Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

December 7, 1909

HIDDEN POUCH FOUND
IN OLD JAMES HOUSE.

FILLED WITH OPENED LETTERS
ADDRESSED TO A. F. GEORGE.

Sack Discovered by Plumber in
Sealed Closet at 1836 East Ninth
Not Like Those Used By Gov-
ernment in Bandit's Time.
Mail Receptacle Found in Jesse James's Old House.
UNLIKE PRESENT DAY POUCHES.

A rendezvous of Jesse James was recalled yesterday afternoon, when E. N. Watts, who runs a plumbing shop at 1836 East Ninth street, discovered in an old house at 1836 East Ninth street a mail pouch upon which human eyes probably had not gazed for years.

Watts was doing extensive remodeling work on the interior of the house preparatory to its occupancy as a pool hall, when he accidentally broke into a little closet which evidently had been sealed for years. In that aperture he found a mail pouch, filled with mail matter. He dragged the sack to the light and after examining it concluded that it must have been a part of the spoils of the James gang.
USED AS A RECEPTACLE.

Mr. Watts notified the postal authorities and a postoffice inspector was soon on the scene. He examined the pouch and its contents, finding the sack was filled with many letters, all of which had been opened and were addressed to "A. F. George, 609 East Fifteenth street, Kansas City, Mo." The inspector's conclusion was that the sack must have been used as a receptacle for the accumulated correspondence of Mr. George, whoever he might have been.

Closet Where the Pouch of Mail Was Found.
CLOSET WHERE THE POUCH WAS FOUND.

The inspector took the sack and contents to the federal building, where officials, who had been in the service as long as twenty years, examined it closely. They said that although the pouch resembled the official style, it lacked certain necessary features that would justify its identification as ever having been owned by the United states government. The officials were at a loss to know why anyone would try to duplicate the official one used years ago.

Labels: , , , , ,

November 5, 1909

MAY DIVORCE JESSE JAMES.

Mrs. Stella S. James Files Suit --
Friends Think James May Re-
Enter the Tobacco Business.
Jesse James, Jr., Kansas City Attorney.
JESSE JAMES.

Jesse James, lawyer, son of the famous bandit, and one of the best known men in Kansas City, was made defendant in a divorce suit filed yesterday by Stella J. James, who says they were married January 24, 1900.

Jesse and his wife were married while he was running a cigar store in the Junction building at Ninth and Main streets. It was not long after his celebrated trial in which he was acquitted of a charge of complicity in the Blue Cut train robbery. Jesse was one of the most talked of men in all the country in those days, and his cigar business prospered.

That he and his wife led a happy married life was the general opinion of their friends. In her petition, however, Mrs. James says that her husband has been getting homo late at night, and on these occasions has refused to tell his wife where he had been. The wife says that she is ill and under a doctor's care and without means of support. Their home is at 809 Elmwood avenue.

Friends of Jesse James have noted a change in his demeanor within the last few days. That he was troubled was apparent. Long ago he quit the cigar business, and for a time was the proprietor of a pawn shop. Then he began to study law, and after his graduation he began to practice in local courts and gave evidence of doing well. He devoted his attention largely to criminal business.

Only a few days ago Jesse confided to friends that he had decided to quit the law and intended to go on the road for the American Tobacco Company. It was Jesse's first intimation that he was not satisfied with the legal profession.

Jesse James was not at the Elmwood avenue address last night, and persons at the house said that Mrs. James was sick in bed and could not discuss the case.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

August 21, 1909

FEW QUANTRELL'S MEN THERE.

Former Guerrillas Are More Inter-
ested in the Crop Prospects.

Only twenty-five men responded yesterday morning at the roll call of the Quantrell guerrillas, now in reunion in Independence. Cole Younger was not present, being on a lecture tour, the subject of his lecture being "Keep Straight." Frank James, another noted guerrilla, is down in Oklahoma in the Big Pasture, farming, and did not have time to attend. James has not attended any of the reunions since his noted speech made in the Independence court house yard, in which he declared that his friends were in the North and that he was never turned down except by those of the Southland.

The headquarters of the reunion were in the Brown building, North Main street. Here the scattered membership met and registered and it was here that it was noted that among the absent ones were John C. Hope, ex-sheriff of Jackson county, and Cyrus Flannery Wolf of Bates county, both having died within the past year. Captain Benjamin Morrow was present, Lieutenant Levi Potts of Grain Valley and Warren Welch were busy among the veteran guerrillas. Captain Gregg, who has been in about as many tight places as the next guerrilla who followed Quantrell, was present with his family. Also Dr. L. C. Miller of Knobnoster.

There was no formality about the reunion. "They just met and that was all there was to it," was the way one of them expressed himself. Some of those from Kansas City and nearby points brought well-filled dinner baskets, but the greater portion of those present had to go to restaurants. It was a day of reminiscent stories for the guerrillas and the oft repeated stories of the civil war were gone over and over again. Gabe Parr, who as a boy shot his way to freedom, yet lives, and others with equally hair raising stories were present and passed the day, telling of the yesterdays of their early manhood. The thing that interested these men most was the state of the crops.

The veterans will hold another session today and adjourn, in all probability to meet in Independence next year.

Labels: , , , , , ,

August 17, 1909

"BAD" MAN BUSINESS
DOESN'T PAY, SAYS COLE.

Former Bandit Tells Politicians It's
Best to Walk the Straight and
Narrow Path.

Less than 5,000 people attended the Lone Jack picnic yesterday, which is a considerable crowd to gather up in the farthest corner of Jackson county, but nothing to the crowds which have gone there in days of yore. On the speakers' list were Congressman Borland, Representative Holcomb, former County Judge George Dodd and Cole Younger. Ex-Criminal Judge W. H. Wallace started for the picnic, going past F. M. Lowe's house in his automobile and inviting that congressional candidate to go with him, but something must have happened for there was no Judge Wallace at the Lone Jack all day. Sam Boyer, county clerk, was the only Republican official who reported, but there was a herd of Democratic officials. Circut Judge E. E. Porterfiled and Thomas J. Seehorn, both of them with records of never having missed the August pilgrimage, were given ovations. the speeches were tame, Cole Younger's being the possible exception. The well known old guerrilla has a lecture he reads, which is a little classic. It is moral in that there is not a cent nor a good night's sleep in being a "bad" man, and the only people who think there is are those who do not know the man who was "bad," while they who do know him always remind him that he was off the reservation once and cannot get all the way back on.

The weather was torrid, hundreds of buggies stopping short of the destination. Automobiles which carried the Kansas City contingent passed derelicts at almost every shade tree on the way. It was 100 in the shade but nobody on the way to the picnic had any shade to get under.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

May 30, 1909

IN HIS OWN WORDS.

Ex-Governor's Life Sketch, as Writ-
ten by Himself.

Here is a brief sketch of the ex-governor's life, as given by himself in his own words:

"I was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky., on a farm near Shelbyville. My father, Henry Crittenden, died when I was two years old leaving my mother a widow with five sons; three daughters had died in infancy; the oldest son was not over 15 years of age. My mother was remarried after a few years to Colonel Murry of Cloverport, K y., and five children were born of this union.

"My education was begun at a small subscription school at Shelbyville and continued until I was old enough to go to Center college at Danville, from which I was graduated in the class that had in it Judge John of this city, Governor John Young Brown, W. P. C. Breckinridge, Boyd Winchester and other noted men. I studied law in Frankfort in the office of John J. Crittenden and married in Frankfort Miss Carrie W. Jackson. Soon afterwards I removed to Lexington, Mo., where I opened my first law office. I remained there till the war broke out, when I assisted John F. Philips in raising a regiment of Union soldiers that was sworn in at Georgetown, Pettis county, in 1862, for three years. The regiment was mustered out April 7, 1865 two days before Lee's surrender. At the close of the war I removed to Warrensburg, as feeling still ran high at Lexington. I formed a law partnership with Frances M. Cockrell, who returned from the Confederate service at the close of the war. We practiced law successfully until I was elected to congress in 1872, but the partnership was not dissolved. It continued until General Cockrell was elected United States senator. I remained in congress until 1878 when I refused to be a candidate for re-election. I was nominated for governor over John S. Marmaduke, who became my successor and John A. Hockaday, who had been attorney general under my predecessor.

TEMPESTUOUS ADMINISTRATION.

"The four years of my administration are known to all the older citizens of the state. Phil E. Chappel of this city was state treasurer during my administration,and no state ever had a more honest, faithful or intelligent official.

"My administration was perhaps the most tempestuous in the state's history. We had so many questions of great importance to settle, which agitated every part of the state. One was the great lawsuit with the Hannibal & St. Joseph railroad; as governor I advertised the road for sale. The state won on every point we raised. My efforts to break up the James gang, the most noted band of outlaws ever known in the United States, are familiar to all.

LIFE IN MEXICO.

"After I left Jefferson City I came to Kansas City, in 1885 and resumed the practice of law. I had been out of law office so often in my life and been out of practice so long that I had lost almost all connection with the law and had got behind in my knowledge of the books. I had virtually lost my disposition to return to practice. But the law is a jealous mistress and will not favor any man who deserts it on all occasions.

"I was given the post of consul general to Mexico by President Cleveland in 1893 and absented myself from my own country for four years. My life in Mexico was very pleasant. There were many charms about such a life then and there are more now. I returned to Kansas City and have been here ever since, living a quiet and pleasant life with my family and friends in one of the greatest young cities in the world."

Labels: , , , , , , ,

May 30, 1909

DEATH CLAIMS FORMER
MISSOURI GOVERNOR.

THOMAS T. CRITTENDEN SUC-
CUMBS AT AGE OF 77.

Twice a Member of Congress and a
Consul General, The Governor
Saw State Through Most
Strenuous Period.

EX-GOV. T. T. CRITTENDEN, SR.

Twice a member of congress, once the governor of his state, at another time consul general to Mexico and for the last eight years referee in bankruptcy, Thomas T. Crittenden died at dawn yesterday morning. Thursday afternoon the ex-governor sustained a stroke of apoplexy. While watching a ball game he fell unconscious from his seat and did not regain his mental faculties. Death came at 5:30 yesterday. Interment is to be made tomorrow afternoon in Forest Hill cemetery, after services at the family residence, 3230 Flora avenue.

With the former governor at the time of his death were all surviving members of the family save one, that one now traveling in Japan. The grief stricken family is Mrs. Crittenden, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., mayor of Kansas City; H. Houston Crittenden, and W. J. Crittenden. It is the latter who was unable to be at his distinguished father's side till the last.

SOLDIER OF RENOWN.

With Governor Crittenden there died a man of parts, and all those parts true facts. He was a soldier of renown, having fought and won battles which turned form this state the tide of slavery. He was a courageous man, having, in the face of the enemy, been appointed to succeed a dismissed brigade commander because his senior had hesitated about making a charge which the division commander knew Crittenden was eager to make. He was a statesman, as his record in the congress of the United States and in Jefferson City shows. He was a man of commerce, as his most excellent direction of international commerce while consul general to Mexico bear out. He was a man of letters, widely read and collecting a magnificent library. He was a judge in equity, as is shown by the last eight years of his public service, and always, he was a gentleman.

Handsome of face, his bearing was striking. The last moment he was on his feet, with the weight of seventy-seven years on his shoulders and those added to by the infirmities of four years in the saddle during the civil war, he was straight as an arrow. Governor Crittenden had the bearing of a courtier. He was gracious always, charming his familiars and captivating his casual acquaintances. He spoke softly, chose his words and ever was anxious to do something for someone else. Never a moneymaker, he lived to see three splendid sons grow up to take care of that part of his affairs. Fond of public places, high ones, the old governor's happiness at seeing one of his sons become mayor of this city was taken by himself as an honor.

A LIFELONG DEMOCRAT.

"Is this governor Crittenden?" would be asked.

"The mayor is my son," he would reply. The old governor enjoyed living all things in life.

He was a most thoughtful man. Obscurity found him delving. Great charities might take care of themselves, he would say, but little ones were hopeless, so he did little ones. Born in Shelby county, Ky., 77 years ago, he was born and bred a Democrat, and lived and died one, but he was a rampant Union man and helped raise a Union regiment with which he kept in the field throughout the war. He was of the Washington type, if history is to be believed.

Governor Crittenden believed in the dignity of the occasion. The men who fought under him and who yet live say he was almost a martinet within the regiment and at the same time a father to the men. As governor he lived up to his high office. When Madam Patti first visited Missouri someone proposed a ceremonial visit. Patti said it was like going to Windsor Castle. And yet this same man undertook to break up the James gang, summarily granted a pardon to a malefactor who had been the agent of destruction and paternally took the hand of a surviving member of the gang, Frank James. Nor did the kindly man ever lose sight of the objects of his official stoicism, for one of his constant correspondents and visitors was this same Frank James.

HE NEVER FORGOT.

No situation was too perplexing for Governor Crittenden. He was governor when Missouri was in the transition stage. The war had not long been over. Democrats, he being one, were fighting to capture everything. The James boys were turned highwaymen and their names were associated with the contemporaneous history of the state. They lowered its level and defied capture. Missouri had had one governor who confessed inability to cope with the situation. Probably profiting by his experience in the war, Governor Crittenden made overtures to Bob Ford, a member of the James gang, and through that means encompassed the destruction of the band. Ford killed Jesse, and Frank, the second brother, surrendered. What in other states would have meant a feud for a generation was dismissed by the clever work of Governor Crittenden as soon as it was over.

No one was forgotten by Governor Crittenden. Had Dickens known him he would have gone into literature with other notable characters. As early as 1870 there was a man came to Kansas City to make some political speeches for the governor. Two years ago that man's dead body was found in squalor. The first hand to get into a purse to buy a grave and a casket was the hand of the old governor. He got not a little of his pleasure out of his personal acts of charity to his personal acquaintances.

It was a pleasure to know the old governor. He was always affable and sunny. He was comforting in sorrow and refreshing always. In his long life he was always busy, and yet he did no great things. He was a monument to the man who has not done great things in that he showed how really much an ordinary man can do with credit to himself and yet keep within the orbit of the ordinary man.

Labels: , , , , , ,

December 18, 1908

MARRIED SAME WOMAN TWICE.

Still Frank James's Brother-in-Law
Couldn't Keep His Wife.

Harry Ralston was given a decree of divorce in the circuit court at Independence yesterday from his wife, Alice Ralston, whom he charged with desertion. Ralston is a brother-in-law of Frank James and the marriage dissolved yesterday was the second to the same woman.

Mr. Ralston stated yesterday that his wife had deserted him and taken up her home in California. They could not agree on the control of the children.

Labels: , , , ,

October 24, 1908

JESSE JAMES USED TO
KEEP NEGRO SCHOOL.

J. M. TURNER, EDUCATOR, RE-
CALLS EARLY DAYS HERE.

Former Minister to Liberia Taught
First Negro School in Mis-
souri -- Addresses Negro
Hadley Meeting.

From slavery into the diplomatic service cost J. Milton Turner a life of effort, but he had time on the side to educate the negroes of Missouri and help 'em out in Kansas. Turner, who was the principal speaker at the negro Hadley meeting last night in the Rev. Dr. Hurst's church at Independence avenue and Charlotte street, came here yesterday for the first time in a great many years.

There wasn't any reception committee at the depot to greet him, so he strolled up to Ninth and Main streets to have a look at the site of the first negro school in Missouri. Turner taught that school. It was supported by Jesse James, and most of the legal advice and diplomatic stunts necessary to keep a Confederate school board from running Turner out of the community came from Colonel R. T. Van Horn.

Turner said last night that he came here in '67 to get the Republican separate school law into effect. There wasn't a negro school in the state when he landed, although the law provided that there should be in every district where there were over twenty pupils. The school board of '60 and '61 had gone off to join the Confederate army, and had returned and arbitrarily taken up their old duties and were then finishing up their terms in office. They got back to duty just in time to confront the separate school law, which Republicans had placed on the books and which the Democrats have been claiming credit for ever since.

JESSE JAMES CONTRIBUTES.

Turner wanted to start a school, but the Confederate school board here wouldn't recognize either him or the law. Turner said yesterday that Colonel R. T. Van Horn secured a carpenter shop for him at Ninth and Main streets and told him to get busy. Turner had a wife, but no furniture, and a generous storekeeper gave him cloth to make a partition and goods boxes to make tables. The board refused to pay his salary and he lived in the carpenter shop and taught school in a corner of it the entire winter without pay.

"Jesse James used to ride in and shoot up the town," said Turner. "He was in sympathy with the school. When he was ready to leave the town he used to ride up and demand to see the n----- school teacher. I would go out trembling and admit that I was the teacher.

"Are they paying you?" Jesse James would ask. When I told him no he would hand me a $10 bill and ride away. He was about the only cash patron I had."

In the spring, after his first term, the carpenter returned and offered to sell Turner his place, 200 feet on Main street and seventy-five feet on Ninth street, for $300, and offered to trust the negro for the money. Turner thought the carpenter was crazy and declined, taking a summer job as a bootblack in a hotel on the Kansas side of the border.

GETS HIS BACK PAY.

Getting into Kansas got Turner into more trouble. Susan B. Anthony and Mary Cady Stanton and Jim Lane and a bunch began to espouse woman's suffrage about that time, and the issue became woman's suffrage against negro suffrage. But Turner extricated himself and got back to Kansas City, where, he said yesterday, a Dutchman who had been elected to the school board settled up with him for all the back salary and rehired him for teacher.

Then Turner went down the river on a steamboat, and Joseph L. Stephens got him to stop off at Boonville and teach the second negro school in the state. Stephens paid the bill. Stephens afterwards got to be father of a governor of Missouri. Thomas Parker, then state superintendent of instruction, heard of the negro educator and sent for him. He appointed Turner second assistant, but said he did not have an y money to meet his salary. Turner worked for nothing until he was also named second assistant by the Freedman's bureau at Washington and assigned to Missouri and Kansas territory. This paid $125 a month. The Missouri Pacific railway gave the transportation and Turner began to travel about establishing negro schools. He put in 140, and then discovered there wasn't a negro in his territory who could read or write, and he was up against it for teachers.

News didn't travel fast in those days, and it was a long time before Turner learned that a negro regiment on the battlefield had voted to appropriate $5,000 to build the Lincoln institute at Jefferson City. Turner got busy and called a convention at the state capital, had 790 negroes there, and invited the general assembly to look on. That night members of the general assembly went down and donated $1,000 toward negro education.

A THAW GETS INTO THE GAME.

The outgrowth of Turner's Jefferson City convention was a bill in the general assembly to appropriate $15,000 to the negro educational movement, just as soon as the negroes themselves could certify to having a like capital in cash and real estate. The negroes sent Turner down East to beg money, and he got $1,000 in cash from a fellow named William Thaw down in Pittsburg, whose son afterward got into print for killing Stanford White on a New York roof garden. Begging did not suit Turner, and he returned to Missouri.

"This brings us to the convention of '70, when we Republicans got the balance of power in Missouri," said Turner with a chuckle, as he rubbed the rheumatism out of his aged joints. "That's where I met Carl Schurz of St. Louis. Mr. Schurz was in the senate. That's when the fifteenth amendment was put in operation.

"I was in that convention, backed up by 200 negro delegates, and I was in joint debate with Carl Schurz for three days. He wanted to enfranchise the Confederate veterans, and so did we negroes, but we kicked when Schurz wanted the bill to read for the benefit of white men only. With my 200 negroes I held the balance of power, and Mr. Schurs bolted the convention and the party."

This convention and the memorable three days' debate with Carl Schurz got Turner into the limelight. Colonel R. T. Van Horn of Kansas City recommended him to President Grant, and the negro was sent as minister to Liberia. He stuck it out there for eight years, and then returned to St. Louis, where he was born into slavery, and became a lawyer. For twenty years he has been an attorney for the negroes of Indian Territory, and secured for them their treaty rights there.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

August 4, 1908

RALSTON SUES FOR DIVORCE.

Brother-in-Law of Frank James Says
His Wife Has a Temper.

Harry M. Ralston brought suit for divorce in the circuit court at Independence yesterday against his wife, Alice E. Ralston. Harry Ralston is a brother-in-law of Frank James. He was married to his present wife in 1892. A divorce followed in August, 1907. Mrs. Ralston went to California and there married a man by the name of Kenney. Soon after this marriage she was divorced from her California husband and she again met Ralston.

About two years ago they were remarried and seemed to live happily. June 14, 1908, they separated again. They have two children. The husband claims abusive conduct upon the part of his wife.

Labels: , , ,

September 18, 1907

FRANK JAMES A FARMER.

WILL SETTLE ON 160 ACRES IN
OKLAHOMA.

During Visit in City Missouri's Form-
er Bandit Declares It Is Non-
sense to Say That Quan-
trell Still Lives.

Frank James, the former Missouri bandit, who has lived a reformed life since the bank raid at Northfield, Minn., which ended so disastrously for the James and Younger boys, has turned farmer. He spent yesterday in Kansas City with his nephew, Jesse James, Jr., an attorney, and talked of his plans.

For some time James, now 64 years old, has lived on the old homestead in Clay county, thirty miles from Kansas City. He hunted in winter and in summer was employed as a starter at race tracks. Recently he purchased a farm of 160 acres in Oklahoma and will go there October 1 to make his home. Frank is a well-preserved old man, but looked rather pale yesterday and the penalties of declining years appeared not far away in his future.

"Of course Quantrell is dead!" the brother and advisor of Jesse James and the Younger crowd during their years of border ravages exclaimed when the recently published rumor that the former Guerrilla chieftain is alive was mentioned.

"There is no question of his death. Why, I was at his side when he fell. In a pitched battle between the Quantrell command and Federal soldiers in Kentucky in the spring of '65, Quantrell was wounded. His command was hard pressed, but rallied around their leader. The boys wanted to take up Quantrell and make a dash for the hills, where, they told him, if escape were possible, they could nurse him back to health.

" 'No,' said Quantrell, 'I am as good as dead. Leave me and get to the hills yourselves. If I am dead, the next thing to do is save the living ones.'

"The last I saw of Quantrell he was paralyzed from the waist down and imploring his men to leave him alone. He died three hours later w here he had fallen and was left on the battlefield.

"The statement that he is still living is nonsense."

Frank James left last night for Kearney, Mo, at 5 o'clock.

Labels: , , , , , ,

August 19, 1907

WAS SISTER OF YOUNGER BOYS.

Mrs. Emma Leach Dies as Result of
Street Accident.

Mrs. Emma Leach, 54 years old, a sister of Bob and Cole Younger, who lost her right leg in a street car accident at Twelfth street and Highland avenue last Friday afternoon, died at the general hospital yesterday afternoon.

Mrs. Leach was standing on the cornier waiting for a car, when as it approached a huckster wagon drove up just as she walked out to board the car. A man who swung onto the front end of the car struck her, causing her to fall against the wagon, and then to the ground. As she tried to arise, her leg was thrown out across the track, and a wheel passed over it, crushing it at a point above the knee.

She was treated by an ambulance surgeon and removed to the general hospital, where the leg was amputated.

Labels: , , , , ,

August 16, 1907

NURSED JESSE JAMES

ARREST OF NEGRO REVIVES FOR-
GOTTEN BANDIT.

Son of Noted Highwayman, but
Now a Lawyer, Appeared in
Court in Defense of
Former Slave.

Charles Finley, a negro, of 523 Bluff street, who was tried before Justice J. B. Shoemaker yesterday afternoon and bound over to the criminal court on the charge of stabbing Edward Dyer, a member of the fire department at the Fifth and Bluff street station, was reared by Zerelda James-Samuels, was a hostler for Jesse and Frank James, the bandits, in their palmy days, and nursed young Jesse James, the Kansas City lawyer. Young Jesse defended him in the justice court yesterday and would take no fee.

"It's the first time I have been in trouble, since Master Jesse was killed twenty-five years ago in St. Joseph," said Finley last evening. "When I was arrested, I telephoned for Young Jesse, for I done raised that boy from a baby, just as his grandmother had raised me, and he came double quick and took my case. I knew he would not forget me when I got in trouble.

My father and mother were 'Reldie James' slaves long before the war. They lived on a farm near Kearney, Clay county, where I was born during the war. I never was a slave, but Old Misses 'Reldie raised me and my mother gave me to Susan James until I was 21 years of age. When Susan married Mr. Palmer and went to Texas, I went along and worked for them.

"I was back in Kearney pretty soon, though, and lived with 'Reldie. I never could forget that she had treated me like one of her own when I was a baby and that she always put me back of her on the horse when she rode to Liberty or about the farm.

"When Jesse and Frank got to be bad men, they needed someone with them so they took me to care for their horses and run errands. I ran with them most all the time, until Jesse was killed. I was not in St. Joseph that day, but heard all about it pretty soon. I was at home with 'Reldie.

"Old Miss 'Reldie thinks a whole lot of me yet -- she is Mrs. Samuels now, you know -- but she wouldn't do any more for me than would young Jesse or his sister.

"How did I come to leave her? Why, I came down here after Jesse was killed. I have worked for young Jesse a good deal. Then I got married and have a family of my own, so I have to stay here and work."

Charlie is a concreter. He says he makes $2 a day at it, but he doesn't enjoy the work nearly so well as he used to enjoy living on the farm near Kearney and helping " 'Reldie" take care of young Jesse.

"That boy sure was a smart little fellow," Finley says, "but he was powerful mischievous."

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook

New Book!
The Son of Jesse James is Accused of a Train Robbery at Leeds ... Can he get a fair trial in Kansas City?
The Trial of
Jesse James, Jr.


Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory