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November 28, 1909

WHILE IN FIT SHOT ROOMER?

Defense Planned for Mrs. Sadie
Geers, Charged With Murder.

Mrs. Sadie Geers, facing a charge of murder in the second degree, was bound over to the criminal court yesterday by Justice James B. Shoemaker. She was unable to furnish $5,000 bond and was returned to the county jail to remain until her case comes up for trial.

Mrs. Geers is held for the shooting which resulted in the death of Harry Bonnell, one of her roomers in a house at 509 East Sixth street, last Sunday afternoon. The defense will use the plea that the woman was subject to epileptic fits and that she shot Bonnell during one of them. The court appointed Jesse James to defend Mrs. Greer.

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November 5, 1909

MAY DIVORCE JESSE JAMES.

Mrs. Stella S. James Files Suit --
Friends Think James May Re-
Enter the Tobacco Business.
Jesse James, Jr., Kansas City Attorney.
JESSE JAMES.

Jesse James, lawyer, son of the famous bandit, and one of the best known men in Kansas City, was made defendant in a divorce suit filed yesterday by Stella J. James, who says they were married January 24, 1900.

Jesse and his wife were married while he was running a cigar store in the Junction building at Ninth and Main streets. It was not long after his celebrated trial in which he was acquitted of a charge of complicity in the Blue Cut train robbery. Jesse was one of the most talked of men in all the country in those days, and his cigar business prospered.

That he and his wife led a happy married life was the general opinion of their friends. In her petition, however, Mrs. James says that her husband has been getting homo late at night, and on these occasions has refused to tell his wife where he had been. The wife says that she is ill and under a doctor's care and without means of support. Their home is at 809 Elmwood avenue.

Friends of Jesse James have noted a change in his demeanor within the last few days. That he was troubled was apparent. Long ago he quit the cigar business, and for a time was the proprietor of a pawn shop. Then he began to study law, and after his graduation he began to practice in local courts and gave evidence of doing well. He devoted his attention largely to criminal business.

Only a few days ago Jesse confided to friends that he had decided to quit the law and intended to go on the road for the American Tobacco Company. It was Jesse's first intimation that he was not satisfied with the legal profession.

Jesse James was not at the Elmwood avenue address last night, and persons at the house said that Mrs. James was sick in bed and could not discuss the case.

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September 18, 1909

MRS. SHARP'S TRIAL IS SET.

Wife of "Adam God" Has No Means.
Counsel is Furnished.

In the criminal court yesterday the trial of Mrs. Melissa Sharp, wife of James Sharp, "Adam God," was set for October 18. As she had no counsel, Jesse James was assigned by the court.

Mrs. Sharp was in the riot at the city hall December 8, 1908, when two policemen were killed. Her husband, James Sharp, was convicted in the criminal court last spring and sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty-five years. He is now serving his sentence, pending the opinion of the supreme court on his appeal.

Mrs. Sharp's appearance before the court was in response to her own request. She had asked Judge Latshaw for an audience and when she came into the court room she asked for a hearing.

"I am ready for trial at any time," she told the court.

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September 18, 1907

FRANK JAMES A FARMER.

WILL SETTLE ON 160 ACRES IN
OKLAHOMA.

During Visit in City Missouri's Form-
er Bandit Declares It Is Non-
sense to Say That Quan-
trell Still Lives.

Frank James, the former Missouri bandit, who has lived a reformed life since the bank raid at Northfield, Minn., which ended so disastrously for the James and Younger boys, has turned farmer. He spent yesterday in Kansas City with his nephew, Jesse James, Jr., an attorney, and talked of his plans.

For some time James, now 64 years old, has lived on the old homestead in Clay county, thirty miles from Kansas City. He hunted in winter and in summer was employed as a starter at race tracks. Recently he purchased a farm of 160 acres in Oklahoma and will go there October 1 to make his home. Frank is a well-preserved old man, but looked rather pale yesterday and the penalties of declining years appeared not far away in his future.

"Of course Quantrell is dead!" the brother and advisor of Jesse James and the Younger crowd during their years of border ravages exclaimed when the recently published rumor that the former Guerrilla chieftain is alive was mentioned.

"There is no question of his death. Why, I was at his side when he fell. In a pitched battle between the Quantrell command and Federal soldiers in Kentucky in the spring of '65, Quantrell was wounded. His command was hard pressed, but rallied around their leader. The boys wanted to take up Quantrell and make a dash for the hills, where, they told him, if escape were possible, they could nurse him back to health.

" 'No,' said Quantrell, 'I am as good as dead. Leave me and get to the hills yourselves. If I am dead, the next thing to do is save the living ones.'

"The last I saw of Quantrell he was paralyzed from the waist down and imploring his men to leave him alone. He died three hours later w here he had fallen and was left on the battlefield.

"The statement that he is still living is nonsense."

Frank James left last night for Kearney, Mo, at 5 o'clock.

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August 16, 1907

NURSED JESSE JAMES

ARREST OF NEGRO REVIVES FOR-
GOTTEN BANDIT.

Son of Noted Highwayman, but
Now a Lawyer, Appeared in
Court in Defense of
Former Slave.

Charles Finley, a negro, of 523 Bluff street, who was tried before Justice J. B. Shoemaker yesterday afternoon and bound over to the criminal court on the charge of stabbing Edward Dyer, a member of the fire department at the Fifth and Bluff street station, was reared by Zerelda James-Samuels, was a hostler for Jesse and Frank James, the bandits, in their palmy days, and nursed young Jesse James, the Kansas City lawyer. Young Jesse defended him in the justice court yesterday and would take no fee.

"It's the first time I have been in trouble, since Master Jesse was killed twenty-five years ago in St. Joseph," said Finley last evening. "When I was arrested, I telephoned for Young Jesse, for I done raised that boy from a baby, just as his grandmother had raised me, and he came double quick and took my case. I knew he would not forget me when I got in trouble.

My father and mother were 'Reldie James' slaves long before the war. They lived on a farm near Kearney, Clay county, where I was born during the war. I never was a slave, but Old Misses 'Reldie raised me and my mother gave me to Susan James until I was 21 years of age. When Susan married Mr. Palmer and went to Texas, I went along and worked for them.

"I was back in Kearney pretty soon, though, and lived with 'Reldie. I never could forget that she had treated me like one of her own when I was a baby and that she always put me back of her on the horse when she rode to Liberty or about the farm.

"When Jesse and Frank got to be bad men, they needed someone with them so they took me to care for their horses and run errands. I ran with them most all the time, until Jesse was killed. I was not in St. Joseph that day, but heard all about it pretty soon. I was at home with 'Reldie.

"Old Miss 'Reldie thinks a whole lot of me yet -- she is Mrs. Samuels now, you know -- but she wouldn't do any more for me than would young Jesse or his sister.

"How did I come to leave her? Why, I came down here after Jesse was killed. I have worked for young Jesse a good deal. Then I got married and have a family of my own, so I have to stay here and work."

Charlie is a concreter. He says he makes $2 a day at it, but he doesn't enjoy the work nearly so well as he used to enjoy living on the farm near Kearney and helping " 'Reldie" take care of young Jesse.

"That boy sure was a smart little fellow," Finley says, "but he was powerful mischievous."

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