Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

January 4, 1910

RABBI BECOMES A CITIZEN.

Final Papers for Father of "Sammie
the Office Boy."

Fifteen aliens whose names had been posted for ninety days after the final application for citizenship papers had been made, were given their naturalization papers by Judge John F. Philips of the United States court yesterday. There were no Italians in the lot, the fifteen being distributed as follows: Six from Sweden, four from Russia, two from Roumania, and one each from Scotland, Germany and Hungary.

Among those who became citizens of the United States was Rabbi Max Lieberman, for years in charge of the Kenneseth Israel temple, synagogue of the Orthodox Jews, near Fifteenth and Oak streets. Rabbi Lieberman came to this country in 1891. He is the father of Samuel Lieberman, better known as "Sammy, the office boy," who died early in November last, after a brief illness. Sammy was an employe of The Journal, and it was here where he gained the name of "Sammy, the office boy," stories of his travels being published just as he had written them.

Labels: , , , , ,

January 1, 1910

BIRTHDAY CAKE FOR JUDGE.

Seventy-Five Colored Candles, One
for Each Year of John F. Philips'
Life, Presented at Dinner Party.

The seventy-fifth birthday of John F. Philips, federal judge, was celebrated by a dinner party, at which there were many prominent guests, in the Mid-day Club rooms, yesterday evening. One of the features of the evening was the presentation to the judge of a mammoth birthday cake containing a colored candle for each year.

The coincidence of the judge's birthday with New Years eve afforded an opportunity to those present to stay the old year out at the club. The time was well taken up with speeches and was enjoyed thoroughly by all, not excluding the host, who is yet the better of his years.

Judge Philips was born on December 31, 1824, and has been a judge of the United States district court since June 25, 1888.

Labels: , , , ,

November 28, 1909

PICTURES OF RETIRED JUDGES.

Adorn Kansas City Court of Ap-
peals Court Room Wall.

Pictures of the judges who have retired from the bench of the Kansas City court of appeals were placed yesterday in the court room. The pictures were enlarged from photographs secured by the three judges now on the bench.

The pictures of the judges included are: Jackson L. Smith, W. W. Ramsey, Willard P. Hall, John F. Philips and Turner A. Gill. Judge Smith is dead and Judge Ramsey is now practicing in St. Joseph. The other three live in Kansas City. Judge Philips, one of the first three judges, is now on the federal bench.

The Kansas City court of appeals was established by an act of the legislature in March, 1885.

Labels: , ,

August 16, 1909

HUGH C. WARD DIES
IN NEW YORK CITY.

APOPLEXY FOLLOWED HEAT
PROSTRATION A MONTH AGO.

Mrs. Ward and Judge PHilips at His
Bedside -- With Family Was
Spending Summer at Bass
Rooks Point, Mass.
The Late Hugh C. Ward, Prominent Kansas City Attorney.
HUGH C. WARD.

Hugh C. Ward, one of the most prominent attorneys of Kansas City, and a member of a pioneer family of Western Missouri, died from a stroke of apoplexy in New York yesterday morning.

An attack of heat prostration which he suffered in Chicago a month ago was one of the causes which led up to the death of Mr. Ward. He had never fully recovered from this attack, although his condition had improved sufficiently to permit him to continue his journey to New York, accompanied by his wife. With Mr. Ward at his death were Mrs. Ward, Judge John F. Philips and several relatives.


WESTERN TRIP FATAL.

Mr. Ward had taken a cottage for the summer at Bass Rocks Point, near Gloucester, Mass., and he left for that place in June with Mrs. Ward and their four children. Business matters required the presence of Mr. Ward in Kansas City and he came home for a few days in July. He left again for his summer home on July 13, but became ill as a result of becoming overheated in Chicago.

Mrs. Ward was called to his bedside by telegraph, and after a week his physician pronounced him able to travel. Mrs. Ward and her mother, Mrs. J. C. James, started for the East with Mr. Ward, but it was found necessary to make a stop in New York where Mr. Ward was taken to a hospital and given the attention of some of the best specialists of the city.


SUDDEN CHANGE FOR THE WORSE.

His improvement was slow, but a telegram from Mrs. Ward to her father, J. C. James, on Tuesday announced that he was much better. A sudden change occurred, however, and at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon Mr. James received a message that Mr. Ward had grown much worse. Mr. James left at once for New York.

The announcement of the death of Mr. Ward came in a telegram from L. T. James, Mrs. Ward's uncle, who landed in New York yesterday morning from a European trip.

The funeral services and interment will occur in Kansas City, the details for these to be arranged as soon as Mr. James reaches New york.

In addition to his wife and the children, Hugh Campbell, Jr., James Crawford, Francis and John Harris, Mr. Ward is survived by his mother, the widow of Seth E. Ward, and his brother, John E. Ward.


LEGISLATION AND POLITICS.

Hugh C. Ward was born March 10, 1864 at Westport. His parents were Seth and Mary Frances Ward. Hugh was reared on the farm and received his elementary education at a private school in Westport and his collegiate education at William Jewell Collete, Liberty, Mo., and at Harvard University. He was graduated with honors from Harvard, a bachelor of arts, in 1886. He then entered the St. Louis Law School and in June, 1888, received his diploma. He then was admitted to the bar in Kansas City.

In recognition of his ability as a lawyer came in 1894 his appointment as receiver for the John J. Mastin & Co., banking business, on dissolution of partnership. The property involved consisted mostly of real estate, and amounted to more than $3,000,000.

Aside from his profession Mr. Ward was known in business circles as a director of the National Bank of Commerce, Commerce Trust Company, Kansas City Railway and Light Company, and of the Kansas City Home Telephone Company.

He was long influential in Democratic circles, and in 1892 was elected to the state legislature where he did much work in connection with constructive measures.

In case preparation Mr. Ward was known as thorough and exhaustive, and in presentation before a judge or jury clear and vigorous in expression, and intensely earnest.

As a politician he was equally successful and well known. In the legislature in 1892 besides being made vice chairman of the judiciary committee, he was appointed chairman of the committtee on conditional amendments.

In 1898 he was appoointed police commissioner by Governor Stephens, who also made Mr. Ward a member of his staff, and placed in his hands the organization of the Missouri National Guard. He resigned as police commissionier and retired from politics in 1902.

SOCIAL AND PERSONAL SIDE.

Mr. Ward was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, deriving his eligibility through the lineal descent from Seth Ward, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. H e was also a member of the Elks lodge, the Country Club, the Commercial Club, the Harvard Club of the Southwest and the American Bar Association.

Mr. Ward was married October 26, 1898, to Miss Vassie James, a graduate of Vassar college and a daughter of J. Crawford James.

One of Mr. Ward's last acts was to give $25,000 to the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

July 4, 1909

CRITICISE CONDITIONS
AT THE COUNTY JAIL.

FEDERAL PHYSICIANS DECLARE
PLACE IS UNSANITARY.

Pardon Recommended for Woman,
That Her Life May Be Pro-
longed -- Feed Prisoners
Too Cheaply?

Conditions at the Jackson county jail, Missouri avenue and McGee street, are criticised by physicians who care for the federal prisoners there.

One of the prisoners is Mary Cook, serving a sentence for six months for counterfeiting, who has become seriously ill. In order to save the woman's life, the United States court officers here have recommended a pardon. This step is most unusual.

The county marshal, in charge of the jail is not held blameworthy by the department of justice, nor by the physicians.

"It is the impossible way they are trying to make the jail cost the tax payers next to nothing," said Dr. Eugene Carbaugh, one of the federal physicians.

When at jail attending the Cook woman, Dr. Carbaugh and Dr. Lapp, an alderman, who is one of the federal physicians, made a casual examination to find the cause for sickness. The declare it is largely due to defective plumbing and neglect of ordinary sanitary precautions.

Without exception, they say, the prisoners complained of the food. The government pays 50 cents a day to the county for boarding its prisoners. The county is feeding the prisoners at a cost of 11 cents a day, which is 2 cents a day more than the bill had been.

When asked what remedy could be proposed, the government representative said "the doctors tell us it would be necessary to tear out every bit of plumbing in the place, and then keep trusties or other intelligent men constantly at work watching the prisoners, to see that they help keep the place in order. More money is needed for better food."

Judge John F. Philips has never spoken of conditions in the Jackson county jail, but he never sends a prisoner there to serve out a sentence. He called a special grand jury last week to take two boys out of the jail and to give him a chance to send them to some place where conditions are at least sanitary. The Cook woman, who is ill through hereditary trouble, was sent to the jail here at her own urgent request.

Labels: , , , , ,

June 3, 1909

CLASSMATES HONOR
YOUNG WOMAN LAWYER.

RISE WHEN HELEN RODGERS
RECEIVES HER DIPLOMA.

Forty-Five Are Graduated From the
Kansas City Law School -- Judge
John F. Philips Delivers
the Annual Address.

As the name of Miss Helen Crawford Rodgers was called last night by the president of the Kansas City Law School, the entire graduating class rose while the young woman received her diploma. It was the occasion of the twelfth annual commencement exercises which were held at the Willis Wood theater. Forty-five graduates received diplomas.

Out of the forty-five graduates, nine received "cum laude" while one was graduated "summa cum laude." Two of the cum laude graduates were graduates of the University of Missouri.

The senior honors follow:

Summa cum laude, Perry W. Seaton; cum laude, Miss Helen Rodgers, W. H. L. Watts, Samuel A. Dew, John B. Gage, Elbridge Broaddus, Jr., Peter J. Neff, Roy W. Crimm, M. L. Driscoll.

Francis M. Black honor, Samule A. Dew; first junior prize, William Jachems; second junior prize, William E. Morton; first freshman prize, Ray E. McGinnis; second freshman prize, W. E. Dreier.

TRIALS OF YOUNG LAWYERS.

An orchestra played "Southern Beauties," after which the Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Lillis delivered the invocation. Another selection was then given by the orchestra which played "Dreams."

In the annual address to the graduating class John F. Phillip, judge of the federal courts took occasion to explain to the young lawyers some of the trials and tribulations of the court. He advised the embryo attorneys not to abuse a judge because of an unfavorable opinion rendered.

"At times the courage necessarily possessed by the court must be greater than that taken to face the booming roar of cannon, or the dangers braved by the seamen who outride the storm in order to save a stricken ship. He is often abused and slandered, and is forced to bow his head, trusting in the Almighty power, being conscious of doing no wrong and having implicit confidence that the sun will come from behind the clouds.

"Yours is the most intellectual and honorable of all the professions. And while crowned with pleasures and honors, thorns are liable to creep in but you must remember they must be worn with the pleasures."

SAYS COURTS ARE MALIGNED.

The court of appeals had been arraigned and maligned because it had sustained the fundamental principle of law giving every man a fair trial, he said. Continuing, Judge Philips said even the supreme court of the state had been abused because it had reversed a case in which the indictment was shown to be faulty through the omission of the word "the." The speaker informed his audience it was necessary that the indictment have the word "the," thus telling in which state the crime was committed.

Competition among lawyers, Judge Philips declared, was only increasing the number of brighter men. The day of the flamboyant lawyer, he said, was past as the attorney with facts and authorities would swamp him before the vocal oratory had a chance to flow. He named the Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution as the work of lawyers.

CONGRESSMAN BORLAND PRESENT.

The presentation of the diplomas was by Oliver H. Dean, president of the faculty. In a short address to the students the speaker ridiculed the idea of farmers and merchants making the laws of the country, instead of the lawyers, but advised them not to enter politics.

Congressman William P. Borland, formerly dean of the school, returned from Washington to attend the exercises and to present the honors won by the students.

Labels: , , , , ,

June 2, 1909

GROVE OF FAME FOR SWOPE.

Park Board Member Suggests Crit-
tenden Peace Oak as Nucleus.

The peace oak grove planted in Swope park east of the shelter house a year or so ago by the late Ex-Governor T. T. Crittenden, is to serve as the nucleus of a grove of fame in the big park. The idea was suggested at yesterday's meeting of the park board by J. W. Wagner, a member of the board. Mr. Wagner regretted that the city had not been sufficiently far-sighted years ago to ask men of fame visiting Kansas City to plant a tree.

"It is not too late to begin it now," said Mr. Wagner, "and our work will be appreciated by future generations."

He recalled that the battle of Westport during the civil war was fought close by where the Crittenden peace oak is planted, and Mr. Wagner gave notice that at the next meeting he is going to invite Judge John F. Philips and Colonel R. T. Van Horn, who took part in the battle, to plant trees.

Labels: , , , , ,

June 1, 1909

SIMPLICITY MARKS
CRITTENDEN FUNERAL.

FORMER GOVERNOR OF MIS-
SOURI LAID TO REST.

Rev. Thomas P. Haley Pronounces
Fitting Eulogy in Presence of
Relatives and Friends
of Many Years.

While respecting in every way the wish of the late Thomas T. Crittenden that his funeral be conducted with as little ostentation as possible, hundreds of former governor's friends, men and women, stood under the trees on the lawn at the residence, 3320 Flora avenue, yesterday afternoon within the sound of the voice of the Rev. Dr. Thomas P. Haley, who with the assistance of Rev. Burris A. Jenkins and the Rev. Dr. S. M. Neel, conducted the simple service for the dead.

Governor Crittenden had left a letter addressed to Dr. Haley asking that he officiate at his funeral. The letter was sealed in 1906.

"I count it one of the choicest blessings of my life to have known and loved Thomas T. Crittenden," said Dr. Haley. "He was a man of great heart, noble mind and character, whom none could know but to love and admire.

"Everyone who knew him was his friend. He had close friends far away as well as near, but among those who most revered him, which is an indication of the kind of man he was, are his neighbors, those with whom he came in contact in his everyday life. Every child in the neighborhood knew him and loved him.

WAS KIND TO ALL.

"He was ever willing to recognize his fellows as men, no matter what their station in life might have been. He was as careful to be considerate to the hod-carrier as he was to the banker.

"He would treat the washerwoman with as much consideration as the finest lady."

In finishing his characterization of his dead friend, Dr. Haley touched on Governor Crittenden's rare virtues as a husband and father, saying he was always careful to perform his public duties in the daytime, reserving the evenings for the society of his family.

Over the casket, during the funeral services, was draped the battle flag of the Seventh Missouri cavalry, which Governor Crittenden and Judge John F. Philips organized at the beginning of the civil war. The shot-torn banner was made by the women of Georgetown, Mo., and presented to the regiment. After the war it became the property of Judge Philips, who said it should drape his casket after his death.

NEGRO A MOURNER.

No mourner was more sincere than "Uncle" Dan Edwards, who was Governor Crittenden's "waitin' boy," as he styled himself, during the four years of the war. "Uncle" Dan is now pastor of the Metropolitan Negro Baptist church, at Ninth and Washington streets, Kansas City, Kas. He went to the Crittenden home in the early morning and asked for a last look at the face of his old "marster," and, as he said, "tuck dinner" there. He followed his master's body to Forest Hill, where it was buried.

Among those who came to the funeral was J. B. Waddell of Springfield, whom Governor Crittenden appointed as his adjutant general.

Enough floral offerings were sent to make a great mound at the grave. Members of the family, however, asked that the greater part of the flowers be sent to adorn graves that might go through Memorial day undecorated. Among the pieces sent was one from the children of the neighborhood bearing the card which read:

"Children of the Kentucky Block"

City officials and attaches in their offices also sent many beautiful floral pieces.

The pallbearers were Kelly Brent, John Hanley, W. W. Collins, S. L. Long, Daniel T. Blake, W. S. Cowherd, Porter H. Hovey and Leon T. Brown.

So profuse was the floral offering in memory of Governor Crittenden that Mrs. Crittenden requested that some of them be sent to various hospitals in Kansas City after the burial. The flowers were all left at the cemetery until late yesterday afternoon, when many were collected and sent to the following hospitals:

German hospital, new general hospital, old city hospital, Nettleton home, St. Joseph's hospital, St. Mary's hospital, and Mercy hospital.

RESOLUTION IN COUNCIL.

The council in special session yesterday passed the following tribute to the memory of the ex-governor:

"The death of former Governor Thomas Crittenden is a distinct loss, not only to our city, but to our state and nation. When a boy, following the dictates of his ancestral instincts, he dedicated his life to his country's service and took up his sword to defend its flag. To the closing of his rich and fruitful life, as soldier, congressman, governor, consul general and citizen he gave the best he had, his time, his talent, his eloquence, his energy to the state and nation. He was an illustrious example of American manhood. He was courageous and tender, courtly and constant, patriotic and modest. He honored women, trusted men and worshipped God. He belonged to the rare old school which held honor above wealth and virtue above life. He was every inch a Crittenden, which means that he turned his back to no foe and bended the knee to none but his Maker.

"He has fought the fight, he has finished the work, he has kept the faith and now takes his place full of honor among his distinguished ancestry.

"This city does not mourn alone. Today tears are falling nationwide. We, his neighbors, join with the multitudes in deploring his loss and extend to his sorrowing wife, his distinguished son, our mayor, and all the members of the grief-stricken family our earnest sympathy."

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

May 30, 1909

IN HIS OWN WORDS.

Ex-Governor's Life Sketch, as Writ-
ten by Himself.

Here is a brief sketch of the ex-governor's life, as given by himself in his own words:

"I was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky., on a farm near Shelbyville. My father, Henry Crittenden, died when I was two years old leaving my mother a widow with five sons; three daughters had died in infancy; the oldest son was not over 15 years of age. My mother was remarried after a few years to Colonel Murry of Cloverport, K y., and five children were born of this union.

"My education was begun at a small subscription school at Shelbyville and continued until I was old enough to go to Center college at Danville, from which I was graduated in the class that had in it Judge John of this city, Governor John Young Brown, W. P. C. Breckinridge, Boyd Winchester and other noted men. I studied law in Frankfort in the office of John J. Crittenden and married in Frankfort Miss Carrie W. Jackson. Soon afterwards I removed to Lexington, Mo., where I opened my first law office. I remained there till the war broke out, when I assisted John F. Philips in raising a regiment of Union soldiers that was sworn in at Georgetown, Pettis county, in 1862, for three years. The regiment was mustered out April 7, 1865 two days before Lee's surrender. At the close of the war I removed to Warrensburg, as feeling still ran high at Lexington. I formed a law partnership with Frances M. Cockrell, who returned from the Confederate service at the close of the war. We practiced law successfully until I was elected to congress in 1872, but the partnership was not dissolved. It continued until General Cockrell was elected United States senator. I remained in congress until 1878 when I refused to be a candidate for re-election. I was nominated for governor over John S. Marmaduke, who became my successor and John A. Hockaday, who had been attorney general under my predecessor.

TEMPESTUOUS ADMINISTRATION.

"The four years of my administration are known to all the older citizens of the state. Phil E. Chappel of this city was state treasurer during my administration,and no state ever had a more honest, faithful or intelligent official.

"My administration was perhaps the most tempestuous in the state's history. We had so many questions of great importance to settle, which agitated every part of the state. One was the great lawsuit with the Hannibal & St. Joseph railroad; as governor I advertised the road for sale. The state won on every point we raised. My efforts to break up the James gang, the most noted band of outlaws ever known in the United States, are familiar to all.

LIFE IN MEXICO.

"After I left Jefferson City I came to Kansas City, in 1885 and resumed the practice of law. I had been out of law office so often in my life and been out of practice so long that I had lost almost all connection with the law and had got behind in my knowledge of the books. I had virtually lost my disposition to return to practice. But the law is a jealous mistress and will not favor any man who deserts it on all occasions.

"I was given the post of consul general to Mexico by President Cleveland in 1893 and absented myself from my own country for four years. My life in Mexico was very pleasant. There were many charms about such a life then and there are more now. I returned to Kansas City and have been here ever since, living a quiet and pleasant life with my family and friends in one of the greatest young cities in the world."

Labels: , , , , , , ,

May 28, 1909

GOVERNOR CRITTENDEN
STRICKEN BY APOPLEXY.

FALLS FROM SEAT WHILE
WATCHING BALL GAME.

Age and General Ill Health Believed
by Doctors to Render Recovery
Problematical -- Has Not Re-
gained Consciousness.

As the result of a stroke of apoplexy which came upon him yesterday afternoon while watching a baseball game at Association park, former Governor Thomas T. Crittenden is lying at the point of death at his home, 3220 Flora avenue, with physicians in constant attendance.

Slight hope is entertained for Mr. Crittenden's recovery. His age and general ill health are said to be factors against his rallying. Though Mr. Crittenden had not regained consciousness up to a late hour last night, it was ascertained by the attending physicians, Ned O. Lewis and J. C. Rogers, that Mr. Crittenden's entire left side is completely paralyzed. The left side of his face is badly bruised where he struck the benches in front of him when he fell forward at the ball park.

Mr. Crittenden had been sitting in the grandstand near the third base line during the first of the two games which were played between Kansas City and St. Paul. Other spectators who were sitting near him said that he had not displayed any unusual excitement over the game and had been sitting rather quietly.

It was the beginning of the second inning of the second game when Mr. Crittenden was seen suddenly to fall forward and outward into the aisle.

CONDITION IS CRITICAL.

Thinking that Mr. Crittenden had but fainted, his immediate neighbors rushed to pick him up and placed him on the bench, where they attempted to revive him. Dr. Stanley Newhouse, the park physician, was hastily called from the press box, where he had been watching the game. He gave Mr. Crittenden prompt attention, but was unable to revive him.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was summoned from the city hall. He was driven to the park in an automobile, and suggested that he drive his father home in the motor car. Dr. Newhouse advised an ambulance, and one from the Walnut street police station was summoned. Then Mr. Crittenden was taken to his home.

After a long consultation with Dr. Lewis and an examination of Mr. Crittenden, Dr. Rogers stated that while the patient was in a precarious condition and that he was critically ill, there was a little hope for his recovery.

"It all depends upon the size of the hemorrhage on the brain," said Dr. Rogers. "It appears that the hemorrhage is from a ruptured small blood vessel, but we do not know whether or not the flow had been stopped completely. Governor Crittenden has been in poor health for several months. That taken into consideration with the fact that this is the second attack, does not argue well for a speedy recovery."

Dr. Newhouse, who first attended Mr. Crittenden, is not so sanguine as Dr. Rogers. Dr. Lewis remained with his patient all night, and did not make a statement.

HIS SECOND SEIZURE.

Eighteen years ago, while Mr. Crittenden was a practicing lawyer, he had his first stroke of apoplexy. No ill effects resulted from the first stroke, other than to make him more susceptible to the second.

Mr. Crittenden has long been a baseball enthusiast and there have been few games this season, according to his son, that he has missed. It has been his chief recreation, and though his family feared for him to go alone to the games on account of his age and declining health, Mr. Crittenden persisted in doing so. Mayor Crittenden said last night that his family had feared some untoward incident as a probable result of his innocent recreation.

Dr. Newhouse stated last night that he believed the attack was caused from an overwrought nervous condition. He said that it occurred at a lull in the game and excitement, and was the result of a reaction upon the nerves, even though Mr. Crittenden had not appeared excited.

Mr. Crittenden in 77 years of age. He was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky. His father was Henry Crittenden, a farmer, and the former governor was one of eight children. He received his education at Center college, Danville, Ky. Among his classmates were Judge John F. Philips of this city, who was by his bedside last night; W. P. C. Breckenridge, John Young Brown, and other noted men.

LAWYER AND SOLDIER.

Mr. Crittenden studied law at Frankfort. Soon after his marriage to Miss Carrie W. Jackson he moved to Lexington, Mo., where he first practiced law. There he remained until the civil war when he and Judge Philips raised a regiment of federal sondiers, and were engaged in the war for three years. Many of his battles were fought in Jackson county.

At the close of the war Mr. Crittenden formed a partnership with Francis M. Cockrell, afterward United States senator. During that time Mr. Crittenden was sent to congress from Missouri.

In 1878 Mr. Crittenden became governor of Missouri, and the four years of his administration were stormy ones. At the close of his term he moved to Kansas city, where, with the exception of four years, he has resided since. That exception is during the time he acted as consul general to Mexico under President Cleveland.

Mr. Crittenden has three sons, H. H., Mayor Thomas T., both of Kansas City, and William J. Crittenden of Pittsburg, Pa., now in Japan.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

April 29, 1909

WOMAN LAWYER DEFENDS BOY.

Light Sentence for Youth Charged
With Mail Theft.

Attorney Miss Carey May Carroll of Independence defended young Alvin Edwards in the federal court yesterday against the charge of taking $10 from a letter in a rural mail box. Miss Carroll pleaded that the youth of the defendant should extenuate the crime, saying that he was only 16 years old when it was committed, but that his character had improved since. Judge Philips fined him $40 and costs.

Labels: , , , ,

June 29, 1908

NOT SO EASY TO
BECOME CITIZENS.

NATURALIZATION SYSTEM HAS
MATERIALLY CHANGED.

Largest Class Since New Law Went
Into Effect Will Be Examined
by Judge John F. Philips
This Morning.

Twelve foreigners will line up in the United States court this morning to be examined by Judge John F. Philips as to their fitness to be admitted to citizenship. It will be the biggest class held in the federal court since the enactment of the new law. Classes this size formerly were put through the circuit or county courts in two shakes of a lamb's tail. Now it is all different, and getting naturalized is about as tough a proposition as a man has to go through. Getting married is nothing at all; getting divorced is, of course, little more, and going dead is no trouble whatever.

Getting naturalized used to be done by going with a ward heeler a few weeks before election day to a judge, and signing a paper there. That facility made the business big. Hanging in the office of United States District Clerk A. Utter are three sheets of paper with forty names on them. These represent every application for citizenship that has been filed here since February 13, not 1 per cent of the old colony days, when ward heelers got so much per head for "citizens" to vote the next month.

The forty men who are bulletined had all been in the country five years before they got their second papers, and they have all had their second papers two years, or nearly two years. Twelve of them will be ripe today, and so they will be marched up before a federal judge and quizzed. There will be no ward heeler doing the talking, and assuring the judge that "he's all right, judge; I've got his slip here," the slip being the man's name written in English, himself, most likely, unable to utter it, and the prospective citizen absolutely ignorant of the government of the United States.

That type of foreigner is out of the running entirely now. He never will get to vote. In the federal court there is no night sitting, no colonizing, no running them through in blocks, and above all else no slips. Each man will have to toe the mark and tell something about the constitution, the rights of the franchise, the form of government, the course of a document, from the draft to the signed law, and most likely may have to compare the government of the United Stats with that of the land he is forsaking.

The new law does not limit immigration. The same lot of undesirables can still get into the country, but they may not vote till they know English, have established a reputation, and are up on the bill of rights and other fundamental principles of the government.

Labels: , ,

January 8, 1907

HOTTMAN'S FIFTH RESPITE.

Delay of Ninety Days Follows Federal
Appeal for Mrs. Myers

The officers of the county jail received a telegram soon after 8 o'clock last night from the office of Governor Folk, saying that the governor, upon receipt of news from the federal court and Kansas City that Judge Phillips had granted a writ of supersedeas in the case of Mrs. Aggie Myers, had granted Frank Hottman a further respite of ninety days.

Governor Folk said to a correspondent of The Journal at Jefferson City that as Hottman is the only witness against Mrs. Myers, he should not be executed till her fate is finally determined.

Night Jailer McGee notified Hottman immediately of the respite. Hottman was in the death cell awaiting execution Thursday. It is the fifth time he has been respited and he is used to it. When the jailer told him of the respite all Hottman said was: "Well, I guess it's all right," and without a show of emotion prepared to go to sleep. He was not removed to the other part of the jail last night, but will be this morning.

Yesterday the attorneys for Aggie Myers filed an appeal to the supreme court of the United States from the decision of Judge Philips, refusing an application for a writ of habeas corpus. The attorneys declared Mrs. Myers is held illegally by the state authorities. She also was to hang Thursday for the murder of her late husband. The mere taking of the appeal acted as an arrest of judgment in the instance of Mrs. Myers, postponing the date of execution till the higher court can pass upon the case.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory