. He and The Journal run the whole police department, and they have put me down and out, so it's me or King now."

"Well, he's gone home now, out on Wabash avenue, so you can't find him here. You had better go on and leave me alone."

"I don't believe King has gone, I'm going to see, anyhow."

WAS READY TO SHOOT.

The it occurred to Gallagher to look over the transom and see for himself.

"Stand clear of the door," wh ispered Mr. King to Miss Lefler. "The minute his head comes up over that transom I'm going to shoot. I believe that I will be justified in doing so."

Gallagher grasped hold of the knob, with one hand upon the top of the door, which he with his great height could easily reach. He was just in the act of swinging up to the transom when Patrolman W. K. Latcham came bounding up the stairs. He had been called by H. F. Hollecker, a saloonkeeper at 716 East Fifteenth street.

"You're under arrest, Gallagher," he called, being warned by Mrs. Condon that Mr. King was inside the door waiting to shoot at the first opportunity. That stopped Gallagher, and probably saved his life; for if his head had appeared above the transom Mr. King says that he would surely have shot.

Then Gallagher began to beg to get inside the door or to look over the transom. By signs only Mrs. Condon had told Officer Latcham that Mr. King was in the room waiting for a sight of Jack Gallagher. The officer would not allow him to climb up the door.

"You've got to come with me," said the officer, "and you've got to come at once. You know I'm able to take you and take you alone, so come along and behave."

GALLAGHER KNEW HIS MASTER.

Officer Latcham said afterwards: "The coward began to crawl like a whipped cur and came right along, not giving a bit of trouble. I did not even have to draw my revolver on him. When we got downstairs we found the patrol wagon waiting for us and nothing else happened."

At the station the day shift of police had come on and Sergeant Halligan booked Gallagher for disturbing the peace and refused to allow him to be released on bond. He was taken to police headquarters with the rest of the prisoners who had been arrested during the night.

Gallagher said that he would not go in the patrol wagon with the rabble, but he found out that the officers were determined that he should and soon stopped his bullying and took his seat in the wagon beside a drunken man.

"S-a-y," was the word used by Gallagher when he was brought before Theodore Remley, acting police judge.

"Now you keep quiet until your time comes," remonstrated Judge Remley.

"All right, judge," Gallagher replied in his blustering, bullying manner. "I suppose you are going to fine me because Albert King said for you to."

After James Mulloy, the policeman making the arrest, Miss Lefler, the nurse, and several witnesses had told their stories to the court, Gallagher asked permission to ask questions of Miss Lefler.

His first question was so insulting and foreign to the case that Judge Remley told her not to answer.

"That's right," Gallagher snarled at the judge, "you take away my rights after convicting me on their testimony. Now fine me if you dare to."

"Your fine is $500," replied the judge.

"How about signing a personal bond' asked Gallagher.

"Wait a minute, Gallagher, I have another case against you," Cliff Langsdale, the city attorney, said as Gallagher was being led back to the holdover.

"That's right, stick me, fine me another $500, the police and papers are against me and I guess you are, too."

A few necessary steps required by law and Judge Remley levied a fine of $500 on the second charge of disturbing the peace.

Looking over towards the table occupied by the newspaper men, Gallagher said: "I know when the police reporters leave the station They leave here at 2:45." Swearing vengeance against the police and the newspapers, Gallagher was placed in the holdover, later to be removed to the matron's room.

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July 16, 1908

CUNNING SHOWN
BY GALLAGHER

SLUGGER WILL TRY TO HAVE
HIMSELF DECLARED INSANE.

THUS ESCAPE HIS MIS-DEEDS

CREATES A SCENE IN THE ROOM
OF ALBERT KING.

Arrested and Released on Ridiculous
Bond of $11 -- Fined $1,000
in Police Court on Two
Charges.

An attempt is to be made by the friends of Jack Gallagher to have him declared insane.

The object is to prevent justice from taking its course.

The first suggestion for a lunacy commission was made by Jack Gallagher himself.

His saloon license gone, under a double fine of $500, and with a penitentiary sentence staring him in the face, Gallagher's only hope is in an "easy" lunacy commission that will free him of all responsibility for his brutal, wanton and wicked acts.

A depravity seldom equalled, unbridled license and bad whiskey is what's the matter with Jack Gallagher. His mentality, even though of a low order, is capable of recognizing right from wrong. Gallagher, according to the statements of eye witness, was too drunk when taken to Central police station yesterday morning that the officers in charge hesitated about arraigning him in court.

The lunacy commission judge is the last desperate stand of this desperado and his friends.

Gallagher was locked in a cell in the police matron's room last night.

INSANE? NO, BAD WHISKY.

When the city attorney, Cliff Langsdale, called the case of the city against Jack Gallagher, arrested yesterday morning on two charges of disturbing the peace, it was said Gallagher was too drunk to appear. Newspaper men attending police court insisted that he be brought out before the court and arraigned on the charges. Sergeant Frank Snow informed the court that Gallagher was "pretty drunk," but Judge Remley finally ordered him brought out of the holdover so he could judge for himself.

Gallagher's demeanor before the court was that of the bully. While he showed signs of heavy drinking he was sufficiently sober to know what he was talking about and the police judge decided he was sober enough to stand trial.

After Gallagher had been fined $500 on two charges he asked his brother, Thomas Gallagher, to apply for a lunacy commission to inquire into his sanity. Thomas Gallagher immediately sought the chief of police, Daniel Ahern, and asked that the $1,000 fine be stayed until he could have his brother tried for insanity. Chief Ahern readily granted the request, giving Gallagher a stay for twenty-four hours. Judge Remley consented to the stay granted by the chief of police. Jack Gallagher was then turned oer to Colonel J. C. Greenman who has charge of all insanity cases for the police department. Gallagher was taken from the common holdover and placed in a cell in the matron's room. The police stated that he had been put in the matron's room because it was rumored that Gallagher's friends had passed cigars and whisky into the jail to him when he was held for investigation when he assaulted Albert King on Wednesday, a week ago.

Gallagher's friends called on the chief of police during the morning and afternoon, but the chief refused to say what their mission was. Jack Spillane, a street inspector, was in evidence at police headquarters and in the chief's office all of yesterday afternoon. He refused to say what he wanted, except that he was a friend of Gallagher's.

SLUGGER'S FRIENDS BUSY.

Thomas Gallagher insisted on an early meeting of the lunacy commission and desired to name the members who were to be called in to act. He was informed by Colonel Greenman that the law required a certificate of two reputable physicians to determine whether a man was insane or sane. He also told Tom Gallagher that he intended to go further than the law required, that he intended to appoint four physicians so the public would be satisfied with any verdict that the board should return.

A physician, who said he had been Jack Gallagher's family doctor for the last five years, appeared at police headquarters and said he wanted to be called as a witness to testify that Jack Gallagher had been insane for nearly five years. He was one of the physicians that Thomas Gallagher asked Colonel Greenman to appoint as a member oft he lunacy board.

Willis King, a brother of the reporter assaulted by Jack Gallagher, called on Colonel Greenman yesterday afternoon and asked that he be notified so he could have witnesses summoned to appear before the commission. Colonel Greenman set the time for the commission to meet at 10 o'clock today.

"BAD MAN," SAYS AHERN.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern said yesterday afternoon that he considers Jack Gallagher a "bad" man and that he does not want him at large. He said he will hold him pending a report of the self-solicited lunacy commission, a member of which Gallagher requested to be allowed to name.

"When Gallagher was brought in here the second time today I made up my mind that he is dangerous and should not be allowed his liberty again, said the chief. "Why, he might attack you, or me. I wouldn't allow a bully like that to strike me, but I know I am just as liable to a cowardly assault from a man of that kind as a newspaper reporter or any other person.

"Gallagher was fined in police court. His fines were heavy, but if he were went to the workhouse I thought Jack's friends might pay his fine, and I decided to prevent it.

"It was my plain duty to send him to the workhouse, though. What could I do under the circumstance of a fine and no cash forthcoming. When Jack's friends suggested he is crazy I was a way to keep him under restraint.

"It does not matter to me whether he is crazy from the effects of bad whisky or from other causes. I simply had to keep him under restraint, and I thought the lunacy commission plan was the best way out. I straightway turned the prisoner over to Colonel Greenman, the humane officer."

MUST KEEP THE PEACE.

At the request of Albert King, Jack Gallagher will be placed under a heavy police bond by the prosecuting attorney. After being placed under a bond, if Gallagher cannot raise funds to meet it, he will remain in jail for thirty days, after which time he is at liberty and will forfeit the bond if he disturbs the peace of the complainant.

Besides this, a warrant charging Gallagher with burglary is in the hands of the authorities. The charge of burglary is brought under a statute which defines burglary as the forcible entry into the dwelling house of another in the night time with intent to commit a felony therein.

Gallagher's actions in the home of Mr. King yesterday morning bring him under the rule of the statute and the warrant for his arrest on the charge of burglary is the result.

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April 1, 1908

WILL TEST NEW SALOON LAW.

Parent May Collect Damages if Li-
quor Is Sold to Minor.

Whether saloons must pay $50 for every offense of selling liquor to a minor with out a parent's written consent is to have its first decision in a justice's court April 3. Yesterday Mrs. Ida M. Carson filed suit in Judge Remley's court against the Kansas City Breweries Company, owners of a saloon at 324 West Sixth street, and James Meaney, a bartender, for $300 damages. Six offenses in the month of March were charged, the minor involved being Claud, the 16-year-old son of Mrs. Carson.

Under this statute, which has never been tested in Kansas City, if saloonists are found guilty the jury has no power to lessen the amount to be paid. Also under conviction there is a penalty that the criminal court may assess for each offense, to say nothing of the forfeiture of license which such conviction would bring with it.

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November 17, 1907

A HUSBAND WHIPPED AND FINED.

The Man Who Helped the Neglected Wife
Commended by the Judge.

"Just look at what he did to me," said W. K. Nation to Judge Remley in police court yesterday morning. He was testifying against L. Butler, who lives at Nation's home, 3410 Independence avenue. His face was bruised and his eyes discolored.

"This man deserted his family," Butler said, "and sold some of the furniture. The baby was dying. There was little money in the house, and as I had been a friend of the family for several years, Mrs. Nation's sister sent for me. The baby died. All this time Nation was away somewhere, doing nothing for the family. After the funeral, there was little for Mrs. Nation's support, so I went to boarding there, in order to let her have money. This man came home last night. He patched things up with his wife. She forgave him for leaving her. The he started in on me. You can see the outcome."

Did you really do these things of which Butler accuses you?" Judge Remley asked Nation.

"I didn't know whether the child was going to die or not," Nation said. "The baby had been sick for about a year. There was a little trouble between my wife and myself and so I just went away."

"I think, as Butler does, that he had a right to hit you. You have been punished some already, as the marks on your face show. But you haven't been punished enough. Your fine is $10. Butler, you are discharged."

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November 13, 1907

SAID SHE SOLD THE FURNITURE.

Three Sets in Seven Years Frank
Grantella Said He Had Bought.

"That was a neat job of justice," John Swenson, city attorney, told Judge Remley yesterday morning, after the judge had dismissed the case of Frank Grantella.

Grantella was charged with non-support of his wife, Laura, of 584 Harrison street. The judge resisted the temptation to fine him and instead made him promise to pay $6 a week toward the support of Mrs. Grantella and three babies.

"I'd be tickled to death to live with my wife if she wouldn't sell the furniture," said Grantella.

"How much furniture have you bought her?"

"Three sets in seven years."

Then came the judge's decision and the city attorney's compliment.

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October 1, 1907

$200 FINE FOR MECCA HOTEL.

All but Two of Thirty-six Frequent-
ers Forfeited Their Bonds.

C. H. Walker, proprietor of the Mecca hotel, Twelfth and Locust streets, was fined $200 in police court yesterday on a charge that he was conducting a disorderly place. The school board had asked that the Mecca and St. Regis "hotels" be not allowed to run within 300 feet of the high school.

Last week the proprietors of both places were arraigned in court and Mrs. Carrie Perkins, proprietress of the St. Regis, was fined $200 by Acting Police Judge Remley, and Walker, of the Mecca, was discharged. The police said they could not get evidence against the place. Saturday night City Attorney John Swenson and his assistant, Fred Coon, watched the Mecca from 8 to 9 p. m. In that time eighteen couples, none of whom had baggage, entered the place. A raid was ordered and it took three trips of the wagon from the Walnut police station to get all prisoners down there.

Only one of the eighteen men arrested appeared in court yesterday. The gave the name of H. C. Lewis and showed on the "hotel" register where he had registered under the name of "A. L. Gibson." He was made a witness for the city and it was mainly upon his testimony that Walker was convicted. Walker gave bond for an appeal of the case to the criminal court. The bonds of all but Lewis and his companion were declared forfeited.

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August 9, 1907

TO ANSWER MURDER CHARGE.

Raymond Weixeldorfer Released on
$5,000 Bond by Justice Remley.

Raymond Weixeldorfer was arraigned for second degree murder before Justice Remley yesterday. The death of Johann Almensberger last Saturday was the cause of the murder charge against Weixeldorfer. In a fight at a German party June 23, at 1884 Terrace street, it is alleged that Weixeldorfer struck the blow which caused Almensbergers death. The coroner's jury yesterday morning advised the holding of Weixeldorfer. He was released on $5,000 bond.

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February 26, 1907

FUNERAL OF A CAR VICTIM.

Margaret Blume, Killed on Eighteenth,
A Neighborhood Favorite.


Margaret Blume, the 5-year-old child killed by a street car Sunday at Walrond avenue on Eighteenth street, will be buried this morning in St. Peter and St. Paul's cemetery, Twenty-fifth and Brooklyn.

MARGARET BLUME.
The funeral service will be at Sacred Heart church at 9 o'clock, Rev. Father R. G. Lyons officiating. Margaret was the oldest of three children and was a neighborhood favorite.

Motorman Jesse F. Cannon, who was running the car, was arraigned on a charge of manslaughter and criminal negligence yesterday before Justice Theodore Remley. His preliminary hearing was set for March 7 and he was released on a bond of $500.

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