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February 11, 1910

DR. HYDE CHARGED
WITH MURDER IN
THE FIRST DEGREE.

Colonel Swope's Nephew by
Marriage Formally Accused
and Arrested.

OUT UNDER $50,000 BOND.

Special Grand Jury Convenes
Saturday to Investigate
Swope Deaths.

BIG LIBEL SUIT DROPPED.

By Dismissing Proceedings,
Dr. Hyde Avoids Giving
Deposition.

Dr. B. Clark Hyde, Charged with First Degree Murder.
DR. B. CLARK HYDE.

Dr. B. Clark Hyde, whose wife is a niece of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, was formally charged in a warrant issued yesterday afternoon by Justice of the Peace Loar at Independence, with having caused the death of Colonel Swope by poison.

Dr. Hyde was arrested in the office of Marshal Joel Mayes at 4 o'clock and an hour later gave bond in the sum of $50,000 before Justice Loar. The hearing is set for February 17.

The surties on the bond are M. D. Scruggs, vice president of the Kansas City Live Stock Commission Company; Fernando P. Neal, president of the Southwest National bank, and Herbert F. Hall, presiden tof the Hall-Baker Grain Company. Frank P. Walsh, John M. Cleary, John H. Lucas, attorneys for Dr. Hyde, and William McLaughlin joined in signing the bond, which was twice as large as was suggested by Prosecutor Conkling.

SPECIAL GRAND JURY CALLED.

Two hours prior to the issuance of the warrant, Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the riminal court ordered that a special grand jury be convened to examine into the deaths of Colonel Thomas H. Swope, Chrisman Swope and other members of the Swope family who died of typhoid fever, including Moss Hunton, who died suddenly in the Swope home.

Marshal Joel Mayes was busy yesterday selecting a list of names of men who will be asked to serve on this grand jury. The jury will be convened Saturday morning when Judge Latshaw will instruct them in their duties.

The refusal of Dr. Hyde to appear at the Reed offices yesterday morning so that his deposition could be taken in his libel suits for $600,000 against the Pulitzer Publishing Company and the dismissal by the attorneys of the suit when they learned that an attachment had been issued for Dr. Hyde, precipitated the criminal proceedings.

The information was sworn to by John G. Paxton of Independence, the executor of the Swope estate. On the reverse of the warrant was a request by Prosecutor Conkling for an immediate arrest.

BIG LIBEL SUIT DROPPED.

The scenes of activity in the Swope case yesterday were kaleidoscopic. The legal sparring began in the morning when attemts to take depositions in the offices of Atwood, Reed, Yates, Mastin & Harvey on one hand and Frank P. Walsh on the other failed because the witnesses subpoenaed were not present.

Following the issuance of an attachment by the Reed forces came the dismissal of his suit for $600,000 damages.

The dismissal of the libel suit in which the Reed forces had obtained a prior right to taking depositions was not wholly a surprise, but it roused the attorneys for the Swope estate to activity. It was shortly after 10 o'clock a. m. when the attorneys and the women witnesses in the case gathered in the Reed offices. George H. Roberts, the notary, had failed to arrive and he was found in the court house. He had not expected the case to be called. Dr. Hyde had not arrived and it was determined to ask for an attachment. This was issued and a deputy sheriff began a search for Dr. Hyde.

JUDGE LATSHAW ACTS.

It did not take long for this news to reach the Walsh offices and John M. Cleary was dispatched to Independence. There the suit alleging libel against the Pulitzer Publishing Company, John G. Paxton, Dr. E. L. Stewart and Frank G. Hall was dismissed. The sheriff was notified and recalled the deputy who had been unable to find Dr. Hyde. the latter was ensconced in a private apartment of Mr. Walsh's offices. The news of the dismissal of the suit did not sit well with the attorneys for the Swope estate. There was a conference between Reed, Atwood, Maston and Paxton. It terminated at the office of Prosecutor Conknling.

It was at this juncture that Judge Ralph S. Latshaw entered the case. He went into conference with the attorneys and a quarter of an hour later declared that he would convene a special grand jury on Saturday monrning.

In the meantime Mr. Paxton had gone to Mr. Walsh's office. He said that he was sorry that he had caused the attorneys any embarrassment, but that he had a great deal of private business to attend to. He would greatly appreciate the favor of being excused until 2:30 p. m. Mr. Walsh conferred with Judge Johnson, and returning to the room, told Mr. Paxton that they would excuse him until 2:30 p. m.

Then Mr. Paxton got busy. Mr. Reed arranged for an interview with County Prosecutor Virgil Conkling. It did not take the attorneys long to arrive at a decision. This was that Mr. Paxton should swear to the information and that Prosecuting Attorney Conkling would recommend an issuance of a warrant charging Dr. Hyde with murder.

Before Prosecuting Attorney Conkling departed for Independence he called up Mr. Walsh on the telephone and asked him to have Dr. Hyde in the office of County Marshal Joel Mayes at 4 p. m. as he desired to serve a warrant on him at that time. Mr. Walsh promised to have his client there at the appointed time.

Dr. Hyde was not at the Walsh offices when this message came and caught his attorneys somewhat by surprise. They were getting ready to take the deposition of Mr. Paxton. Dr. Hyde was notifed over the telephone to come to the Walsh offices and then Mr. Cleary was given the job of finding bondsmen for Mr. Hyde. He was only a few minutes later than 4 p. m. in getting the signatures of the three businessmen to the bond which was made out in blank.

The warrant was issued at 3:30 o'clock on the application of J. G. Paxton in the office of Justice of the Peace Loar of Independence. Mr. Paxton was accompanied to the office of Justice Loar in the Jackson County Bank building by T. J. Mastin. Virgil Conkling indorsed the information. "I hereby approve of complaint and request that a warrant be issued," affixing his signature to the back of the document.

"I suggest that the bond be fixed at $25,000," said the prosecutor. "I believe that is sufficient in this case as there are certain contingencies which lead me to believe that a greater bond is not necessary." Justice Loar also was informed by the prosecutor that he could do as he pleased as to the amount of the bond, but that the state would be satisfied with that amount.

LEAVES WITH WARRANT.

Justice Loar upon the receipt of complaint at once was given another paper by Virgil Conkling which proved to be a warrant for the arrest of Dr. Hyde. In the body of the warrant the wording was identical with that in the complaint, and after being signed by the justice of the peace, who ordered it delivered to the marshal of Jackson county, the prosecutor and Attorneys Mastin and Paxton left in an automobile for Kansas City with the warrant.

Prosecutor Conkling stated that he had placed in the warrant that the preliminary examination would be held February 17.

Justice Loar stated that if the defendant waived preliminary examination he would commit him to jail, but if not he would accept the bond which it was expected Dr. Hyde would give.

Shortly before 4 p. m. Mr. Walsh and Mr. Lucas took their client to the criminal court building. Dr. Hyde was smiling. They hastened to Mr. Conkling's office where they remained until they were told that Mr. Conkling and Mr. Paxton had returned from Independence and were in the marshal's office.

Prosecutor Conkling handed the warrant to Marshal Mayes and told him Dr. Hyde would be in the office in a few minutes.

"Is your name B. Clark Hyde?" inquired Marshal Mayes of Dr. Hyde a few monents later when he was brought into the office by Attorneys Walsh and Lucas.

Dr. Hyde nodded his head in reply.

WAIVES READING WARRANT.

"I have a warrant which I am directed to serve on you. Shall I read it?" Marshal Mayes inquired.

"We waive the reading of the warrant," spoke up Attorney Walsh and the party including Dr. Hyde smiled.

Dr. Hyde and Marshal Mayes entered into a conversation on temporal subjects. The afternoon was delightful, remarked the marshal.

Prosecuting Attorney Conkling and Attorneys Walsh and Lucas drew to one side of the room.

"I have recommended that Justice Loar take a bond of $25,000 for the appearance of Dr. Hyde at the preliminary hearing which has been set for a week from today," said Mr. Conkling.

COULD MAKE IT A MILLION.

"That is satisfactory to us," replied Mr. Walsh. "Mr. Cleary is out now and will be here very shortly with a bond that will be good for a million dollars if necessary.

"That is not necessary," replied Mr. Conkling. "I have suggested a bond which I deem sufficient."

Attorneys Conkling, Walsh and Lucas then withdrew to the outer office, leaving Dr. Hyde with Marshal Mayes.

"I am very much interested in knowing what they are going to do with me next," said Dr. Hyde to Marshal Mayes.

"Do we have to go to Independence, and will I have to stay there all night?" asked Dr. Hyde.

"If your attorneys are unable to get bond for you, you will remain with me tonight. If they do get bond, you will go to Independence with me and then go on home," said Marshal Mayes.

Dr. Hyde was inclined to be almost talkative while in the marshal's office. He talked on almost any subject not pertaining to the case, and his face, for the first time during the week, was wreathed in smiles.

About 4:30 p. m. Mr. Walsh suggested that the party depart for Independence, as he expected Mr. Cleary had already started there. Assistant Prosecutor Jost accompanied the party in the Walsh automobile, representing Mr. Conkling. A moment later they were on their way to Independence.

At 5:15 o'clock a large automobile glided up to the bank building at Independence. In it was the county marshal, having in custody Dr. Hyde. Accompanying the party were Frank P. Walsh, John Cleary and John H. Lucas. They immediately went to the office of Justice Loar.

Dr. Hyde followed his lawyers closely, and as soon as he entered stepped to one side, and motioning to a newsboy, bought an evening paper, scanning the headlines. Not once did he raise his eyes, but kept them riveted on the columns which contained the latest developments in his case. After reading the full account, he turned the paper over and reread it.

MAYES SIGNS RETURN.

County Marshal Joel Mayes drew up his chair to the desk and signed the return, turning it over to the justice.

Dr. Hyde, who was standing near, found room on a window sill where he kept reading his paper, only looking up sufficiently long to buy another, which he read with as much eagerness as the first.

Frank Walsh left the court room, stating that he would be back in a short time. Upon his return he placed the bond before the justice of the peace for $50,000 instead of the $25,000 expected.

"I expected bond for $25,0000, but this is better still," said Justice Loar.

Mr. Walsh signed the document, then handed a pen to Dr. Hyde. Dr. Hyde wrote in a plain, bold hand, without a tremor, and his signature was affixed with as much indifference as if writing a prescription for a patient. After Dr. Hyde, John M. Cleary and John H. Lucas signed the bond.

LAWYERS SIGN BOND.

After this preliminary Dr. Hyde, followed by his lawyers, went to their automobile and soon were out of sight.

"This is a good bond," said Justice Loar, after the crowd had left the office. "Mr. Neal is president of the Southwest National bank, and the others I am given to understand are stockyards men. I do not expet that there will be a preliminary examination here. I am confident that it will go to the criminal court at once.

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February 8, 1910

CORONER'S INQUEST BEGINS
DEATH AND POST-MORTEM OF
COL. THOMAS SWOPE
EXAMINED.

HYDE'S NAME MENTIONED.

Doctors and Nurses Testify
at Independence.

The coroner's inquest into the death of Colonel Thomas C. Swope got underway in Independence yesterday, and it was brought out that Colonel Swope, tried a number of tonics and remedies, and that he worried over his will in the weeks before his death, and wanted the poor of the city to benefit by the income from his residuary estate, valued at $1,000,000.

Harry S. Cook, superintendent of the Forest Hill cemetery, told the story of the removal of the body of Colonel Swope at dead of night from the catacombs where it was at rest. He said that secrecy was observed and that a blanket was hung on the grillwork of the tomb, so that no one could look in, had anyone had an inkling of what was going on.

The casket, he said, had not been touched and the body was frozen and in a good state of preservation.

The autopsy was conducted at Ott's undertaking rooms at Independence. Coroner Zwart, Drs. Hektoen, Twyman, Stewart, Hall, and a younger docter were among those who attended the post-mortem, it was testified. The body was still frozen, and coal oil lamps and stoves were lighted to thaw it. Bottles were filled with hot water and laid on the body, and then all was covered with blankets.

The post mortem began at 2 p. m. After the doctors finished the autopsy, in which they removed all of Colonel Swope's internal organs and his brain, the body was sewed up, dressed and put back in the casket and removed to the third floor of the undertaking establishment, where it was hidden. It was taken back to the vault the following day. This was done in the day time, as the story of the autopsy had leaked out and there was no further reason for secrecy.

Dr. E. L. Stewart, who graduated seven years ago, and specializes in microscopy, took notes for the doctors who conducted the post mortem. Dr. Steward did not remember all of the details of the autopsy. He declaired that he was too busy taking the dictation by Drs. Hall and Hektoen to observe their operations as closely as he would have liked to. He said that so far as he could see, there was nothing about the appearance of any of the organs removed by the doctors which would indicate that they were other than in a normal condition.

Dr. Stewart turned his findings over to Dr. Hektoen, he said. Dr. Hektoen also took charge of Colonel Swope's viscera. Dr. Stewart remarked about the frozen condition of the body, which he said was rather frail. The brain, he said, after removal, was cut into thin slices so that the doctors could ascertain if there had been a hemorrhage. No blood clot was found either in the brain or in the lining.

NO CLOTHING ON BODY.

The clothing had been removed from the body when he first saw it and he noticed an undertaker's mark on the arm. He also noticed a small dark mark on the left wrist and the undertake's mark on the abdomen. He told of pulling off the scalp, sawing the cranium and removing the skull cap and then taking out the brain. This he said was sliced, but he did not remember into how many sections nor their thickness. The brain was then placed in one of the big half gallon fruit jars and was sealed.

Dr. Stewart said that the brain was taken out whole, as he remembered it. There was no hemorrhage, at least none that was visible to the naked eye, he said. Dr. Stewart did not know whether Dr. Hektoen took the kidneys. He said that to the best of his recollection several of the blood vessels near the heart were hardened. He said that neither he, nor any of the doctors who performed the autopsy, could attribute Colonel Swope's death to any unusual condition found in his vital organs.

He said that one kidney seemed to be slightly enlarged, but this fact, he added, might have been natural. The liver, he said, was of the ordinary gray color and was in good condition. Dr. Stewart said that had there been a hemorrhage of the brain that the embalming fluid wich is used would not have reduced it.

Dr. G. T. Twyman, the Swope family physician, was present at the autopsy, which he said was conducted by Drs. Hektoen and Hall. The body was very well preserved, but was frozen hard. the fluids in the body had all turned to ice. Efforts to thaw it were without avail. There was but one abnormal condition of any consequence, he said, and that was a thickening of the walls of the stomach.

KNEW NOTHING OF DEATH.

Dr. Twyman said that Colonel Swope was not anxious to take medicines or tonics. He last saw him professionaly on April 28, 1909. He had seen him at various times since then and there was nothing in his condition to lead him to the belief that he would die suddenly, he said. Dr. Twyman said that he knew nothing about Colonel Swope's last illness or death. He did not know what caused Colonel Swope's death and he declared that there was nothing in the post mortem which could lead him to form an opinion as to the cause of death.

Sylvester W. Spangler, who since 1903 has had charge of Colonel Swope's real estate, told of Colonel Swope's penchant for taking medicines of various sorts which might be recommended to him by friends, including a tonic which contained strychnine, quinine and iron. He also told of the oft-repeated wich of Colonel Swope just prior to his death that he could arrange in some way to so place his residuary estate that the revenue could be used for the benefit of the poor.

"The last time I saw Colonel Swope alive was the Saturday preceding his death," said Mr. Spangler. "I came down on account of the death of the night previous of his cousin and also to attend to any business matters which he might indicate he wanted closed. I was with him for about an hour and he was in bed all of this time. About the close of our converstaion Colonel Swope addressed me: 'So far as pain is concerned,' he said, 'I have none and never felt better in my life, but I realize that I am a weak man and can't live long.' I cheered him up as best I could.

KEPT TONIC IN OFFICE.

"Colonel Swope kept a tonic in his office, which, according to the label, contained strychnine, quinine and iron and was put up in Independence. He took the contents of two of these bottles, to my knowledge. He would take the medicine for a couple of days and then would not take any for several days, or a week. He took a teaspoonful at a dose. The medicine was orange colored. He also took tablets, some of a white sort and some bromo-quinine tablets. He took Pape's Diapepsin for his stomach trouble. In fact, he took a great many medicnes which were recommended to him by friends as good for his particular case. Two years ago he took some acid phosphates.

"He often told me about some new remedy he had purchased and which he said he would give a trial, as it was harmless, and if it did no good it would do no harm. He had a vest pocket memorandum book in which he kept a record of the medicines recommended to him and which he tried. He would invariably return to me and tell me that the medicines were fakes. The elixir, he said, was prescribed by an Independence, Mo., doctor and was to give him strength.

"Colonel Swope rewrote his will while I was in his employ. He did not discuss the bequests with me and I knew nothing of the amounts until after his death and the publication of the instrument.

"The reason he gave me for rewriting the will was that some of his property had greatly increased in value and that some had decreased. He wanted the proportions of his bequests to be as he first intended. After providing for all of his heirs he still had a good deal of property that he wanted to dispose of in a charitable way. This residuary estate was worth, he told me, about $1,000,000. He wanted the revenue from the estate to be applied to the benefit of the poor, regardless of their former conditions in life.

WORRIED OVER WILL.

"He was endeavoring to find a way to dispose of this property so that the revenue would be used for the purpose intended. He could transfer it, he said, so that it would not be necessary for him to make a new will and the old would could not be broken. He was worried over the disposition of the residuary estate. He told me that if he deeded it to the city that the revenue, and possible the principle, might be wasted, while if he deeded it to loyal citizen friends, that he feared they were too busy hustling after the almighty dollar to give the property and the revenue the proper attention.

"About six weeks before he died he went to the vault and got his will. After keeping it in his office for a week he told me one Saturday that he would take it home and spend Saturday and Sunday on it. Monday morning he brought it back and said that he had looked it over carefully and that it was as nearly perfect as he could make it. He said that he could not betteer it if he wrote it 100 times.

"Colonel Swope's effects, such as clothing which he kept in the office, were given to the Salvation army after his death. I never heard of an enemy of Colonel Swope and knew of no one that he ever entertained any malice against.

"Colonel Swope claimed Wooford county, Ky., as his home until he gave Kansas City Swope park in 1903. He lived in Independence except for a few months, about 1904 or 1905, when he roomed at the Orient hotel.

"Colonel Swope voted but once in his life, he told me, and that was when McKinley made the first race for the presidency. Colonel Swope made a special trip to Wooford county, Kentucky, to cast his vote for McKinley."

Miss Pearl Virginia Kellar, 36 years old, a trained nurse of five years' experinece, was the witness of the day. Miss Kellar attended Colonel Swope during his last illness and was employed by Dr. B. Clark Hyde, three weeks prior to that event. For several weeks Miss Kellar has been virtually one of the members of the Swope household in Independence. She said that she had only a passing acquaintance with Dr. Hyde, prior to the time that he employed her to go to the Swope home.

MENTIONS HYDE'S NAME.

"Dr. Hyde called me over the telephone Sunday night, September 12. He asked me to meet him Monday at 7:30 a. m. and go to Independence. On the way he told me that Colonel Swope was not really ill; that he had fallen and slightly injured his left shoulder, but to make him feel that I was doing something for him and to massage the injured shoulder. Mrs. Swope and the four daughters met us at the threshold and after donning my uniform I was escorted to Colonel Swope's room where we shook hands and he said he was glad to seee me. The injury I found to be very slight. I was with him three weeks, except one day when I went to the dentist.

" 'Here are some "Pinkle's Pink Pills and some tonic,' said Dr. Hyde to me. 'Let him have the pills and also the tonic as he has been in the habit of taking them.' I found the tonic to contain strychnine, iron and quinine and peptomangan. It was put up by Pendleton & Gentry of Independence. Colonel Swope told me that Obe Gentry had given Mr. Hunton the prescription and that it was very good.

" I kept a nurse's record of Colonel Swope for two weeks, or a week longer than he thought I kept it. He objected to the keeping of the record and when I told Dr. Hyde that I had kept it a week longer than Colonel Swope was aware, and that there was no good reason for keeping it longer, Dr. Hyde suggested that I discontinue it. Colonel Swope objected to me taking his temperature. I made up his bed and straghtened him around, then gave him a bath, an alcohol rub and massage and later another alcohol rub and massage."

NURSE'S NOTES READ.

Miss Kellar here produced her notes and read off her daily notations as to the treatment the patient received and his condition. She said that he ate very full dinners, including cabbage at one meal which she said Dr. Hyde told her he could have as he had been accustomed to it. She gave him occasional drinks containing wine or brandy. She said that Colonel Swope and Dr. Hyde were on perfectly friendly terms.

Her records showed that he took several doses of the pink pills, varying the number from time to time. Monday, September 20, she said that he sat up for an hour in an adjoining room where he looked over the grounds. Wednesday she said that he began taking the tonic, which heretofore he had not touched. She said that Mr. Hunton suggested taht now as he was better that he could take the tonic and get well sooner. Miss Keller also testified to the frequency that Colonel Swope vomited and said that these attacks were without the slightest warning and usually at meal times.
"On Wednesday, September 29 Colonel Swope and I went out riding. We drove out the Lexinton road past the Swope farm which he had not seen in nine years. We were out for two hours and he stood the trip splendidly. Thrusday we drove almost to Kansas City. Friday we started to Blue Springs, but failed to take the right road and had a rough ride.

"After putting Mr. Swope to bed, I came down stairs and Mr. Hunton called me. He was eating dinner and suggested that I eat with him. We had almost finished when Mrs. Swope and Miss Margaret came in. Mr. Hunton looked at me and said that he felt queer. Mildred and a girl friend entered the room at this time and Mr. Hunton tried to pick up a glass of water. He half raised it and then it fell from his hands. I ran to his side and discovered that his left leg was helpless. A negro boy helped me carry him to the library and we summoned doctors.

HUNTON BECAME SICK.

"By the time Dr. Twyman came Mr. Hunton had lapsed into unconsciousness. He had vomited profusely. The boys got an ironing board and we laid Mr. Hunton on this and carried him upstairs. Colonel Swope meanwhile had called, and one of the servants failing to pacify him, I told him that Mr. Hunton was seriously ill. After Dr. Hyde came they decided to bleed Mr. Hunton.

"I did not tell Colonel Swope about the death of Mr. Hunton until Saturday morning. When I told him that Mr. Hunton ws dead, he grasped the bed clothes, and hiding his head, cried, 'Poor Moss.' For a moment he sort of sobbed, and then he asked me to tell him all about it. He th en told me he wanted to be very quiet. He wanted to see no one but Mr. Spangler. He first said taht he did not want to see Dr. Hyde for fear that the doctor might think that he needed him professionally. Colonel Swope did not go across the hall to see Mr. Hunton, and I read to him. The news of Mr. Fleming's wife's death came at noon. Mr. Spangler ws the only visitor. He came about noon."

As Miss Kellar reached this part of her narrative, Deputy Coroner Trogdon conferred with Coroner Zwart and Attorney Reed and announcement was made of adjournment until 10 o'clock this morning.

MRS. SWOPE SHIELDED.

Miss Kellar, the trained nurse who was with Colonel Swope the last three weeks of his life, arrive at the court house shortly before 4 p. m. with Mrs. L. O. Swope and a woman companion. They were driven to the court house in an automobile and were escorted by Attorney John Mastin. They were taken in the witness room, which was kept locked. Miss Kellar, her companion and Mr. Atwood shielded Mrs. Swope from the gaze of the curious. Mrs. Swope was attired was attired in black and wore a heavy veil.

The array of legal talent in the case yesterday was probably the largest in the history of the court house. The Swope heirs and Mr. Paxton, the executor of the estate, were represented by Messrs. Reed, Atwood and Mastin. Virgil Conkling, the prosecuting attorney, represented the state, while Dr. Hyde was represented by Attorneys Walsh, Cleary and Johnson. Coroner Zwart wsa represented by Deputy Coroner Trugdon.

"Can we come in and listen to the case?" inquired Mesdames William Young and Cliff Morrow, neighbors of the Swopes, of J. A. Brown, superintendent of the court house building. "Certainly," he replied and secured them a seat immedately behind the attorneys. There were a score of women at the inquest in the afternoon.

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February 1, 1910

POISON WAS FOUND,
DECLARE CHEMISTS.

COLONEL SWOPE'S DEATH AS-
CRIBED TO STRYCHNINE, PROB-
ABLY GIVEN IN DRUGS.

DR. B. CLARK HYDE SUES.

Asks Damages Aggregating
$700,000 for Statements
Regarding Deaths.

DR. B. CLARK HYDE,
Physician Who Sues for $700,000 for Statements Growing out of the Swope Poison Cases.

CHICAGO, Jan. 31. -- Colonel Thomas H. Swope of Kansas City died from the effects of poison, according to the findings of Dr. Ludwig Hektoen and Dr. Walter S. Haines, announced in Chicago this afternoon.

It was formally declared by the doctors that Colonel Swope died from the effects of strychnine poisoning.

The report of the experts does not include the result of the analysis of the contents of the stomach of Chrisman Swope, nephew of Colonel Swope, who died soon after the demise of his uncle, under similar circumstances.

ATTORNEYS HEAR REPORT.

The investigation of the mysterious deaths of the late Colonel Swope and his nephew was shifted to Chicago today. For several weeks the internal organs of the bodies have been here in the laboratories of Dr. Hektoen and Dr. Haines, toxicologists. Today Attorney John G. Paxton, administrator of the Swope estate, Attorney James A. Reed, his associate, Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney at Kansas City; Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner there, and Thomas H. Swope, nephew of the dead millionaire, came to receive the report of the experts as to whether or not poison had been found in sufficient quantities to cause death.

PAXTON'S TERSE ANSWER.

The visitors arrived on a Santa Fe train at 7:28 a. m., and went at once to the Hotel La Salle, where a room was engaged. Later a conference was held at the University Club, at which the findings were revealed.

Attention of Attorney Paxton was called to the fact that suits for $100,000 had been instituted against him for slander in connection with his share of the investigation.

"I have nothing to say about this suit except that I feel somewhat flattered," said Mr. Paxton. "I have received the news by wire that Dr. Hyde has sued myself and Drs. Hall and Stewart in suits aggregating $700,000 because of slander in connection with the Swope case. I have nothing further to say.

Mr. Paxton would make no further comment beyond saying that the investigation was not fully concluded yest, and would say nothing of the investigation of Chrisman Swope's death. It was said that strychnine had been found in the stomachs and livers of both men.

Coroner Zwart returned to Kansas City tonight, but Mr. Paxton, Mr. Reed and Attorney Conkling remained. They will leave Chicago tomorrow night, Mr. Paxton said. An inquest over the bodies of Colonel Swope and his nephew will probably be started next Monday. Any criminal warrants that will be issued will probably follow the inquest.

DR. HYDE SUES FOR DAMAGES.

Through Frank P. Walsh and John M. Cleary, attorneys, Dr. B. Clark Hyde filed suit yesterday in the circuit court at Independence demanding damages aggregating $700,000 from J. G. Paxton, executor of the Swope estate and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The petition declares that published interviews pointed to Dr. Hyde, son-in-law of the Swopes and their family physician, as the instigator of a plot to murder Swope heirs.

The damages are asked on three counts and newspaper men are named as witnesses to statements alleged to have been made by Mr. Paxton which the plaintiff declares destroyed his professional standing and were meant to oppress, impoverish and wholly ruin him. The first suit against Mr. Paxton charges slander and the amounts asked are $30,000 actual damages and a like amount for punitive damages. The complaint in the suit against the publishing company states that headlines in the Post-Dispatch over a purported Paxton interview said that the man who "planned to kill family with typhoid germs," which, the petition alleges meant Dr. Hyde, "who has been continually watched by five detectives and will not be allowed to escape punishment."

The petition is long, and is a narrative leading up to the final mention of the family doctor's name and alleged insinuations that he plotted to kill. Interviews with the county coroner, Dr. B. H. Zwart and Dr. Frank J. Hall, specialist in analytical work, are made a part of the contentions of the plaintiff. The damages asked in the first count total $200,000, and after this comes a similar charge on another published interview and another $200,000 is asked. The third is based on the publication of Dr. Hyde's picture, which the petition alleges clearly identified him as the "man," meant in all the interviews charging murder plots.

Dr. Hall and Dr. Edward L. Stewart are made defendants along with the newspaper. The plaintiff estimates the total wealth of all the defendants at $5,000,000.

Mrs. B. C. Hyde, formerly Frances Lee Swope, yesterday gave out a signed statement insisting that she was constantly at her husband's side, and knew his every movement.

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October 16, 1909

REED ENTERS RACE
TO SUCCEED WARNER.

FORMER MAYOR ASPIRES TO BE
UNITED STATES SENATOR.

His Candidacy the Result of Con-
ferences Held Here Last Week
Between Local and Out-
side Party Leaders.

Among the Democrats of Kansas City, Jackson county and portions of the state it was given out yesterday that James A. Reed has entered the race for United States senator to succeed Major William Warner.

The close political and personal friends of Mr. Reed last night confirmed the report that he is a candidate and added that his candidacy is the result of several conferences held in this city during the week with representative Democrats of Jackson county and throughout the state.

"All of Mr. Reed's old friends and many new ones were present at these conferences, and they all promised support and encouragement to his cause," said a well known politician.

"Mr. Reed goes into the fight in much better shape than he was in when he sought the governorship against Joseph W. Folk. Then he had a divided Democracy against him in his own county, but now he starts out on his senatorial canvass with every element of Jackson county Democracy at his back. Delegates from throughout the state that came to the conferences and which resulted in Mr. Reed coming out full fledged for senator, stated that the report is being circulated over the state that he has built up a large law practice and does not want to be senator. While it is true that Mr. Reed has a big practice it is of that kind and character that will not suffer by his becoming senator. The out-of-town supporters of Mr. Reed were authorized to make such a statement and to add emphasis among their constituency that Mr. Reed is an aspirant for the high honor."

Mr. Reed was prosecuting attorney of Jackson county when in response to the demands of the Democrats of Jackson county he resigned to accept the nomination for mayor. He was elected by the biggest majority ever given a candidate for that office and two years later again succeeded himself. Were it not that he entered the race for governor he could have had a third nomination for mayor. Two years ago he was solicited to run for congress but declined on account of his law practice.

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September 26, 1909

JOHNSON NOT GUILTY
VERDICT OF JURY.

REPORT AFTER NEARLY FIVE
HOURS DELIBERATION.

Defendant in Buckner, Mo., Assault
Case Says He Was More Affec-
tionate Toward Wife Than
Ordinary Husband.

After being out from 7:35 until midnight a jury in the criminal court last night returned a verdict finding William A. Johnson, charged with an assault on his wife in Buckner, Mo., August 20 of last year not guilty.

In all likelihood the case would have gone over until Monday, had not the jury made a request of Judge Ralph S. Latshaw to allow them to finish last night. the jurors have been kept locked up the greater part of a week and they were anxious to be at their homes Sunday.

The testimony yesterday, as presented by the defense, was largely that of Johnson himself. Johnson was on the stand the greater part of the afternoon. He said he was 57 years of age, had been born in Ohio and come to the Buckner neighborhood about the time he reached manhood. He said he was married 31 years ago and that he was unable to read and write, except that he could sign his name. This lack of education he attributed to the fact that he had to shift for himself from the time he was 15 and also because school conditions were rather unsettled at the time he was a child, it having been the time of the civil war.

Johnson first rented the farm he later came to own. He built the house in which he and his wife lived 20 years. His farm comprised about 800 acres and was encumbered for about $47,000. He testified that he lost money in two ranch deals, in one of them, $10,000. He said that whenever he had money in the bank, he allowed his wife to draw checks herself.

AFFECTION FOR WIFE.

"What was your feeling toward your wife?" he was asked.

"It was good, as much as that of any man and better than that of any number of men I see around," replied the witness.

This was true both at the time Mrs. Johnson was hurt and now, said he. Recounting the events leading up to and immediately upon the injury of Mrs. Johnson, the witness said:

"When we came home from church that evening (about eight hours before the assault), my wife read the paper to me and then we went to bed. I went to bed first and fell asleep almost immediately after taking some medicine I need for asthma. My recollection is that the light was burning when I went to bed. The next thing I heard was my wife calling, 'O, Dode!' a nickname she used for me.

"I jumped up and saw her on the floor, sitting down. I asked her what she was doing there and at first she didn't answer. Then she said she was sick. I wanted her to get on the bed, but she said she was too sick and asked me to lay her down. I got some pillows from the bed and laid her head on them. I don't remember whether I lit the light or not. I asked her what hurt her and she did not answer. Then I ran downstairs to call the Hilts. When they came upstairs with me, we put my wife on the bed and I called a doctor. I saw no blood until I laid her back on the pillows.

"Did you, that night, get up and go downstairs and up again or anywhere else in the house until you called the Hilts?"

"I did not."

"Did you know until the doctors made an examination how badly your wife was hurt?"

"No."

"Have you knowledge of who hurt your wife?"

"I couldn't look it in the face if I killed an animal, much less my wife. I didn't do it and have no knowledge of who did."

Johnson's testimony was not materially changed by cross-examination.

Mrs. C. F. Harra, who lives near Buckner, testified that she had asked Johnson the day after the assault if he was going to make an investigation. The witness said he replied:

"There is no need to investigate. There are no clues."

Other witnesses put on by the defense were Whig Keshlear, a detective, and his assistant. Thomas F. Callahan, an attorney, who acknowledged a deed made by the Johnsons. Depositions were read from Catherine Elliott, a washwoman, and Martha Shipley, a nurse. Both said the Johnsons seemed fond of each other. Henry Johnson, a nephew, also was called. He slept in a room adjoining the Johnsons the night of the assault.

Late in the afternoon Mrs. Johnson was recalled to the stand by the state. She said that, while she was recovering, she often talked to Johnson, but never about the injury. There was long argument over whether this answer should be admitted, but it was finally allowed to go in.

"I called for Mr. Johnson frequently to talk to him to give him a chance to ask me how it all happened."

The jury was withdrawn for a time while this testimony was being debated by counsel. James A. Reed, for the fifth time during the trial, moved the discharge of the jury while Mrs. Johnson was on the stand, but Judge Latshaw overruled.

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August 1, 1909

DIDN'T WANT TO BE KNOWN.

"It's Nobody's Business," Said Gun-
ard Edholm, and Died.

Five days ago a well dressed Swede, about 40 years of age, applied to former Mayor James A. Reed for employment as yardman and chauffeur, and was engaged. He said little about himself at the time, no more than that he had been a baker, but wanted an outdoor job, and set about learning how to run Mr. Reed's car with a good deal of intelligence.

Three days ago the new man said he felt ill and the net day went to the hospital. Yesterday Mr. Reed was at the postoffice trying to find some mail for the man, who had died.

"I mean to give him a decent burial," said Mr. Reed, "and want to find out whom the poor fellow was. He evidently was a man of education. One of the maids at the house asked him, when he said he thought he ought to go to the hospital, to give the address of his people.

" 'It is nobody's business,' he said. 'I don't want anybody to know where I am.' "

The former mayor's mysterious stranger had given the name of Gunard Edholm.

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November 5, 1908

HADLEY'S VICTORY
IS CELEBRATED.

SUPPORTERS MARCH STREETS IN
CHEERING THRONGS.

COULD HARDLY
BELIEVE NEWS.

COMING ON HEELS OF WHAT
LOOKED LIKE DEFEAT.

Men Shouted the Winner's Name as
They Crowded the Streets.
Herbert Spencer Hadley, Governor-Elect of Missouri
HERBERT SPENCER HADLEY.

Republicans in Kansas City and Jackson county awakened yesterday morning to learn that their hope of seeing a Republican elected governor in the present generation had been fulfilled, and that for the next four years the commonwealth will be ruled from the governor's mansion at Jefferson City by Herbert S. Hadley. At first the news was too good to be believed, and there were many doubting Thomases, especially in view of the fact that when tired, exhausted humanity sought rest a few hours before from the fatigue of watching the returns, advices at hand indicated the success of W. S. Cowherd, the nominee of the Democrats.

True, from the standpoint of Republican estimates the night before the meager returns then at hand pointed towards Hadley's election, but they were so indefinite that not even the most sanguine partisan could make himself believe that the complete returns would show anything but the often repeated story of Democratic success.

Like the wind, the cheerful news that Hadley was gaining as each report came in from belated voting places, and that his majority in St. Louis was something unheard of, swept over the city. Enthusiasts shouted the glad tidings until they were hoarse, and by noon newspaper office bulletins gave out the information that Hadley had been elected without a doubt.

SHOUTED IN THE STREETS.

Above the din and racket of commerce shouts and cheers for Hadley rent the air along the crowded downtown streets, and as by magic an impromptu parade was formed. Headed by a band of music, hundreds of shouting, enthusiastic Republicans fell in behind the musicians and marched through the streets. An immense framed portrait of Hadley was borne at the head of the procession, and a large American flag that, when unfolded, almost spread its patriotic colors the width of the street, was grasped by willing and enthusiastic men and carried far above their heads.

The crowd took the building of The Journal by storm. They marched into the building hundreds strong, the band playing patriotic airs. The marchers, cheering and their spirits at high tide, made a circle of the business office corridor, and marched up the stairs to the rooms of the editorial and local departments.. It was an unusual and unique demonstration, the like of which had never before been undertaken in a political campaign.

COWHERD'S BATH OF GLOOM.

While the Republicans were rejoicing, W. S. Cowherd, the Democratic nominee for governor, was in his law offices in the American Bank building greatly depressed over the outlook. He was surrounded by friends and supporters, and they were undertaking to figure out a bare possible majority for their defeated idol. The best they could do was to make the majority possibly 2,000, a most discouraging concession in view of Missouri's normal majority in the past of from 35,000 to 40,000.

"Pretty slim drawing of figures, boys," painfully conceded Mr. Cowherd. At 2 o'clock he complained of weariness after his trying campaign, and he went to his apartments in the Roosevelt. He said he was going to try and forget it in the sweet dreams and left orders not to be disturbed.

"I'm not making any claims. It may take the official count to determine the result," is all Mr. Cowherd would say when questioned.

DEFEAT IS ADMITTED.

Two hours later R. J. Ingraham, his law partner, had a conference with former Governor A. M. Dockery, Bernard Corrigan, James A. Reed and other Democratic leaders, and the defeat of Mr. Cowherd was practically admitted. It was conceded that it would be impossible to overcome Hadley's strong lead in St. Louis and the complexion of the returns that were coming in from Southeast Missouri. They signed and sealed their verdict complacently, but with expressions of deep regret.

Mr. Dockery said he had ideas as to what had contributed to the defeat of Cowherd and added that it would do the party no good to make them public. Others in the conference also decided that they did not want to see in the newspapers what they thought of a lot of men whom they freely blamed for the result.

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October 6, 1907

TAFT SCORNED AT ARMORY.

3,000 Listen to Democratic Speakers.

Enthusiasm reached a high state at the opening of the Democratic campaign in Kansas City last night. Four thousand people crowded into the Armory at Fourteenth street and Michgan avenue to hear the issues and principles of the Democratic platform discussed by Ward Headley of Kentucky; Frank S. Monnett of Ohio, and James A. Reed and William P. Borland.

William T. Kemper acted as chairman of the meeting. At 8 o'clock the speakers had not arrived and he introduced William P. Borland.

"The Democratic party is the only party which is running its own candidate and he is running against two men," he said. "Taft is the proxy of Roosevelt; Higsen the proxy of Hearst. The antics of the Republican campaign would be good food for the humorists."

Ward Headley of Kentucky made good with the crowd. He is an interesting talker. He articulates well, speaks fluently and mixed just enough humor with his talk to keep the closest attention of his audience.

"There is only one great issue in this campaign," he began. "That is whether the Americans shall control their government or whether the trusts and corporations shall govern it. The Democracy is united this year for the first time in many campaigns. It isn't harmony from inactivity, but it is the desire to again gain control of our government."

Frank S. Monnett of Ohio, who led the oil fight in that state on the Standard Oil company, used many figures in his speech. He confined himself mostly to the various monopolies with which he had dealt and produced figures to show the falsity of Taft's statements in Kansas last week when Taft said that the price of corn was higher during Republican administrations than during the Democratic administrations.

The speech of James A. Reed brought cheer after cheer. The crowd had listened to other orators for two hours, but they were as eager to hear the Kansas City man as they were the first speaker. His speech was confined mostly to state politics. He also took a gentle jab at Taft's religious zeal.

"So Taft came to town Sunday and went to church three times?" he asked, beginning his talk. "And to think that he never was in a church in his life until he entered this campaign. They told us he was Unitarian and that he believed in neither hell nor heaven. Why, he hadn't been in town fifteen minutes until he began to feel the holy thrill of religion. Who knew our atmosphere affected strangers so queerly?

"Then he went to church looking for salvation. It was only the religious fervor and zeal which took him there. Nothing else could have induced him to go. Once wasn't enough so he tried it twice more in the same day. Then, in order that he could be baptized in every kind of religion he went to the church of the colored brethren to be anointed therein. Let us rise in prayer with Mr. Taft."

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July 7, 1908

IS REED TO MAKE THE
NOMINATING SPEECH?

THIS WORD COMES TO THE KAN-
SAS CITY MAN'S FRIENDS.

They Also Hope to See a Deadlock
in Convetion and Reed's Name
at the Head of the Ticket
As a Result.

Friends of former Mayor James A. Reed were told yesterday unofficially that Mr. Reed had been decided upon to place William J. Bryan in nomination for the presidency. The distinction , which would in a measure reflect upon Kansas City and Missouri, was enough to make the most ardent friends of the former mayor on good terms with themselves, but there were some of the most enthusiastic who looked so far as to see a deadlock and Reed's name put at the head of the ticket.

"That is how General Garfield got to be president," said one man, who was discussing the tip. "Garfield went to Chicago to place the name of John Sherman before the delegates. He did so in such a tremendous speech that when it came to balloting the convention showed it had been carried away by Garfield's presence and speech, for it nominated him. Reed can make a speech on Bryan and Democracy that can stampede that convention, if it is true that seventeen states are in caucus this afternoon trying to find somebody to stampede them.

Mr. Reed is one of the "big four" from Missouri. Governor Folk, another of the squad, is in Denver, but is not getting a word in edgeways, according to the news dispatches. But Folk is to be heard from. He has a speech of his own and it is a trick of his to have a claque organized to call for him at the psychological moment. His speech is a most temperate one. Folk is running in Missouri for the senate. To make a pro-Folk anti-Bryan speech in Denver would mean to invite certain assassination in the senatorial election in November. Folk wants to be president or senator, and his speech is cut to fit either job. It will disappoint the ultra Folkites at home.

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June 17, 1908

THOMAS MINOGUE IS DEAD.

Prominent in Local Sports for the
Past Twenty Years.

Thomas Minogue, for the last twenty years one of the prominent figures in Kansas City's sportdom, died about 6 o'clock yesterday morning at his boarding house, 1325 Brooklyn avenue. Minogue was 45 years old and Wednesday night was apparently healthy and in prime condition. A hemorrhage of the lungs was the cause of his death. He was unmarried, but leaves a mother and sister in Leavenworth, Kas. At the time of his death, Minogue was assistant superintendent of the streets. He had formerly held the same job under Mayor James A. Reed, when T. J. Pendergast was head of the department. At one time he was a bartender in the Pendergast saloon. When the new administration came in Minogue was given back his job as assistant street commissioner.

Minogue's figure was as well known around the racing stables at New Orleans and in the East as in Kansas City. No wrestling contest or prize fight was complete without him. He sometimes officiated as referee and sometimes as announcer. At various times he became a promoter of prize fighters, but never with striking success.

Among sporting men Minogue was considered a "good Indian." He never "laid down" and never left a friend in the lurch. He was a friend of "Doc." Shively and Dave Porteous, and was looked upon as an authority on boxing. He was a member of the order of Eagles. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

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April 8, 1908

CROWDS AT THE JOURNAL.

Never Before Have So Many People
Assembled to Read the Bulletins.

After the returns last night had indicated beyond a doubt the election of Mr. Crittenden, the crowds on the streets began to organize, and at 11 o'clock had grown to most remarkable proportions. They were apparently wild with delight and they began marching form one street corner to another, cheering and waving handkerchiefs and umbrellas. It was the most demonstrative crowd that ever assembled after an election of any kind in Kansas City.

The crowds first began to gather shortly after 7 o'clock around the Journal office, where the election returns were being pictured. As the evening advanced the crowd grew larger, until it was far in excess of that of any other election of any kind in the political history of the city. Artists in The Journal office were kept bus writing the returns on the glass slide, and as they were thrown on the screen across across the street any favorable returns to Crittenden were cheered continuously until that particular slide was withdrawn. The artists also drew amusing cartoons of the principals in the great contest, and these, too, were wildly cheered by the crowd.

After the slides had been discontinued shortly after 11 o'clock, the crowd showed a tendency to disband, but just at that time other thousands arrived from somewhere about town with a brass band. This was the signal for a renewed demonstration, which lasted almost a half hour For a time it seemed that all the voters in the city had assembled at the corner of Eighth and McGee streets, but their celebration had scarcely been begun when another crowd hove in sight from East Eighth Street. This was the Sixth Ward Democratic nambeau crowd, its friends and sympathizers. This crowd numbered almost a thousand, and was also accompanied by a brass band. They formed a pretty sight as they marched down Eighth street with flambeaus waving and the noise of their cheering drowning all the music the band produced. When the two crowds came together in front of The Journal there was a demonstration that has been unequaled in Kansas City.

With hundreds of torches flaming and led by a brass band, thousands of Democrats escorted James A. Reed to a place in front of The Journal building at about midnight. Mr. Reed arose from his seat in an automobile and addressed the exultant crowd.

"I have asked you Democrats to follow me here so that I might express the sentiment of the Democratic party toward The Journal," said he. "The Kansas City Journal is a partisan newspaper, and like all partisan papers, it fights in the open, and is entitled to the respect of all decent men. We have come here to pay our deepest respect to a fair, honest and decent antagonist.

"While we do not always agree with some of the Republican causes which are espoused by our honorable partisan paper, The Kansas City Journal, we can not help admiring the open and honest way with which it deals with its antagonists. In fact, we admire and have great respect for a fair opponent."

"With Mr. Reed in the automobile were I. J. Ingraham and Linn Banks and a number of ladies.

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April 8, 1908

CRITTENDEN WINS BY
LARGE MAJORITY.

MOST REMARKABLE DEMONSTRA-
TION EVER WITNESSED IN KAN-
SAS CITY TAKES PLACE WHEN
RESULT IS LEARNED.

KYLE RE-ELECTED
POLICE JUDGE.

BAEHR IS ALSO ELECTED
CITY TREASURER --
THE REST IS DEMOCRATIC
-- CRITTENDEN'S MAJORITY
1,320.

THE WINNING TICKET (Majorities).

Mayor -- Crittenden, D ..........................1,320
Police Judge -- Kyle, R ...........................2,213
Treasurer -- Baehr, R ............................1,220
Auditor -- Greene, D ..............................2,478
Attorney -- Langsdale, D .......................1,708
Upper House President, Gregory, D .....1,344

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Democrat, was elected mayor of Kansas City yesterday over Mayor Henry M. Beardsley, Republican, by 1,320 majority, with one precinct of the Twelfth ward missing. Harry G. Kyle, Republican, was re-elected police judge over Michael E. Casey, Democrat, and William J. Baehr, Republican, was elected city treasurer over Thomas S. Ridge, Democrat. Kyle's majority was 2,213.

The upper house Democratic ticket, with Robert L. Gregory president, elected three of its candidates, making that branch of the council still Republican. The lower house is overwhelmingly Democratic.

It was a big Democratic victory, and for the first time in four years the Democrats will be back in the city hall for a term of two years one week from next Monday.

While in the city ten days ago Attorney General Hadley warned his Republican friends that the issues advanced were false, and he quietly passed the word that if they were persisted in it could mean nothing but defeat. The result proves that Hadley was right.

Overcast clouds and intermittent showers ushered in the day. Despite the unfavorable aspect of the weather, voters were up and astir long before the break of day, and at 6 o'clock, when the polls opened, the voting places of the 164 precincts in the fourteen wards were besieged by long and patient lines of men awaiting the time and opportunity to cast their ballots.

The voting was rapid, the record in some precincts being one to the minute. Merchant, banker, professional man vied with the laborer to get to the ballot boxes.

SOME ARRESTS MADE.

In a majority of the precincts over half the total registration had been voted by noon, and from that time to the close of the polls at 7 o'clock the voting was by jerks and starts. It was stated in some of the precincts as early as 6 o'clock that all the votes that could be depended upon to be cast had been delivered, and this seemed true, for the judges, clerks and workers sat around idle.

Assertions of fraud were made during the early hours, and some arrests resulted It was charged that men had tendered money for votes, and that voters had accepted money. The early arrests of these offenders put a stop to any more such work so far as was observable, although at several times during the day Alderman Pendergast openly charged that Republicans were paying $3 a piece for negro votes in the First ward. Watchers sent into the ward by the Civic League said they had seen no vote-buying.

BUSINESS MEN REVOLT.

Up to noon the Republican headquarters felt sure of victory and the Democrats felt uneasy The first alarm was felt at 1111 Grand when the Republican precinct workers telephoned in that the noon hour vote of business men was against the Republican ticket. The excuse offered was that retail merchants were in a revolt against an evening newspaper.

The Democrats had not counted on this vote at all. As soon as they saw they were getting it they sent their runners into the stores after the clerks. With oodles of money to pay for carriages and automobiles to hurry them to their home wards, the Democrats found the store proprietors willing to let the men off to vote. It was a fully fledged rebellion in the Republican party.

As early as 4 o'clock it was announced at Democratic headquarters that the Democratic ticket was in the ascendancy. News came that Walter Dickey, Republican state chairman, had joined Mayor Beardsley in the Ninth ward, and with it came the news that negroes were beginning to vote the Republican ticket there. Dickey was understood to have wagered, for friends, about $18,000. One negro said he had been offered $8 for his vote. High as this was, $8 apiece for votes to save heavy bets would not be out of the way. There was Democratic money seen in the ward immediately. Twenty-four negroes voted the Democratic ticket straight at Fifteenth and Tracy. This looked like commercialism, but the retort was that the Republicans were at the same game. Governor Folk was hurried to the ward to see Democratic tickets voted by negroes. He expressed surprise.

There were only three fights reported at either headquarters, and both headquarters said they had heard of very little challenging. This presaged clear tally sheets, an early count and all judges signing.

ENTER CRITTENDEN, EXIT BEARDSLEY.

At 7 o'clock the mayor arrived at 1111 Grand, thinking he had squeezed through, but by 8 o'clock he admitted to a Journal man that "it looks blue." An hour later he conceded his defeat. This was while he sat in headquarters with a crowd taxing the capacity of the big hall.

Crittenden was sent for. He was not able to get to the Democratic headquarters until about 10 o'clock, just as Mayor Beardsley was leaving his own headquarters, a defeated man.

CROWDS FILL THE CITY.

The rival city chairmen, the rival candidates for mayor, the commissioners and governor Folk all admitted that there had been a reasonably fair election, marked by the absence of repeating and ruffianism. The most sensational spectacle at night was of Republicans going in squads to the Democratic headquarters to share in the demonstrations of victory. Full importance was given at the Republican headquarters to the weight the defeat will have on the Republican chances this fall, unless there is a new alignment and new issues found... while the Democrats claimed to see ahead far enough to make James A. Reed United States senator. Reed arrived at his headquarters about 10 o'clock. He was called on for a speech and made one from his automobile. He congratulated the entire party upon its success as an organization as a whole, but credited the enormous majority, by comparison, to the opposition of an evening newspaper. When afterwards Mr. Reed went past Eleventh and Grand on his triumphal tour, his car was halted and once more he was compelled to make a speech. He repeated what he had said at Democratic headquarters. From there he went to The Journal office, arriving just as two Democratic bands and processions met, one from Democratic headquarters, traveling from the west, and another form the Sixth ward, headed by the Italian band, coming from the east. The meeting was unexpected and most dramatic. From The Journal the crowd went back to Democratic headquarters and at midnight it was roving about the city.

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April 7, 1908

FILLED CONVENTION HALL.

Beardsley and Warner the Speakers
at Closing Republican Party.

Republicans held the closing general rally of the campaign in Convention hall last night. Speeches were made by Senator William Warner, Mayor Beardsley and R. R. Brewster.

The big hall was crowded to overflowing with men, women and children, many bringing their entire families to hear the speeches of the workers for the Republican administration. Repeated applause from a vicinity within close reach of the platform where the speakers stood followed the attacks on the different corporations, James A. Reed and Mr. Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr. Bitter attacks were made upon the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, and pictures of cities were shown where the street car fare is less than 5 cents, in one of which, at least, the fare was reduced by a public utilities commission.

Another series of pictures of the different Republican candidates for election today and of different improvements in the city made under the Beardsley administration was shown.

Senator William Warner acted as chairman of the meeting and delivered the opening address. The first part of his speech was pertaining to national and state affairs, in which he upheld the policies of President Roosevelt, and added that William H. Taft intends to carry out those policies. He gave a short talk on the railroad corporations as they are conducted today and as they were before President Roosevelt's administration.

NEED OF A COMMISSION.

He soon turned, however, to the election today in Kansas City, and in a brief address commended every candidate and attacked the Metropolitan street railway, Mr. Reed and Mr. Crittenden. One of his principal points was that a utilities commission will give the city a chance to govern corporations, and not the corporations to govern the city. "Corporations should not govern the city and dictate to the people how much they shall pay for their service, or how city affairs shall be operated," said Senator Warner. "I believe in a public utilities commission. The people should control and regulate the electric light plant and the Metropolitan street railway. We do not know whether these corporations and others are conducted properly, we do not know whether they are charging us unreasonable prices for service. A public utilities commission would see the books of these corporations and determine for the citizens if the corporations are meeting the public's interest.

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March 11, 1908

POSEY'S HALL WAS TOO SMALL.

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., and James
A. Reed Spoke There Last Night.

For the first time in the history of Tenth ward Democracy, Posey's hall, Twenty-sixth and Prospect, was not large enough to accommodate the hundreds that turned out to hear the speeches last night of Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., James A. Reed, Hamil Brown, former Congressman Butler of Ohio and others. Thre were a number of women present. Mr. Crittenden promised, if elected mayor, a safe, sane and business administration of city affairs and to appoint a utilities commission that will fearlessly and honestly investigate the public service corporations.

Mr. Reed was in a particularly entertaining mood and presented facts and figures relating to municipal affairs that seemed to take well with his hearers.

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February 29, 1908

WHY REED WOULDN'T RUN.

No Financial Reward in Politics,
Says Ex-Mayor.

Does politics pay? If there be someone who has the delusion that it does, let him read this little story about James A. Reed:

When a committee waited upon Mr. Reed and asked him to accept the Democratic nomination for mayor, Mr. Reed made a little speech to that committee which set all of them to thinking. He told the story as one friend would tell a confidence to another.

"When I came to Kansas City," said Mr. Reed, "I had been practicing law for eighteen months. My first months in the law business were lucky months. I made money. With fortune smiling upon me, I succeeded in accumulating $7,000. Then I got overambitious and decided to come to a big town. I came to Kansas City.

"For eight years I struggled in the legal whirlpool in Kansas City. I made only a bare living. I got interested in politics and as you all know, finally got the appointment of county counselor. I saved a little. I was elected prosecuting attorney at a good salary, but I was getting mired in politics by this time and saved no money.

"I served four years as mayor. My salary was $3,600 per year. The ofice cost me $4,000 a year, easily. I left it poorer than when I went in. Still ambitious, I sought the gubernitorial nomination. My campaign cost me money. I made the fight and lost. I quit the contest not only without money, but with debts as well.

"I shook off political ambitions. I plunged into the practice of law on a serious basis. I have been making money and have paid my debts. I now have several retainers, which, if I should accept the nomination for mayor, would have to be returned to my clients.

"I would refuse the nomination for mayor simply because I cannot afford to accept it. No lawyer can perform the duties of mayor honestly and still practice law. He must devote his whole time to the mayor's office. Therefore, the salary to a man who has a good law practice is inadequate. I can't take the nomination because I can't afford to be elected. I am too badly in need of money."

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January 5, 1907

HOW TO STOP EM.

HOTEL GUESTS WHO SWIPE
LINEN AND BRIC-A-BRAC.
THE BANE OF THE BONIFACES.

SUSPECT EVERY MAN, WITH OR WITHOUT BAGGAGE.
Members of the Missouri-Kansas Hotel Men's Association
Relate Their Grievance Because of
Souvenir Collecting Guests.

It was late yesterday afternoon. The Kansas-Missouri Hotel Men's Association was nearing the close of its annual session at the Midland hotel. Discussions of various kinds, following papers, were had.

"Any unfinished business?" asked Charles Wood, of Topeka, proprietor of the National hotel.

Mit Wilhite, famous in Kansas because he runs the Mitway hotel at Emporia, and because he is one of the biggest baseball fans in North America, and usually runs a team of his own during the summer to entertain himself, caught the chair. "There is a question that I want to ask of this convention," he said. "My wife has asked me to solve it. I can't. What do you do when guests at your house swipe towels? We have lost just an even six dozen since October 1. What in the name of Charles Cominskey do you do to get them back or get some sort of redress?"

There was a shout of laughter from all over the hall. The 100 or more dellegates appreciated the situation. They just threw back their heads and shouted.

Allen J. Dean of htis city is president of the association. "I can give you a dead certain relief," he said. Name it, shouted Wilhite. "I'll pay you for the prescription."

"Buy six dozen more," answered Dean. Then there was more merriment.

It's a funny proposition," said Dean, "a mighty funny one. Just last week I got a big package from a town in Wisconsin. I opened it and found a sugar bowl, of an old colonial style that we used about six years ago. Accompanying was a letter but unsigned. The writer said: "I have been attending revival meetings, and have experienced a change of heart. I herewith return to you a sugar bowl which I took from your hotel when a guest there a number of years ago. It is with me a matter of principle."

"But over at the Hotel Baltimore we had a strange experience. A guest there bought a new trunk, had it taken to his room, filled it with all the stuff from the room that he could cram into it, blankets, carpet, rugs, dresser scarfs and knick-knacks and he got away."

"The Bellvue-Stratford hotel has a remedy," said a member. "On every floor is a glass lookout. A young lady is placed in each one of these day and night, and can see, without being seen, all persons who come and go. When a guest leaves a room an inventory is immediately made of the room, and if anything is missing, the guest can be caught before he gets his bill paid at the office."

"In my hotel at St. Joe," said George Boone, "I had some gas stoves. One day I missed the silver ornament from one in room 11. I found that the occupant had just checked out, but that his grip was still at the check stand. It was not locked. I opened it, took out my ornament, but it back on the stove and closed up the grip. That guest never stopped at my hotel again."

"I got an envelope here a few days ago," said Frank Miller, of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas eating houses. "It contained $5. The note was unsigned, but the writer said he owed me that much for something he had taken. I never knew what it was or who took it."

And so they related experience after experience, but the final verdict was in harmony with that of A. J. Dean: "Go out and buy; six dozen more. That is the only sure remedy."

The meeting opened yesterday morning. Mayor H. M. Beardsley made the welcoming address. Reports of officers and a great deal of routine business was transacted. Frank Miller and D. C. Smith, of Kansas City, read papers. A number of other papers were read from members on the programme, who were unable to attend. The delegates will be here over tomorrow, and are down on the programme, as printed, "For good fellowship."

The banquet was held last night at the Savoy hotel. James A. Reed was the principal speaker. A programme of vaudeville from local theaters was put on.

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