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February 4, 1910

PATRONYMICS OF THE GREAT.

Sly Attempt of Wrongdoers to En-
list Official Sympathy.

"Did it ever occur to you," asked Inspector Edward P. Boyle last night, "how many men when arrested will take the name of the chief of police, the police judge or some other official with whom they have to come in contact? They hope to gain sympathy by that ruse. We got a man yesterday for horse stealing, and, by gosh, he gave the name of Edward P. Boyle, my full name. He is in the county jail now under my name, but when we looked him up in the National Bureau of Identification, we find that he has a goodly supply of names."

"Boyle" was arrested by L. C. Barber, a motorcycle policeman, on complaint of of the Kirby Transfer Company, Missouri and Grand avenues. It appears that he rented a horse and wagon from Kirby to do a huckster business and disposed of the rig.

"Boyle's" picture is in the book sent out by the National Bureau of Identification at Washington. He appears there under the name of James J. O'Neil, which, bu the way, is the name of a former chief of police of Chicago. He also bears the names of Edward Riley and Edward Connors, the last being believed by the police to be his. He has done time in the Rochester, N. Y., Industrial school, the Elmira, N. Y., reformatory, and two years in the Auburn, N. Y., penitentiary. He was five years in Elmira. The man of many "police" names also has done short terms elsewhere.

When Hugh C. Brady was police judge there hardly was a week that some bum did not give the name of "Hugh Brady, sir, yer honor."

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January 3, 1910

DID NUDE VISITOR
BECOME SENATOR?

KANSAS CITY DETECTIVE TELLS
OF EDITOR-POLITICIAN'S
HUNT FOR CRIME.

Covered With Mud, He Broke
Into Station, but Later
Showed Big Roll.
Detective Joe Halvey Narrates a Tale.
HALVEY SMOKES UP.

Murder was in the air in the detective bureau rooms of Central police station -- murder, along with other things, particularly tobacco smoke. This is said to be the atmosphere of a police secret service department the world over.

It is stronger when there is a story telling contest on and the sweating of a murder suspect in an adjoining room. Detective Joe Halvey had elected to while away the time until the end of the secret conference. His audience consisted of newspaper men, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle and Detectives Robert Truman and Dave Oldham.

"It was a late spring night three years ago," said Detective Halvey. "One of those chilly early mornings when reporters love to sit about the 'phone in the lobby and call up instead of going out after their stories," he added, with a ponderous wink.

A SCRIPTURAL WIND.

"It was a very cold night and a wind like the one spoken of in the scriptures was blowing down Missouri avenue."

"What kind of a thing was that scriptural wind?" inquired the reporter.

"I don't see why you intellectual cubs never seem to have had a religious bringing up," scornfully broke in Inspector Boyle, who prides himself in having maintained a Bible in his home since his marriage twenty years ago. "I think it is in Psalms where a March wind is spoken of that blows the straw hat wherever it listeth while many a good man and strong sweareth thereat."

The silence which followed the inspector's quotation was profound. The narrator took advantage of the lull.

"Well, it was getting along toward the second owl car. Michael O'Brien had just brought in a 'drunk' and booked him under the charge of investigation and Pat O'Brien and I were toasting our shins by a warm fire in this same office. I remember every detail, you see, just as though it was yesterday.

YELL AND A SOB.

"Suddenly there came from somewhere on Fifth street near the Helping Hand institute, a blood curdling yell ending in a sort of a sob, as though some man was being choked.

"There were twelve good men in different parts of the station, wherever there was a heating stove, and all jumped at once. There had been a good many holdups during the winter months and of course the first thing we thought was that some villain had made a touch under the eaves of the station. We were not going to stand for that, no sir-e-e-e.

"I was about the first of the officers to reach the big folding doors in the north end of the station. My six shooter was in my hand and there was blood in my eye, I can tell you. If there was something going on I wasn't bound to let the blue uniformed mutts with the brass buttons do the pinch act to the discredit of the detective department.

"Just as I had reached the last step the doors flew open in my face. There was just enough time for action and no time for thought. A lean white streak had started to unwind itself up the stairway when I dropped on it like a thousand bricks.

NAKED, SHIVERING MAN.

" 'Look out below!' I yelled, grabbing it by the neck and bearing it to the linoleum. Then I made a careful analysis. what I was holding was a naked man shivering with the cold and dirtier than any tramp from having been dragged in the mud. 'Great thunder,' said I, 'this must be Adam returned to look after his Eden interests. Who are you, anyway?'


THOUGHT IT WAS ADAM.

"It didn't take much tugging and hauling after I got up off of him to get him in front of the desk sergeant and it took still less time for the entire force to see that he was in the last stages of destitution. He didn't have a finger ring left and his clothing was mud.

" 'What's your name?' the sergeant asked.

" 'You can put me down John Smith,' said 'Adam' with a groan. 'I ain't got any other name, for political reasons. Gentlemen, what I want is clothes, clothes, clothes.'

CLOTHES OBTAINED.

"The nude wonder somehow looked respectable and we could see that he was right about what he wanted. Half a dozen of us took him into the sink room and gave him a bath, while the rest of the shortstops went in search of clothes. He was not a very tall man and very slim, while the officers we had to draw from were all big, so when we got done with dressing him he looked like a Populist of the short grass country the year of the drought.

"I can't help but laugh when I think of him sitting there in the detectives' room with the waist band of the sergeant's extra trousers drawn up under his arm and his feet in shoes the size of four-dollar dictionaries.


LOOKED BETTER CLOTHED.

"But for all his togs he couldn't help but look respectable. Every time he opened his mouth he emitted an idea by the double handful, which was strange considering his appearance when we first saw him. He was no ordinary man, that was a cinch. He was a genius.

ASKS FOR REPORTERS.

"About the time we were settling back into the humdrum of waiting until morning the unknown quantity took a hitch on himself and asked: 'Where are the reporters? Seems like there ought to be one or more around. It isn't time for the second mail edition yet.'

"We told him there was a little reporter named Billings in the room allowed for the use of newspaper men and that he was probably at that moment writing a story of how a naked, insane man had broken into the police station with the intent to murder the captain.

" 'I'll risk it,' he said with a laugh, 'send him to me.'

"We sent for Billings and it was evident that the two would be kindred spirits. The very first thing the stranger said to the reporter was what he refused to tell the sergeant, and that was how he had come to be naked. We had set him down to be a sort of a crank with spells of lucidness who had undressed and run into the station on a bet, but now we knew better.

HELD UP AND ROBBED.

" 'I was held up and robbed because I got into bad company trying to have a good time when I ought to have been decent,' he told Billings. 'I am sure none of this I tell you will get into the papers because I am a fellow newspaper man.

" 'Now what I want is clothes. I haven't got a cent but plenty of credit. I can get $10,000 anywhere when the banks open. I want you to strike some second-hand clothing store where the proprietor sleeps in the rear and get me a complete suit. I'll pay you when pay day comes.'

"Billings did not answer at once, and we could see he was studying hard. He had the money, for it was Saturday, the day he got paid, but he appeared not to like the idea of lending so much on such a short acquaintance. Finally an idea seemed to come to him. He looked sharply at the stranger and asked rather quick: 'What's thirty?' Now 'thirty' is a newspaper term that few people understand, but this one answered in a second, grinning from ear to ear: 'It means to chuck work and go home,' he answered.

REPORTER BUYS SUIT.

"Well, sir, the reporter did just as he said and got a whole outfit for $14.50 and the stranger left at daybreak telling us all to stick around until he could get another and better rig and return.

"In three or four hours he was back. He had on a brand new suit of the best ready-made clothes in town, patent leather shoes and a plug hat. Also he had a roll of $100 bills so large that they wouldn't go into his inside coat pocket without a special effort. He was showing us that he had the credit he had boasted about.

"This time when we saw him he was feeling better toward the world and would talk more about himself, but he wouldn't tell his name, although I have since suspected the reporter knew it. He told us, though, that he was a prominent Missouri editor with aspirations to the United States senate.

"He had been in politics for years with his paper and never wanted anything so bad as that Senate plum. His platform from the start, he said, had been the cleaning up of the state morally.

WANTED TO FIND TRUTH.

" 'I have preached against immorality so much," he explained, 'that I just had to get out and find the truth about the other side. If my political enemies get hold of last night's caper it will be my undoing.'

"After he had gone the reporter looked at me and said: 'Well, we have promised never to mention this and it is safe, I guess. But my! what a story it would be for some newspapers I know.'

"The reporter is out of town now. By the way, Billings wasn't his name, either. I wonder which United States senatorial candidate that was?"

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December 24, 1909

TEXAN SUSPSECTED OF
KANSAS CITY MURDER.

M'CLINTOCK DUNLAP'S SLAYER
MIGHT BE DALHART MAN.

Clyde Charles Confesses He Killed
Kansan Near Larned -- Says He
Was With Restaurant Em-
ploy Here Oct. 18.

LARNED, KAS., Dec. 23. -- Clyde Charles, confessed murderer of George B. Neptune of Larned, now is suspected of the murder of Mark Dunlap, a Dalhart man, at Kansas City, October 18. Alfus H. Moffet, of the Moffet National bank, and Jake Garmater, both of Larned, are in Dalhart making examination and recovering stolen property that belonged to Neptune.

Neptune was killed at his farm home near Larned September 18, soon after Charles shipped a number of his horses and other property to Dalhart. He then went to Kansas City, where he spent several days.

Charles and Dunlap met in Kansas City. They had known each other before. Dunlap had been working in a restaurant in Dalhart. He was well liked. His life was insured for $1,000. Charles, two other men and Du nlap were known to have been together in Kansas City a few nights before Dunlap was killed.

CAME WITH CATTLE.

Dunlap went to Kansas City with a car of cattle. He had $100. Charles, who acknowledged that he was with Dunlap at the time of the killing, claimed that four men had rushed out of an alley and one had struck Dunlap. He says the men made no attempt to rob. He also claims that Dunlap did not have any money.

Charles told the same story at Dalhart, although the restaurant keeper where Dunlap had worked claimed that Dunlap had more than $120 when he started. Charles's sister, however, corroborated Charles in the statement that Dunlap had no money when he was in the city. How she knew is not known.

It is thought t hat there was a plan to get the life insurance money by some means. But this theory is now disregarded as it is the belief that the man was murdered for the small sum of money he had.

At Larned the officials today are "sweating Charles. Charles confessed to the Neptune killing, but has as yet refused to divulge anything more.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle thinks that Clyde Charles, sentenced to a life term in the Kansas penitentiary for the murder of George B. Neptune at Larned, Kas., is the man who killed Mark Dunlap in Kansas City on October 18.

Dunlap met his death in a fist fight at Sixth and Main streets. Many passersby saw the killing. The police were able to obtain a very accurate description of the man who struck the blow, and officers who worked on the case says that it coincides with the description of Charles, which has been given out by the Kansas authorities.

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December 14, 1909

SLAYER WAS KILLED
AFTER HE SURRENDERED.

OFFICERS ALSO TESTIFY GAL-
LOWAY WAS DISARMED.

Coroner Could Not Learn Who Fired
Shot That Proved Fatal to
Murderer of Deputy Sheriff.

That Charles T. Galloway, who murdered Deputy Sheriff Charles Lukens of Wyandotte county, Kas., December 8, was shot and killed after he had surrendered and had been placed under arrest a few hours after the commission of his crime, was testified by witnesses at the coroner's inquest held yesterday morning. According to the testimony of several officers who participated in the spectacular attack which led to the killing of the cornered slayer, Galloway was unresisting and disarmed when the fatal bullet was fired into his abdomen.

"Detectives Wilkens, Downs and myself went upstairs to search for Galloway," testified Detective Ralph Truman. "We found him in a closet in the back part of the house. We called to him to give up. He answered with a valley of shots -- I don't know how many -- and we began shooting at him.

"After we fired a good many shots he called out to us and said: 'I'll surrender.' We told him to open the door and come out. He came out and we got him by the arms and led him into an adjoining room. There were then several shots fired, by whom I don't know, but at the last shot Galloway fell. Upon examination we found he had been shot through the body."

"Was Galloway disarmed when shot?" Trueman was asked.

"I believe he was," he replied.

"Was he unresisting at the time he was shot?"

"Yes, he had surrendered," responded the witness.

"What condition was Galloway in when you brought him out of the closet?"

"He was all right, as far as I know."

HIT DETECTIVE'S SLEEVE.

Detective J. W. Wilkens testified that he and Trueman led Galloway from the closet in which he had been hiding, and that he called to the crowd to quit shooting, but it seems that in the excitement of the moment, not all could realize that Galloway had surrendered. Wilkens said when the fugitive came out of the closet he assumed a crouching attitude and that he had his hands up in the air as a mute signal of surrender. Wilkins also said that the bullet which penetrated the sleeve of his own overcoat was the same one which killed the prisoner.

Detective David H. Oldham, in his testimony, said that earlier in the evening Inspector Boyle had been communicated with over the 'phone, and he had advised that a heavy guard be placed around the house in which Galloway had barricaded himself, and no attempt be made to capture the man until morning, when he would probably be in a less dangerous mood.

This course was decided upon, but at about 11 o'clock, some one, Oldham did not know whom, yelled out that he would go up and help get the fugitive, whereupon several officers announced they would take the lead. Within a moment, the witness said a squad of officers were inside the house. They searched the down stairs rooms first, and then proceeded with a rush upstairs and soon afterwards a fusillade of shots was heard.

Many other witnesses were examined, but no one knew who fired the shot which killed Galloway. The coroner's jury returned a verdict to the effect that Galloway met his death as a result of a gunshot wound inflicted by some unknown person.

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November 3, 1909

KANSAS CITY TRIO CONVICTED.

Caught in Nashville, Tenn., After
Following Taft From West.

"Fine work," commented Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday when he read a communication from the police department of Nashville, Tenn., stating that Arthur Goldblatt, Samuel Kemp and Henry Baker had received penitentiary sentences.

Goldblatt, known as "Little Artie," Kemp, alias "Big Sammy," and "Kansas City" Baker, when working together, constituted the most adept gang of pickpockets in the country.

All three were born and raised in Kansas City. They made their home town a base for their operations. Leaving Kansas City, they would separate and meet in an appointed town.

The Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition was their recent field of operation and from there they followed President Taft part way on his tour. They were caught red handed in a crowd in Nashville, Tenn., and a speedy conviction was obtained. Goldblatt received a sentence of three years in the penitentiary and his companions each went to the workhouse for a year.

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October 30, 1909

WILSON CONFESSES;
TELLS OF ROBBERY.

ENTERED SCALES OFFICE ON
NIGHT OF SEPTEMBER 8.

Prisoner, Who Wrote Threatening
Letters to R. A. Long, Will Be
Turned Over to Federal
Authorities Today.

After "sweating" Thaddeus S. Wilson all day yesterday, E. P. Boyle, inspector of detectives, finally obtained a confession from the young man last night in which Wilson admitted that he had not only sent the two threatening letters to R. A. Long on Thursday but also had broken into the office of the Moneyweight Scale Company, 730 Delaware street, about three months ago.

"I might as well own up," he admitted. "You have the goods on me."

His signed statement offered the confession not only to sending threatening letters to R. A. Long, but also of the burglary of checks and money from the offices of the Moneyweight Scale Company on the night of September 8.

Although state law is drastic in its punishment of blackmailers, and the letter in which $5,000 is demanded is clearly within that class, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle announced last night that Wilson would be turned over to the federal authorities today.

The United States punishes with unusual severity persons who attempt to use the mails to defraud, and in Wilson's case there is no avenue of escape. Wilson will be taken in charge by the postoffice inspector.

Close questioning of Wilson yesterday afternoon at police headquarters by Inspector Boyle elicited the information that R. A. Long was not the only Kansas City man from whom he had demanded money.

Lawrence M. Jones was requested to send $1,000 to the young man September 6, but had paid no attention to the matter.

LIGHT ON POLICE METHODS.

When Wilson first came to Kansas City three months ago, he secured employment with the scale company. A few days later the place was robbed. Among the papers taken from the safe was $75 in currency. A couple of days following the robbery, Mr. Shomo of the Moneyweight Scale Company received an anonymous letter signed "C. O. D. 1239." A promissory note was also enclosed in which "C. O. D." intends to pay back the $75. The letter follows:

"KANSAS CITY, MO., September, 1909.
"Dear Sir: You will please find inclosed certain papers that are perhaps of value to you, also note covering the amount with interest computed that looks good to me. Thanks, humbly, C. O. D. 1239.
"P. S. -- Better send to Wichita and tell Mr. Reade to send another money order.
"P. S. 2 -- Say while I was sitting there in that big chair a bluecoat and a graycoat came along, saw an open window and began to talk about it. Yes, they wondered if any one was in there. I began to think it was a hell of a place for me. But I had to sit there and take it. Come very near offering them a ten spot to go on away and leave me alone. Then I heard one of them say to the other one:

" 'Crawl in through that window and see what's wrong inside.'

"Things getting hotter for me.

" 'Me?' says the bluecoat. 'Oh, no.'

"If I had been out in the country I'd laughed out. Come I couldn't. Well, they argued which it should be to go in. Well, they finally said they would send the janitor.

" 'No, no, no! I'm not on the police force yet,' says he. Then there was some more arguing. Well, they came back and looked at the crack in the window with more argument. I was afraid I would have to give up that ten spot. They said they would wait and see. I don't know where they waited. I didn't see them when I made my exit.

"I will close. I would like to tell you some more about those cops. They're true bloods, all right. Say, you will get my check someday. C."

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October 29, 1909

TRIES TO BLACKMAIL
R. A. LONG FOR $5,000.

LETTERS TO MULTIMILLIONAIRE
DEMAND THIS AMOUNT.

Is Arrested Just as He Is Given
Decoy Package.

THADDEUS SEBASTIAN WILSON.
Accused of Writing Letter to R. A. Long Demanding $5,000 Under Thread Against His Home.

A bungling attempt to "black hand" R. A. Long out of $5,000 resulted in the arrest of a man at the general delivery window of the postoffice at 8:30 o'clock last night, just as he had been handed a decoy package, supposed to contain the money demanded.

At police headquarters the prisoner gave the name Thaddeus Sebastian Wilson, who recently came to Kansas City from Garnett, Kas. He denied writing letters to Mr. Long asking for money, and at the same time making a veiled threat. Wilson was placaed in the holdover to be questioned later. Inspector E. P. Boyle said he had reason to believe that he had the right man.

When Mr. Long went to his office in the R. A. Long building yesterday morning, he found this letter on his desk, addressed and written in long hand, on plain stationary:

"Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 27.
"Mr. R. A. Long.
"Dear Sir: -- Say, old man, I am broke, and want some money. I have to help take care of my mother and sister. You know times are pretty hard on poor people and it is pretty stiff.

"I am trying to give my sister an education. If I had some money I would buy a little store for my mother, and I would work. We could make and save money that way.

"Now, I have to have some money, and I am not going to knock some poor devil down to get it. I want you to send me $5,000 at once. I don't want you to give it to me. I will pay it all back with interest.

"You get up $5,000 in bills of different kind and wrap 'em in a package like goods from the store. Wrap them up good so they won't be tore open. Then you mail it like store goods. It will come all right.

MADE NO THREATS.

"Now I must have the money. I want to be honest so I ask you for it. No guess work or foolin, nothin but the dow will do. Send it today. Sure now. Say I've made n o threats. I have not been foolin either. I have lots of friends that will stand by me.

"You send me $5,000.00 as soon as possible today, as I told you konw. I guess you understand. Now get busy if you want us both to prosper. You needent say nothing to anyboydy, either. For the love of your home send that money as soon as you get this. This is more important. Let your work go.

"Waiting for results. O. B. VANDELLER.
"Gen. Delivery."

Mr. Long read the letter over, then tossed it to his secretary to make a copy. He did not give it a second thought.

R. A. LONG.

But a second letter was received at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. This was more insistent. The writer in his first letter had apparently feigned illiteracy, but in the second the language was pointed and written in the best of style. There were none of the misspelled words that had appeared in the first.

SECOND MORE INSISTENT.

It read:

"Kansas City, Mo., October 27, 1909.
"Dear Sir -- Now the best, cheapest and healthiest, and the most satisfacaotry way for you to do is to send along that $5000. No fooling goes much longer. You'll get it all back within three years. Now mind, $5,000 in the postoffice by tonight. Quicker the better; cheaper and healthier way is to send it along. I'll send you a note duly signed for the amount.
"Earnestly, O. B. Vandaller.
"Gen. Del.
"P. S. -- You send a letter also.

Mr. Long notified the police about 4 o'clock and Detectives Jo Keshlear and J. J. McGraw were assigned to watch the postoffce.

NERVOUS IN POSTOFFICE.

When Wilson went into the postoffice he appeared very nervous. He looked around the rotunda before he took courage to step up to the general delivery window. Finally he edged in among a small crowd of peole and in time reached the window. He went into his pocket and from a notebook handed a sheet of paper to the man at the window.

By that time McGraw and Keshlear knew he was the man after the Long decoy package. Before the clerk could hand it to him, however, Keshlear arrested Wilson. He made no resistance, but became more nervous. The slip of paper, which he handed the clerk and the window has been taken from a loose leaf note book in Wilson's pocket. On it was written, in identically the same hand as that of the Long letters:

"Give man my mail. -O. B. Vandeller."

The package which Wilson would have received, had he been given time, was a twelve-ounce bottle in a cigar box. The package was wrapped in newspapers with plain wapping paper on the outside.

To Inspector Boyle Wilson denied that he had written a letter demanding $5,000. Just a brief statement was taken down in shorthand at first, and the prisoner, who gave his name as Thaddeus Sebastian Wilson, was locked up to think the matter over.

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September 25, 1909

CATTLEMAN KILLS
PARTER IN HOTEL.

SEXTON BAR TRAGEDY FOL-
LOWS QUARREL OVER RANCH.

Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., Puts
Three Bullets Into Brain of
Edward Hayes of Paw-
huska, Ok.
Eugene Hayes, Kansas Cattleman Accused of Murder.
EUGENE HAYES.
Kansas Cattleman Who Killed Edward
Hayes, His Partner, in the Barroom
of the Sexton Hotel Last Night.

Following a quarrel concerning the affairs of their 40,000 acre ranch in Osage county, Oklahoma, Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., a cattleman reputed to be worth half a million dollars, shot and killed his partner, Edward Hayes of Pawhuksa, Ok., in the bar of the Hotel Sexton at 7:45 o'clock last night.

Edward Hayes was shot three times, almost in the center of the forehead. He died instantly Eugene Hayes, who is held at police headquarters, says he shot in self defense.

The shooting was witnessed by Edward Lewis, and Lewis Weisenbacher, bartenders; Lee Russell, a millionaire cattleman from Ft. Worth and Lee Rogers, a Kansas City real estate dealer who is an ex-cowman.

L. C. Thompson, another Kansas City real estate man and former cattle raiser, was in the crowd, but says he did not see the shooting.

The five men entered the hotel together about 7:30 o'clock last night, and sat around a table in the front end of the saloon. About fifteen minutes later Eugene and Edward Hayes went to a table in the rear and against the wall opposite the bar.

THREE BULLETS INTO BRAIN.

Before dinner was served they began quarrelling about business affairs, but the conversation was not overheard by anyone unless it was Lee Russell, who is said to have been standing near the small table at which the partners were sitting.

Suddenly Eugene Hayes, who was facing north, leaped from his chair and running around the end of the table began firing. The first shot struck Edward Hayes in the forehead. Two more were effective, almost in the same spot.

Edward Hayes fell back in his chair, dead, and Eugene, taken in charge by a friend, walked towards the front door after placing his pistol, an automatic gun, in his hip pocket. As he rounded the glass screen at the end of the bar Patrolman Arthur Kennard arrested him.

Edward Lewis, the bartender who saw the shooting, said Edward Hayes reached towards his hip pocket first. As he did so, Lewis said, Eugene got up and pulled his pistol, and began firing as he stepped toward Edward. Edward Hayes did not succeed in getting his revolver out of his pocket. The coroner removed it, and took charge of it until an inquest is held. It was a Luger rapid fire gun, the magazine holding seven cartridges.

"I BEAT YOU TO IT."

"I beat you to it," the witness declared Eugene Hayes said as he put away his revolver.

Inspector E. P. Boyle sent Detectives Ralph Trueman and Denver D. Mitchell to the hotel as soon as he was informed of the killing. Detectives Keshlear and McGraw followed.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified, and after viewing the body had it removed to Stewart's undertaking rooms, where he performed a post mortem.

Immediately after the shooting the hotel management called Dr. A. L. Porter, who lifted the dead man out of the chair and laid him on the floor.

Eugene Hayes was taken to police headquarters by Patrolman Kennard. He gave the patrolman his pistol while on the street car.

When taken before Lieutenant James Morris to be booked for investigation Hayes was recognized by Patrolman "Jack" McCauley, who asked him what he was arrested for.

"Just killed my partner, Ed Hayes, up at the Sexton hotel.

"What for?" asked Lieutenant Morris.

QUARREL OVER RANCH AFFAIRS.

"Well, he was going to kill me if I didn't. I had to do it. That's all."

To Captain Walter Whitsett, and Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Hayes made no attempt to conceal anything except details of the shooting. He refused to say anything more until he could see John Hayes, former chief of police.

"He's a relative of mine, you know," he kept saying during the conversation. "I'm a ranch owner in Oklahoma," began Hayes. "I'm a pretty well known man, and John Hayes, who was formerly chief of police, is a cousin of mine, and he comes down to the Territory and hunts on my place. This man Ed Hayes is no kin of mine. I simply took him into a partnership wit me and he owes me $5,000. He didn't pay anything into the place.

At police headquarters last night the police took off of Eugene Hayes a diamond ring which is valued at $1,000. Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky took possession of a gold watch, a gold pen, $5.50 in money, and a a revolver taken from Edward Hayes. He wore a Knights of Pythias watch charm.

Ex-Chief John Hayes denied last night that he was any relative of the prisoner. "He is not even distantly related," Hayes said. "I have known him for years and have hunted on his place down in Oklahoma. I don't know why he should claim to be some relative of mine."

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September 20, 1909

MARKS ASKS MATRON'S
RESIGNATION; GETS IT.

Commissioner Says Mrs. Burns Dis-
obeyed Orders in Various Ways.
She's Off the Force.

Mrs. Elizabeth Burns, for nearly two years a police matron, resigned yesterday upon the request of Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner. Mrs. Burns left police headquarters soon after and went to her home, 1509 Harrison street.

Mrs. Burns said she was accused by Mr. Marks of having allowed a reporter for The Journal to talk with Ethelyn Collins, held by the police as a material witness. The Journal printed no interview with the Collins girl. It was said that strict orders had been given that no one except police officers should talk with the Collins girl.

"I left the matron's room but a minute Saturday night," Mrs. Burns said. Mrs. Maud Fontella, where the Collins girl lived, brought the girl $31. As prisoners are not allowed to have money at police headquarters, I asked Henry C. Smith, a special investigator for the police board, who brought Mrs. Fontella to the matron's room, to wait in the room until I got back.

"When I returned three minutes later a reporter for The Journal was talking to Smith. So far as I know he did not talk to the girl nor make any effort to. I told him he could not talk to her and he laughed and said he 'had the whole story.'

"When Mr. Marks asked for my resignation, I was so stunned that I complied without thinking that he was not the entire board. I would not work at headquarters again, but I would like to be tried by the police board in order that my record may be cleared, as I am guiltless of any charge made."

Mrs. Burns is the widow of William Burns, for many years a member of the police force and a captain at the time of his death. She has four children.

Commissioner Marks denied last night that he had taken into consideration the fact that a Journal reporter had talked to the girl, in the presence of Henry Smith, a patrolman, when he asked Mrs. Burns for her resignation. He said that as far as he was concerned the fact that she had allowed a visitor to see Tony Cruie against expressed orders was not used against her.

She had allowed two men, one an old man and the other a young one, to speak with the girl against orders, he said, and had disobeyed orders in other ways, he intimated.

Soon after taking oath as a commissioner Mr. Marks informed reports that there would soon be two good-hearted matrons at police headquarters. It was rumored last night in police circles that Mrs. Joanna Moran was to be asked for her resignation also. Mrs. Burns and Capt. Walter Whitsett have had little difficulties several times.

Soon after Mrs. Burns left the station yesterday, Mrs. J. K. Ellwood, formerly matron of the detention home, was sent for by Mr. Marks. Her husband is the secretary to Inspector E. P. Boyle. She was placed in charge of the matron's room and spent the night at the station.

She said that Mr. Marks had asked her for forty-eight hours of her time, and then she was to be through. Asked if she expected to receive the appointment as a permanent position she refused to answer.

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July 25, 1909

CHINESE DON JUAN
ARRESTED IN CHICAGO.

CLAIMED GAW WING ELOPED
WITH MRS. ETHEL GORDON.

Celestial of Many Love Affairs
and Woman, Who Is Said
to Be From Kansas
City, Fine.

White women have a strange fascination for Gaw Wing, a Kansas City Chinese. Gaw has been arrested in Chicago in company with a woman who gave her name as Mrs. Ethel Gordon, also of Kansas City. The two eloped recently, it is claimed, and Chicago was the destination.

Gaw at one time, so it is said, went to Topeka where he fell love with a white school teacher. He flashed his bundle of bills and the school teacher became Mrs. Wing. She was at the police station in Kansas City yesterday looking for her recreant husband.

About a week ago, having forgotten his school teacher wife long since, it is claimed, he and Mrs. Gordon, both known to the police in the person of inspector Edward P. Boyle, left Kansas City. It was common gossip among the Chinese of West Sixth street that Gaw left a wife in Kansas City. This wife to who they refer says she was Mrs. Charles Wilson before she married the flighty Wing. She and the Mongolian also eloped to Chicago and were arrested January 26 of this year and were fined in the municipal court of that city. Mrs. Wilson has a child 2 years old.

Gaw's friends in Chicago paid his fine and he and Mrs. Wilson were released.

They came back to Kansas City and their domestic bark suddenly ran upon breakers. Mrs. Wilson Wing dropped out of sight.

Wing and Charlie Chu, a restaurant keeper at 125 West Sixth street, were fast friends and Gaw spent much of his time at the restaurant. White women came and went and from the lot Wing, it is alleged, selected Mrs. Gordon, who the police say lived at the Madison house, Independence avenue and Walnut street. Gaw, it is said, took up his abode at the Madison house and a rapid courtship followed. Gaw and his new spouse left for Chicago about two weeks ago and from that city last night came the news of their arrest.

Gaw was passing under the name of Charles Foy and Mrs. Gordon was registered as his wife. Inspector Boyle says that he is certain the eloping Chinaman is Gaw Wing. Mrs. Gordon told the Chicago police that she had been living in Chicago for over a year with her brother at 516 North Ashland avenue.

The Chinese and the woman were arrested by Chicago detectives after having been seen to enter a questionable hotel together and register as Charles Foy and wife. They were fined $200 and court costs there yesterday morning.

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July 1, 1909

OFFICIALLY NOT LEON LING.

Japanese Suspect Given Clean Bill
of Health by Inspector Boyle.

Carl Young, the Japanese who was arrested Tuesday night because he looked like Leon Ling, the Chinaman who killed Elsie Sigel in New York, was released at police headquarters yesterday morning. Young is an educated Japanese and proved to the satisfaction of Inspector Edward J. Boyle that he was not the man wanted. The inspector gave him a letter stating that the bearer had been investigated and had proved that he was not Ling. Young said that he had been arrested in St. Louis under the same suspicion. He is a traveling salesman.

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June 28, 1909

SOLDIER, SAILOR AND
THIEF, IN THE TOILS.

"BOBBY" WRIGHT, 75, SPENDS
NIGHT IN HOLDOVER.

Built Missouri Telegraph Lines in
1862, Then Was Steamboatman
and Later Noted "Hotel
Worker."

"Bobby" Wright, 75 years old, formerly soldier, sailor and now the oldest sneak thief in point of experience int he world, stayed in the city holdover last night to avoid worse trouble. Wright has been in the city several weeks, but was not picked up by the police until yesterday.

Wright confided to a visitor through the bars last night that he was born in New England, but was brought up in the South. When the civil war broke out, however, he was loyal to the Union and joined the army, becoming a private in the miners and sappers' division of the army. He was assigned to General Lyon's army in Missouri and afterwards under General Fremont.

"I put telegraph wires clear across Missouri in the year 1862," he said.

After the war he became a sailor on a merchant ship and was for ten years a steamboatman on the Mississippi river. Then his criminal tendencies became assertive and he became a professional thief, if the records kept by the police departments of many cities are to be believed.

His advent into this city was in 1882 and he has been a frequent visitor since. On almost every visit he was entertained in the city holdover, and he has frequently been convicted in the municipal court.

Wright is whitehaired, partly bald and has white whiskers. He is stooped and tall. His particular branch of thievery is known as hotel work. He walks into a hostelry, goes upstairs, and when he finds a door unlocked enters the room and makes away with all the valuables he can conceal about his person. This is the police report on Bobby Wright.

"He is one of the cleverest men in the country at his trade," said Inspector of Detectives Edward J. Boyle last night.

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June 17, 1909

ATTEMPTS MURDER TO
CONCEAL RECORD OF
POLICE PROBE.

THUG STRIKES DOWN MISS A. LEE
OWEN IN HER OFFICE IN
DWIGHT BUILDING.

WON'T STOP
INVESTIGATION.

MAYOR OFFERS A REWARD.

Young Woman Was Alone in Her
Office When Murderous Assailant
Tried to Crush Her Skull With a
Black Jack -- Commissioner Marks
Orders Men Who May Be Attacked
to Shoot to Kill -- Governor Had-
ley May Offer Reward Today.
Girl Struck Down by Unknown Assailants.
UNKNOWN THUG STRIKES DOWN POLICE BOARD'S GIRL STENOGRAPHER; STEALS RECORD OF INVESTIGATION.

Struck on the left temple with a "black jack" by an unknown thug, Miss Anna Lee Owen, a public stenographer who has been taking the evidence in the investigation held by the police commissioners, was knocked unconscious while at work in her office, 605 Dwight building, last night and a part of her stenographic notes stolen. She was taken to the University hospital immediately after being found by Hugh E. Martin. She is said to be in critical condition. Her skull probably is fractured.

Mayor Crittenden personally offers a reward of $100 for the arrest of her assailant.

The attack upon Miss Owen was made some time between 6:30 and 7:15 o'clock, while she was alone in her office. She regained consciousness before being removed to the hospital, but was not able to furnish a description of her assailant.


STRUCK FROM BEHIND.

Miss Owen's office is separated from the hall by a reception room. When Mr. Martin left the office at 6:30, she was at work on the notes. The hall door was closed and also the door leading from the reception room into her office. Mr. Martin returned to his office at 7:15. Opening the door into Miss Owen's office, he found her huddled on the floor. Believing she had fainted from overwork, he lifted her head and was startled by her groaning as if injured.

Liquor which was kept in another office in the suite was secured by Martin and he rubbed the young woman's head with it. She partially revived and exclaimed, "Mother, they have taken my notes." Dr. Eugene Carbaugh was summoned to attend Miss Owen, and Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was notified. He informed the police and then took personal charge of the case.

Cowardly Assault by a Brutal Thug With a Black Jack.
A BLACK JACK, SUCH AS WAS PROBABLY USED IN THE COWARDLY ASSAULT ON MISS OWEN.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle carried Miss Owen down stairs in the elevator and placing her in an automobile assisted Dr. Carbaugh in supporting her during the drive to the hospital.

From what little Miss Owen could tell last night she was working over her typewriter when she heard a step behind her chair. Knowing that the men who had offices in the suite had gone home, she looked up to see who it was. She had not heard the outer doors opened. Just as she secured a glance of the figure of a man, she was struck down.

IMPORTANT EVIDENCE GONE.

The stenographic notes and transcripts which she had made during the trials and investigations before the police commissioners were always carefully guarded by Miss Owen, who was afraid an attempt would be made to steal them. The notes were securely locked up in the office vault each night. When an investigation was made after she regained consciousness it was found that a large part of her notes were missing.

Just what notes were secured is not known. It was said that the evidence given late yesterday afternoon in the trial of the case against the conduct of the saloon conducted by James Redmond, 1205 Walnut street, were not secured. But it is believed that a large part of the testimony in the other investigations was lost.

ENTIRE FORCE AT WORK.

Through the inability of Miss Owen to assist the police by furnishing a description of her assailant, and also the failure of the police to elicit any information from the elevator operators was impossible to secure a clue to work on. No one could be found last night who had seen or noticed any stranger loitering in the halls or around the office in the Dwight building.

When Commissioner Marks arrived he ordered that the police make every possible effort to capture the thug, and until midnight he was actively engaged in directing the police in their work. The police were not notified of the assault until 8 o'clock, and inspector Boyle dispatched e very officer in the headquarters at the time to the scene. He and Captain Whitsett followed and were closeted with the commissioner for some time. Every detective in the city was called in and placed at work upon the case. The the substations were notified, and in all over 150 police officers were engaged in searching the city.

GIRL AND MARKS SHADOWED.

After the assault last night Commissioner Marks informed the police that he had been followed and shadowed by two men since he began his activity in the police shakeup. Not only has Mr. Marks been trailed, but Miss Owen has been dogged by two men to and from her work in the city. She was not positive of this surveillance, according to Mr. Marks, until Tuesday evening after the adjournment of the police board.

Intuitively feeling that she was being followed, Miss Owen boarded a Twelfth street car and transferred to a Northeast car. Arriving at Budd park she left the car and entered the park. All of this time the suspected man was in close proximity. At the park he disappeared for a time but was on hand when she again got on a car to ride into the city. She went to the Dwight building after leaving the car and while on the sixth floor saw the man in the hall. She then went to the office of Mr. Marks and informed him of what she had done.

GIRL FREQUENTLY ANNOYED.

Telling her to hold a handkerchief to her mouth if she saw the man on the street, Mr. Marks went down and walked around. He found a man on the street who appeared to fit the description of the man who had bothered Miss Owen, but she denied he was the one. The police were not notified at any time previous to the assault that either Miss Owen or the commissioner were being shadowed.

On another occasion it is said Miss Owen was frightened by men who followed her about the streets and went to the Coates house for the night, instead of returning to her home. While there, it was said, she received a telephone message from some man who refused to give his name. The purport of the telephone message was that there was a man in an adjoining room who intended her harm.

The mother of Miss Owen, who visited her daughter at the University hospital last night in answer to questions, said that her daughter had never mentioned to anyone at home that she was annoyed by anyone or that she had ever been followed.

On orders received from Mr. Marks, the hospital authorities refused to allow anyone to see Miss Owen. Strict orders were issued to not allow anyone but the nurse, her physicians and mother to visit the young woman. A special nurse was secured for her and the police commissioner's orders included a special diet for Miss Owen.

Several hours after the assault Dr. A. H. Cordler was called in consultation and the patient was pronounced to be in a very critical condition.

BY AN IMPORTED THUG.

The Dwight building was thoroughly searched by the police. Every street car in the city, and especially those leading into the suburbs, was being ridden by a police officer all night long. The outgoing trains were watched, although the police believed that the man would endeavor to leave the city by street car.

Inspector Boyle said last night that it was his opinion that the attack upon Miss Owen, and the theft of the stenographic notes, was done by an imported thug. If it was accomplished by home talent the inspector expressed the opinion that it was done on the spur of the moment to cover, if possible, damaging testimony given during the recent investigation. If the thug was imported for the purpose, St. Louis is probably the city, Inspector Boyle said, and his belief is also that of Captain Whitsett and Chief of Police Frank Snow.

Two men who have already figured in the police investigation and the saloon trials were ordered arrested and locked up of investigation. The theory of the police is that while these two men did not do the work they could give valuable information as to who did. But the men had not been found at 1 o'clock this morning. Captain Whitsett said he believed that the man would be arrested before twenty-four hours had passed. Acting Chief Snow said the man would be in custody by morning and inspector Boyle was positive he could not escape arrest.

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April 21, 1909

BOY PRISONERS TELL
OF SEVEN HOLD-UPS.

IMPLICATE OTHERS IN STATE-
MENT TO INSPECTOR BOYLE.

Arrests May Lead to Breaking Up
Band of Highwaymen Which
Has Been Operating Al-
most Nightly.

FRANK M'DANIELS.

In the arrest of Joseph Tent, 20 years old, and Frank McDaniels, 18 years old, the police think that they have solved the identity of the mysterious highwaymen who have bee holding up persons almost nightly in Kansas City. The two, who are mere boys, admit that they have taken part in at least seven holdups in the last six weeks and Inspector Boyle thinks that they can be connected with several others.

For several hours yesterday afternoon, the boys were "sweated" in the inspector's office and at last were willing to make statements to the prosecuting attorney. Two or three others are implicated by the boys' confession and within the next few hours other arrests likely will follow. It is believed the boys are members of a gang of highwaymen, who prowl nightly in Kansas City.

The capture of the youthful bandits came about in a singular manner. In the reports of pawned jewelry that came into the hands of the detectives Monday afternoon was the description of a watch which had been taken from F. R. Hedges of 1004 Forest avenue on the night of April 15. It had been pawned Saturday, the pawn broker said, and a boy had left the watch at his office. Detective John Farrell stationed himself near the store and about 1 o'clock two young men entered the pawn shop and offered to redeem the watch.

PAWNBROKER GIVES TIP.

"Just wait a moment," said the pawnbroker, and he hurried outside. Farrell entered the shop and arrested both men. The younger proved to be Tent, who had secured a prospective purchase for the watch.

"I don't want to go unless you take the fellow that helped me," said Tent. "I don't want to go alone.

The chance to land another highwayman was satisfactory to the officer, and the two went to a photograph gallery at 310 East Twelfth street, where Tent admitted that Frank McDaniels, his partner, was working. The two climbed the narrow stairway and passed into the dark room of the gallery. Farrell was holding the young man to keep from losing his way. Suddenly he felt something pressing against his side, which instinctively he knew was a revolver. He jerked the revolver from the boy's hands. Tent denied that he had intended to fire.

"I was trying to get rid of it," he said to the officer, "and it was so dark that I couldn't see where I was placing it."

McDaniels was caught in the gallery and both were taken to headquarters. Both admitted that they had taken part in several robberies, but only two in each other's company. Experienced highwaymen had been their companions, the boys said, and the police are inclined to believe their story.


JOSEPH TENT.

In the inspector's office, the boys did not appear to realize the gravity of their deeds. Both admitted that older crooks had started them in the business. Both denied that they had started in the holdup business together, and claimed that they had known each other but a few days.

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April 8, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
TO CLEAN UP TOWN.

MAKES FRANK SNOW ACTING
CHIEF, ED BOYLE INSPECTOR.

Flahive Given Pick of Force and
Told to Drive Out District 4's
Tough Gang and Ignore
the Politicians.
The New Police Board.
THE POLICE BOARD AS IT IS NOW COMPOSED.
T. R. MARKS, MAYOR CRITTENDEN, R. B. MIDDLEBROOK.

Captain Frank F. Snow, property clerk at police headquarters, was appointed acting chief of police, and Edward P. Boyle, a detective, was appointed acting inspector of detectives yesterday by the new board of police commissioners.

Captain Thomas P. Flahive of district No. 4 was given his pick of the force, and told to drive out the gang of crooks and undesirables in his district, despite the interference of any politician. Democrat or Republican, and clean up a certain disreputable element that has infested that part of the city for so long a time.

Chief Daniel Ahern was placed in charge of the new district, No. 10, and Inspector Charles Ryan was told that he would be taken care of.

Thomas R. Marks and R. B. Middlebrook, the first Republican police commissioners Kansas City has ever had, being in the majority on the board did not wait for the presence of Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., to start the ball rolling. By appointment they met in the office of Daniel Ahern, chief of police, shortly after noon. Then they sent for Charles Ryan, inspector of detectives.

RYAN IN THE RANKS.

Telling the two officials that they would be cared for in some manner, the commissioners asked for their resignations. In a few minutes, they had them in writing.

Captain Snow and Ed. P. Boyle were sent for and told that Snow was to be made acting chief of police and Boyle acting inspector of detectives.

Later, when the board met with the mayor in the chair, Commissioner Middlebrook presented Ahern's resignation and moved its acceptance. Snow was then formally made acting chief. The same form was gone through in regard to the acceptance of Ryan's resignation and the temporary appointment of Detective Boyle to his place.

The next order of business was to take care of the deposed officers. Ahern was appointed captain of the new police district, to be known as No. 10. Ryan was made a detective, and assigned to duty under Acting Inspector Boyle, his former subordinate.

AHERN IS APPRECIATIVE.

Captain Ahern showed great appreciation when the board cared for him in the manner in which it did.

"I did not expect to remain," said the former chief. "My position belonged to the new commissioners, and they had a right to it. I certainly appreciate the magnificent manner in which I have been cared for, and will show it by doing my full duty and carrying out to the letter every order of the board."

Former Inspector Ryan had little to say except that he would line up with the men he used to boss with such severity, and do the best he could. It was intimated that Ryan may resign from the force later, but that could not be confirmed.

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December 10, 1908

"ADAM GOD" HAS
NOT BEEN CAUGHT.

LEADER OF MANIACAL RELIG-
IONISTS STILL AT LARGE.

DETECTIVE BOYLE AFTER HIM.

BELIEVED TO BE HEADING FOR
BONNER SPRINGS.

Man Answering His Description Seen
in Armourdale -- Clark and Mul-
lane May Recover -- Selsor
Will Die.

Information was given the police about noon yesterday that a man answering the description of James Sharp, the "Adam God" of the murderous band of maniacal religionists which shot three members of the police force Tuesday, had been seen in Armourdale by a railroad man. Police were immediately dispatched to pick up the man's trail. At last midnight Sharp was still at large.

Every lodging house in the city and all the places were searched by the police Tuesday night and yesterday morning in an effort to catch the instigator of the riot of Tuesday afternoon in which Patrolman Albert O. Dublow was killed and two policeman and a citizen were seriously wounded. Many false clues were followed, as every policeman was anxious to find the man who had preached to his followers that it was right to kill.

Though the entire department was working on the case not a trace of Sharp could be found, and the information that he had passed through Armourdale was the first clue that looked good. The railroad man who telephoned to Chief Daniel Ahern that he had seen Sharp, said that the man had trimmed his whiskers and was bleeding. It was known that Sharp had been shot in the hand. When he laid a gun on the bar in John Blanchon's saloon, 400 Main street, while the shooting was going on in the street, the bartender saw that his right hand was bleeding.

NEGRO TRIMMED HIS BEARD.

According to the story told by the railroad man, Sharp stopped him and asked the direction to Bonner Springs, and then hurried on. He told the chief that he noticed blood on the man's hand and clothes. While Sharp wore a long beard, partly gray, during the fight, when he stopped in the railroad yards in Armourdale the beard was clipped, and his hair had been trimmed. Two hours later the police at No. 2 station were told by Chester Ramsey, a negro barber for George W. Robinson, 956 Mulberry street, that he had cut a man's beard and trimmed his hair and that man might have been the leader of the Adamite fanatics.

Ramsey said that the man came from the east about 5 o'clock Tuesday evening and, when he left the shop went west. The man acted strangely while in the shop, refusing to take either of his hands out of his pockets.

"He got in a chair and ordered me to take his hat off," said the barber. "He kept his hands in his coat pockets while I cut his hair and trimmed his beard I had about half finished when he seemed to get very nervous and said, 'Hurry up. I have to meet a man.' When I got through with him he got out of the chair and had me put his hat on his head. Then he made me take the money out of his left trouser pocket. He explained that his hands had been frozen and he couldn't take them out of his pockets.

"I said, 'You must have been in a colder climate than this. He said, 'Yes, I was up north of here fishin'. That was all he said."

The police believe the man was Sharp. They say he evidently was hiding his right hand, which was shot, and kept the left hand on a revolver in his pocket. The description of the man given by Ramsey coincides with that of Sharp.

CITY HALL GUARDED.

The police took precaution to guard the city hall and police headquarters all day yesterday. They were of the opinion that Sharp might return to the scene of the crime on Tuesday, and for revenge enter the station unnoticed and shoot one or more of the officers.

The police are not sure that Sharp is alone. Two patrolmen stood on the sidewalk at the main entrance to the station and two were stationed in the areaway opening on the market. Inside the station two officers guarded the hallway leading to the chief's office and our or five patrolmen and detectives were held in reserve.

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December 10, 1908

FUNERAL OF OFFICER DALBOW.

Will Take Place This Afternoon.
Police to Attend.

Mrs. Albert O. Dalbow, the widow of Patrolman Dalbow, killed in the city hall riot, yesterday accompanied her brother-in-law, Joseph Dalbow, to his home at Sixty-first street and Troost avenue. She will live there until she makes other arrangements after the funeral of her husband.

The funeral services will be at the home of Joseph Dalbow this afternoon at 2 o'clock. The body will be placed in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery.

A special order was issued yesterday afternoon by Chief of Police Daniel Ahern detailing officers to act as pallbearers and as an escort. The pall bearers will be officers John Tarpey, H. A. Eads, Edward Boyle, John P. Withrow, M. A. Savage and George Hightower.

Chief Ahern telephoned to the police chiefs of Kansas City, Kas, and Leavenworth, inviting them to send a representation of the police departments of their cities to attend the funeral of Patrolman Dalbow. Thirty patrolmen were ordered to act as the special escort and the night men were urged to attend. The police detail will be in charge of Drill Master Lang.

David E. Bowden, chief of police of Kansas City, Kas., last night made out a list of twenty-two patrolmen and officers which detail will represent the Kansas Cit, Kas., police department at the funeral of former Patrolman Dalbow.

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December 9, 1908

BULLETS KILL TWO AND WOUND FIVE IN FIERCE BATTLE BETWEEN POLICE AND BAND OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS

FIGHT BEGAN IN FRONT OF CENTRAL POLICE STATION AND ENDED AT MISSOURI RIVER BANK.

MAN AND GIRL AMONG DEAD

YOUNG GIRL, MEMBER OF THE BAND,
PIERCED BY BULLETS AFTER FLEE-
ING TO THE RIVER.

Three Policemen Wounded.
Houseboat Where Religious Fanatics Sought Refuge
Tent on Missouri River Flat Boat Where the Women and Children Members of the Religious Fanatics Took Refuge.


THE DEAD.

ALBERT O. DALBOW, policeman
-- Shot through the breast, abdomen and thigh.
LULU Pratt, 14 years old, fanatic
-- Shot through back of neck at base of brain. Bullet came out through left cheek


THE INJURED.

-- Shot through the right chest and cut through right eye and upper lip with dagger. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Michael Mullane, patrolman
-- Shot in the right chest, right kidney and left hand. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Louis Pratt, fanatic
-- Shot in forehead. Right ankle crushed and shot in calf of same leg. Leg amputated at general hospital later.
J. J. Sulzer, retired farmer living at 2414 Benton boulevard
-- Shot in right hip, also in right chest. Latter bullet glanced and severed the spine. Paralyzed from shoulders down. Taken to University hospital; will die.
Lieutenant Harry E. Stege
-- Shot through left arm. Ball passed along his chest from right to left, grazing the skin, taking piece out of arm. Went back into fight.

In a battle between police and religious fanatics which began at Fourth and Main streets at 3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and ended at the Missouri river bank, two persons were killed and five were injured. The trouble came about through the police trying to break up a religious street meeting, at which revolvers and knives were carried by the exhorters.

Just a few minutes before the tragedy occurred George M. Holt, a probation officer, found Mrs. Melissa Sharp, Mrs. Della Pratt and the latter's five children singing near Fifth and Main streets. He asked why the children were not in school, and was answered with an insult.

"Do you belong here?" he asked of one of the women.

"No, we have a house boat on the river," she replied.

The fanatics, after a collection amounting to about $3 or $4 had been made, started north on Main street with Mr. Holt following. They went into what is known as the Poor Man's mission, 309 Main street, conducted by J. C. Creighton and wife. Mr. Holt then approached J. A. Sharp, husband of one of the women, and addressed him and Louis Pratt, the other's husband.


ASSAULTED HOLT.

"I am the father of Jesus Christ," said Sharp. "I have been sent to reorganize the world. You are no more than damned sheep. Get out of here. I am going to preach with my children right in front of that police station. You'll see what they'll do to me. Get out!"

With that Sharp drew a big revolver and struck Mr. Holt over the head. He left the "mission" with the fanatics following, all of them but two having revolvers, Sharp with both revolvers and knives. The fanatics consisted then of Mr. and Mrs. Sharp, Mr. and Mrs. Pratt and the latter's children, Lulu, 14, Lena, 12, Mary, 11, Dewey, 8, and Edna, 4 years old.

While Mr. Holt hurried into police headquarters, his head bleeding, the fanatics ranged along the curb in front of John Blanchon's saloon, 400 Main street, and the men began to flourish revolvers and knives and talk in wild tones about what God had commanded them to do. While all this was going on Patrolman Dalbow, who was sent from the station to see what the trouble was, walked up to James Sharp, who styles himself as "Adam God." Witnesses say that Dalbow spoke kindly to the man and told him he must cease, as a crowd was gathering.


"I'LL SHOOT THE SERGEANT."

"Do you come as a friend, brother?" Sharp asked.

"Yes," replied the officer," the sergeant wants to see you.

"I am going over and shoot the sergeant," said Sharp, his wrath rising again.

Just at that juncture Lieutenant Harry E. Stege, who had followed Dalbow out of the station, arrived on the scene and said to Sharp, "Drop that knife," at the same time drawing a revolver and pointing it at Sharp.

Then the trouble began in real earnest. Louis Pratt, who, up to that time had stood mute by the curb, a little in the rear and to one side of Sharp, raised a revolver which he was carrying in his hand and shot at Lieutenant Stege.

Louis Pratt, Religious Fanatic
LOUIS PRATT.
Religious Fanatic, Whose Leg Was Shot
Off in Fight With Police.

The ball tore through Stege's clothing form the right to the left side along the chest, taking a chunk out of the left arm. Stege retreated, shooting, and a general fusillade was opened on the police. Pratt shot Dalbow through the chest, just as he was drawing his revolver, and one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, witnesses say, shot him in the back as he retreated.

DIES IN EMERGENCY.

Dalbow staggered across the street south to the door of the emergency hospital. As he pushed open the door his revolver fell from his hand. "I am shot bad," he said to Dr. R. N. Coffey. The officer caught him and carried him to a cot in the hospital. He died in a few minutes without regaining consciousness.

The shooting by that time had attracted the attention of all the officers in police headquarters. Sergeant Patrick Clark, in his shirt sleeves and unarmed, went out and into the thickest of the fray. The big leader, Sharp, was tackled by the sergeant and, though the latter was armed with both a knife and a revolver, the sergeant went after him with his fists. Clark was stabbed twice in the face and as he turned, was shot through the shoulder.

Captain Walter Whitsett, Inspector Charles Ryan, Detective Edward Boyle and others went into the street, emptied their revolvers and returned for more ammunition.

The gamest fight against the greatest odds was made by Patrolman Mullane, who ran down Fourth street from Delaware street just in time to meet the enraged fanatics fighting their way toward him. Louis Pratt, Mrs. Sharp and Lulu, the oldest Pratt girl, all attacked him, paying little heed to the shots of others. He at that time was the only policeman in uniform in range. Mullane would shoot at Pratt and when the woman and girl would walk right up to him and shoot at him, the big Irishman, realizing that they were only women, only clubbed his gun and struck at them.

The three-cornered fight lasted until Mullane's gun was empty and they had him cornered behind a small wagon on the north side of Fourth street. While he was attempting to get at Pratt the woman and girl pumped shots into him from the rear. He soon followed Sergeant Clark into the station, where both men fell to the floor. Doctors attended them there. They were later removed to the emergency hospital, their wounds dressed, and sent to St. Joseph's.

SPECTATOR IS SHOT.

While there were no fewer than 500 spectators in the crowd when the shooting began, only one was shot. That was J. J. Sulzer, 2414 Benton boulevard, a retired farmer. He was an onlooker and was hit by two bullets, the fanatics evidently taking him for an enemy. He was shot in the right hip first and almost immediately afterwards in the right chest. That ball ranged in such a manner that the spinal cord was severed. Mr. Sulzer dropped on the car tracks in front of city hall. He was treated at the emergency and sent to the University hospital. The doctors think he cannot live, as he is paralyzed from the shoulders down.

SHARP, RINGLEADER, ESCAPED.

There was not a moment while the fight was on that the police could not have killed all of the women and children, but they refrained from doing so. Seeming to realize the fact, the women and older Pratt girls -- Mary, Lena and Lulu -- constantly gathered around the two men who were doing most of the shooting. The women and girls would circle about the men, thereby blanketing the fire of the police, and would then fire point blank at the officers themselves.

Among the fanatics, Pratt and Mrs. Sharp made the gamest fight. Sharp, the leader of the bunch, disappeared during the fight, as if the earth had swallowed him. Pratt was so badly wounded that he had to be left on the street, but even then one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, ran to him and gave him a loaded revolver. Struggling to position, he fired again until his weapon was emptied.

Chief Ahern turned in a riot call, and all the police in the city that were available appeared there as soon as possible, under commands of captains and lieutenants.

When it was found that Sharp, the ringleader, had escaped, the chief scattered his men in all direction over the city. It is believed that he was wounded. The houseboat was guarded last night.
WOUNDED RESTING EASILY.

At midnight Dr. Eugene King of St. Joseph's hospital said that Sergeant Patrick Clark was in a serious condition, but that he was doing nicely, and stood a good chance to recover. Patrolman Michael Mullane had shown some little improvement during the hour preceding 12 o'clock. Dre. King said that his chances of recovery were very slight.

The condition of J. J. Sulzer at the University hospital was reported by Dr. A. W. McArthur at midnight to be very critical. Dr. McArthur said that one of the bullets was lodged just beneath the skin on the left side of his body, but that he would not attempt to remove it until this morning.. Hope for Mr. Sulzer recovering from his wounds was slight, the surgeon said.

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May 12, 1908

MURDERED WIFE
IN JEALOUS FIT.

SHE DIED IN HER AGED
FATHER'S ARMS.

STABBED ON PORCH
OF HOME.

E. C. FLETCHER, THE MURDERER,
IS CAPTURED BY POLICE.

E. C. Fletcher, a teamster 37 years old, after being separated from his wife for one week, called at the home of her father, John Harlow, 630 West Eighth street, last night about 8:30 o'clock, ostensibly to talk over going to Oklahoma. In the house was a man named Edward Lewis, another teamster, who had gone to the house to see Harlow about putting him to work. Fletcher asked his wife to come down stairs to talk. When they reached the porch she was heard to scream for help. He had stabbed her just above the heart. She died an hour later.

Fletcher ran south to Ninth street, chased by a negro who had witnessed the act. He was seen at Ninth and Holmes streets a few minutes later, running east. The aged father ran to the porch and held his daughter in his arms until the police ambulance arrived. She sank so fast that Drs. J. P. Neal and R. A. Shiras deemed it necessary to give her a transfusion of salt solution at the emergency hospital to take the place of the blood she had lost. She did not regain consciousness and died without making a statement or even telling her name. The knife blade entered the left side just above the heart and is believed to have severed the aorta.


HE IS CAPTURED.

Detectives Keshlear and McGraw were on the scene soon after the murder and went to work on the case at once.

Patrolmen Holly Jarboe and J. P. Withrow, headquarters men, learned that Fletcher roomed at 211 West Fifth street and went there to watch for him. At 12:15 o'clock they were joined by Detectives Brice, Murphy, Boyle and Walsh. As they stood talking, Walsh exclaimed:

"Here he comes now," and ran toward a man who had just turned the corner. It was proved to be Fletcher. He surrendered without resistance.

Fletcher was taken to police headquarters and Bert Kimbrell, assistant prosecuting attorney, was sent for to take his statement. The murderer had been drinking and was not told that his wife was dead until he had finished his statement. He expressed hope that he had not hurt her.

"I don't know why I struck her. I love he so. I don't know what I was doing," was the sum of his declaration to Kimbrell.

The knife with which he killed his wife was found in his pocket. It was a common clasp knife, with a three-inch blade.


HE OFTEN BEAT HER.

Mrs. Emma Fletcher was 33 years old and a pretty woman. She had been married to Fletcher for seventeen years, but had no children. He was a drinking man, the father says, and often beat his wife and as often left her. Her mother died about the time of her marriage and she and Fletcher had always lived with Harlow.

"He left Emma the last time a week ago while we were living at Thirteenth and Summit streets," said Harlow. "We have often had to move on account of his treatment of her. Tuesday we moved to 630 West Eighth street. Ed Lewis came to see me tonight about getting me a job and we were all in the room on the second floor when Fletcher knocked at the door.

" 'What do you want?' Emma asked him.

" 'I just come to talk to you about going with me to Oklahoma,' Fletcher said. 'I've got the money to take you if you want to go.'

"Then he saw Lewis sitting there and his eyes flashed fire. He told Emma to get her shoes and come outside and talk the matter over. As she left I heard him say, 'I'd rather see you dead than with another man.' I heard them walk quietly down the stairs to the porch and then my daughter screamed. I just thought he had beaten her again as he had so often and ran to her side I could see he had been drinking."


"I WANT TO DIE, TOO."

While the father, grey and feeble, was telling his story to Captain Whitsett he did not know that his daughter was dead. HE would up his sad narrative with: "When I put her white face on my arm I thought she was dead, but I guess he's just cut her. Can any one tell me how she is?" he asked, looking from one to another.

"She is dead," Captain Whitsett informed him in a low tone.

"God be merciful," cried the old man, tottering backwards into a chair. "If she is dead, I want to die, too."

He found that her body had been taken to Freeman & Marshall's morgue and left for there, saying he wanted to be with her during the night.


OTHER TOWNS NOTIFIED.

Fletcher has been working for James Stanley, a contractor, who is building a church at 752 Sandusky avenue, Kansas City, Kas. Surrounding towns had also been telephoned to be on the lookout for him in case he should catch a train out. He was believed to be making for the Belt line tracks when last seen.

P. W. Widener, from whom Harlow rents at 630 West Eighth street, told the police that he had just entered his home about 8:30 p. m., when he heard a knock and saw Fletcher at his wife's door talking to her.

"I heard them go down stairs together," he said, "and almost immediately heard her scream. She was lying on the porch, stabbed, when I reached her. Fletcher was chased to Ninth street and lost sight of."

Widener related that when Harlow rented the rooms he said his son-in-law often raised "a little rumpus when drinking," but did not pay any attention to it. He said it had often caused him to move.

Fletcher has a brother, Arthur Fletcher, living somewhere in the city. Harlow has one more daughter, Mrs. Clara Coleman, who lives in the West bottoms in Kansas City, Kas., but he did not know where.

Coroner George B. Thompson said that an autopsy would be held today and an inquest later.

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