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November 26, 1909

WORKHOUSE INMATES
NOT SERVED TURKEY.

ROAST PORK THERE, WITH SIDE
DISHES PLENTY.

Various Institutions Served Thanks-
giving Dinners -- Children Had
Their Fill of Chicken -- Pris-
oners Not Forgotten.

The unfortunate who are in institutions and the unlucky who happened to be in jail yesterday were not overlooked Thanksgiving day. While a regular turkey and cranberry sauce dinner was not served at all places, on account of the high price of the bird, a good, wholesome, fattening meal was served, where turkey was absent.

In the holdover at police headquarters there were forty prisoners, all but five men. when noontime arrived the following was served to a surprised and hungry bunch: Turkey and cranberry sauce, real biscuits and hot cakes, baked potatoes, hot mince pie and coffee with real cream.

Out at the city workhouse there were 107 men and eighteen women prisoners to be served, too many for turkey at prevailing prices. They were all given their fill, however, of the following menu: Roast pork with dressing, baked Irish potatoes, bakes sweet potatoes, vegetable soup, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, coffee.

A real turkey dinner with cranberry, baked potatoes, celery, vegetables, pie, and coffee with genuine cream was served to the 109 prisoners in the county jail. After appetites had been appeased the men and women put in the rest of the day singing old-time hymns. It has been truthfully said that no old-time hymn can be started in the county jail but that enough voiced immediately join in to make it a success. And they always know the words and the chorus.

CHILDREN MADE HAPPY.

There were but seven children in the Detention home yesterday, but they were not overlooked. The matron saw that they were served with turkey, vegetables, mince pie, coffee, etc.

At the Salvation Army Industrial home, 1709 Walnut street, fifty-five men, and employes of the institution, sat down to Thanksgiving dinner.

"We had turkey, cranberries, potatoes, celery and other vegetables, bread and butter, mince pie, cake, coffee, candy, nuts and apples," said one of the men. "And we got all we wanted, too."

The Salvation Army proper served no Thanksgiving dinner to the poor yesterday, as it makes a specialty of its big Christmas dinner. Baskets are also given out at that time. Wednesday and yesterday baskets were sent out to a few homes where it was known food was needed.

Probably the happiest lot of diners in the entire city were the twenty little children at the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street. While they laughed and played, they partook of these good things: Chicken with dressing, cranberry sauce, sweet and Irish potatoes, celery, olives, salad, oysters, tea, apple pie a la mode, mints, stuffed dates and salted almonds.

DINING ROOM DECORATED.

The dining room was prettily decorated with flowers, and Miss Louise Mayers, a nurse, and Miss Mae Shelton, a deaconess, saw to the wants of the little ones. After the feast all of them took an afternoon nap, which is customary. When they awoke a special musical programme was rendered, and the children were allowed to romp and play games. Those who had space left -- and it is reported all had, as they are healthy children -- were given all the nuts candy and popcorn they could eat.

"I wist Tanksgivin' comed ever day for all th' time there is," said one rosy-cheeked but sleepy little boy when being prepared for bed last night.

Over 200 hungry men at the Helping Hand Institute yesterday were served with soup and tomatoes, escalloped oysters, roast beef, celery, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, cream turnips,cabbage stew, bread, butter, pumpkin pie and coffee.

Out at the General hospital, the convalescent patients were allowed to eat a genuine turkey dinner but those on diet had to stick to poached eggs, toast, milk and the like. A regular Thanksgiving dinner was served to the convalescent at all the hospitals yesterday.

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December 22, 1908

FREE TICKETS FOR ALL TO
THE GRAND TOMORROW.

A. Judah's Gift to the Children Will
Be Distrubted From Different
Charities Today.

Manager A. Judah of the Grand has invited the poor children of the city to a matinee performance by Corinne and her company tomorrow afternoon. The entertainment is being given in connection with the Christmas tree, and Manager Judah promises a surprise for the little ones who will be his guests for the afternoon. Admission will be by ticket, and the distribution of tickets will begin today, in charge of the following charitable organizations:

Associated Charities, 1115 Charlotte street (will also distribute tickets among colored population); Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street; Helping Hand, 408 Main street; Franklin institute, Nineteenth and McGee streets; Grace hall, 415 West Thirteenth street; Humane Society, city hall, second floor; United Jewish Charities, 1702 Locust street; Italian Charities, offices with Associated Charities; juvenile court, county court house; Bethel mission, 43 North First street, Kansas City, Kas; Catholic Ladies' Aid Society, Eighth and Cherry, St. Patrick's hall.

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August 14, 1908

ANNA MAY WILLIAMS
AT REST.

"Suicide the Result of a Disordered
Brain," Says Rev. Moore.

Standing above the body of pretty Anna May Williams, the Rev. Charles W. Moore, pastor of the Institutional church, yesterday said:

"No one is perfect, and all of us have sinned. Then let us not be judges, upon the sins of others. It is well that this sweet little should passes before God for final judgment. God does not hate the sinner, but loathes the sin. It is only those who have sinned that need the Savior and this little soul soul was one of that class. Who can say that his feet have not occasionally strayed from the narrow path? If there be any, let him judge, but beware of the Pharisee.

"I do not hesitate to say that suicides are the result of a disordered brain. No person is in his right mind when he deliberately takes his own life, cutting off the beauties of life on this earth and causing great grief to those who are left behind. But knowing that God is just and His forgiveness is great we commit this soul to His keeping."

The chapel at Forster-Smith's undertaking rooms, where the funeral was held, was crowded with friends of the dead girl and with men and women who had hoped to get a glimpse of the body prompted by curiosity.

As the broken hearted mother was led down to the waiting carriage by her husband, her grief became uncontrollable and she sobbed aloud. Persons a block away were attracted by the cries of the mother and a large crowd of excitement seekers gathered in front of the undertaker's establishment.

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August 13, 1908

NEWSBOYS MOURN FOR LEE.

They Gather About the Bier of a
Victim of a Street Car Accident.

Accompanied by many newsboys with whom he associated in life, the body of William A. Lee, Jr., the newsboy who was killed by being crushed between a streetcar and a beer van at Eleventh and Main streets, last Monday, was taken to the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street, where funeral services were conducted at 2 o'clock p. m. yesterday afternoon.

Charles W. Moore, founder of the Institutional church, delivered the eulogy, and before he had concluded the audience was visibly affected. Mr. Moore dwelt at considerable length of the excellent qualities of the dead newsboy.

Young Lee had been a member of the Light Bearers' Club for some time, and had been considered one of its most ardent workers. Newsboys of the city contributed toward defraying the funeral expenses. William A. Lee, the father, who had been released from jail by order of the court sufficiently long to attend the funeral, accompanied the grief stricken mother to the church and cemetery. Owing to the circumstances it is now thought that Lee will be permanently released with the understanding that he secure employment at once and care for his wife.

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July 28, 1908

AN OUTING FOR CHILDREN.

Ten Days for Sixteen Youngsters at
Valley Falls, Kas.

Sixteen children of the Institutional church, between the ages of 6 and 12 years, will be sent to Valley Falls, Kas., this morning for a week or ten days' outing in the homes of residents of that city. The Epworth League of the Grand Avenue Methodist church is paying the expenses of the youngsters while on the outing. Last year many children were sent to the country from the Institutional church.

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February 8, 1908

TO SAVE BOYS AND GIRLS.

Juvenile Association Determined to
Raise Fund of $10,000.

An active campaign is to be begun by the Juvenile Improvement Club to raise $10,000 for use in caring for neglected children in Kansas City. In this association are gathered all the workers for the juvenile criminal and homeless. The money will be spent to endow the Boys' hotel, a hotel for negro girls, boys clubs in the West, North and East bottoms, and to provide scholarships for boys who now have to stay out of school and work to support smaller children dependent upon them. The idea of the club is to get all varieties of juvenile reform and educational work under one management.

Judge McCune of the juvenile court is president of the club, the Rev. Daniel McGurk is vice president, Arthur L. Jelley is treasurer, and Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer is secretary. On the executive committee there are in addition to these men the Rev. Charles W. Moore of the Institutional church, Mayor H. M. Beardsley and H. J. Haskell. Subscriptions may be sent to Hughes Bryant, R. A. Long, Charles D. Mill, C. A. Young or C. V. Jones, who comprise the finance committee.

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September 7, 1907

OVER 30-FOOT EMBANKMENT.

Negro Crap Shooter's Desperate Leap
to Escape Arrest.

"Jigger for the bull."

That was the warning in North end parlance that a negro sounded when Patrolman Eads came upon a crap game back of the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street, last night. It meant, "Run, a policeman is coming." Behind Eads was Patrolman Phillips.

"Oh, jigger for two bulls," was the second exclamation, and a half dozen negroes "jiggered."

Back of the church is an embankment supported by a wall thirty feet high. One negro jumped over this wall and landed on the roof of a coal house.

"From the noises made, I thought every bone in his body was broken," Eads said, "but I guess I was mistaken. I could see him from the top of the wall. I told him to consider himself under arrest. He climbed from the roof. He had scarcely touched the ground, when a bulldog seized his pants above the legs. The negro just simply ran away with that dog. He did not give him a chance to let go. The negro and the dog disappeared in the darkness. Now, I suppose there will be a stolen dog reported in the morning."

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August 23, 1907

BOY AND GIRL ESCAPED.

Got Away from the Institutional
Church and Returned Home.

Leading his 4-year-old sister by the hand, both their faces wreathed in smiles, and happy because they were going home, Fred Sockman, an 8-year-old boy, made his escape from the Institutional church last night and found his way, unguided, to his mother's home in Independence. A street car conductor gave the boy and his sister passage to Independence, where he gleefully told the story of his deliverance to his mother, who welcomed him with a warmth begotten by long and enforced separation.

The children were taken to the Institutional church several days ago by order of a court, following a quarrel between their father and mother, who live at Independence. The father was locked up in the county jail on a charge of wife beating. The children will be returned to the Institutional church today.

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July 27, 1907

COMPLAINS OF A 'HOME'

CHILDREN MISTREATED BY AT-
TENDANTS, IT IS ALLEGED.


Matron at Joseph's Home Denies
Charges Made by Mrs. Ambie
Russell -- Juvenile Court to
Decide Next Monday.


Joseph Home, 2610 Cleveland Avenue
THE JOSEPH HOME, 2610 CLEVELAND AVENUE.

Upon a complaint of Mrs. Ambie Russell, who has had four children in Joseph's home at 2610 Cleveland avenue since last Thanksgiving day, petitions were filed in the juvenile court yesterday afternoon alleging that the children were neglected.


Two of them, Irene, 10, and Katie, 7 years old were found at the home, taken to the detention home and later to the day nursery of the Institutional church by Probation Officer Edgar Warden. The other two, Earl, 13, and Eddie, 14 years old, were not found at the home. Subpoenas were issued for Mrs. Anna Baker, manager of the home; Mrs. Nellie Shaw, who is usually in charge, and for Mrs. Leslie Lewald, an employe, to appear before Judge Goodrich of the juvenile court Monday morning.

In a signed statement which Mrs. Russell made to Humane Officer Frank McCrary yesterday afternoon she charges that Mrs. Lewald and Frances Robinson, a negro woman who was until recently employed at Joseph's home, frequently punished the children by strangling them in basins of water and by beating them in the face until their little noses bled.



ARE NEGLECTED, WOMAN SAYS.
"There are about thirty children in the home and they are not properly clothed and fed," Mrs. Russell says in her statement. "I have bought clothes during the last eight weeks for my children and upon one occasion when I visited the home I saw a dress I had taken out for Katie on another child and Katie was dressed in rags.

"One one occasion during my stay Mrs. Shaw, an assistant to Mrs. Baker, struck Earl with a stick and then hit him on the nose with her hand and dragged him off to bed. I went to his room and found his pillow saturated with blood."

Mrs. Russell was deserted by her husband four years ago in Herrin, Ill. she has lived in Kansas City several months and when she became ill went with her children to the Joseph home. Several weeks ago she left the home by request because it was said that she had spoken disparagingly of the place to prospective contributors to its support. Mrs. Russell is now employed at the Hotel Kupper.


WHAT AN OFFICER FOUND.


Edgard Warden, who brought the Russell girls to the detention home yesterday, reported that he had found Mrs. Shaw to be a very pleasant woman, and that the children seem to like her. He also said that the home has solicitors working in nineteen states. There are about thirty children there.


The two little Russell girls were neatly dressed when brought to the detention home. They said they and the other children at Joseph's home attended the Greenwood school, Twenty-seventh and Cleveland streets. They looked bashful and would not answer when asked if they had had enough to eat and were well treated.

The Associated Charities, through G. F. Damon, secretary, issued a circular December 5, 1906, containing what purports to be a history of Mrs. Baker.

Mrs. Nellie Shaw, the matron in charge of Joseph's home, emphatically denies the charges made by Mrs. Russell. Mrs. Shaw was formerly assistant matron at the Institutional church.

"There is no truth in any of the charges made against this home," said Mrs. Shaw yesterday. "I came here to take the management of the children in February, and since I have been here I can answer that there has been no cruelty of any kind. I have two children of my own who live here, and I treat them just as I do the others. The only punishment which children ever receive is a spanking. It is necessary where there are so many children that discipline be kept. But no one ever punishes the little ones but myself, and I only spank them whenever it is necessary, with my open hand."


CHILDREN LIKE MRS. SHAW.

The little boys and girls in the home do not seem to be afraid of Mrs. Shaw, but play about her in what seems to be the most affectionate manner.

"I think the boys and girls love me, and I have always wanted them to," said she.

Mrs. Shaw says that Mrs. Russell, who was an inmate of the home with her four children for months without cost, became angry at her because she suggested that some of the money which Mrs. Russell earned after she finally secured a position at the Kupper hotel be spent on the children.

" 'My money is my own,' she said, and seemed angry at the suggestion. 'I'll spend it as I please.' "

Eddie, Mrs. Russell's 14-year-son, was placed by the home on a farm at Arthur, Kas., and his 13-year-old brother Earl is on another farm a few miles from there. Mrs. Shaw says that the boys were not placed in adoption, but were simply put on the farms for a summer's outing. She says that is the custom of the Institution church and other charitable institutions in Kansas City to place children with private families, sometimes for adoption, unless a part at least of their board is paid. Mrs. Russell consented that her two boys be sent to Kansas for the summer, she says.


FOUNDED FOUR YEARS AGO.

St. Joseph's home was founded four years ago by Mrs. Annie Baker, who had run a similar institution for two years in Joplin, Mo. Mrs. Shaw says the home was founded by Mrs. Baker after being left destitute with two children, in order to help mothers where were in a similar condition. It is supported by public subscription.

"The whole trouble is that we do not give an accounting of our finances to the Associated Charities," said Mrs. Shaw. "They have been trying to get us to do this for a long time, and when we consistently refused to make regular financial reports to them they became angry and have been trying to do the home harm ever since.

"We cannot see why we should give up the management of our enterprise to the Associated Charities, who had nothing to do with its beginning or its development."

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