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February 7, 1910

PORTERFIELD KNEW
SWOPE CLAIMANT.

CIRCUIT JUDGE SAYS ELMER C.
WAS PROSPEROUS BUSINESS
MAN OF MARTINSBURG.

DOUBTS STORY'S TRUTH

Must Prove His Allegations,
Which Legal Records
Alone Could.

The claim of Elmer C. Swope of Martinsburg, W. Va., that he is the son of the late Colonel Thomas Swope was the general topic of conversation yesterday among old friends of Colonel Swope, by whom it was ridiculed. They declared that Colonel Swope came here before the war, and that therefore the Eastern claimant was in error. They also insist that Colonel Swope was a bachelor, and that had he been married someone here surely would have known of it.

"I think that Elmer C. Swope is laboring under an hallucination," said Judge E. E. Porterfield, who was born and raised in Martinsburg. "I knew Elmer C. Swope when he came to our town a quarter of a century ago and went to live with his uncle, Hugh A. Frazier. Mr. Frazier was in the implement business and young Swope was then just out of age and took an active hand in the business. He was well liked and the business prospered.

"I left there over a score of years ago but have returned frequently for short visits. On these trips I have seen Elmer Swope, and have talked with him. In recent years he suffered business reverses, and lost much of his money. My brother, Joseph L. Porterfield, is in the real estate business in Martinsburg and I make sure that I would have heard something about Elmer C. Swope's claim before this were there anything to it."

SHIFTS TO INDEPENDENCE.

The center of interest in the Swope case shifts this morning to a little room in the court house at Independence, where Coroner B. H. Zwart, assisted by Deputy Coroner Trugdon, will begin the inquest into the cause of death of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope.

Here the witnesses on the several sides will be asked to tell the coroner's jury all they know about the last illness and death of Colonel Swope. The attorneys for the interested parties will be present. The coroner, his deputy and the members of the jury will ask questions of the witnesses. Whether Prosecuting Attorney Conkling will question the witnesses will be determined this morning. It is presumed by the attorneys for the Swope heirs that the prosecutor's office will ask some of the questions, either directly or through the deputy coroner.

Yesterday was a day of rest of those engaged in the case. The attorneys attended to private affairs and several of them took long motor rides in the afternoon.

Independence had many visitors yesterday. They began coming into the town early in the morning and most of them walked about the old court house and visited with those shopkeepers whose places were open. The people in Independence are surprised that the outside outside world should take so much interest in the Swope case. In fact, there are many of the residents who are not aware of the fact that an inquest is to be held this week. The persons who will attend the inquiry promise to come largely from Kansas City.

The testimony which will be heard today will be from the undertaker and his assistants who removed the body from the cemetery to the undertaking rooms at Independence, the sexton at the cemetery and possibly the doctors who performed the autopsy and removed the viscera. Other witnesses will be placed on the stand to prove the identity of the body.

On Tuesday it is probable that the members of the Swope family, the nurses and possibly the doctors will be heard. The experts from Chicago, it is thought likely, will not be heard until Wednesday. They are expected to arrive here Tuesday, however, and will confer with Mr. Paxton, the executor of the estate.

In the meantime the attorneys in the Dr. Hyde libel suit will rest. It is not expected that they will endeavor to take any depositions until after the inquest. One of the principal reasons for a delay is that they expect to attend the inquest and therefore will not have the time to give to examining witnesses.

It is understood that Detectives Harry Arthur and Joe Morris have been detailed by the police department to attend the Swope inquest. They will be there to assist the prosecutor.

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January 24, 1910

TINY TOT TELLS THE TRUTH.

Assures Court He Never Sells Papers
After Six O'clock.

Tony Grapes is the name of a diminutive Italian boy. He says he is 8 years old, but looks no more than 6. A few days ago he approached Judge E. E. Porterfield on a Brooklyn car and wanted to sell him a paper. Yesterday Tony and his father were in the juvenile court.

"Do you remember seeing me?" asked the judge.

"Yep," smile Tony, showing his white teeth. "I sell you paper."

"Do you remember when I asked you how late you quit selling papers and you said, 'Any old time?'"

"I quit all the time at 6 o'clock," said Tony, who had evidently been informed that little boys are not allowed to sell papers later than that.

Tony said he had made 15 and sometimes 25 cents a day and that he gave the money to his moth er. Tony acted as interpreter when the judge told the boy's father he must not sell papers any more until the youth is older

"You are sure you are telling your father exactly what I say to you?" asked the court.

"Sure," said Tony. "He says he no like me to sell papers. He 'fraid the cars run off my legs and arms and hands and feet. Then I wouldn't have any to sell papers when I get big."

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January 12, 1910

ITS MOST SUCCESSFUL YEAR.

Girls' Industrial Home Cared for
1,927 Persons in 1909.

At the annual meeting of the Industrial Home for Girls Association held at the home, 2940 Highland avenue, it was stated that the year 1909 was the most successful in the seventeen years of the home's existence. During the year it has cared for 1,925 girls, one boy and one old woman.

The Industrial Home, which was formerly the Door of Hope, organized originally to care for wayward girls. A year ago it bought the premises it now occupies for $7,000, of which all but $300 is paid. the report for the year shows receipts of $4581.20 and expenses $4,347.97.

The new officers elected yesterday were:

President, Mrs. E. L. Chambliss; vice president, Mrs. John B. Stone; recording secretary, Mrs. George r. Chambers; corresponding secretary, Mrs. George E. Ragan; treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Moore; board of managers, Mrs. J. W. Stoneburner, Mrs. George A. Wood, Mrs. William Waltham, J. M. Givvons, E. R. Curry, Miss E. Ellis, Miss Ella Albright, Miss W. H. Buls, Mrs. W. Matthews, Mrs. J. Fulton and Miss Foster.

Trustees -- R. D. Middlebrook, Judge J. H. Hawthorne, J. N. Moore.

Advisory board -- I. E. Burnheimer, H. R. Farnam, Porter B. Godard, Rev. W. F. Sheridan, Judge E. E. Porterfield.

House surgeon -- Dr. H. O. Leonard.

Matron -- Mrs. S. E. Dorsey.

The retiring president, Mrs. George A. Wood, expressed her thanks to all who helped to give the girl inmates a merry Christmas.

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December 11, 1910

JUDGE TAKES PART
OF RUNAWAY GIRLS.

Homes Have Been Found for
Ava Jewell and Hattie
Hayes.

"I told them 'If you never do anything worse than sit on a rock pile and crack rock for papa you will be queens on a thrown with jewels in your crowns.' "

T. W. Jewell, 920 Cambridge avenue, Sheffield, made this statement in the juvenile court yesterday afternoon after admitting that he had required his daughter, Ava Jewell, 16 years old, and his stepdaughter, Hattie Hayes, 15 years old, to crack rock in his quarry "because they were useless to their mother in the house."

About three weeks ago both girls ran away from their rock cracking work, Ava going to Kansas City, Kas., and Hattie Hayes getting employment at a cracker factory. For the past week she had been working as a domestic in a Sheffield hotel. She was taken into the juvenile court on the request of her mother and stepfather.

"Why did you put these girls, young women, I might say, to work on a rock pile?" asked Judge E. E. Porterfield earnestly.

"It was honest labor," said Jewell, "nothin' of which they should be ashamed. They might o' done far worse. You tell him how it came about, mamma," concluded Jewell, addressing his wife.

"Well, they just wouldn't do the housework right," said Mrs. Jewell. "It kept me continually following them about doing the work over again. I knowed somethin' had to be done to keep 'em busy, so I asked papa if he could use 'em in the quarry on the rear of our lot. 'Yes,' says he, 'I can use 'em breakin' up the small stones. Then he put 'em to work down there. That's all.'

"They was there about two or three weeks," said Jewell, "not over three at the outside, and all the work they done could be did in ten to twenty hours. I built 'em a nice platform on which to work. All they had to do was gather the small rock, carry it to the platform and break it. It sells for $1 a yard, judge. It's valuable."

"You know what they done, judge?" asked Jewell in apparent surprise, "they hammered holes in their skirts and kept me busy putting handles in the stone hammers. They would strike over too far and break the handles, just for meanness. Why, there mamma used to come down there just to encourage them, you know, an' she would crack more rock in an hour than they'd crack in a whole day. Mamma liked to crack rock, didn't you mamma? All the time them girls was a complainin' and talkin' o' runnin' away, an' one day both of 'em up and run away."

"I am surprised that they waited so long," said Judge Porterfield when Jewell had finished his explanation. "They should have gone the first day you put them there. A stone quarry, using a hammer and a drill, as this girl says she had to do, is no place for young women."

It was at this point that Jewell delivered himself of the tender sentiment about "jewels in your crowns."

"That sounds nice," suggested the court, "but it doesn't go with me. Any place on earth for a girl or woman but the rock pile, whether it be for papa or in jail. I do not approve of it. this girl will be made a ward of the court and a place secured for her. Working promiscuously in hotels and factories is not the best place for her, either, so long as she is not remaining in the home."

Hattie, who was 15 in October, was turned over to Mrs. Agnes O'Dell, a juvenile court officer, who will secure a place for her in a private family. Her stepsister, Ava Jewell, has a place as a domestic in Kansas City, Kas.

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January 8, 1910

FREE DANCE HALL
FOR POOR GIRLS.

PUBLIC INSTITUTION, PROPERTY
CONDUCTED, FAVORED BY
PROBATION OFFICER.

Working Girls Would Be At-
tracted From Vicious and
Immoral Resorts.

A free public dance hall for the poor girls of Kansas City, to be built and maintained by the city or by some charitable institution, thinks Dr. I. E. Mathias, chief probation officer of the juvenile court, would be an agency of reform that would do an inestimable amount of good.

"Perhaps I am not orthodox, and maybe this scheme looks somewhat sensational, yet I think that it would do an immense amount of good," said Dr. Mathias yesterday. "Girls will dance, and so will boys. How much better it would be that they should have their good times in a free public hall, where they would be protected from rowdies and immoral young men, than in the public dance halls where there are temptations and immoral surroundings, that work to their downfall."

The probation officer was discussing conditions in Cincinnati, where he and Judge E. E. Porterfield of the juvenile court went last month to attend a national meeting of juvenile court officers.

"This meeting was held in a church that maintained a free dance hall," Dr. Mathias continued. "Everybody is allowed to attend the weekly dances at the church, as long as they conduct themselves properly. There are no toughs and thugs, and the dance is as orderly as any social affair conducted by society people.

"In the ordinary public dance halls of Cincinnati liquor is sold, and the dances usually end in fights or drunken brawls. It was to give the poor girls and young men a chance to attend respectable dances that this church put in a dance hall.

"Many churches have built expensive gymnasiums for the boys. Charitable institutions here as well as in other cities have made ample provisions for the reform of bad boys. But these good people forget about the girls. Perhaps there is a sewing room set aside for them, or a kitchen where they are taught to cook. These things are all right. But how about their good times? The boys have their gymnasiums, their summer camps and their night schools.

"Did it ever occur to you that a girl enjoys a good time the same as a boy? She does not care for gymnasiums, summer camps or the like. The young woman's chief amusement is dancing, but the young men can do things and go places where girls cannot.

"What is left for the poor working girl? She can go to these public places where there is every influence to drag her down, but if she has any pride or self-respect she will prefer to remain at home and do nothing. Of course we do not have the evil surroundings in the public dance halls of Kansas City that the young woman finds in those of the large eastern cities, but here they are not what they should be.

"The city probably could not build a dance hall. The erection of such a building and its maintenance would be more in the province of the charitable institutions or churches. I think one or more of them in Kansas City would do much to better the conditions of the poor working girl, even more than some of the other philanthropic ideas that have been advanced in the uplift of the poor young men and women of this city."

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December 28, 1909

MOTHER LECTURED BY JUDGE.

She Admits False Age of Son Was
Given Factory Inspector.

Mrs. E. L. Folsom, 707 East Eighteenth street, weeping bitterly, was lectured by Judge E. E. Porterfield in the juvenile court yesterday for making a false affidavit regarding the age of her son, Lyle H. Wilcox, in the office of W. H. Morgan, state factory inspector, recently when the boy went to work. She swore that he was born April 7, 1895, but yesterday admitted that he was born a year later. While under oath, as the court learned from private conversation with the woman's daughter, other misstatements were made.

"You ought to be punished," said Judge Porterfield, "for making the false affidavit about your son's age and for other statements made here under oath, but I cannot do it in this court. It could be done in the criminal court, however. This habit people have gotten into of making false affidavits of their children's ages before the factory inspector has got to be broken up. Somebody is going to be punished, too, if it does not cease."

The boy, Lyle, was given into the custody of his sister, Mrs. Iva Hubbard, 1405 Spruce avenue. Mrs. Folson said she had born ten children, seven of whom are living. She said she was divorced from Joseph Wilcox in Oklahoma City, Ok., and that seven years ago in January she was married to Folson.

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December 21, 1909

GAMBLED HIS MONEY AWAY.

Cecil Killey, 10 Years Old, Spent It
at Drug Store Raffles.

Money given him by his grandmother to buy schoolbooks Cecil Killey, age 10 years, of 4016 Central avenue, spent on drug store raffles. The boy was taken into juvenile court yesterday to explain.

"All the boys do it," explained the youngster. "Sometimes there are as many as thirty in a drug store at one time. It costs ten cents a chance. If you win you get a box of candy."

"You are too young to gamble this way," said Judge E. E. Porterfield. "The next time you are brought into this court you will be sent to the McCune Farm.

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December 17, 1909

YOUNG HANSEN TO BOONVILLE.

Master and Faithful Dog May Be
Separated Indefinitely.

"Lawrence Hansen, I am afraid, will have to go to Boonville."

Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, made this statement yesterday when asked what would be done with the Kansas City, Kas., youngster who ran away from his home Monday night with $5 of his mother's money.

"We had him once at the McCune farm, but he ran away. The only place for him, now that he has violated his parole, is the reform school."

"Will he be given back his dog, Jack?" was asked.

The doctor laughed.

"I want to tell you I have been in hot water all day. There was a woman down here at 7:30 o'clock this morning demanding that I give the boy his dog. Several persons stopped me on the street to inquire what I intended to do."

But Dr. Mathias would not say whether he would reunite dog and master. If Lawrence is sent to the reform school by the juvenile court, it will be impossible to keep the two together. Lawrence will be kept locked up at the Detention home until Monday, when Judge E. E. Porterfield will decide his fate.

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December 14, 1909

JUDGE PORTERFIELD
RECOMMENDS COW-
HIDE FOR OBSTREP-
EROUS BOYS.

His Father Had Cowhide and
Was Not Afraid to Use It.
Juvenile Court Judge Edward Everett Porterfield
JUDGE PORTERFIELD OF THE JUVENILE COURT.

Judicial notice was taken yesterday for the first time of the cowhide, as an instrument of regeneration for obstreperous boys, when Judge E. E. Porterfiled of the juvenile court paid it the following tribute:

"If I ever amounted to anything, it's because my father kept a cowhide, and he was not afraid to use it."

This remark was occasioned by a mother's statement that she did not like to whip her children. John Morrisy of 815 East Eighth street, had been summoned into court on the complaint of the mother. She said that she could not control him.

"The only fault I have to find with him is that he does not get up in the morning," she said. "And when he drinks beer he swears at me and his grandmother so loud that he attracts the neighbors."

"Why don't you get the cowhide?" asked the judge.

"Oh, I never did believe in whipping my children."

"You make a mistake, madam. If there was ever a boy in this court who needed a cowhiding, it is your son. My suggestion to you is to get a long whip. If John doesn't get up in the morning, don't wait until he gets his clothes on. Pull him out of bed and thrash him on his bare skin. Like lots of other mothers, you have spoiled your boy by being too lenient."

John Morrisy was arrested the first time in December, 1908, and sentenced to the reform school. He was charged with cursing his mother. John agreed to sign the following pledge, on condition that the sentence would be suspended:

"I am going to get a job and I am going to keep it, give mother my money; am going to church, come in early at night; I am not going to drink whisky or beer; I will not swear any."

John broke that pledge last Thursday. He bought some beer in a livery barn. When he came home he abused his mother and cursed her. The boy was charged also with smoking cigarettes. This he admitted.

"Where did you get the papers?" asked the court.

"It's this way," explained the boy. "The merchants ain't allowed to sell or give them away. I went out to a drug store. I bought two packages of Dukes. When I told the man that the tobacco was no good without papers, he said it was against the law to give them to minors. Then he walked back of the prescription case.

"He looked at me, then at a box behind the counter, where he kept the papers. Of course, I got wise right away. I reached my hand in the box and got three packages."

"You won't smoke any more cigarettes," said Judge Porterfield, "if I don't send you to Booneville?"

"If I can't get the papers, I won't."

The question had to be repeated two or three times before the boy understood. He promised not to use tobacco in any form. If he does, Judge Porterfield ordered that he be taken immediately to reform school. John was taken to the boys' hotel. A job will be found for him, and if he lives up to his pledge, will not be ordered to the reform school.

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December 5, 1909

CAMPAIGN TO RESCUE
CHILDREN FROM WORK.

COMPLAINT MADE THAT STORE
EMPLOYS TWO, 4 YEARS OLD.

Picture Shows Where Girls, Under
16, Play and Sing and Will Be In-
vestigated by Dr. Mathias,
Chief Probation Officer.

Parents who permit their children to sing in picture shows in violation of the law, or to participate in any entertainment for which they receive pay, according to Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, will be prosecuted in the juvenile court.

Heretofore prosecution of child labor cases has been almost entirely on the initiative of the local and state factory inspectors. But complaints have been made recently to the juvenile officers that the practice has not been entirely stopped. An investigation is to be made to find out whether the parents and theaters are obeying the law.

The law forbids children under 14 years of age to engage in any "gainful occupation." Children under 16 can not work for wages without first receiving a permit from the local factory inspector.

This does not forbid parents to allow their children to participate in church entertainments and the like, where they receive no pay.

COMPLAINT AGAINST STORE.

Complaint was made yesterday of a large department store, which is giving a Santa Claus entertainment. Two children, 4 years of age, take minor parts and their parents are paid for their time. With W. J. Morgan, factory inspector, a juvenile officer yesterday went to the store to investigate the complaint, and will report Monday in juvenile court to Judge E. E. Porterfield.

Several picture shows are reported to have employed girls under 16 years of age, without official permits, to play the piano and sing. These cases are to be investigated immediately.

"The child labor law, if anything, is not severe enough," said Dr. Mathias. "It should not only require children to remain in school until they have reached a certain age, but it should keep them in school until they have passed through the graded school into the high school.

"The trouble with the present law is that it is founded on the law of averages. The average boy or girl completes the grammar school at 14 years of age. But think of those who do not go beyond the third or fourth grade. Many children have not reached the high school at 14.

SHOULD HELP ABNORMAL.

"If there is any change in this law it should be re-framed for the benefit of the abnormal, or the child below the average. Every child should be compelled to stay in school until he or she had reached the high school. The child might be 16 or 18 years of age before he is graduated and permitted to go to work, but he would be a much better citizen than if allowed to quit at 14.

"Take for instance the foreigners who are rapidly migrating to Kansas City and other American towns. Many of them have been brought up to believe that a wife or a child is an asset, the same as the old slave holders used to think. Hardly before the child is able to walk and talk the father puts it to work. The boy gets a place in a shoe-shining parlor or holding the horse of some delivery man. The pay is $1 or $2 a week, which is given the parent.

"These foreigners average about one child a year. The more children, they know, the greater their income. If it were not for the child labor laws, these children would be permitted to grow up in ignorance, and their little bodies stunted from doing heavy work before they had gained physical strength."

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November 28, 1909

MAKING GOOD MEN
AT M'CUNE FARM.

WORK OF INSTITUTION TOLD AT
CORNERSTONE LAYING.

Great Future of Farm for Boys De-
scribed by Speakers -- Large
Crowd Witnesses Ceremonies
and Visits the Home.

"There's de judge, fellers!"

"Hello Judge!" shouted more than eighty happy boys as they rushed to open the gates that admitted William Scarritt's automobile which bore Judge E. E. Porterfield to the McCune Farm for Boys to see him that they grabbed hold of his arms and legs and climbed all over him in enthusiasm.

Judge Porterfield's visit to the farm was for the purpose of conducting the ceremonies for the laying of the cornerstone of the fine new schoolhouse which is now under construction. The occasion was eventful because of the fact that there were more visitors at the farm yesterday afternoon than ever before at any one time.

The ceremonies started at 3 p. m. with a song by the youngsters, who sang it with earnestness. After the invocation by J. M. Taylor, superintendent of the farm, the boys sang another gospel hymn and Judge Porterfield made the opening address.

TOOK CLEVELAND PLAN.

"April 16, 1908," the judge began, "marked an epoch in the civic life of Jackson county. It was the date of the opening of the McCune Farm for Boys.

"To start with the officials had 100 acres of land and one small farmhouse and it was, and still is, the intention to follow the plan of the Cleveland authorities on their handling of their youngsters who have not adequate chances to build their lives upon a good home training. The Cleveland farm contains 285 acres of land, has seven cottages, a laundry, barns, gymnasium, carpenter shop, water, sewer and electric light systems. The feature of the home is that each cottage comprises facilities for fifteen to twenty boys and has a faculty consisting of a head master and head matron who have absolute charge of the boys.

"In comparison, we have eighty-two boys and three cottages, while Cleveland has 115 boys and seven cottages. The latter home is more complete, of course, but at the same time it is much older and without doubt Jackson county will have an institution just as good in a couple of years. Our condition is such now that I have often been compelled to send boys back to undesirable homes because of lack of room at the farm. Some have been paroled when they should not have been, but their places had to be given up to others who needed the training even worse than they.

PROUD OF RECORD.

"Since the home has been opened 183 boys have been sent here. eighty-two are now in attendance; eighty have been paroled, and not in a single instance, by the way, has any one of them been sent back; fourteen were sent to the reform school because they ran away from the farm, and only three out of this whole 183 have been guilty of other offenses bad enough in their nature to necessitate their being sent to the reformatory.

"Paroled boys are found good homes by Mrs. O'Dell, and she always has a good home ready for every boy who deserves it. These boys have the advantage of a splendid school, are taught useful work and enjoy baseball and other sports of which all boys are fond. In short, it is a character building institution.

"Prior to the advent of the court in 1902 all boys who had committed small offenses were compelled to go to the county jail where they were thrown in with the vilest of criminals and were really hardened by their confinement instead of being benefited as the officials intended they should be. Those boys possessing small criminal tendencies easily learned the worst, and I am glad that we have passed that stage now.

WERE MAKING CRIMINALS.

"It is not a misstatement of facts to say that the state was engaged in making criminals. The McCune farm makes citizens. The jail enforced idleness and ignorance, thereby making charges for the state. The McCune farm teaches industry and prepares for good citizenship.

"The only relief I know is to issue $100,000 or $200,000 worth of bonds and diminish the issue on public improvements, for it is easier to make a citizen than build cities. It is a matter of economy to improve this institution. The governor of Colorado said in a speech in 1904 that in eighteen months the juvenile court had saved the state $88,000. Seven hundred and seventeen boys were dealt with and only ten were sent to the reform school. Prior methods sent 75 per cent and in two years the state saved $200,000 in criminal court expenditures.

"As a financial proposition the farm will pay for itself in two years' time, and what is priceless and cannot be measured in money value is the good citizenship that the influences will stimulate.

LIKE FARM LIFE.

Judge McCune addressed the audience next and confined most of his remarks to the boys.

"How do you like the this place, boys?"

"Fine! Best ever!" they answered.

"Why were you sen here?" he asked.

"To have a good home," they replied.

"Like your teachers?"

"You bet. Every one of them."

"Of course you do," said Judge McCune. "Why, I even knew some of you fellows after you had run away to come back of your own accord and fall on your teachers' necks and say you were glad to get back home, and you kissed them, too, didn't you?"

Here the boys laughed heartily and ascented to the speaker's last remarks.

"It pleases me very much to see the interest shown at these ceremonies this afternoon by the large representation of public citizens, and I know that with their support this home for boys will be the best that money and effort can make."

Judge J. M. Patterson followed with a few remarks and declared that if the taxpayers would look into this matter and investigate, as their duties as citizens demanded they should do and aid the courts to the best of their ability, this McCune farm for boys would become a very great institution which other large cities would wisely pattern after, for the start now made is so well planned that only the money is all that is needed to perfect the young enterprise.

CORNERSTONE IS LAID.

The ceremony of laying the cornerstone for the new school house was then completed. In the box in the stone were deposited the annual report of the juvenile court, copies of the Kansas City daily papers and a report of the progression of the institution compiled by Judge Porterfield.

The new building is to be a six-room structure sufficiently large to accommodate 225 boys and is to cost $15,200. It is located 600 yards southwest of the main dormitory on a hill overlooking the old Lexington road and is surrounded by many beautiful shade trees.

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November 14, 1909

LIKES KANSAS CITY PLAN.

Cincinnati Will Soon Have Juvenile
Improvement Association.

CINCINNATI, O., Nov. 13. -- As a result of the visit of Kansas City men interested in juvenile reform, Cincinnati soon wi ll have a juvenile improvement association patterned after that of Kansas City. Delegates from other cities to the convention of juvenile court attaches also were interested in the pardons and paroles board of Kansas City.

E. E. Porterfield, judge of the Kansas City juvenile court and president of its juvenile association, created a favorable impression by his description of the plan by which boys are kept in school through charitable persons paying them a salary equal to what they could make if employed.

The speech of Jacob Billikopf of the Kansas City pardon and parole board, in which he gave concrete examples of the work being done for families of persons conditionally paroled from the city workhouse, caused much discussion among the delegates. Dr. E. L. Mathias, juvenile officer in Judge Porterfield's court, took part in the discussion and told of the work done by him. The three Kansas City delegates have left Cincinnati for their homes.

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November 2, 1909

JUROR'S BEER DELAYS CASE.

Falls Against Railing and Then Tells
Judge He Had Two Glasses.

Because one of the jurors had been drinking, Judge E. E. Porterfield of the circuit court yesterday afternoon was forced to continue a trial until this morning.

The juror asked to be excused to get a drink of water. Coming back into the room, he fell heavily against the railing and had difficulty in regaining his seat.

"You have been drinking," said the court.

"Only had two glasses of beer," was the reply.

"I will continue the case until tomorrow morning," said Judge Porterfield. "If you are under the influence of liquor at that time, I will fine you for contempt of court."

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October 11, 1909

MET AFFINITY ON WOLF HUNT.

Dell L. Park Granted a Divorce
After Giving His Evidence.

Affinities may not be common to the woods and fields, yet from the evidence in a divorce suit heard yesterday by Judge E. E. Porterfield of the circuit court affinities there are and everywhere. In fact, the evidence had it, a Kansas City woman found one on a wolf hunt.

Dell L. Park, an inspector in Kansas City for the Hartford Insurance Company, was the plaintiff in a suit for divorce brought against Mollie E. Park. Last spring the couple went to Yates Center, Kas., on a wolf hunt. Here Mrs. Park, it is alleged, met her affinity. She did not appear in court, and Judge Porterfield granted Park a divorce.

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August 28, 1909

IT TOOK THREATS TO
MOVE THIS WOMAN.

FEAR OF IMPRISONMENT HER
LAST THOUGHT.

"We Shall See," Said Mrs. Mary
Baughman, When the Juvenile
Court Took Her Grand Child-
ren From Her.

It took threats of imprisonment to move Mrs. Mary Baughman, who was born McCormick, from the juvenile court room yesterday afternoon. Even in parting she was not subdued.

"It will break my heart to part with the children and I will have them, court or no court," was her defy as she rose to go.

"If you make trouble we shall have to put you in jail," said Judge E. E. Porterfield.

"Yes, we shall see," retorted the irate grandmother. "It doesn't become a judge to talk that way to a woman who is asking nothing but the right to care for her children," and she swept from the room.
"It's my own fault for running to those probation officers with my troubles," said Mrs. Baughman afterward. "Pearl and Frances Harmiston, my grandchildren, have had me as their only support since they were small. Lately I have had them in St. Agnes home. Their mother, my daughter, Mrs. Charlsie Wiggons, 214 East Missouri avenue, is doing better now than she did and I thought she ought to help a little to support the girls. So I asked the probation officers what I could do to make her help me. Instead of this, they bring them into court and send to them to St. Joseph's home, where the little ones have to wash and scrub floors. I have always worked hard, but it wasn't 'till I was a woman grown and had the strength. I was born a McCormick, and I will have the children."

The Harmiston children were sent to St. Joseph's home during the morning session of the court, over the grandmother's protest.

The records show that they were in court as neglected children, on complaint of their mother.

In the afternoon Mrs. Baughman returned and sat patiently until 4 o'clock, when she asked the court again to give her the children. The threat to send her to jail followed.

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August 21, 1909

DON'T BE A BUM, JUDGE SAID.

Weary Willie Is No Good to Any-
body, Court to Youngster.

"Uncle liked sister, and my aunt liked me. It got so that uncle always took the other side when I said anything. So I just left."

That's the way Jean Corwin Miller, 13 years old, late of Calvert, Morton county, Kas., began his story yesterday in the juvenile court. Both his parents are dead. He and a sister were living with Jasper A. Miller, a farmer at Calvert.

"I had $3 when I left," said the boy. "I rode on the cars to Colby, walked to Manhattan, and rode the cars again to Lawrence. When I got there I found I was 10 cents short of the fare to Kansas City. A man gave me the dime."

"Well," said Judge Porterfield, "where did you want to go?"

"To Mrs. Ella Hogan, my aunt, in Ottawa, Kas."

After a talk with the boy, who is bright for his age, and seemed rather homesick, the court ordered him kept at the Detention home until his relatives could come for him.

"You don't want to start out in life as a bum," said the judge. "Grow up into a man and make something of yourself. Bums are of no good to anybody."

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August 17, 1909

"BAD" MAN BUSINESS
DOESN'T PAY, SAYS COLE.

Former Bandit Tells Politicians It's
Best to Walk the Straight and
Narrow Path.

Less than 5,000 people attended the Lone Jack picnic yesterday, which is a considerable crowd to gather up in the farthest corner of Jackson county, but nothing to the crowds which have gone there in days of yore. On the speakers' list were Congressman Borland, Representative Holcomb, former County Judge George Dodd and Cole Younger. Ex-Criminal Judge W. H. Wallace started for the picnic, going past F. M. Lowe's house in his automobile and inviting that congressional candidate to go with him, but something must have happened for there was no Judge Wallace at the Lone Jack all day. Sam Boyer, county clerk, was the only Republican official who reported, but there was a herd of Democratic officials. Circut Judge E. E. Porterfiled and Thomas J. Seehorn, both of them with records of never having missed the August pilgrimage, were given ovations. the speeches were tame, Cole Younger's being the possible exception. The well known old guerrilla has a lecture he reads, which is a little classic. It is moral in that there is not a cent nor a good night's sleep in being a "bad" man, and the only people who think there is are those who do not know the man who was "bad," while they who do know him always remind him that he was off the reservation once and cannot get all the way back on.

The weather was torrid, hundreds of buggies stopping short of the destination. Automobiles which carried the Kansas City contingent passed derelicts at almost every shade tree on the way. It was 100 in the shade but nobody on the way to the picnic had any shade to get under.

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August 15, 1909

BABY IS NOT WANTED.

Offer to Give Away Unborn Child
Staggers the Judge.

On the advice of Judge E. E. Porterfield, a letter received yesterday at the Detention home has been forwarded to the prosecuting attorney at Chillicothe with a request to investigate the case of a man who wants to give a baby, not yet born.

The letter states that the wife of the writer expects to become a mother within ten days and adds that, as the couple does not wish children, they would like to have the child adopted. It was mailed in Chillicothe Friday, and is directed to Mrs. Agnes O'Dell at the Detention home. The writer offers to pay Mrs. O'Dell liberally if she will nurse his wife in her illness and assist in getting the child adopted.

An answer was sent to the writer of the letter yesterday and others to county officials in Chillicothe. Judge Porterfield said he had never heard of such a case of cruelty.

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June 15, 1909

GUY COLBY MUST REFORM.

Former White Ward of Negro
Woman Is Sent to Boonville.

Guy Colby is going to leave Kansas City for four years this time. His ticket reads Boonville, Mo., and he will start today. The sentence is four years.

Yesterday Guy ran away from the McCune home for the second time. He was found and taken to the Detention home before evening. He said he was anxious to see Ernest Crocroft, with whom he ran away from the McCune farm two weeks ago to Jefferson City. Crocroft was sent to Boonville.

At the time his friend was sentenced, Colby also was in court and was told that his next offense would result in a reform school sentence. That was imposed yesterday by Judge E. E. Porterfield of the juvenile court.

It was Guy Colby who was taken by probation officers from Mrs. Sarah E. Carr, a negro woman, who had cared for him for years. His mother lives in Haverhil, Mass. An investigation made by probation officers showed she was not able to care for the boy, so he was sent to the McCune farm.

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May 21, 1909

WED AT 13, AT 15 DIVORCED.

Judge Porterfield Grants Decree to
Mamie May Carroll.

Married at 13 and divorced at 15 is the record of Mamie May Carroll. She was granted a decree yesterday by Judge Porterfield of the circuit court and given the custody of her baby girl. Daniel Carroll, her former husband, is a teamster. The allegation was non-support. At the time of her marriage Mrs. Carroll's mother, Mrs. Maggie Ehlin, 2130 Washington street, gave her consent.

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May 16, 1909

GIVE UP HIS BOY?
NEVER, SAYS FATHER.

BRAWNY IRON WORKER WINS
ADMIRATION OF JUDGE.

Authorities Wanted to Send Clar-
ance Anderson to McCune Home,
but Request Failed After
Parent Told Story.

"Rather than give up my boy I'll sell out all I have in Kansas City and leave. The only thing which will separate me from my children is death."

Charles Anderson, an iron worker, said it and brought his big fist down on the table at one end of which sat Judge Porterfield of the juvenile court. Clarence Anderson, the boy, was in court Friday on complaint of the truant officer.

"Wouldn't you like to have the boy sent to the McCune farm?" asked the court.

"No. I have lost two children already," said the man, who swings beams in midair.

"You would not lose the lad if he went to the farm."

"I don't want him to go."

Then Anderson told his story.

"I have had a hard time to raise my family, but I have buckled down to the job, and mean to stay by it till the last rivet is headed. My wife is dead. I have a daughter who works afternoons. In what spare time she has, she looks after this boy and his smaller sister. Just to show you what I think of my family, let me tell you that I threw up a job at $150 with the American Bridge Company. That was because the work took me from home. I couldn't get anything in my line in Kansas City, and I had to follow the work, wherever it was. No I can work here, and I mean to stay by my family. You couldn't get me to give up one."

"Just keep the lad in school, that's all," said the court, with admiration for the ironworker's words and for a man who meant "to stay with the job" until it was finished.

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April 27, 1909

WED, HE SAID, WHILE
IN HYPNOTIC TRANCE.

FOR THAT REASON CATTLEMAN
SUED FOR DIVORCE.

Charles E. Brooks Says Woman
Rubbed His Head Until He Was
Unconscious and Then
Got a License.

Hypnotism was responsible for his marriage, declared Charles E. Brooks, a cattleman, who yesterday secured a divorce from Estella Brooks by default in the circuit court. Judge Porterfield heard the case.

Brooks, who is about 55, while his former wife is 30, said in his testimony:

"I met Mrs. Estelle Neville February 6, 1908. She answered my advertisement for a housekeeper. She called me up and asked me to take her to lunch down town. During lunch she borrowed $30 from me. She said she could buy a $60 coat for $30 at a sale that day. The same evening she paid me back the money.

"At that time she was running a millinery store on Twelfth street. I went there on Saturday night, two days after I had met her. I was suffering from the effects of a street car accident. She asked me if I did not want her to rub peroxide on my forehead. I said no, but she got on her knees and began to rub my forehead. She continued to rub my head and asked me to marry her. She kept on rubbing my head until I did not know what was going on.

GOT LICENSE AT MIDNIGHT.

"Then she called up the recorder -- it was midnight -- and had a license issued. We went to a minister's and were married. On Sunday -- the next day -- I awoke in a hotel on West Twelfth street. I was in bed and she was sitting beside the bed. We went to her millinery store and stayed about an hour. After that I went to my daughter's home. I have never been back to Mrs. Brooks's home since.

In answer to questions by Judge Porterfield, Brooks said:

"She told me she was a hypnotist. She had several books on the subject."

This was Brooks's second attempt to get a divorce. Earlier in the year he brought proceedings to annul the marriage. He was brought into the court of Judge Goodrich, February 1, on a stretcher and taken to a hospital immediately afterwards. Judge Goodrich refused to hear the case, telling Brooks that he should sue for a divorce, as the things complained of had happened before the marriage. Mrs. Brooks filed an answer denying the charges.

The records of the recorder show that the Rev. Frank S. Arnold of 5143 Olive street performed the ceremony.

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April 17, 1909

HIS LONG PLAY IS ENDED.

Mere Matter of Chirography Led
Herbert Spencer to Court.

It was fine for Herbert Spencer not to go to school. He is 11 and lives at 1301 Forest avenue. For nine weeks he did not go to school, but had one long grand play. Of course, all good t hings must come to an end, and so did Herbert's fun.

"Son," said his mother to him one day, "why is it I do not get any reports from your teacher? How do I know whether you are are getting along in school?"

"I'll see," said the dutiful child.

Just a little while afterwards Herbert handed his mother a note, written in the geometricals which they teach in the schools and call writing. Reading from the first angle to the last tangent, this is what Mrs. Crabtree, the mother, read:

Mrs. Crabtree:
Your boy Herbert has been in school every day. He will pass. MISS THOMAS.

Miss Thomas was the boy's instructor in the Morse school.

But Mamma knew a thing or two. It turned out that Miss Thomas had learned to write before the copybooks began to use an ax on the alphabet. A charge of truancy stared Herbert in the face yesterday in the juvenile court.

"Better let your teacher write the reports after this," said Judge Porterfield. "Run along this time, but go to school."

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March 12, 1909

FOUND HER BOY IN
THE PRISONER'S DOCK.

MOTHER HAD BEEN TOLD HE'D
BE HOME AFTER A WHILE.

"Do You Know This Man?" She Was
Asked -- "Why, It's Ernest, My
Boy," Slowly Said the
Aged Witness.

For more than a year Ernest H. Wolf, accused of murder, has been in the county jail, but his mother did not know where he was. On the witness stand in Judge E. E. Porterfield's division of the circuit court yesterday, she said:

"They told me my boy had been in an accident and would come home after a while."

Even then Mrs. Wolf, who is 74 years of age and retains her faculties with difficulty, did not understand what charge her son was facing. She was put on the stand to support the defense of insanity.

"Do you know this man?" she was asked, as the attorneys pointed to Wolf.

Slowly the old woman got out of the witness chair and went over to the defendant. There she threw her arms around him and sobbed:

"Why, it's Ernest, my boy."

For several minutes mother and son were fast in each other's embrace, while tears came to both.

Even after she left the courtroom the aged woman did not realize that her son was on trial for murder.

Dr. B. A. Poorman and Dr. Fred J. Hatch were called as experts on insanity by the defense. They said there were evidences of a disordered mind on the part of the mother.

"Why is the attention of the public not called to insane persons before damage is done?" Dr. Poorman was asked.

"It should be done, but seldom is," said the physician. "Relatives are slow about getting into court and having one of their family declared insane. So it is almost impossible to secure commitment for insanity until the person in question does something which brings him to the public notice and his case its into the hands of public officials.

The case of Wolf, who is charged with murder in the first degree for shooting James R. Smothers in Stelling's saloon on Westport avenue in November of 1907, went to the jury last evening. Smothers died five days after the shooting, which grew out of a barroom fight. Wolf is 36 years of age. Judge Porterfield announced that he would hold a night session to finish, if necessary, because he holds juvenile court today. So there was a rush to finish in order to get everything before the jury before 6:30 o'clock.

After deliberating until late last night t he jury found him guilty of second degree murder. He was sentenced to ten years in prison.

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March 10, 1909

MAY BE A NEIGHBOR

WORKHOUSE FOR GALLAGHER IF
HE CAN'T PAY FINE.

Again Assessed $100 for Attacking
Reporter and Old Appeal Bond
Doesn't Hold -- Must Put
Up or Go to Jail.

For forcibly entering a room on July 15 last year in which Albert H. King, a reporter for The Journal, lay injured after being slugged by the defendant a week before, "Jack Gallagher, who says his name is John Francis Gallagher, was sentenced yesterday to pay a fine of $100, with court costs. The case was tried before a jury in Judge E. E. Porterfield's division of the criminal court, which was only a few minutes in making up its mind.

The visit made to Mr. King's room, which Gallagher stated on the stand "was just a friendly call," was made at 5 o'clock in the morning. He was arrested at the time, but by an oversight of an officer at the Walnut street station, who did not realize the gravity of the offense, Gallagher was released on bond of $11. He was no sooner out of the station two hours later than he returned immediately to Mr. King's room, and a second time tried to force an entrance. For this offense he is yet to be tried.

Gallagher was tried before a jury in Judge Ralph S. Latshaw's division of the criminal court last month for an assault committed on Mr. King July 8, last. On this occasion he was also fined $100 and costs, and given a stipulated time in which to pay the fine.

The grand jury found an indictment against Gallagher for the assault, and it was, therefore, a state charge. The case tried yesterday, and the one still pending, are appeals from the municipal court where he was fined for disturbing the peace. Gallagher spent nearly one month in the workhouse before bonds for an appeal could be perfected.

When the jury returned its verdict in Judge Porterfield's court yesterday, Gallagher was allowed to go, the court stating that the bond made by Judge William H. Wallace when the case was appealed, would remain in effect until the fine and costs were paid. Cliff Langsdale, city attorney, who h ad prosecuted the case, was not satisfied with this arrangement, however, and found a recent law which states plainly that when a person is fined in the criminal court, after having taken an appeal from the municipal court, he must settle the fine and costs at once, or be committed to the workhouse until such fine and costs are paid.

Judge Porterfield admitted that the recent law took precedence. An effort was made then to get a commitment from the criminal clerk consigning Gallagher to the workhouse until he had settled up with the court. The clerk's office was closed, however, so the commitment will be asked for first thing this morning.

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March 2, 1909

COURT ORDER
STOPS SALOME.

SPRING SONG IS GIVEN IN
FLESHLINGS AND SHOES.

MISS HOFFMAN VERY ANGRY.

SAYS ACTOIN TAKEN BY PEOPLE
WHO NEVER SAW DANCE.

Injunction to Be Heard in Judge
Porterfield's Court Tomorrow.
"I, Too, Am a Christian,"
Says Miss Hoffman.
Gertrude Hoffman, Salome Dancer
GERTRUDE HOFFMAN.

Gertrude Hoffman did not give the Salome dance at the Shubert theater last night because a court order commanded her not to do so.

In the "Spring Song "Gertrude, who goes bare-footed and bare ankled and almost bare-kneed in this number, wore fleshlings, and on her classic feet she wore soft shoes because the court order commanded it.

A temporary restraining order, made by Judge E. E. Porterfield of the circuit court late yesterday afternoon and returnable tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock, scored first blood for those who are fighting the presentation of the semi-nude dance in Kansas City.

Miss Hoffman was served with the order while she was in her room at the Coates house. The order was also served on Earl Steward, manager of the Shubert, J. J. Shubert and Lee Shubert being included in the list of defendants.

Miss Hoffman went to the Shubert last night determined to do her dance. She was mad and excited. It was decided to eliminate the "Salome" dance, but as the court order made no mention directly of the Spring Song number, that dance was given.

"What kind of a town is this?" said Miss Hoffman, as she retired to her dressing room after the conclusion of her act.

One could still hear the applause coming from the auditorium of the theater.

"Do you hear that?" she said. "Did you see that audience? Did you see any people with low brows in that audience? Do they look coarse, unrefined, ill bred? No, certainly they don't.

"What does the so-called religious element of Kansas City think I am doing over here? Do they think I get out on the stage and wriggle? Do they think the audience giggles?

"I have given my dances all over the Eastern section of the United States. I played in the leading cities of New England where the Puritans came from and where their descendants live and thrive and still preach purity.

"Intellectual audiences, audiences of brain and a taste for art saw my dances. I played to an audience made up entirely of Harvard men while in Boston. I played to an audience made up almost entirely of Yale men when we played in New Haven. When we played in Springfield, Mass., more than half of the audience was composed of girls attending Smith college. They came over thirty miles to see my performance. They represented some of the richest, most intellectual families of the United States. They didn't blush. They had nothing to blush for. They applauded.

"Who are these people who rant about something they have never seen? They are hypocrites, to begin with. Why do they seize on this performance, when they have ignored other theatrical performances which might have given them some excuse for going to court?

"If these people object to my dance why don't they go to your art academies and tear down the nudes. Why don't they close up the art academies and prevent nude women from posing for nude pictures? Why don't they?

"That's art, they will say, if they have intelligence. So it is. And this dance I give is art, classic art.

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January 30, 1909

NEGRESS ADOPTS WHITE BOY.

But She Can't Have Him While
Living In Missouri.

Color lines were drawn sharply in the juvenile court yesterday. Mrs. John May, a negro woman, adopted Guy Colby, a white boy, 8 years ago in Lynn, Mass. He is now 11. The adoption was legal in every way, according to the Massachusetts statutes, but Missouri laws do not recognize such a relationship.

Probation officers discovered that Guy, a white boy, was attending the Attucks school for negroes. Judge E. E. Porterfield sent the lad, who looks well cared for, to the McCune farm. He promised Mrs. May that she could have him again if she returned to Massachusetts, which it is her intention to do. She took the lad from a foundling home.

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January 9, 1909

BOY CASE IS ARBITRATED.

Judge Porterfield's Verdict: "Don't
Use Shinny Sticks Any More."

In the juvenile court yesterday afternoon Eddie Stephons and Tommy Bramlette, 14 and 13 years old, respectively, told Judge E. E. Porterfield that when boys play policemen it means clubs will be freely used on the heads of any prisoners taken into their custody.

The boys had been fighting and Eddie still bore a scar across his forehead and one cheek was swollen as the result of a blow from Tommy's shinny stick. The defendant readily confessed it was he who delivered the blow.

"That will do," said Judge Porterfield, after each boy had told his story. "The plaintiff has no case at all. He simply got whipped. Dismissed, but you must not use shinny sticks or play prisoner and policeman until good feeling is restored between you."

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January 6, 1909

SPEYER, CHILD SLAYER,
IS NOW A FREE MAN.

RELEASED BY JUDGE PORTER-
FIELD OF CRIMINAL COURT.

"Realization of My Act Has Been
Greater Punishment Than Law
Could Inflict," Says the
Showman.

Six and one-half years in jail, three times convicted of the murder of his own 5-year-old son, John Martin Speyer, showman, stepped out of the county court house yesterday a free man. At 38 years of age he again faces the world, leaving on the county's books one of the most unique records ever entered opposite the name of a model prisoner.

Three times the supreme court held that Speyer was insane when he killed Fred, his child, and the prosecuting attorney, Virgil Conkling, believed a fourth trial would result in the same finding. So, when Speyer was taken before Judge E. E. Porterfield of Division 2 of the criminal court yesterday, Mr. Conkling dismissed the charge against the prisoner.

BEEN PUNISHED ENOUGH.

Judge Porterfield, in releasing Speyer, impressed upon him the fact that he was still a young man and able to make a good record in the world. The judge continued:

"I cannot believe that you were responsible for your actions when you killed your child. The supreme court has said so three times. The world, I believe, looks upon you with charity and expects of you only good conduct in the future. What you must have suffered from the realization of your act no doubt has been greater punishment than the imprisonment you have undergone. You are now free. Is there anything you wish to say to this court?"

Speyer, almost unnerved at his release after long imprisonment, rose slowly and said:

SHAKES HANDS WITH EVERYONE.

"You are right. The realization of what my act has meant has been to me far greater punishment than the law could possibly inflict. I intend to live an upright life. I was irresponsible when I committed the act which brought me to jail. By my conduct in the future I hope to make some small reparation. I thank you all for your kindness to me."

After shaking hands with everyone near, including the jailer, Speyer went to the jail and gathered up his few possessions, among them the manuscript of his lecture on prison life. As he had no money, deputies in the office of the county marshal made up a purse of about $15. Speyer said he would go to 520 East Eleventh street, the home of George McCabe, until he could find employment.

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January 6, 1909

PORTERFIELD JUVENILE JUDGE.

High Man on the Democratic Ticket
Succeeds Judge McCune.

Judge E. E. Porterfield of the circuit court will be chosen today to preside over the juvenile court for a period of two years. The law sets the formal election for Thursday, but action is to be taken today so that the new judge may, in a manner, familiarize himself with the duties of the place.

At the last general election, Judge Porterfield was elected to serve a term of six years. He was the high man on his ticket. He has not sought the office of juvenile judge, but today's meeting will give it to him. The term of the judge of the juvenile court is two years, unless unforeseen circumstances change the tenure of office.

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December 31, 1908

JUDGE M'CUNE'S LAST DAY.

New Presiding Officer for Juvenile
Court Must Be Chosen.

For the last time, Judge H. L. McCune will hold juvenile court today. He has been at the head of this work for two years, and the history of the Kansas City child's court is the history of his tribunal, for there has been no other regular judge since the juvenile law went into effect. Judge McCune goes out of office the first of the year. His successor will be chosen by the circuit judges from among their number. Judges John G. Park, Republican, and E. E. Porterfield, Democrat, are most frequently spoken of for that place.

Dr. E. L. Mathias, probation officer, yesterday completed his annual report, which will be handed to Judge McCune for approval today. The report shows that 1,155 cases were handled during the year in court and 851 settled out of court, making a total of 2,006. The report shows the disposition of those handled through the court. The register of the Detention home shows that 977 children have been booked there during the year.

As a general thing the report shows that children who have a father but no mother living are less in evidence in the juvenile court. Ninety living with the father were brought to the attention of the probation officers, while 131 who lived with the mother, the father being dead, were in court.

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December 8, 1908

J. S. CHICK, PIONEER
MERCHANT, IS DEAD.

HE FOUNDED THE FIRST BANK
IN KANSAS CITY.

Widely Known for His Integrity and
Honor in Business Affairs.
Funeral Will Be Held
Tomorrow.

Joseph Smith Chick, founder of the first bank in this city and for fifty years a citizen here, died at his home, 1039 Brooklyn avenue, at 4:30 yesterday morning. He had been ill several months, although he went to his offices until last week.

Mr. Chick was born in Howard county, Mo., August 3, 1828. His parents were from Virginia and the family lived on a farm. In 1830 the family moved to the town of Westport. Mr. Chick's father, Colonel William M. Chick, was one of the early purchasers of the original site on which Kansas City was built. At the time the family moved to Westport there were not a half a dozen families in Kansas City, called then Westport Landing. Joseph Chick went to the Westport schools, but at the age of 18 years put away his books and went into business. He became a clerk in the general store of H. M. Northrup, the largest shop of its kind in the town of Westport Landing. He worked hard and faithfully and in 1852 was admitted to a partnership in the firm.

Soon afterwards he and his partner conceived the idea of operating a bank in Kansas City and established one under the name of H. M. Northrup & Co. The company also took some interest in the trade across the plains to Santa Fe and in the year 1861 Mr. Chick and Mr. Northrup, with their wives, made the trip over the Santa Fe trail to trade with the Indians.

BANKING IN NEW YORK.

The next year, on account of the unsettled conditions prevailing, the company gave up its business in Kansas City and removed to New York, where they established a bank under the name of Northrup & Chick, on Wall street. For eleven years they continued in that city but in 1874 Mr. Chick sold out his interest and removed to this city, where he associated himself with some of the wealthy business men of the city and organized the Bank of Kansas City. In 1888 this institution was merged with the National Bank of Kansas City and Mr. Chick was chosen president, a position he held until the dissolution of the firm in 1895. Since then he had been in the real estate business with his son.

Mr. Chick was also connected with the St. Louis and Missouri River Telegraph Company, built to Kansas City in 1851; the Missouri Pacific Railroad, the macadamized road from Westport to the city, the first telephone company, the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the National Loan & Trust Company. He was once president of the board of trade.

For many years Mr. Chick had lived in the house where he died. Immediately after his return from New York he bought a large plot of ground in that neighborhood, ten acres facing on the street that is now Brooklyn avenue. Mr. Chick gave the street its present name after the city that he made his home when a banker in New York.

Since his early youth Mr. Chick was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and a faithful attendant at church services. For the last twenty-five years he had been the president of the board of stewards of the Central Methodist Episcopal church.

MRS. CHICK IS ILL.

Mr. Chick was married to Miss Julia Sexton of Howard county in 1855. Mrs. Chick is 76 years old. She is dangerously ill and may not survive her husband for long.

Two children survive, Joseph S. Chick, Jr., and Mrs. E. E. Porterfield, wife of Judge Porterfield, and three grandchildren, Mrs. Robert G. Caldwell, who lives in Indianapolis, Ind., E. E. Porterfield, Jr., and Miss Julia C. Porterfield.

The funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Burial will be in Mount Washington cemetery. The active pallbearers will be selected from Mr. Chick's nephews.

In both his public and his private life Mr. Chick bore the reputation for exemplary character. His business integrity was above reproach, and when the bank with which he was connected failed in 1895 on account of hard times, Mr. Chick assumed the task of paying off the debt. Five years ago the last dollar was paid, together with 8 per cent interest on the money. He was always benevolent in disposition and had given an efficient business training to many young men now scattered in many states. His bearing was erect and his address cheerful. He was beloved by many, and liked by all who knew him.

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December 1, 1908

NO ONE ANXIOUS TO
BE JUVENILE JUDGE.

THERE'S WORK AHEAD FOR THE
MAN UNDERTAKING IT.

Judge H. L. M'Cune Will Vacate That
Bench in January, and a Suc-
cessor Is to Be Chosen.
Duties of the Place.

On the first Thursday after the first Monday in January the judges of the circuit court will meet and select a presiding officer of the juvenile court form among their number. For the past two years Judge H. L. McCune has held this place, but he goes out of office in January.

So far, no judge has declared himself a candidate for the lace, although several have said they would prefer not to have the place. Judge James E. Goodrich and E. E. Porterfield seem at present to supply the list of candidates from which a judge will be selected. Neither of them is a candidate for the place, in the meaning that he greatly desires to fill it.

There are many arduous duties connected with the office of judge of the juvenile court. Conversant with the work as was Judge McCune when he took the place, it was some months before even he had things systemized. When he steps down next month the task of learning the ropes will not be an easy one for his successor, at least for a time.

What was at first a small matter, has expanded into a large department. Besides the regular trial of cases in court, there is general oversight over the probation officer and the Detention home, not to mention the McCune farm, on which there is now being constructed a home for boys. It is easy to let abuses creep into the juvenile court system. A knowledge of these, and the way to combat them, is the necessary equipment of a good judge.

There are people in Kansas City, and good people, too -- you wouldn't believe it if you saw their names in the paper -- who have tried to look upon the Detention home as a free employment bureau. It seems so easy to take a boy capable of earning $6 a week out of the home, which he wants to leave anyhow, and pay him $3 a week. 'Sides which, as the old proverb remarks, it saves money.

It has taken the greatest care of the probation force to keep these abuses out of the system in the past, and the same vigilance no doubt will be as necessary in the future. The case spoken of is mild and only one sample of the sort of matters which are brought up to juvenile judge and probation officer in almost constant succession.

The judge of the juvenile court appointed in January probably will serve until January, 1911. No specific tenure of office is fixed, but the intent of the law is that there shall be a change ever odd-numbered year. Of course, changes may be made more frequently, should conditions require it.

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