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October 10, 1909

GEO. P. OLMSTEAD
DIES AT 80 YEARS.

PASSES AWAY WHILE SEATED
AT BREAKFAST TABLE.

Was Connected With Many Promi-
nent Institutions in Kansas City
Where He Lived Nearly
Forty Years.
The Late George P. Olmstead.
GEORGE P. OLMSTEAD.

George P. Olmstead, an octogenarian, half of whose life was lived in Kansas City, died yesterday morning at the breakfast table in his home at 1311 Forest avenue. Until five years ago he was a member of the Cady & Olmstead jewelry firm at 1009-11 Walnut street, which still retains his name. Prior to that he was one of the leading lumbermen of the Missouri valley.

Mr. Olmstead had seated himself at breakfast, and was glancing over the morning paper when his daughter, Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, was about to serve the coffee. As she came in she noticed his head was bowed, but thought little of it, as he often became drowsy when sitting.

Mr. Olmstead's head fell lower and touched the paper, and Mrs. Qualtrough became alarmed. Unable to awaken him, she called her husband, but they could do nothing and he had lapsed into unconsciousness. Dr. R. T. Sloan was summoned, but when he arrived the aged man was dead.

Besides his wife he leaves a son and a daughter, C. B. Olmstead and Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, both of 1311 Forest avenue, Miss Catherine G. Olmstead, a sister, 88 years old, has been at Wesleyan hospital for three years with a fractured limb.

The funeral will be held from the hours Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Burris A. Jenkins, pastor of Linwood Boulevard Christian church, in charge. Temporary burial will be in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Mr. Olmstead was born September 17, 1829, at Little Falls, N. Y., where he grew to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade. Early he made the journey by canal, lake, river and gulf to Corpus Christi, Tex., but did not remain there long.

Later he engaged in the lumber business at Pontiac, Ill, where he was married in 1859 to Miss Cornelia E. Hunt, who survives him. He remained there for several years and again removed to Tuscola, where he lived until they came to Kansas City in 1869. Mr. Olmstead built a home at 800 Jefferson street and lived there until 1887, when he bought the present family home at 1311 Forest avenue. The Jefferson street house was sold at the time of the construction of the cable incline.

On coming to Kansas City Mr. Olmstead became a member of the lumber firm of Leach, Hall & Olmstead, all of the members of which are now dead. Their lumber yard was west of the Union depot and the site is now occupied by a number of large wholesale houses. In 1882 he became a partner of L. S. Cady in the jewelry firm of Cady & Olmstead and in 1887 the lumber firm was dissolved. Four years ago he sold his interest in the business of Cady & Olmstead. For a number of years he was identified with R. M. Snyder, now dead, in Texas and Arizona ranch properties.

Current events drew much of Mr. Olmstead's attention and he took a vivid interest in the happenings of the world at large. His large library attests that he was a wide reader and he was known as a close and intelligent student of the Bible. During the pastorate of Rev. T. P. Haley, he was an active member of the First Christian church at Eleventh and Locust streets. Mathematics and astronomy held an odd fascination for him.

Mr. Olmstead was a close friend of Col. R. T. Van Horn and frequently he would contribute keen and well-written comments on public affairs to the columns of The Journal.

Last fall he was invited to Pontiac to attend the fiftieth anniversary of the Masonic lodge there, which he founded, but he was obliged to decline.

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August 22, 1909

BAND CONCERTS FOR THIS WEEK.


Sunday, 2:30 p. m., Swope park.
Monday, 8 p. m., Concourse, St. John and Gladstone.
Tuesday, 8 p. m., West Terrace park, Thirteenth and Summit.
Wednesday, 8 p. m., Budd park.
Thursday, 8 p. m., Penn Valley park, Twenty-seventh and Jefferson.
Friday, 8 p. m., Troost park, Thirtieth and Paseo.
Saturday, 8 p. m., the Parade, Fifteenth and the Paseo.

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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June 27, 1909

ENGINE HIT BALL PLAYER.

Boy Run Down While Chasing Foul
at Stevens's Park.

While chasing a foul ball across the Belt Line track during a baseball game at Twenty-fourth street and the Southwest boulevard at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Claude Davidson, 12 years old, was run over by a switch engine and mangled by the wheels. He was taken to the general hospital where his right leg and arm were amputated by Dr. J. Park Neal. It was thought at the hospital last night that the boy would recover.

Two boy teams were playing at the Stephens ball park at the time of the accident. Claude Davidson was what is known among school boys as "pig-tailer" and his business was to recover lost balls and catch fouls landing far behind the batter. One of the latter crossed the low fence behind the field and it was in pursuit of it that the boy was hit by the switch engine. His father, William C. Davidson, lives at 1660 Jefferson street.

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June 13, 1909

GIRL WANDERER HELD.

Humane Society Investigation Story
of Rose Slocovitch.

Agents for the Humane Society are holding in the matron's room Rose Slocovitch, 11 years old, until they can investigate the story she told the police last night after Sergeant Robert Greeley had found her wandering on the streets. When found by the sergeant the girl said her foster mother mistreated her and that evening when trouble arose she was left on the street corner.

The story as told by rose is that five months ago a Mrs. Anna McDonald visited Houston, Tex., and claiming to be interested in orphans sold motto cards the the charitably inclined Texans. She was in Houston two weeks ago and when she left she was accompanied by Rose, whose father agreed to the girl's leaving home. Rose said she sold the cards for Mrs. McDonald. Now she desires to return to her home where her mother is supposed to be dying.

Frank E. McCrary, humane agent, visited Mrs. McDonald last night at her home, 1442 Jefferson street, and the girl's story in the main part was corroborated. Mrs. McDonald said she traveled around the country selling post cards and used the proceeds in helping orphan children.

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January 5, 1909

FRANK M. HOWE DIES
OF HEART DISEASE.

WAS AN ARCHITECT OF INTER-
NATIONAL NOTE.

R. A. Long Building, Jewish Temple
and Many Other Important Kan-
sas City Structures Were
Planned by Him.

Frank Maynard Howe of the firm Howe & Hoit, an architect of international note whose name is associated with some of the most important buildings in Kansas city, died at his home, 1707 Jefferson street, at 7:30 o'clock last night of heart disease.

Mr. Howe, who was 59 years old, had been quite ill since June last. On July 6, accompanied by Mrs. Howe and their daughter, Miss Dorothy Howe, he toured Great Britain, Holland, Germany and France, in the hope of recovering his failing health, but when he returned October 7 he was but little improved.

Besides the widow, Mrs. Mary E. Howe, and the daughter, Miss Dorothy, there is another daughter, Mrs. Katherine Howe Munger, who lives at the family home. There is one grandchild, Nancy Munger, 3 years old.

When Mr. Howe came to Kansas City in 1885, the architectural firm of Van Brunt & Howe was established, in connection with a similar firm in Boston, Mass. Several years later Mr. Van Brunt came here. At the death of Mr. Van Brunt, seven years ago, the firm of Howe & Hoit was organized.

PLANNED SOME BIG BUILDINGS.

Mr. Howe was the architect of some of very prominent buildings, among them the Electricity building at the Columbian exposition, Chicago, in 1893, where he was also a member of the board of consulting architects. He held a similar position at the Louisiana Purchase exposition in St. Louis in 1904. Among Mr. Howe's first works was the Union station at Worcester, Mass.

He was born in West Cambridge, Mass., now known as Arlington, and was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Some of the well-known home buildings of which Howe was an architect were the following: R. A. Long building, Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Company store, Fidelity Trust Company, United States and Mexican Trust Company, Reliance building, Scottish Rite temple and St. Mary's hospital.

Among the houses of worship he planned were the new Jewish temple, the Independence Boulevard Christian church and he was building the Linwood Boulevard Christian church. He also planned the homes of Kirk Armour, Mrs. F. B. Armour and Charles Campbell.

When Mr. Howe died he was planning to build for R. A. Long a $1,000,000 home at Independence and Gladstone boulevards, which with stables, conservatory and other buildings, will occupy a full block.

Mr. Howe was a member of the Elm Ridge Club and the Knife and Fork Club, and was president of the Philharmonic Society throughout its existence. As a great-grandson of Isaac Howe, who fought at the battle of Lexington, he was selected for membership in the Sons of the Revolution. Mr. Howe's ancestors were English Puritans and came to Massachusetts in the seventeenth century. He was a member of Ararat temple, Mystic Shrine, and a thirty-second degree Mason.

His principal avocations were painting water colors and music. He played the piano and the pipe organ.

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May 16, 1908

BURGLAR LEFT A SUITCASE.

Filled with Good Clothing on G. W.
Tipton's Porch.

Neighbors of G. W. Tipton yesterday afternoon saved his home at 2002 Jefferson street from eing ransacked by a daylight burglar and gained a suitcase full of good clothes in the bargain. The family was away and a rear window being up attracted the attention of a neighbor next door.

That open window looked suspicious and they concluded to make an investigation. When sufficient force had been marshalled, a rapid flank movement was made on the house. Just as the self-appointed officers drew near the house a man was seen to leap from the open windown and make his escape through the alley. On the back porch he left a suit case filed with men's clothing -- of a good quality, too. The window had been pried open with a burglar's "jimmy." Nothing was taken from the house.

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May 3, 1908

SAYS POLICEMAN HIT HIM.

Ernest Hiatt Had Cuts on the
Back of His Head.

Ernest Hiatt, 19 years old, of 1215 Jefferson street was playing ball in the street near Fourteenth and Jefferson streets yesterday afternoon, when a park policeman ordered him to stop. The boy was sent to the Walnut street station later with two cuts on the back of his head. He said that the policeman had hit him with his club as he was about to recover the ball when the game was ordered stopped. Alderman James Pendergast was a witness, and has interested himself in the affair.

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May 3, 1907

ASSAULT ON GEORGE HICKS.

Main Witness Before Police Board
Beaten Near His Home.

George Hicks, who made charges against detectives at the police board meeting yesterday, was assaulted at Twelfth and Jefferson last night on his way to his home at 1223 Jefferson. Two men attacked him, one knocking off his hat, the other striking him on the ear so that blood flowed from it. Picking up his dog, which one of his assailants had begun to kick, Hicks fled to his home. Rocks were thrown at him as he ran.

It was dark when the assault took place and Hicks would not say that he recognized his assailants. He added that they were some of his enemies. Also he said he had been warned something would happen to him if he testified against certain men.

That the assault was carefully planned seems evident. A young man entered Hicks' restaurant at 339 West Fifth early in the evening and asked when the proprietor was going home. He was told and departed.

For testifying before the board Hicks had been promised protection and no doubt more than the usual police vigor will be exercised in finding his assailants. If the police can't, the board probably can furnish the vigor.

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March 24, 1907

COURTSHIP IN A MIXUP.

Girl Sues for Breach of Promise, Man
for a Ring.

While a case in which George W. Dunlap is suing to recover a diamond ring he claims is in the possession of Ida May Price, of 1827 Jefferson street, was pending in Justice Shepard's court, yesterday, Ida May Price in retaliation instituted suit against Dunlap to recover $30,000 for alleged breach of promise.

In her petition in the breach of promise case which as filed in the circuit court, Miss Price claims that she had been keeping company with Dunlap for a considerable length of time, and from about May, 1906, and frequently thereafter promised, at his request, to marry him.

In his suit to recover the diamond ring, Dunlap claims that he only lent the ring to Miss Price. The case is set for March 29.

Miss Price is a clerk, and Dunlap is proprietor of a clothes cleaning establishment on Central street.

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