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October 13, 1909

BEER FLOWS INTO SEWER.

Crowd Sees Foaming Ale Wasted.

A beer wagon, driven by Samuel Kroyousky of 1527 West Ninth street was struck by a Wabash train last night at Union avenue and Hickory street and was practically demolished. The barrels of liquor were broken open and a stream of beer poured into one of the catch basins. A big crowd gathered and watched the foaming beer escape.

The driver and team escaped injury.

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July 13, 1909

THINKS RIVERS ARE
AT HIGHEST STAGE.

FORECASTER CONNOR NOW
LOOKS FOR FALL.

At Topeka There Was Fall of 0.7
of Foot and at St. Joseph the
Missouri Is Stationary.
Streets Flooded.
Junction of the Kaw and the Missouri Rivers, Looking Toward Kansas City, Missouri
SKETCH OF THE JUNCTION OF THE KAW AND MISSOURI RIVERS, LOOKING TOWARD KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI.

With a rise of over half a foot in the Missouri river yesterday, Forecaster Connor of the local weather bureau predicted a maximum stage of about 27.2 for this morning, which he believes from the information to hand will be the crest. Mr. Connor bases this prediction o n the assumption that there will be no more rains in the Kaw and Missouri river valleys.

The rise in the Missouri yesterday was rapid until 3 p. m. Since that hour it has remained stationary. This was taken by the observer to indicate that the mass of water due to recent rains had crested, and that now only the rise of the day before at Topeka and St. Joseph is to be felt here. At Topeka there was a fall of .7 of a foot during the day, while at St. Joseph the river was stationary.

The heavy rains at St. Joseph yesterday held the river up at that point, but the forecaster does not think they will influence the river there to any appreciable extent, and that by the evening it will show a good fall. The volume of water in the Missouri and Kaw rivers which must pass Kansas City, he asserts, will keep the river at a high stage for several days at least, although there is a possibility of a fall by this evening.

The West Bottoms are beginning to feel the flood now in earnest. The seepwater and sewage, together with the storm waters yesterday morning gave several sections of that district the appearance for awhile, at least, of being flooded by the river. In the "wettest block" several of the floors were under water for a couple of hours and many o f the business men and merchants in that neighborhood are ready to move if the water should go much higher.

Back water from the sewers yesterday covered sections of Mulberry, Hickory and Santa Fe street between Eighth and Ninth streets. Cellars in this district were all flooded.

The Cypress yards in the packing house district is a big lake. There are from two inches to several feet of water all over the railroad yards. Yesterday the Missouri Pacific had to run through eight inches of water at one place to get trains out from the Morris Packing Company plant. The railroad men say that they will run their trains until the water rises to such a height that the fires in the locomotives will be extinguished.

At the Exchange building at the stock yards several pumps were used to keep the basement free from water which started to come in Sunday night. Several of the cattle pens are flooded so they cannot be used and the Morris plant is almost surrounded by water. It is believed that at the present rate the water will be up to the sidewalks at the Morris plant this morning. It would take six feet more, however, to stop operations at this plant.

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March 10, 1909

BLAMES ACT OF PROVIDENCE.

Barber Asphalt Company Still Inter-
poses Plea Touching Repairs.

Property owners on Eight street, between Santa Fe and Hickory, are going to have a conference with the attorney of the Barber Asphalt Paving company with a view to compromising with the company which has raised the point that the washing away of the asphalt in the flood of 1903 was "an act of God."

The company has all these years resisted restoration of the pavement, although it agreed to maintain it for ten years, always interposing when called upon to comply with its contract that it did not consider itself responsible for something over which it had no control.

The questions involved in the argument were thrashed out before the board of public works yesterday.

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February 1, 1907
ACCUSED OF EMBEZZLEMENT.

Ambrose Gallagher Brought Back
From Buffalo to Face Charge.

Detective Joseph Keshlear arrived here last night at 9:30 o'clock with Ambrose Gallagher, a prisoner for whom he went to Buffalo, N. Y. Gallagher is charged with embezlement. The complaint is sworn to by J. H. Lyman, general agent of the Chicago Great Western railway, and alleges that Gallagher stole $200 from that company in January, 1906, wile acting as cashier in their freight office at Seventh and Hickory streets. In telling of his travels after leaving here Gallagher said:

"I went straight to Omaha, Neb., from here on January 28, 1906, the day I left. After staying there a few days I went to Chicago where I found greater latitude for spending money. When the money was all gone I went ot Buffalo, N. Y., got a job right off with the New York Central about the middle of February and have been there ever since."

The prisoner says that he was bonded with a surety company and that he presumed it was the surety company which caused his arrest and will prosecute him.

Gallagher's wife, whom he has not seen since he left here, was at the police station Monday asking when he would be returned. He said he thought his wife was with "the folks in Kansas." Gallagher probably will be arraigned before a justice today.

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