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November 11, 1909

NEW CLAIMANT FOR
HUNTEMANN ESTATE.

ANNA GESINE HEUER SAYS SHE
IS FIRST COUSIN.

Follows Over Two Hundred Claim-
ants for Eccentric Recluse's For-
tune -- Will Come From
Germany to Fight.

Another heir to the Adolph Huntemann estate, claiming to be the first cousin of the eccentric old bachelor who died nearly three years ago, leaving an estate valued at $250,000, appeared yesterday when Anna Gesine Heuer of Bremen, Germany, filed suit in the circuit court to have herself declared the sole heir.

If the German woman can establish her relationship with the late Adolph Huntemann, she will inherit the entire estate. Over two hundred claimants have applied for shares. Of these all have been cut out except eight distant cousins.

The suit is brought against R. S. Crohn, former public administrator, and the only one who now has charge of the estate. The petition says that all the debts against the estate have been paid and that it is now ready for distribution. The personal property is estimated to be worth $76,000, and the real estate, $175,000.

Anna Heuer is 44 years of age and married. She has never been to America. If the court refuses to accept her deposition at the trial of this case, she will come here to fight for the estate.

For years Anna Heuer has been writing to German friends who have settled in Kansas City. In the exchange of letters one of her former friends mentioned the Huntemann matter and told of the fight now being made among the heirs to secure possession of the estate. Anna Heuer investigated her family tree and decided that she was a first cousin.

Among the recent claimants to the Huntemann estate was Mrs. Minnie A. Shepard of Burlington, Ia., who secured affidavits from confederates in Chicago, St. Louis and other cities showing her to be an illegitimate child of the deceased.

Fraud was suspected, and Grant I. Rosenzweig, attorney for the estate, went to Burlington to investigate. Few discrepancies were found. The "tip" came from a woman who had been jilted by one of Mrs. Shepard's confederates. Affidavits were received from relatives to prove that Mrs. Shepard's mother was married, and that the Iowa woman's claims were fraud. When confronted by this evidence October 19, Mrs. Shepard admitted that her affidavits and claims were false.

Huntemann, who was a bachelor, died March 8, 1907, at his home, 4025 McGee street. He had been a recluse, and the amount of his wealth was not known until after he died. He came to this country from Germany in 1860, and settled in Kansas City two years later, without a dollar, and amassed a fortune by investments in Kansas City real estate.

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October 21, 1909

WOMAN FOILS A PLOT
TO LOOT BIG ESTATE.

TIPS OFF IOWA WOMAN'S $300,-
000 CONSPIRACY.

Jealousy Reveals and Thwarts Far
Reaching Intrigue to Get Pos-
session of Late Adolph Hunte-
manns Fortune.

"Hell hath no terror like a woman scorned." But for a jilted Chicago woman, the plot to obtain possession of the $300,000 estate of Adolph Huntemann, who died here in March, 1907, supposedly without heirs, might not have been uncovered.

Through a tip obtained from this woman, Grant I. Rosenzweig, attorney for the estate, worked up evidence which, when presented Tuesday to Mrs. Minnie A. Shepherd and her attorneys in Burlington, Ia., caused the woman to confess that she had concocted one of the cleverest frauds of the age.

Mr. Rosenzweig returned yesterday with the woman's affidavit, in which she admitted the fraud, and relinquished all claims to the estate. This he filed with the probate court.

IOWA WOMAN'S CLAIM.

Last March the court was ready to distribute the estate to the nieces and nephews of Huntemann in Germany, their identity having been established by birth, marriage and death records there.

Just one day before Judge J. G. Guinotte was to make the order Mrs. Minnie A Shepherd appeared and filed suits against the seven different pieces of property constituting the estate.

This stopped the distribution, and Mr. Rosenzweig was ordered by the court to take Mrs. Shepherd's deposition. The story of the attempted fraud, how it was planned, and how thwarted can better be told in Mr. Rosenzweig's own words.

"In her first deposition," he said, "Mrs. Shepherd claimed to be the daughter of Pauline Lipps, who was the daughter of Mary and Adolph Huntemann. While she alleged that Pauline was illegitimate, she claimed that a common law marriage later was contracted, making Pauline a legitimate child under the laws of Missouri. If this had been true Mrs. Shepherd would have been the sole heir, to the exclusion of all the German family.

"She claimed that on account of having been an abandoned child she could furnish few facts, but said she had certain letters written by Adolph Huntemann in which he recognized her as his grandchild, a fragment of a will in his handwriting in which she was so recognized, an old Bible inscribed in his hand to her as his grandchild and a number of similar documents.

HOODWINKED HER LAWYERS.

At this point in the deposition Mrs. Shepherd named women in St. Louis, Chicago and elsewhere who, she said, had known Huntemann intimately and had been eye witnesses to certain events showing relationship of father and daughter between Huntemann and her mother.

"Judge Guinotte always is watchful of anything that looks out of place concerning estates in his court," said the narrator, "and with his approval I began a quiet investigation. I made investigations in Chicago, Des Moines, Burlington, Davenport and St. Louis and discovered a plot that had a branch in each one of these places involving women of lower classes and men of desperate character, a woman teacher and a man now in an Illinois penitentiary."

It appears that Mrs. Shepherd had employed attorneys of good standing, Holsteen & Hill in Burlington, and Boyle and Howell here. Her first step was to deceive them by pretending to advertise in the papers for the missing witnesses.

Her plot was so well arranged that each of the confederates answered the advertisements, wrote to the attorneys, giving her family history, and giving her the best of character. Each gave her a straight line of descent from Huntemann.

JILTED WOMAN'S TIP.

Everything was going well when Mrs. Shepherd made a secret trip to Chicago about the time a brother-in-law whom she and her husband had refused aid, was incarcerated in the Illinois penitentiary.

Just following this a woman in Chicago who had been jilted by one of the men in the case, gave the tip that certain information might be obtained in Davenport, Ia.

Following that up, affidavits were secured showing that Mrs. Shepherd was not an only child, but had five brothers and sisters living; that her mother has a twin sister and a brother living. It was found that her story was false, and that her grandmother, Mary, had been honorably married and was buried in Wilton, Ill.

"In addition," said Mr. Rosenzweig, "thirty or forty letters were secured which had been written by Mrs. Shepherd to her confederates giving dates, names and places which confederates were to confirm. Also letters which confederates were to copy in English and German and a fragment of the alleged will where the handwriting was to be identified.

"Confederates had obeyed her instructions, and identified all these fraudulent papers as genuine. An old Bible had been secured from a secondhand store and all names inserted in dim ink. All documents were yellow with age. I also had proof that Mrs. Shepherd's mother had died in 1903 and not in the early 80's."

After getting all of this together, Mr. Rosenzweig decided that the time had come to present it to Mrs. Shepherd and her attorneys in Burlington. He arrived there Tuesday and first laid the evidence before the lawyers who were reluctant to admit that their client could have hatched up such a clever plot.

"I went out and brought her to their office," continued Mr. Rosenzweig, "and there ensued a meeting which lasted six hours before the woman gave in. A woman of more brazen boldness and falsehood, backed by clever cunning I never expect to see. She denied authorship of the letters notwithstanding her attorneys had some of hers with which they were compared and she said that relatives who had made affidavits were unknown to her.

TRIES TO BRAZEN IT OUT.

"She looked us straight in the eye, and almost convinced her attorneys that a mistake had been made. She asked for a day in which to think the matter over, but I asked her if her story would be believed against the contrary evidence of five brothers and sisters, two uncles and aunts, her stepfather, some of her confederates and all of her letters and documents plotting the fraud which I possessed.

"At this point she asked for a private conference with her attorneys and shortly they returned saying she admitted it all. Her statement in writing was taken before a notary in which she admitted that she was not descended from and bore no kinship or relationship in now way whatever to Huntemann.

SUCCESSFUL BEFORE.

"After seeing articles in the newspapers that Huntemann had left a $300,000 estate and no known heirs the plot was hatched with assistance of others. She thought she might as well be an heir as anyone else. What inspired her most was the fact that she had been successful six years before in a similar undertaking, she said. An Australian had died leaving an estate of $1,000. By means of affidavits and other documents she said she established the fact that she was an only child of the Australian."

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July 1, 1909

NEEDS PROOF OF HER GRAND-
MOTHER'S MARRIAGE.

Claimant to Estate of Adolph Hunte-
mann, Supposed Bachelor, Says
She Is Granddaughter.

If Minnie A. Shepherd of Burlington, Ind., is unable to give proofs of her parentage, the recognized heirs of the late Adolph Huntemann will get the $200,000 estate which was to have been divided among them on May 15, last, but which was tied up the day before by six suits brought in the Nevada, Mo., courts by Mrs. Shepherd, the wife of a farmer.

Yesterday a bundle of papers arrived here from Burlington, being a transcript of a deposition Mrs. Shepherd made last week in her case against the Huntemann heirs. According to her, she is the only direct heir of Kansas City's supposed old bachelor, as she claims to be his granddaughter.

In her deposition, Mrs. Shepherd says that she is the daughter of Mrs. Mary Stubans, who in turn was the daughter of Adolph Huntemann and a woman whose name Mrs. Shepherd does not remember. "Aunt Kate" King, who once lived in St. Louis, would know, she says, but Mrs. Shepherd does not know where "Aunt Kate" lives. She is advertising for her now in St. Louis and Chicago newspapers, in the hope of learning the name of the grandmother, and something about the wedding.

Answering questions put by Grant Rosenzweig, attorney for the public administrator, the woman claiming to be the granddaughter of Huntemann says she does not know where her grandmother was married to Huntemann. Mrs. Shepherd admits her mother was born out of wedlock, but says that after the arrival of the baby there was a marriage, and in that way the baby, Mrs. Shepherd's mother, Mary Stubans, became the legal child of Huntemann.

When asked by Attorney Rosenzweig, if when she read in the newspapers that Huntemann had died leaving an estate of $400,000 she had not been prompted to file a claim against the estate. Mrs. Shepherd answered that her first report was the estate was only $4,000, and she did not believe it. When later she learned it was $400,000, it has shrunk to $200,000 now according to the attorney for the administrator, she at once set about finding the records regarding herself.

She found that her mother had been Mary Stubaus nursed by a Mrs. Alexander and "Aunt Kate" King at her birth.

Adolph Huntemann died in March, 1907, supposedly a single man, leaving much valuable business property and some farm property. Attorneys employed in the case could find no heirs closer than cousins in Germany until the very day before the dividing of the estate, when the Indiana woman appeared of record in the substantial way of six civil suits to stop the distribution.

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July 4, 1907

TO SEEK HUNTEMANN HEIRS.

Trip to Germany by S. Rosenzweig,
Special Commissioner.

Who are the Huntemann heirs, and if so, why? That is the question. The public administrator of Jackson county is holding an estate worth $400,000, and he cannot find anybody to whom it belongs. There are about twenty claims on file, some of them worth the price of wrapping paper. The best claim so far developed is from Germany, where the deceased Adolph Huntemann, was born and lived the early years of his life.

So many claims have come from there through the German consulate at St. Louis and through attorneys that the probate court has sent a special commissioner in the person of S. Rosenzweig to Germany to sift out the claims. With the dog days coming and the courts all closed, there was no trouble to get a lawyer to agree to go to Germany, via London, Paris and so forth to look for Huntemann heirs.

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March 18, 1907

MANY WANT HIS MONEY.

Claimants to Huntemann's Estate
Coming With a Rush.

Another cavalcade of alleged heirs of Adolph Huntemann swooped down on Public Administrator Crohn, by letter yesterday. They hail from Texas, Wisconsin, Cincinnati and St. Louis. One woman wrote that she was sure she was related to Huntemann and added: "Won't you please furnish the evidence for me." Administrator Crohn said she failed to state where the "evidence" could be found. Mr. Huntemann died March 12, at his handsome residence, 4025 McGee street, and left an estate worth $400,000. So far as known he had no heirs.

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March 17, 1907
CLAIMANTS APPEAR.

THREE AFTER THE ESTATE OF
ADOLPH HUNTEMANN.
ONE LIVES IN WISCONSIN.

WRITES TO CHIEF HAYES AND
ALLEGES RELATIONSHIP.
The second is Detective Huntsman, of
Kansas City, Who Says His Family
Name Was Modified --
The Third in Cincinnati.

An heir to the estate of Adolph Huntemann, who died at the General hospital here March 12, leaving an estate valued at $400,000, has turned up. Chief Hayes yesterday received a letter in which was an Associated Press clipping telling of the death of the aged German and stating he had no heirs so far as known here. The letter follows:

Allenville, Wis., March 14, 1907
Gentlemen find inclose a Duplick to refer to. My Father Conrad Eckstein Had a Sister Married to Huntemann in Germany & She was Born in 1819 in April, so if you Find the reckords of his mother berth corspond with this rite me the full dat
yourd Truly,
L. W. ECKSTEIN, Allenville, Wis.

"Mr. Eckstein is not quite clear," said Chief Hayes, "but I take his letter to mean this: Go back to Germany, and if you find that this man's father's sister, Miss Eckstein, and anybody named Huntemann were born about the same time, send the $400,000 to the man in Allenville, Wis."

Adolph Huntemann was born in Hanover, Germany. He came to America in 1843 with his parents and later emigrated to Lawrence, Kas. He and his family lived in Lawrence during the Quantrell raid. Huntemann later moved to Kansas City and bought real estate. He was a frugal man and watched his interests well. The property which he got for practically a song then has increased in value so that at the time of his death the old German was worth nearly half a million dollars. He had about $75,000 in cash in the bank.

It is possible that Huntemann has an heir in Kansas City. John Huntsman, a city detective, is now investigating the records back in Germany before he makes any formal claim. His granfather's name was Peter Huntemann and he was born in Hanover, the same town as was Adolph Huntemann.

Mr. Huntsman says that when his father came to this country he changed the name to Huntsmann and later on, within the last few years, kin fact, Mr. Huntsman himself dropped teh final letter "n" from his name. He did it, he said, because he thought the final letter superfluous and teh spelling of the name was unchanged materially by it. An attorney has the matter in charge for Mr. Huntsman.

CINCINATTI, O., March 16 -- (Special.) Herman Hunteman and his daughter are to lay claim to the estate left by Adolph Huntemann, who died in Kanas City leaving an estate valued at half a million dollars. According to the announcement of death received here Adolph Huntemann left no heirs, but it is claimed that Herman Hunteman is his cousin and that the two men came to this country together fifty years ago from Germany, Herman stopped in this city and Adolph went on west and accumulated a fortune. Herman Hunteman makes his home in Osgood, Ind., but he has a daughter who lives in Avondale, a fashionable suburb of this city. It is said to be their intention to bring action to gain a share of their relative's estate.

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