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January 31, 1910

HOW JUSTICE ROSS
MADE HIS FORTUNE.

DONOR OF MONEY TO MA-
HONEY CHILDREN WAS
ONCE A LAMPLIGHTER.

Formed Partnership With
John Mahoney Twenty-
Five Years Ago.

Justice Michael Ross, of Kansas City, who in the Wyandotte county, Kansas, probate court Saturday gave the children of his dead partner, John Maloney, $50,000, was born in Cincinnati, O., December 19, 1859. His father, Alexander Ross, came to Kansas City in 1866 to aid in the erection of the first gas plant the city had. In June a year later, the family followed him, coming from St. Louis by boat.

"The Missouri was full of boats in those days," said Justice Ross last night, "and was the principal means of navigation between here and St. Louis. Kansas City had a real wharf and it was a busy one."

Two brothers, William J. and James Ross, and a younger sister constituted the children at that time. James was drowned while swimming in the Missouri river in 1872.

"We attended a little frame public school down in the East Bottoms just opposite what was known as Mensing Island," said Justice Ross. "Later we went to Washington school which still stands at Independence avenue and Cherry street. A ward school education was as high as one could go in those days unless he went away, and that was all we received."

After the erection of the gas plant Justice Ross and his brother William secured positions as lamp lighters. It required them to get up at all hours of the night, according to the condition of the weather and the fullness of the moon, both to light and turn out the street lamps. After doing this work at night Justice Ross worked all day on an ice wagon for J. E. Sales. Later on he worked in the old Davis brick yard, which stood about where the Zenith mill now stands in the East Bottoms.

Justice Ross always had in view the day when he would go into business for himself -- be his own boss. With his savings and some help from his mother he started a little grocery and general store on the levee at First and Campbell streets in 1874. After a time his brother, William, was taken into partnership, but remained but a few years. The latter for several terms was a member of the city council.

BOUGHT OTHER STORES.

As the city began to grow away from the river, Justice Ross saw better opportunities and opened a grocery store at 1401-3 East Fifth street, at Lydia avenue, and later another at 1100-2 East Fifth street, at Troost avenue. These two stores were money makers and enabled him later to branch out along other lines.

In September, 1888, Justice Ross was married to Miss Bessie Egan. All of their children, seven boys and four girls, are living, the oldest daughter being away at school near Cincinnati, and the oldest boy at St. Mary's, Kas. Six of the nine children at home attend the Woodland school.

"I knew John Mahoney from the day he came here with the C. & A. railroad," Justice Ross said. "He was doing small jobs of grading in those days and his mother went with him over the country. They used to trade with us at the little store on the levee and when in town Mahoney and his mother stopped at our home."

It was almost twenty-five years ago that Mahoney and Ross went into partnership and the latter has been a silent partner ever since, Mahoney seeing to most of the details and looking after the work. Justice Ross also had other interests, such as tree planting, and planted the trees around the finest residences and along many of the prettiest boulevards. In speaking of some of the work done by himself and Mr. Mahoney, the justice said:

"We built all of the Southwest boulevard, also Fifteenth street, doing the grading work. Roanoke boulevard is another piece of our work, as was the ill-fated Cliff drive, where poor John and his wife met such a tragic fate. We did lots of work on the country roads in Jackson county and built almost all of the roads in Wyandotte county, besides many of the brick-paved streets.

LARGE CONTRACT WORK.

"We also did much work away from here, such as government work on the levee at New Orleans, county roads in Southern Indiana and railroad grading in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Mahoney was a man who made friends wherever he went. I just received a letter from Indiana asking if he and McGuire were the same men who were there asking for all particulars."

As Justice Ross's business ventures thrived he found it impossible to give the time required to his two grocery stores, and a few years ago he disposed of them. Previous to that, however, he had established the Missouri Carriage and Wagon works at 308-10 Broadway, which he still operates.

For many years he has been buying property and erecting modern flats thereon. He does not build flats to sell, but he keeps them for what they bring in. When Admiral boulevard was cut through at Virginia avenue, Justice Ross owned a big row of old flats immediately in the right of way. They are brick and their moving back was the biggest job of that kind ever done in this city. He made them modern and is erecting more flats near them.

The prettiest and most costly structure erected by Justice Ross is a flat building at Benton boulevard and St. John avenue, on a promontory overlooking the entire city. He owns forty or more pieces of improved property in the city.

In the fall of 1898 Michael Ross ran for justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket and was elected. Since then he has held the office for three terms, twelve years, winning each time with ease. He said last night, however, that he would not seek the office again. He intends to build a big home in the southern part of the city and he and Mrs. Ross will devote their time to their children. He now lives at 626 Troost avenue.

"John Mahoney almost decided to go to Jacksonville, Fla., with our party," said the Justice. "The ground was frozen and he could not work. But he was such a home-loving man he hated to leave his family, even for a day. I had a premonition when I left that something would happen. When I got the wire the first thing I thought of was his automobile. We did not get the particulars, however, until we got a paper at Memphis, and did not get full particulars and learn that McGuire was killed and the others hurt until we got The Journal at Paola, Kas.

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January 26, 1910

GENTLY SLAPPED WITH A KNIFE.

Then Fork Is Used in Restaurant
Quarrel Over "Profits and Loss."

Angus Harding and Frank Barber are owners of a restaurant at 2600 Independence avenue. Monday they quarreled over "profits and loss," and Barber is alleged to have used a fork. A complaint was filed yesterday by Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, charging Barber with felonious assault.

"When the argument came to the boiling point," said Harding yesterday, "Barber grabbed a butcher knife. I thought I was cooked, sure, but instead of stabbing me, he gently slapped me on one cheek and then on the other with the flat side. I made a dive for him. Then he grabbed up a fork and jabbed me in the forehead." Harding exhibited a long gash cut the breadth of his forehead.

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January 13, 1909

ICE FLOES WRECK
SHIPPING ON BLUE.

Pleasure Craft Smashed and
Swept Away by the
Grinding Cakes.

Great havoc among the shipping in the Blue river was wrought by a sudden break-up of ice on that stream yesterday afternoon. Several costly houseboats and launches were crushed, or their moorings snapped and carried away down the river. In all the damage amounts to several thousand dollars.

At the Kansas City Boat Club's moorings, Fifteenth street and Blue river, Harvey H. Espenship's thousand-dollar houseboat, fully furnished, was swept from its berth by the ice and carried down the river. Marion Bolinger, a boatman at Independence avenue and the Blue, saw it being carried by. It was crushed, and floating on his side. The boat contained several hundred dollars' worth of furniture, including a piano.

HOUSEBOAT AND LAUNCHES.

Mr. Espenship lost two launches, also the Iona I and the Iona II. These boats were valued at $600. both were carried down the Missouri river, one of them smashed in a jam of ice as it passed Independence avenue.

Bert Claflin of Centropolis lost a houseboat and a launch. More than twenty small boats were swept away or crushed in the ice at Fifteenth street.

Charles Demaree's houseboat and launch broke their cables. The houseboat was secured, but the launch was lost.

A lighter belonging to Harry Harris, son of Postmaster J. H. Harris, was crushed. Mr. Harris intended to build a house on the lighter next spring. A houseboat, the owner of which is not known, was crushed as it passed Independence avenue. The riven timbers were scattered among the ice cakes along the shore.

SEVEN-FOOT RISE.

The rise in the river during the afternoon was more than seven feet. At 8:30 o'clock last night the river left its banks at Fifteenth street. Boat owners, alarmed by the residents along the river, hastened to the moorings and secured their craft with chains. the landing stage at the boathouse, Fifteenth street and the Blue, was carried away.

The ice was breaking slowly, or a great deal more damage would have resulted. The ice cakes, being thick and heavy, crushed the small craft as they ground against them. The Kansas City Canoe Club lost many small boats.

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December 24, 1909

GAS COMPLETES RUIN
OF RIALTO BUILDING.

FLAMES UNDER CONTROL WHEN
MAIN BREAKS, EXPLODING.

Firemen Grope Way to Street as
Third Roar Is Heard and Fire
Raging for Hours, Leaves
Only Ice-Coated Walls.
Fire and Explosion Destroy the Rialto Building.
CHARRED WALLS OF THE RIALTO BUILDING, ALL THAT REMAINS OF A "FIRE TRAP."

Flames fed by a broken gas main destroyed the Rialto building at the southwest corner of Grand avenue and Ninth street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning. The building was erected in 1887 by Albert Marty, its present owner. The fire started in the basement and raged virtually unchecked for three hours until everything inflammable had been consumed. Nothing remains but the ruined and ice-coated walls. The loss is estimated at $300,000.

The building was one of the few remaining big Kansas City fire traps which are a terror to the fire department. Almost entirely of frame construction inside, it burned like tinder. In the language of Assistant Chief Alex Henderson, "not all the fire companies in Missouri could have stopped it."

The fire was noticed first by J. W. Johnson, a negro janitor, who had for many years been a fixture in the building. Johnson was sitting in one of the offices on the second floor at 3 o'clock in the morning, when he was startled by a rumbling sound like the report of a muffled cannon. He jumped from the chair in which he had been resting after several hours of hard work in policing the building, and bounded down the stairway.

He was confronted by dense smoke, and forgetting everything but that there were several person in the building who were in imminent danger of losing their lives, he bounded up the steps and shouted fire from each landing. In this manner he aroused Dr. J. W. Gaines, Dr. Robert O. Gross, Dr. Emil Thielman, Dr. Oliver F. Jones, Dr. A. Talbot, Dr. B. E. Jordan, Dr. J. B. Jones and Dr. Frank Jones. On the fifth floor Johnson came upon Charles R. Manley, senior physical examiner of the Y. M. C. A., in a semi-conscious condition, the result of striking his head against a post in his efforts to escape while groping his way through the dark, smoke-filled hallways. Johnson himself was beginning to feel the effects of the smoke, but not thinking of his own life in his efforts to save others half carried and dragged Mr. Manley down the stairway and out into the streets to safety. In the meantime, A. E. Perrine, night watchman in the building of McGowan, Small & Morgan, gas grantees, which is the first building south of the Rialto, discovered smoke and noticing the glare of flames which by that time had gained considerable headway in the trunk factory, hastened to a telephone and turned in the alarm.

FIRE FIGHT BEGINS.

The fire department soon was on the scene. The fire at first looked to be easy to extinguish. The firemen had the flames smothered, when a terrific explosion, caused by the breaking of a gas main, shot the flames up through the building to the top floors. At the time of this explosion Assistant Chief Alex Henderson and a squad of men were on the first floor of the building. The force of the explosion shook the entire building and as the flames were spreading to all parts of the structure, it was as much as a man's life was worth to stay inside, as another explosion could be expected at any time. While Chief Henderson and his men were extricating themselves from the trap, Captain Pelletier, with several men, were groping their way about in the basement of the Ninth street entrance. In what seemed to be hours, they emerged through the smoke and debris into the street. It was none too soon, as the third explosion occurred a few minutes later and had any of the firemen remained in the building they would have been buried beneath the floors and walls. By this time twenty companies had arrived and were throwing streams of water into the burning building from all sides, but it was of no use. The interior of the building was mostly wood and the outside wall kept the streams from getting to the center of the building, where the fire was worst.

The Rialto was the only old-time building of any consequence on Grand avenue. Albert Marty, the owner, is an active real estate and building man of Kansas City. He purchased the ground in 1886 and in 1887 constructed a five-story building on the corner. In 1889 he purchased forty-eight feet on the south side of the corner lot and the same year erected the south half of the building which burned yesterday morning.

The building was occupied by many prominent physicians and dentists, some of whom have been in the building twenty-five years.

"The number of occupants is in the neighborhood of 100," said Dr. H. D. McQuade, who had offices in the building for many years. "Many of us will be up against it for offices for some time, but I expect to contract for offices on the fifth floor of the Keith & Perry building tomorrow. Many of us received offers from other physicians to share their offices while looking for locations."

VALUED AT $125,000.

The building was valued at $125,000, although at the time of its erection it cost in the neighborhood of $200,000. That was more than twenty years ago. There was $81,500 insurance carried on the structure. The heaviest loser among the occupants was Hugo A. Brecklein, a druggist, occupying the first floor. Mr. Brecklein estimated his loss at $20,000, with $12,000 insurance.

J. H. Langan, son of John P. Langan, a grocer at 4601 Independence avenue, was walking north on Grand avenue yesterday morning when the fire started, and in attempting to awaken some of the men who were sleeping in the offices, he broke the glass in one of the doors, severely cutting his hand. But he saved the life of a man who was sleeping through all the disturbance, and succeeded in helping him to the street.

At least sixty physicians and twenty dentists lost their office furnishings and instruments in the Rialto building fire yesterday. The average loss for each tenant is said to have been about $700, and that only a small part of it was covered by insurance.

For years the Rialto has been the doctors' office building of Kansas City. Many of the most prominent physicians of the city were established there. Owing to the fact that in many buildings dentists and physicians are not allowed to rent offices, because the odors arising form the mixtures of medicines is objected to by other tenants, this building has long been recognized as the headquarters of men engaged in these two professions.

VALUABLE RELICS LOST.

About 1,000 specimens of prehistoric stone implements and two ancient violins were cherished treasures of Dr. A. H. Cordier, which were lost in the Rialto fire. Dr. Cordier occupied room 310, third floor.

A collector of prehistoric implements, Dr. Cordier, on trips to Mexico, Alaska, Ohio, Kentucky, Arkansas and through Missouri, got several thousand specimens, and he had about 1,000 of them on display in his offices. His is a collector of old violins and had two of these instruments, which he prized highly, in his rooms. Another relic which Dr. Cordier lost was the mounted head of a mountain sheep which he shot while on a hunting trip in British Columbia. Dr. Cordier's office had been in the Rialto building eighteen years.

DR. ANDERSON LUCKY.

A long distance survey of the Rialto ruins makes it appear that Dr. R. V. Anderson, a dentist, is the only tenant of the burned structure whose effects were not destroyed, and he recalls the fact that once before in a fire in the Rialto building he also was lucky.

Dr. Anderson's office has been in the building nearly eighteen years, ever since he began to practice, and some years ago ago fire broke out beneath his office, and his rooms, enveloped in smoke and flame, seemed doomed. The firemen, however, extinguished the blaze before his effects suffered any serious damage.

ORDINANCE NOT ENFORCED.

At the burning of the Rialto building yesterday morning the firemen were greatly handicapped by dangers from exploding gas, and they were in continual danger of being burned by flame of escaping gas. Had the building been equipped with a Siebens' shut-off gas valve it would have been possible for the firemen the moment they reached the fire to turn off the gas in the entire building and thereby lessen the danger occasioned by the escaping gas. The building code requires the installation of gas shut-off devices on all buildings, but for some reason the ordinance has never been enforced.

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December 4, 1909

ZONES OF CONTAGION
NEAR THREE SCHOOLS.

SCARLET FEVER AND DIPH-
THERIA IN SEVERAL SECTIONS.

Tin Drinking Cup Blamed by Medi-
cal Inspectors, Especially at
Benton -- Several Parochial
Schools Involved.

The medical inspectors going the rounds of the public schools have unearthed diphtheria and scarlet fever zones within the confines of Benton, Washington and Karnes schools. They are also learning from the daily returns of practicing physicians, of the existence of the two maladies among pupils of two or three of the parochial schools, but as the authority of the inspectors does not extend to schools of this description Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary commissioner, has not felt justified in taking any voluntary official notice or action.

Of the parochial schools the worst afflicted is St. John's Parochial school, 534 Tracy avenue. This school, located in a district largely inhabited by Italian children, is conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Yesterday Sister Superior Monica appealed to the health authorities to make an investigation. Dr. H. Delamater, chief inspector, made a personal visit to the school and was informed that ninety of the 160 pupils are detained at home by sickness. Within the last six days cases of scarlet fever have developed among the pupils, and Dr. Delameter fears that many who are home at home may have it. He will have an examination made of the school building as to its sanitary condition, and will have class rooms fumigated.

Washington public school is at the southwest corner or Independence avenue and Cherry street, and the Karnes school is at the northwest corner of Troost avenue and Fourth street. Large numbers of the pupils have scarlet fever, the majority of victims predominating among those attending Karnes school. The diphtheria is not as epidemic as scarlet fever. The attendants of these two schools live in the territory bounded on the south by Admiral boulevard, north by the river, west by Grand avenue and east as far as Lydia avenue. The majority of the cases are north of Fifth street and scatter as far to the east as Budd park. As an assistance to the health authorities in keeping in touch with the exact location of the disease, a large map of the city has been prepared, and when a case of diphtheria develops a green-headed pin is driven into the map, designating a particular territory, and when one of scarlet fever is reported the map is perforated with a red-headed pin.

MAP RAPIDLY FILLING.

The map describing the Washington and Karnes school districts is rapidly filling up with the pin indicators, but not as noticeably as the district in which Benton school is situated. At the latter school diphtheria is the most prevalent, and is giving some alarm. The infection is spreading with rapidity. Benton school is at the southwest corner of Thirtieth street and Benton boulevard, in a fashionable and well-to-do neighborhood. There are from twenty to thirty cases of diphtheria among pupils going to this school, and it is feared that the disease got its start from the drinking cups in use there.

"The drinking cup in the public schools is a menace to health and is a communicator and spreader of disease," said Dr. Delamater yesterday. "Its frightful possibilities were fully described by Dr. W. S. Wheeler in his last annual report, and he advises that it be relegated and sanitary fountains installed in the schools. The health of no child is safe when the tin cup is in use. While I am not directly charging the appearance of diphtheria at Benton school to the drinking cup, still there is plenty of room for that suspicion as the school building is new and should be sanitary."

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November 21, 1909

BOY JUMPS OFF CAR;
KILLED BY AUTO.

NOT THE HOPPING KIND, JUST
PLAYING, COMPANION SAYS.

Edgar Palin, Aged 12, Dies in Hos-
pital From Injuries Received in
Alighting in Path of Machine
Giving Children Ride.
Edgar Palin, 12-year-old Killed by Automobile.
EDGAR PALIN,
Twelve-Year-Old Boy Who Leaped from Street Car Fender and Was Mortally Injured by Automobile.

As Edgar Palin, 12 years old, 2802 East Sixth street, jumped from the back fender of an eastbound Independence avenue car yesterday afternoon at Prospect avenue, he was run over and fatally injured by a motor car driven by E. T. Curtis, 3338 Wyandotte street. He died at 7 o'clock last night at the German hospital, without recovering consciousness.

With Allen Compton, 400 Wabash avenue, the boy had been playing all afternoon. About 3 o'clock the two lads started northward on Wabash avenue, and at Independence avenue both noticed an approaching street car.

"Let's catch the fender," called Edgar, as he waited along the curbing. The car was moving at moderate speed and the boy ran behind, and caught hold of the fender. His companion, 10 years old, ran behind on the sidewalk. At Prospect avenue Edgar, without looking around, jumped from the fender directly in front of an approaching auto, barely fifteen feet behind him. Curtis attempted to dodge the boy. The left fender of the auto struck the child and he was sent tumbling on the pavement. He was picked up by Curtis. Several children were in the auto. With Curtis was Herman Smith, of 3606 Olive street, whose father owned the car. In a nearby drug store it was found the boy had been injured seriously.

GIVING CHILDREN RIDE.

"I was driving at about fifteen miles an hour," Curtis said. "The auto belonged to young Smith's father and I was running it because I had the most experience. A party of school children were with us. We were taking them for a ride around the block. I noticed the child on the fender and did not have the least idea that he was going to run in my path. I swerved to one side, but the machine skidded and the fender of the auto struck him in the back. I realized at once that he had received a fearful blow."

After the child was given emergency treatment in the drug store by two neighboring physicians, he was taken to his home in the motor car, and after being attended by Dr. Max Goldman, was removed to the German hospital. Dr. Goldman found that the boy's spine was broken and that his skull was probably fractured.

Allen Compton, his playmate, was in a condition bordering on hysterics last night. The two had been gathering old papers during the forenoon and had just been to the paper mill, where they had received a few pennies with which they intended to buy Christmas presents.

"Edgar wasn't no car hopper," Allen said last night, in defense of his friend. "He was just running behind and holding on to the fender. Edgar wasn't that kind."

With Judge J. E. Guinotte, a friend of the family, young Curtis went to police headquarters last night and made a statement to Captain Walter Whitsett. After consulting Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, it was decided not to hold him. He promised to come to the prosecutor's office Monday and make a complete statement. He said that he had been running a car for eight years. He is the son of W. E. Curtis, a live stock commission man.

The injured boy was the son of W. M. Palin, a real estate dealer in the Commerce building. The body will be taken to Gridley, Kas., for burial.

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November 7, 1909

PARISH BENEFIT BAZAAR.

Receipts Will Be Added to Assump-
tion Building Fund.

A bazaar for the benefit of the New Assumption parish, recently created by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Hogan, will be held this week beginning tomorrow night in the hall at the southwest corner of Independence boulevard and Prospect avenue. A special music programme will be a feature each evening. There also will be many events in the way of voting contests.

The New Assumption parish was formerly a part of the St. Aloysius parish and embraces the territory east of Prospect avenue to Norton avenue. The southern limit is Independence avenue and the territory extends as far north as Cliff drive. Father William J. Connolly is the pastor and services are being held temporarily at 3327 Garner avenue. the profits from this week's bazaar will be added to the fund for a new church.

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August 4, 1909

WIPING OUT A CAR LINE.

W. H. Winants Tells of Pioneer
Movement in Electric Railways.

Some idea of the complete way in which the street railway properties are wiped out may be gathered from the fate of the old Northeast electric line. It was only in an accidental way yesterday that the fact was developed that within the last twenty years there was built, operated and wiped out in this city an electric railway. The contractor who was speaking of the line could not recall particulars of it, but remembered that Colonel W. H. Winants, president of the Mercantile bank of this city, had been president of the old company. When Colonel Winants was asked about the road he told a story that was one of pioneering.

"Municipal transportation is a dangerous thing," said the Mercantile bank's president. "So many bright minds are bent upon perfecting the means of rapid transit that great discoveries are made, so great that they destroy all earlier methods. Eight men, including myself, found some twenty years ago that horse cars, dummy engines and cable railways would soon be obsolete and that electricity would be the moving power.

"We raised money for a line and took over the Northeast horse car line. That system ran from the Market square to Woodland avenue by way of Independence avenue. It took care of only that territory, and being a mule line, was not conducive to settlers going beyond. With electricity available we went further. We left Independence avenue and laid rails along the present route, though not so far east as the cars now go.

"When we went out there we went out alone. Our equipment was crude, being then newly invented, and the consequence was the service was not as good as it might be. It would not be accepted today. But we ran electric cars, the people saw how much faster they went than the old mules, and how much farther they could go without coming to a dead stop. Mules would go only so far.

"Poor as our service was, the line began to develop the country, and in an incredibly short space of time there were houses going up all along the route, and thus began the growth of the northeast part of Kansas City. The street cars did it."

Asked what became of the line, President Winants laughed and said that "modern inventions and other things made it necessary to get a bigger company, the Metropolitan, to take it over.

"I had the honor of being the president of the first electric line in Kansas City, and the only 'gravity system' we have had. One morning I arrived at the car line barns at Highland avenue, or near there, and found the trolley had got mixed up with the overhead rigging, and had been torn off the top of the car. It would not do to tie up the system. It was time for people to be getting down town. So I had the trolley pole laid at the curb, closed the doors, told the passengers there would be no stop made till we got to the end of the line, thus giving a chance to any who wanted to get off, and away we went.

"It was a downhill run all the way except past Shelley park, and we gathered enough momentum before reaching that level to carry us on to the next decline. We made the trip all right, and thus began and ended Kansas City's gravity line.

"Seriously speaking," resumed Colonel Winants, "there is a great risk in street car sureties. The lines have to spend vast sums of money pioneering. They do a tremendous amount of good to the city and a new invention may wipe them out."

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July 25, 1909

CHINESE DON JUAN
ARRESTED IN CHICAGO.

CLAIMED GAW WING ELOPED
WITH MRS. ETHEL GORDON.

Celestial of Many Love Affairs
and Woman, Who Is Said
to Be From Kansas
City, Fine.

White women have a strange fascination for Gaw Wing, a Kansas City Chinese. Gaw has been arrested in Chicago in company with a woman who gave her name as Mrs. Ethel Gordon, also of Kansas City. The two eloped recently, it is claimed, and Chicago was the destination.

Gaw at one time, so it is said, went to Topeka where he fell love with a white school teacher. He flashed his bundle of bills and the school teacher became Mrs. Wing. She was at the police station in Kansas City yesterday looking for her recreant husband.

About a week ago, having forgotten his school teacher wife long since, it is claimed, he and Mrs. Gordon, both known to the police in the person of inspector Edward P. Boyle, left Kansas City. It was common gossip among the Chinese of West Sixth street that Gaw left a wife in Kansas City. This wife to who they refer says she was Mrs. Charles Wilson before she married the flighty Wing. She and the Mongolian also eloped to Chicago and were arrested January 26 of this year and were fined in the municipal court of that city. Mrs. Wilson has a child 2 years old.

Gaw's friends in Chicago paid his fine and he and Mrs. Wilson were released.

They came back to Kansas City and their domestic bark suddenly ran upon breakers. Mrs. Wilson Wing dropped out of sight.

Wing and Charlie Chu, a restaurant keeper at 125 West Sixth street, were fast friends and Gaw spent much of his time at the restaurant. White women came and went and from the lot Wing, it is alleged, selected Mrs. Gordon, who the police say lived at the Madison house, Independence avenue and Walnut street. Gaw, it is said, took up his abode at the Madison house and a rapid courtship followed. Gaw and his new spouse left for Chicago about two weeks ago and from that city last night came the news of their arrest.

Gaw was passing under the name of Charles Foy and Mrs. Gordon was registered as his wife. Inspector Boyle says that he is certain the eloping Chinaman is Gaw Wing. Mrs. Gordon told the Chicago police that she had been living in Chicago for over a year with her brother at 516 North Ashland avenue.

The Chinese and the woman were arrested by Chicago detectives after having been seen to enter a questionable hotel together and register as Charles Foy and wife. They were fined $200 and court costs there yesterday morning.

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July 15, 1909

NOISE OF THE KIDS
DROWNS SET SPEECHES.

FIRST PUBLIC PLAYGROUND IS
OFFICIALLY OPENED.

Crowd of 500 Youngsters Rollic So
Enthusiastically That Associa-
tion Directors Abandon Pro-
gramme of Ceremonies.

Thronged with children of all ages and color, the small plot of ground at the northwest corner of Charlotte street and Independence avenue was last night officially opened by the directors of the Playgrounds Association as the first public playgrounds in Kansas City. It was planned to have several short addresses by the directors, but the enthusiasm of the youngsters was such that no attention was given to the speakers, who were relieved of their embarrassment by the band.

Long before the hour announced for the opening the children of the neighborhood had arrived, and were busy with the swings, sliding boards and "teeters," Misses Agnes O'Brien and Elsa Katzmaier, the instructors, were assisted by their supervisor, Mrs. Viola Dale McMurray, in the opening. The instructors will be on duty all day, and will teach the children, according to their ages, games.

GREAT CROWD CAUSED CONFUSION.

Confusion reigned supreme last night, and the real intent of the playgrounds could not be shown on account of the enormous crowd. Mothers accompanied the tiny tots, while older sisters and brothers came "just to see," but were as interested as the younger children. Every little while some child would set up a wail and to the kind hearted young instructors would tell about an older one teasing them. Two or three large boys were put off the grounds because they would not behave.

All nationalities were represented among the children and Italians mingled with the negroes as did the Irish and Hebrews.

THURSDAY FOR NEGROES.

After today the negro children will be allowed there only on Thursday, when the white boys and girls will be barred. Besides the baby game which the instructors will teach, baseball basketball and other amusements will be provided at different hours of the day for the larger youngsters.

Small tables and chairs have been provided for the very little ones who will be closely watched while in the play grounds. All movable apparatus is to be locked up at night. A shelter house extending across one side of the grounds can be used on rainy days. The children will be urged to play in the yard, however, as much as possible.

Between 400 and 500 children were on the grounds at one time early in the evening. When the instructors left the grounds after 9 o'clock, some 200 little ones, who were loathe to leave, remained.

The play ground is in the heart of the thickly populated foreign and negro settlements.

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July 14, 1909

ATE ICE CREAM; MAY DIE.

Andrew Johnson Found in Budd
Park Suffering From Ptomaines.

Writhing with pain from ptomaine poisoning, Andrew Johnson, 45 years old, janitor of the Fountain place apartments at 1448 Independence avenue, was found at midnight last night in front of a park bench in Budd park. At the emergency hospital Johnson told Dr. F. R. Berry, who treateed him, that he had eaten some ice cream at a drug store early in the evening. Soon after he was attacked by acute pains in the stomach. Emergency treatment last night brought no relief, and Dr. Berry thought Johnson would not live until this morning.

Johnson has a wife and child.

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July 11, 1909

BOUGHT THE FIRST LOT
IN KANSAS CITY.

J. C. EVANS, PIONEER RESIDENT,
DIES AT AGE OF 76 YEARS.

Was Second White Child Born Here.
Became Indian Trader in Early
Days -- Funeral Not
Announced.
J. C. Evans, Kansas City Pioneer.
J. C. EVANS.

J. C. Evans, 76 years of age, who was the second white child to be born in Kansas City, died at the University hospital yesterday afternoon as the result of an operation. Mr. Evans had been ill but a short while.

On Dundee place, and on the very highest point of that place, J. C. Evans was born. All around the house was farm land and wilderness, and off to the south and west was the thriving town of Westport. For almost twenty-one years Mr. Evans lived in the house on Dundee's place and did his share towards the building of the greater city upon which he looked with utmost pride in the last years of his life.

Mr. Evans, in those early days, was a trader by occupation, and many were the trips which he took over the old Santa Fe trail down into the Southwest to barter and trade with Indians. With the Indians around Kansas City he had many dealings and was looked upon as a fair man by them.

Shortly before the civil war Mr. Evans married Miss Elizabeth Campbell of Clay county. Within a few months the couple moved from Kansas City to a farm in Clay County, where Mr. Evans had lived until his death.

In 1880 Mrs. Evans died, and four years later Mr. Evans married Miss Sarah M. Plummer of Paris, France, whom he met while she was visiting in this country. Mrs. Evans survives her husband.

Among the interesting facts surrounding the long life of Mr. Evans are two most prominent. It was he who surveyed the first plat of Kansas City, and it was he who bought the first town lot.

Mr. Evans was the son of William B. and Amelia McGee Evans, both of whom were prominent in the pioneer days of Kansas City. Mrs. Evans, his mother, was one of the old Westport McGees.

Eight children survive: Mrs. S. P. Stowers, Millersburg, Mo.; Paul Evans, Mountain Grove, Mo.; Amelia Evans, Clay county; Mrs. J. H. Garth, 1035 Monroe avenue, Kansas City; Mrs. W. R. Soper, Independence, Mo.; Mrs. J. C. McGee, Texarkana, Tex.; J. C. Evans, Jr., Oldham, Mo., and J. M. Evans of Clay county. In Kansas City Mr. Evans has a brother, M. M. Evans, Twenty-fifth and Troost, and a sister, Mrs. William Vineyard, 1475 Independence avenue.

Owing to the condition of the railroad service no definite time has been set for the funeral. It will be held from the First Christian church. Rev. F. V. Lose of Liberty, Mo., will officiate. Burial is to be in the family lot at Elmwood cemetery.

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July 11, 1909

BUILT FIRST CITY HOSE CART.

William Henry Brundage Dies at
Age of 64.

William Henry Brundage, who built his own factory the first hose wagon used by the Kansas City fire department, died at his home at 2817 East Ninth street of a complication of diseases at an early hour yesterday morning. He was 64 years old. Mr. Brundage is survived by a widow and a son, W. A. Brundage, who is a traveling salesman for the Anderson Coupling Company.

Coming to Kansas City in the spring of 1870, Mr. Brundage established a wagon factory at 507 Grand avenue in the following year. He manufactured all kinds of equippages, among them hose carts and trucks. When the old volunteer fire company was done away with and the new devices installed Mr. Brundage got the first order for fire trucks and is said to have supplied a very superior article for that time.

Twenty years ago the factory on Grand avenue burned and a new one was built at 1420-22-24 McGee street, where Mr. Brundage was a member of the Commercial Club. After his retirement from business he traveled in the South for his health. He returned a few weeks ago. He has a home at 1849 Independence avenue.

At the time of his marriage in 1868 Mr. Brundage at that time was paymaster in the army under General Curtis.

All attempts to locate the son, who is traveling in Kansas, failed yesterday. The Anderson company, however, assured Mrs. Brundage that he would be found some time today.

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July 9, 1909

HE RODE THE BICYCLE.

But Fred Collins, a Baker, Is Now
Under a Surgeon's Care.

To ride a bicycle was the ambition of Fred Collins, a baker, 1526 1/2 Grand avenue, and yesterday afternoon he secured a wheel and went out on Kensington avenue near Independence avenue to experiment. He started at the top of a hill and when he reached the bottom the machine struck a telegraph post. Dr. E. D. Twyman of the emergency hospital was summoned and set a broken right clavicle.

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July 8, 1909

TO OPEN FIRST MODEL
PLAY GROUND TUESDAY.

Band Music and Flag Raising Pro-
gramme for North End Model
Recreation Park.

There will be many smiling little faces in the North End next Tuesday. This will be the opening of the city's first model playground at Independence avenue and Charlotte street. In the morning there will be a flag raising in which the children will participate. In the evening a band will be on hand to make music for the occasion.

The grounds are situated on a lot 85 x 100 feet. On it is a pretty shelter house, 20 x 75 feet, where children may play out of the sun and where mothers of the neighborhood may rest in the evenings. The place may also be used for neighborhood meetings.

There will be eight shower baths with hot and cold water, an indoor baseball and basket ball court, sand pits where the children may jump, and sand piles where the little ones may play and make tunnels. There will also be teeter-totters, a merry-go-round, a giant slide, hickory turning poles and rings. In all there will be twelve pieces of the most modern outdoor playground apparatus. All of this was made possible by money furnished by the Kansas City Playgrounds Association. The K. C. A. C. will furnish a male director and the Kansas City Women's Athletics club will furnish a young woman to look after the instruction of the girls on the playgrounds.

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June 29, 1909

JOSHES NEW COP AND
IS PROMPTLY PINCHED.

AUDITOR'S PAYMASTER SAID
"OH, YOU KID."

A Jewish policeman, the first Kansas City ever had, arrested an Irishman last night for disturbing the officer's peace.

Max Joffy, formerly a porter in James Pendergast's saloon and later a janitor at the city hall under Mayor Henry M. Beardsley, was appointed a probationary patrolman on the police force yesterday morning along with forty-three other men.

Proudly wearing his new star and swinging a white ash club he entered the drug store of Morton Burger at Independence avenue and Cherry street yesterday afternoon. Frank O. Donnely, paymaster in the city auditor's office, was in the drug store. Knowing Joffy for years he was amused at the Jewish policeman's outfit and burst out laughing.

"Holy St. Patrick, look at the new cop," laughed Donnely, making a grimace, "Oh, you kid!"


Joffy's new found dignity was touched. He placed his hand on Donnelly's back and said:

"I'll teach you to talk that way to an officer. Come on down to the station."

Donnelly rose from the fountain, where he was drinking an ice cream soda, with a glass holder in his hand. Joffy drew his revolver, afterwards found to be unloaded, and with the tags still upon it. Donnelly's Irish spirit ebbed and he submitted. He was taken to the central police station where he was booked for disturbing the peace. He afterward gave bond.

"I know nothing of the merits of the case against Donnelly," said Captain Walter Whitsett last night, "but I do know that a police officer's peace cannot be disturbed, according to the law as it is interpreted by the courts."

Donnelly is a rising young Democratic politician in the Sixth ward. He has been paymaster in the city auditor's office for three years. He lives with his family at 632 Troost avenue.

"I couldn't resist the temptation to have a little fun at Joffy's expense," he said. "I have known the man for five years and had never seen him take offense at a well meant joke before. This is the first time I was ever arrested in my life."

STRANGE NAMES IN LIST.

The list of forty-three officers appointed by the board yesterday bears only one Irish name -- that of Daniel R. McGuire, who was made a jailer. There are such cognomens as Obrecht, Zinn, Mertz, Baer, Niemier and Siegfried. They were given clubs, stars and revolvers yesterday afternoon and will be assigned for duty today.

Joffy was not on duty at the time his first arrest was made. He is the first policeman of Jewish descent to be appointed in the city, according to men who have been on the force for many years.

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June 14, 1909

CONFISCATE 22 CASES OF
BEER AT GALLAGHER'S.

POLICE ARREST 22 IN NORTH
END SUNDAY RAID.

Eight Women Beside Mrs. Gallagher,
Who, With Husband, Is Charged
With Selling Liquor With-
out a License.

Charged with selling liquor without a license, Jack Gallagher, ex-patrolman and former North End saloonkeeper, was arrested and locked up in the holdover at Central police station yesterday in default of $500 cash bond. He was arrested in a raid made by Captain Walter Whitsett on the Star hotel, Oak street and Independence avenue, at 11:30 o'clock yesterday morning.

Since Gallagher's saloon licenses were taken away from him by the board of police commissioners after he assaulted Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, he has been conducting a rooming house in the Star hotel.

Yesterday the lid in the North End was on extremely tight. Gallagher had twenty-two cases of bottled beer in a room in the hotel.

One of the numerous enemies Gallagher had made by his bullying attitude went to police headquarters about 11:00 and reported to Captain Whitsett that Gallagher was violating the excise laws. Calling Sergeant Edward McNamara and ten patrolmen, Captain Whitsett headed the squad in making the raid. Arriving at the Star hotel building, the police found the door leading to the rear stairway locked and barred. Entrance to the hotel was made by the front door.

TWENTY-NINE AND 22 CASES.

The captain and sergeant led the patrolmen in a rush up the stairway. Scattering out the patrolmen searched every room for evidence. Men and women, the police claim, were found drinking beer in several rooms. While searching the house the police discovered one room which was locked. Gallagher said he did not have the key. The prisoners were sent to the station in a patrol wagon which made three trips to take the twenty-nine persons placed under arrest.

When the locked room was entered twenty-two cases of bottled beer were found and sent to headquarters where they are held as evidence. Among the persons arrested were eight women besides Jack Gallagher's wife, who at midnight was released on a cash bond of $500.

All of those arrested said they lived at the hotel. Mrs. Gallagher denied that all of the women lived there, but said only two or three of them were roomers.

When the raid was made, Gallagher threatened to place charges against the police. Their jobs were to be had, according to him, and he told them he would get them. Until he was locked in the holdover Gallagher continued his swaggering tactics. He refused to discuss his arrest.

BEER FOR OWN USE.

Gallagher's wife informed the police that they had a government license, which expired in July. She denied that the police found anyone drinking beer, or that any beer had been sold. Before she was aware that the police had confiscated the beer, she said no evidence had been secured. When asked what they were doing with so many cases in the hotel, she said it was for their private use. Mrs. Gallagher said the police and newspapers were endeavoring to bankrupt them, but that they had plenty left. The habitues were released on $11 bond.

Jack Gallagher has had a varied experience in the North End, having been at various times a policeman, ward politician and saloonkeeper. Following numerous arrests for disturbing the peace, he was finally compelled to serve a term in the workhouse for an assault upon a newspaper man.

The officers participating in the raid under Captain Walter Whitsett were Sergeant Edward McNamara and Patrolmen George Hightower, Daniel Jones, P. J. Murphy, Vincent Maturo, Charles Walters, Walter Doman, Thomas Eads, Thomas Maddigan, Frank Rooth and Patrick Dalton.

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May 16, 1909

JUST LIKE THE ROAR OF
APPROACHING TRAIN.

MT. WASHINGTON RESIDENTS
DESCRIBE THE CYCLONE.

Freak Results of the "Twister"
Viewed by the Hundreds Who
Visited Storm-Wrecked
Suburb.

1. Wreck of Christian church blown across Overton avenue. Newton Bird's residence in the background, turned around on foundation. G. B. De Bernardi's home stood in the foreground; completely demolished.
2. Giant elm uprooted by storm. Tree was three feet in diameter.
3. J. J. Peek's home at Independence and Overton avenues, turned over on side.
4. G. F. Baker's new home, blown from foundation.
5. Where H. D. Jett's home, back of Christian church stood. Mrs. Jett and three children were in building but were uninjured.

Hundreds of sightseers yesterday afternoon inspected the devastation wrought by the cyclone on Friday night at Mount Washington. When the visitors looked at the ruined homes, the twisted trolley poles and the debris that once represented suburban dwellings, surprise was expressed that no one was killed outright. It was almost miraculous, when slivers were found firmly embedded in trees, scantlings driven two feet into the ground and nails driven into the sides of walls that were still standing.

When morning came the work of cleaning up the debris commenced. It was found to be a hard task. The members of the Christian church, which was completely destroyed, were on hand early and picked up chairs, carpets, Bibles and song books.

The owners of the destroyed homes looked upon the matter in a philosophical way. Aside from picking up little things which had escaped destruction, they spent most of the time in explaining to the ever-present crowd how it actually happened. Just a roar, like an approaching train, and it was all over. Not even time to get to the cellar was afforded most of the victims. With mist that was impenetrable, the cyclone swept on, but high in the air fragments of trees, timbers and scantlings could be seen. Every one was of the opinion that the storm traversed Mount Washington in less than five minutes.

STORM'S PATH NOT WIDE.

The path of the storm was not over thirty yards wide. In many instances buildings twenty feet from wrecked ones, were not damaged in the least. Gigantic trees that had stood for more than 100 years were broken off at the base, while others in softer ground were torn up by the roots. A sugar maple in one instance was transplanted into a neighboring garden.

According to the physicians who attended the twenty or more injured, there will likely be no fatalities. The Greer boys who were caught under their home when they attempted to reach the cellar were taken to the Sheffield hospital and both will recover. They remained wedged between the floor and the foundation before they were released by the neighbors. Seth Greer, 17 years old, was injured the least of the two. Lee, the 5-year-old boy, is still in critical condition, although the physicians are hopeful of his ultimate recovery.

Mrs. J. W. Robinson, who lives in Fairmount addition, and whose house was blown to pieces, is dangerously injured. Her head was cut, her left side bruised and she probably has received internal injuries. Mrs. Josie De Bernardi, 61 years old, who received a broken right arm, will recover.

IT WAS A KANSAS CYCLONE.

All who witnessed the storm were of the opinion that it was one of the old-fashioned Kansas cyclones. G. F. Baker, whose new home at the corner of Overton and Independence avenues, was completely wrecked, stood a block away and watched the "twister." The house was not occupied.

The insurance men did a thriving business yesterday among the residents of Mount Washington who escaped storm injury. Agents from Kansas City firms arrived with the first street cars, and it is likely that before last night, the suburb was fairly well covered. No one seemed to be anxious to take further risk.

Dr. Charles Nixon and Dr. William L. Gilmore, the resident physicians of Mount Washington, say little rest Friday night. The two men practically covered the entire district devastated by the cyclone. Both were besieged by persons who desired them to come to the aid of injured friends. Physicians from Independence arrived in a motor car and attended many.

Mrs. John Reed, who was living in a tent in the Fairmount addition, saved herself from serious injury by her presence of mind. She looked out of the tent when she heard the roar of the storm. She knew that it would be impossible to reach safety. Alongside of the tent was a barbwire fence. She grasped one of the posts and waited until the storm struck. her lacerated arms showed that her experience had been a trying one. She didn't give up, though.

"I locked my arms," she said, "and closed my eyes. It was all over in a minute. It was simply awful. I was lifted from the ground, but I wouldn't let go."

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May 15, 1909

SCORES INJURED IN A
STORMSWEPT SUBURB.

TORNADO STRIKES MOUNT
WASHINGTON.

Many Homes Wrecked or Demol-
ished -- Trees and Poles Razed,
Air Line Train in the
Twister's Path.

Sweeping across the country just east of Kansas City, a tornado tore down many buildings and injured more than twenty persons about 6 o'clock last night. The greatest damage was done in the neighborhood of Mount Washington and Fairmount park. The storm originated near the intersection of the Blue Ridge road and Fifteenth street, and crossed the country to the northeast.

Little damage was done by the tornado until it reached the street car line at Mount Washington, and from there until it reached the Missouri river it left only wreckage in its path. It moved some houses from the foundations, demolished others, and razed trees and telegraph poles. Many persons were injured by flying timbers. Several of the injured are not expected to live, and quite a number not bruised suffered from nervous shock.

ROOFS 200 FEET IN AIR.

Wreckage was blown high in the air, and witnesses say that roofs were seen at an altitude of 200 feet. Timbers carried onto the street car and railroad tracks delayed transportation, and made it dangerous for traveling. Flying timbers threatened injury to all those who braved the storm to go the the assistance of the unfortunates whose homes were demolished. Immediately after the force of the tornado had passed, men and women gathered to the aid of those needing it and surgeons were sent for from Independence.

Many miraculous escapes were recorded and the storm played havoc with everything in its path. Trees several feet in diameter were uprooted and then broken off, while telephone and telegraph wires and poles were blown down which tended to make the work of rescue the harder. As fast as the injured persons were found friends and neighbors carried them to their homes and summoned medical aid.

TRAIN IN TRACK OF STORM.

The Air Line train, which is due to leave Independence at 5:45, was directly in the path of the tornado, and at Mount Washington narrowly escaped being wrecked. A roof whirling in the air 200 feet high passed over the rear coach, and the end of the roof tore a hole in the top of the car. A timber was driven into the roof of the coach, and was sticking there when the train pulled out.

The concrete and steel bridge of the Chicago & Alton crossing the electric line leading to Fairmount park was moved four inches from its foundation. Residences on the hill were blown down and the wreckage strewn along the Chicago & Alton and Missouri Pacific tracks.

The storm struck the ground at various places, and where it did any damage its path was estimated to be about 150 feet wide. Many persons saw its approach and attempted to avoid it by running across the country or retiring to the cellars of their homes. One woman who ran into a barn was left unconscious on the ground, while the barn was whipped off the ground and carried away. What became of it was not known last night.

LIKE A LURID DUST CLOUD.

Those who noticed the storm as it approached their neighborhood, said that it seemed to gather velocity and destructiveness as it neared Mount Washington. The cloud, looking like a reddish dust cloud, twisted and whirled with rapidity. It would travel high in the air and then swoop down to earth, smashing and damaging everything it struck.

Throughout and preceding the tornado there was a heavy rainfall. Shortly after the crest of the storm had passed the wind swept territory, the work of rescue was well under way. Later the rain continued, and delayed the recovery of property which had been blown away.

CAUGHT UNDER WRECKAGE.

The low hanging cloud, as it swept around Mount Washington cemetery, took on a funnel like shape when it neared the Metropolitan tracks. The home of George Ogan at 915 Greenwood avenue was the first in the path of the storm. Mr. and Mrs. Ogan, with their daughter, Mrs. J. Jenkins, were in the house, which was lifted from its foundation. After it passed the Ogan home the storm redoubled its fury.

John Archer, a Metropolitan motorman, who was working on a new house near the street car tracks, was struck by a flying timber. Dr. Gilmore, who treated him, found that he was suffering from a severe scalp wound.

At the barn of A. J. Ream not enough timbers were left to show that it ever existed. Mr. Ream's large house, fifty feet to the east, was not damaged. Across the street car spur to Fairmount park, Orli Can's home was blown to pieces. No one was at home.

Next to the Cain home was a new building being erected by C. L. Green, an insurance man, who is in Cleveland, O., at the present time. In the rear was a small cottage in which the family lived. When the storm struck Mrs. Greer and the two sons attempted to reach the cellar. The mother was not injured, but the boys were caught by the house as it ripped from the foundation. A. J. Ream rescued the boys from under the wreckage.

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DESTROYED.

Adjoining the Greer home was the residence of Will McCay, a decorator for Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Company. Mrs. McKay and her 8 year old daughter, Grace, were in the dining room. The roof was carried fifty feet away. Both were hurt.

Next in its path the storm destroyed two large residences belonging to H. D. Jett, a commission man. Mrs. Jett and three children were in the smaller of the two houses. The building was completely destroyed. None of the four were injured.

At the southwest corner of Independence and Overton avenues the storm did its worst. The Christian church, a building erected four years ago, was wrecked beyond recognition. Not a wall was left standing. Had the windstorm struck two hours later, the building would have been occupied, as revival services are held every night.

J. S. DeBernardi's home, directly south of the church, was shifted from its foundation, and Forest, his 10-year-old son, was slightly injured. Charles F. Miller's residence, fifty feet to the west, was shifted from the foundation, but no one was injured, though the family were at home.

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. DeBernardi, the parents of J. S. DeBernardi, lived directly across Overton avenue from the Christian church. The five room cottage was literally blown away, and Mrs. DeBernardi was dangerously injured. Her left arm was broken and she was later taken to Independence for treatment. A new house belonging to J. S. DeBernardi, fifty feet away, was also blown away.

HOUSE TOPSY TURVY.

In its course, the storm next struck the home of W. B. Rich. The house was shifted form its foundation. Steele Byrd's new residence was also shifted from its foundation. The Kefferly home, adjoining the Rich's, had its roof blown away.

Fortunately no one was at home when the storm struck the home of J. Peak, the proprietor of the Fairmount Lumber Company. The house was turned completely over and deposited upside down in the cellar. A new residence belonging to G. R. Baker was next, and was totally destroyed. No one was living in the building.

The storm then jumped the deep ravine between Mount Washington and Fairmount addition. John Robinson's cottage was the first struck and was completely demolished. Mrs. Robinson and her 1-year-old daughter were dangerously injured. J. W. Ferguson's cottage was next destroyed. Mrs. Ferguson was injured, but the two children were not touched.

HELD TO FENCE POST.

Fred McGrath's home, directly north, was also destroyed, and Mrs. McGrath was dangerously injured. Directly north of the McGrath home Mr. and Mrs. John Reed were living in a tent. Mr. Reed was not at home, and when Mrs. Reed saw the cloud she started to run. Finding that it would be impossible to get away, she seized a piece of fence post and managed to cling to it until the wind was over. Her arms were badly lacerated.

A block north the two-story residence of Alexander Harness was demolished. Mrs. Harness received several scratches. A new dwelling across the street in the course of construction was demolished. The one-room home of James Patterson, a laborer, was blown away. Patterson escaped with slight injuries.

From Patterson's home the tornado lifted and no further damage was reported. Sugar Creek, directly in line with the tornado, only experienced a strong wind.

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May 14, 1909

QUARRELED ON HONEYMOON.

Deaf Husband and Tongue-Tied
Bride Booked for Municipal Court.

When Ben Green, who is deaf, married Eliza Reamer, who is tongue-tied, last week at the home of his mother in Lawrence, Kas., everyone thought the match an excellent one, though the couple had known each other only a week.

With light hearts they boarded a train for Kansas City, where they intended to spend their honeymoon. Possibly the world at large wouldn't have known about the union if they had not been arrested at Independence avenue and Holmes street yesterday afternoon. They were quarreling.

Both were taken to police headquarters and charged with disturbing the peace. In default of bond they were kept at the station. Mrs. Green, in the matron's room, attempted to tell about her marriage.

She met Green in Wichita a week ago, she said. It was a case of love at first sight. Green persuaded her to go to Lawrence, where they were united. The husband was unable to find work, she said, and they quarreled. The case will be tried in the municipal court this morning.

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May 8, 1909

LOVER MADE HER SEE STARS.

But When Bertha Marlowe "Came
To" She Still Was For Him.

Unconscious and bleeding from a deep wound in her face, Bertha Marlowe, 19 years old, was found in a rooming house at 210 1/2 Independence avenue last night. When she was revived at the emergency hospital she told the police that she had been attacked by her lover w ho, she asserted, deserted from the army. The girl, who is a laundry worker, told an amazing story of woman fidelity.

She says she came to Kansas City several weeks ago after her sweet-heart had left the army. Her home is in Courtney, Mo., but she gave her parents no intimation of her plans, save that she intended to go to work here.

Since joining the man she ways she has given him money that she has earned in the laundry; money that she received from home, as well as going to police headquarters and baling him out when he was arrested a week ago.

Last night she says he was drinking. She sought him and found him. As a reward he battered her on the face with a beer bottle and other ways mistreated her.

With her face puffed up almost beyond recognition, the ugly cut marring what is not an unpretty face, and reciting the story of mistreatment and imposition, Lieutenant Al Ryan asked her if she would prosecute her sweetheart in the event of his capture.

"Yes, I'll prosecute," said the girl.

There was a moment's pause. "No, I'll take that back. I guess I won't prosecute! I still love him!"

Whereat Dr. Dr. Fred B. Kyger applied some more arniea to the face wound and told the young woman to lie down.

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April 3, 1909

WOMEN FIGHT TO SEE
BOY CRUSHED BY CAR.

HYSTERICAL MOTHERS THINK
INJURED CHILD THEIR OWN.

Strong Men Weep as Jimmie
Palermo, Whose Father Saw
Him Hurt, Is Taken From
Under the Wheels.

While running across the street car tracks on Eighth street near Forest avenue about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, "Jimmie" Palermo, 5 years old, was run down by Independence avenue car 247, westbound, and injured to such an extent that both of his legs had to be amputated above the knee. The operation was performed at the general hospital immediately after the accident. Dr. J. Park Neal, who amputated the boy's legs, reported last night that he had survived the operation in a marvelous manner for one so young, and that he had a fighting chance for his life.

The boy is a son of Salvatore Palermo, an Italian grocer and butcher at 1103 East Eighth street, who lives on the second floor of 1103. The father, with Mack Carter, his butcher, saw the accident. The father ran to the scene, but became frantic when he saw his child pinned down by the front trucks of the car, and had to be taken away.

CROWD WEEPS AT SIGHT.

Two mothers, who thought that the child might be theirs, fought with tiger like ferocity with the crowd until they got to where they could get a look at the pale face of the little fellow.

The boy lay in such a position that he could not be moved until the car was "jacked up." The wrecking crew arrived in a few minutes, and with the aid of volunteers, the car tracks were elevated sufficiently. The boy's arm slipped to his side, and three marbles fell from his nerveless grasp.

"Take hold gently, men, and lift the boy out," said the foreman of the wrecking crew as the ambulance stretcher arrived.

"I just can't do it. I have seen enough to break my heart," said a big workman with sleeves rolled to the elbows, exposing a pair of muscular brown arms. He leaned against a trolley pole and wept bitterly.

As the ambulance was leaving another mother of the neighborhood arrived and battled with the dense crowd to get a look at the injured boy. Every woman in the crowd was crying, as were some of the men, and little brothers and sisters and playmates of the boy screamed with fright and grief.

FATHER SAW THE ACCIDENT.

"Mr. Palermo and I were standing in the door of his store when the accident happened," said Mack Carter, the butcher at the store. "We saw little Jimmie as he started to cross the street from the north to the south side about half way between the alley and Forest avenue. When he saw the car he made a motion as if to turn back. The motorman had slowed down at first, but put on speed again. It looked as if he calculated for the boy to cross the tracks before the car reached him, but Jimmie became confused and was struck by the fender and knocked across the track. It looked like an accident to me."

The grief in the Palermo home was tragic. Between sobs, prayers were said in Italian, and supplication made to Heaven to preserve the boy's life.

SNITCH LATE, BUT THERE.

While the family was in the midst of its grief a stranger appeared. Taking a card from his pocket he said, giving his name:

"Here is my card. I am a lawyer, but I got here a too late to see the accident. Send someone out into the street and get the boy's cap and those marbles. They are excellent evidence before a jury. Get the exact time of the accident , the number of the car and all the witnesses you can. I would like to handle this case for you."

Later in the evening Patrolmen William L. Cox and W. H. Schickhardt boarded car 247 and after riding to the end of the line arrested the conductor, H. E. Stoutz, 4100 East Ninth street, and the motorman, J. E. Warnike, 4600 Independence avenue. At police headquarters they made no statement and were ordered held for investigation, without bond, by Captain Walter Whitsett.

Representatives of the street car company insisted that a charge be placed against their men. Later in the evening an information was secured charging them with manslaughter in the fourth degree, a rather unusual charge while the boy was still living. They were taken to the home of Justice James H. Richardson, 2117 Prospect avenue, and arraigned on that charge. The men were then released on bond signed by representatives of their company. Their preliminary will be later. If the boy does not die, the charge will have to be changed.

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March 17, 1909

WM. KENEFICK'S AUTO
SMASHED TO PIECES.

RAILROAD PRESIDENT'S CHAUF-
FEUR WAS HAVING "JOY RIDE."

Limousine Struck by Twelfth Street
Car and Five Occupants Hurled
to Ground -- One Seriously
Injured -- Owner in Paris.

An expensive motor car belonging to William Kenefick, 1485 Independence avenue, was demolished yesterday afternoon at 2:30 by being struck by a street car at Twelfth and Oak streets. Daisy West, 1333 McGee street, who was in the limousine, was seriously injured. The machine was driven by William Tate, a trusted employe of Mr. Kenefick, who is now in Paris. Mr. Kenefick is president of the Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf railroad.


In the machine at the time of the accident were four friends of Tate' whom he was entertaining.


FOUR FRIENDS WITH HIM.


Taking the machine from the garage yesterday afternoon Tate invited four friends, two men and two women, to go for a ride over the boulevards. Leaving Miss West's home on McGee street, the driver steered the machine over to Oak and started north on that street. As he was crossing the street car tracks on Twelfth street a car going west struck the machine on the right side, just in front of the rear wheels. The machine was thrown over on the side and skidded across the street and onto the sidewalk on the northwest corner of Oak street.


Those persons riding inside of the limousine were thrown from their seats and besides being shaken up were cut by broken glass. Miss West was the only one seriously injured, and she was carried into Hucke's drug store, on the corner, and cared for until an ambulance from Eylar's Livery Company conveyed her to the University hospital.


GIRL SERIOUSLY INJURED.


Dr. George O. Todd was summoned and found the woman to be suffering from a severe wrench of the back, several scalp wounds and possible internal injuries. She was later taken to her home. At the hospital she gave the name of Davis.



The Admiral Auto Livery Company righted the maching and then towed it to the Pope-Hartford Auto Sales Company, 1925 Grand avenue. At the machine shop it was said that the machine was a total wreck and not worth repairing. Thee top was broken and cracked in various places and badly sprung.


NO PERMISSION TO USE CAR?


Mrs. J. W. H offman, 314 West Armour boulevard, a daughter of Mr. Kenefick, last night said that the chauffeur had not informed her of the accident. She said Tate had not been granted permission to use the car and had never before been known to use it secretly. The machine was a Pope-Toledo valued at $6,500 and was about a year old, she said. On Saturday the motor was taken out of the repair shop.


Tate, who is about 27 years old, has worked for Mr. Kenefick since he was 13 years old. Those in the machine at the time of the accident refused to talk aobut it or give their names. Patrolman Patrick Thornton, who walks on Twelfth street, arrived a few minutes after the accident but when the interested parties once refused to talk the patrolman ceased activity. He allowed them to go without getting any of the details as to who they were.

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March 5, 1909

CHILD OF 4 KILLED
BY NORTHEAST CAR.

MANY FRANTIC MOTHERS TRIED
TO IDENTIFY THE BOY.

Each Woman Thought Little Leo
Cassidy, Decapitated and Mangled
Beyond Immediate Recogni-
tion, Was Her Own.

Leo Cassidy, aged 4 years, was run over and instantly killed by a Northeast car yesterday afternoon while playing in the street with two other small boys. The boy lived with his aunt, Mrs. Anna Reddick, at 613 Forest avenue. Excited mothers who thought the unfortunate child might be one of their own, thronged the street, pushed and crowded each other in a mad endeavor to identify the mangled body under the trucks of the car. The accident occurred at Independence avenue and Holmes street.

Mrs. Reddick was in the habit of leaving the child with Mrs. John Davis, 557 Holmes street, during the day while she was at work in Blake's restaurant at the city market. The child slipped out of the house unnoticed. Johnny and Teddy Trent, aged 5 and 3 respectively, who live in the same house with their parents, greeted Leo with a childish welcome.

RAN IN FRONT OF CAR.

Leo ran directly across the street in front of a fast approaching car, the two Trent boys behind him. As the car struck Leo, the others turned and ran screaming to the house. Within the shortest possible time every mother in the neighborhood was on the scene of the tragedy where a crowd had gathered.

Though several persons had seen the accident, none was able to give a concise account of the tragedy. Maud Mahoney of 543 Holmes street was an eye witness. She said that she saw the three children run across the street and a moment later one was run down by the car. Mrs. Gus Berkowitz, who lives over the grocery store at 706 Independence avenue, looked out of the window in time to see the children start in their chase. She thought one of them was her own and was in the act of leaping out the window when she was caught by her husband. All the witnesses said that the car was going at a moderate rate of speed.

POLICE TO CLEAR STREET.

When Mrs. Davis reached the scene her agony knew no bounds, and her screams attracted persons for blocks. D. M. Armstrong, the motorman of the car, was leaning back in the vestibule, his face deathly pale, and Charles Perkins, the conductor, was taking down names. The trunk of the body lay under the car. The head, under the trucks, was beyond recognition.

Passengers from the blockaded cars began to alight when Sergeant John Ravenscamp arrived with a squad of policemen. It took their united efforts to clear the street. Excited mothers would rush up and try to identify the child as their own.

The scene of the accident is one of the crowded parts of the city and is within a block of the proposed North End playground. The Washington school is a block away and all motormen are supposed to run their cars slowly at that point.

Immediately after the accident, the crew of the car were placed under arrest by Detective Ben Sanderson. They were arraigned before Justice of the Peace James Richardson last night, and were released on a $500 bond, furnished by the street railway company. Neither would make a statement.

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January 27, 1909

TRIES SLEEP FROM A BOTTLE.

Waitress, After Quarreling With Hus-
band Cook, Attempts Suicide.

Because she had quarreled with her husband and feared that he meant to leave her, Dollie Duchaine, 26 years old, 1321 Cherry street, attempted suicide last night by inhaling the fumes from a handkerchief saturated with chloroform. Dr. J. W. Hayward of No. 4 police station attended to the woman.

Duchaine is a cook at Roarke's restaurant. H is wife is a waitress at the same place. James Love, 1000 Independence avenue, who had seen the woman early in the evening, said she told him her husband had become angry over some orders she had given him.

"Words followed," Love said, "and it seems that Duchaine told his wife he was going to leave her. She was down-hearted and depressed when I left her."

A note written by the woman before she took the chloroform was found by Officer Fraser. It was as follows:

"Well, Johnnie if you do what you said you would tomorrow, I don't care what happens to me, so I will take a little sleep from the bottle under my pillow. Your as ever, 'D.' "

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