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January 11, 1910

HADLEY ADDRESSES K. OF P.'S.

Local Lodges Will Celebrate Fortieth
Anniversary May 5.

Governor Herbert S. Hadley was the principal speaker at the special meeting of the Knights of Pythias in their hall at 1330 Grand avenue last night. The occasion was the merger of Brooklyn Lodge No. 118 with Lodge No. 1 of this city, and over 500 Pythians attended. Senator Solon Gilmore, ex-senator A. L. Cooper and Joseph Hawthorne also gave brief addresses.

Prior to the speaking plans were discussed for the big celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the local lodge to take place May 5, in Convention hall, where it is estimated that at least 20,000 members under the password will assemble in secret session. This will be one of the most brilliant Pythian functions ever attempted in the United States.

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November 4, 1909

$1,000 FOR MISSOURI SONG.

Verses and Music, to Be Dedicated
to State, Will Be Decided Upon
by Governor and Committee.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., Nov. 3. -- Governor Hadley wants a song dedicated to the state of Missouri that will be noted far and wide for its soul stirring melody, as well as its force of poetry descriptive of the past history of Missouri and the good things that are in store for the state.

During his trip down the Mississippi river with President Taft and party, he listened to songs dedicated to other states and became so impressed therewith that he induced Cyrus P. Walbridge, David R. Francis, Charles Huttig, James H. Smith and Harry B. Hawes, of St. Louis, to put up $50 each. The parties on the steamboat Alton, Gray Eagle and Wells each chipped in and raised $250.

This makes $1,000, which will be paid to the person or persons composing verses and music that will meet with the approval of the governor and a special committee composed of the following:

David R. Francis, Captain Henry King, managing editor of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat; Henry N. Cary, general manager of the St. Louis Republic, Walter S. Dickey, of Kansas City, and Hal Gaylord, of The Kansas City Journal.

Only Missourians who can compose a beautiful song melody, with words telling of the past glories of Missouri and her future prospects need apply. In a few days the governor will write to the members of the committee, telling them his ideas in general terms regarding the kind of song that should be dedicated to this state.

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October 5, 1909

HEAR CONCERT BY 'PHONE.

Governor and Party at Mansion
Listen to Music at Sedalia.

Weil's concert band, assisted by the Sedalia Ladies' Musical Club, gave a sacred concert in the live stock pavilion at the Missouri state fair grounds, Sunday.

By special arrangement with the Bell telephone Company, the music was sent over the wires to the governor's mansion at Jefferson City where it was heard by the governor and Mrs. Hadley, and a large party assembled to hear it.

By the use of specially made megaphone receivers, the music was made plainly audible to the whole assemblage and was keenly enjoyed by them.

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October 3, 1909

IN MEMORY OF HUGH C. WARD.

Governor Hadley and Others Pay
Tribute to Late Member of Bar.

Members of the Kansas City Bar Association gathered in Judge Herman Brumback's court yesterday morning, to honor the memory of the late Hugh C. Ward. Those who paid tributes to his character were Governor H. S. Hadley, J. J. Vineyard, president of the Bar Association; Frank Hagerman, Ellison Neal and Judge Willard Hall.

Resolutions will be drafted and presented to the various divisions of the circuit and appellate courts, in which Mr. Ward practice.

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August 30, 1909

HADLEY WILL OPEN
INDEPENDENCE FAIR.

OLD FASHIONED COUNTY SHOW
IS ON TODAY.

For a Week Products of Farm Will
Take Precedence Over Thrill-
ers -- Special Features
Are Attractive.

There was a bunch of tired men in Independence last night who seemed happy in their fatigue. They were the directors of the Independence fair and everything was ready for the opening this morning. The fair this year is going to be just as it has always been, an old-fashioned county affair where the products of the farm take precedence over thrillers of summer park invention and where a prize hog looks a whole lot better than a motor car, for the time being.

And if exhibits are to be counted, the Independence fair is better off this year than ever before. It has been a good year on the farms of Jackson county, and for that reason the exhibits are going to be the largest in the history of the fair. The mountain of pumpkins, a yearly feature of the fair, is to be cooked into pies and distributed to visitors as edible souvenirs. That is to be done on the last day, Saturday.

HADLEY TO OPEN FAIR.

The fair is to have executive recognition and it will be opened at 10 o'clock this morning by Governor H. S. Hadley. The governor will make his speech at that time, after the salute of Battery B of Kansas City has been fired. After the speech of the governor, the battery will maneuver and the fair will be on in earnest. The gates will be open at 7 o'clock in the morning.

The directors have offered purses aggregating $10,000 for the race meeting, and there is a good list of entries. Independence is on three racing circuits and more than 200 horses will strive for the various purses. There will be from one to three races a day.

SERIES OF SPECIAL DAYS.

Admission to the grounds is to be free this year and as an added attraction, there is to be a fireworks display every night. A band will give a free concert every night. Zach Mulhall's Wild West show will be there.

There is to be a series of special days. Tomorrow is to be a special racing day and there will be an extra race for an extra prize. Thursday will be Kansas City day, when Kansas City exhibitors and Kansas City exhibits will have full sway. Friday will be Old Settler's day. Many of the old settlers of Jackson county and the counties surrounding will attend the fair on that day. Saturday is to be pumpkin day.

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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July 29, 1909

PROHIBITION VOTE PROBABLE.

But When, in Missouri, Gov. Hadley
Doesn't Know.

"The question of state-wide prohibition probably will be submitted to the voters of Missouri," said Governor Herbert S. Hadley at the Union depot last evening. "Whether or not it will carry I am not prepared to say. It is also a question with the prohibition forces as to whether this is an opportune time.

"My understanding is that the members of the anti-saloon league do not favor the submission of a state-wide prohibition at this time because of the fear that it might be defeated. They are in favor of a slower, and they think surer ways of eliminating the saloons and the liquor traffic."

Governor Hadley was apprised Wednesday of the inquiry made by the prohibition chairman Charles E. Stokes of Kansas City, as to the number of petitioners necessary to secure a call for a special election under the initiative and referendum.

Governor Hadley said last evening that the law under which it is proposed to hold this election is the one which was held up in the house, and which he personally insisted should be passed by legislature.

Governor Hadley believes, however, that if the question is submitted, that the anti-saloon league people will join forces with the state-wide prohibition people.

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July 1, 1909

NEGRO MURDERER REPRIEVED.

Governor Hadley at Last Hour Sends
Thirty-Day Stay of Execution
for Claud Brooks.

Less than twenty-five minutes before the time set for the execution of Claude Brooks, the negro murderer, Marshal Joel Mayes received a telegram from Governor Hadley postponing the hanging until July 10. Mr. Mayes had a telephone conversation with the governor, but insisted on a telegram. The governor said the papers in the case would be sent to Kansas City at once.

Brooks, who was ready for his trip to the scaffold, showed no signs of emotion when told the news. He was taken from the death cell and placed in another part of the jail. The other prisoners, hearing the news, cheered.

The decision of the governor, it is said, was based upon the advice of a relative to whom the governor looks for recommendations in Kansas City criminal cases. This relative advised an inquiry into the sanity of Brooks. The governor sent the reprieve while this relative was at the county jail.

The time set for the hanging of Brooks was 9 o'clock yesterday morning. Brooks murdered Sidney Herndon, burned part of the evidence and made his escape. Now doctors say he is of a "low type of mentality."

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June 27, 1909

GALLOWS UP FOR BROOKS.

Negro Who Murdered Sidney Hern-
don Will Be Hanged June 30.

Claude Brooks will be hanged June 30 for the murder of Sidney Herndon. The death watch was put on the condemned negro last night. It was believed until yesterday afternoon that a respite of sixty days would be given. This was refused by the governor.

Mrs. Margaret Simmons, matron at the county jail, had a telephone conversation with Governor Hadley yesterday afternoon. The governor told her there would be no respite and that it would be useless for anyone to see him about a commutation of sentence.

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June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

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June 18, 1909

MORE THAN $2,000
ON SLUGGER'S HEAD.

EXTRAORDINARY EFFORTS TO
GET MISS OWEN'S ASSAILANT.

City Council in Special Session
Offers $1,000 -- Mayor and Other
City Officials Pledge $100
Each for Him.

Rewards aggregating more than $2,000 have been offered for the arrest and conviction of the thug or thugs who slugged Miss Anna Lee Owen, official stenographer for the police board investigation, in her office in the Dwight building Wednesday night, and stole shorthand notes of the important testimony relative to saloons, gambling and the police force, which she was transcribing.

Both houses of the council, in extraordinary session at noon yesterday, by resolution authorized a reward of $1,000, and ten officials personally, following the example of Mayor Crittenden, offered $100 each. Governor Hadley, for the state, announces a reward of $300. The owners of the Dwight building and John T. Wayland, an attorney, offered $100 each.

While Miss Owen was much improved yesterday, she was still carefully guarded at the University hospital., and visitors were not admitted to the sick room. She was unable to throw any more light upon the affair than she had the evening of the brutal attack. That the man who slugged her with a "black jack" wore dark clothes was the nearest to a description that she could supply.

Every detective and policeman in the department was at work on the case yesterday, having been detailed especially to search for clues which would lead to the apprehension of the guilty person. Such a cowardly attack was made upon Miss Owen by the unknown thug aroused every police officer and they were working willingly overtime. The large reward which has been offered through various sources also caused the detectives and uniform men to do their best to secure sufficient evidence to warrant an arrest.

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June 13, 1909

HADLEY BUSY SIGNING BILLS.

Temporary Headquarters at Balti-
more While Father Is Sick.

After two days of signing bills, chiefly revision measures, Governor Herbert S. Hadley left his quarters at the Hotel Baltimore yesterday afternoon for DeSoto, Kas., to be with his father, Major John M. Hadley, who was stricken with paralysis early in the week. The governor departed over the Santa Fe at 4:30 o'clock. He had signed nearly 200 bills.

"A telephone communication early this afternoon announced that my father's condition is much improved," said Governor Hadley yesterday, "and if it is possible I expect to bring him to Kansas City next week. He will either go to the hospital or remain at the home of my sister. At all events I will retain my temporary headquarters at the Hotel Baltimore and finish what business can be attended to there, so as to be in close touch with my father. The trip from Kansas City to DeSoto can be made in an hour on the train or by automobile, while from Jefferson City it might require from eight to ten hours to complete the journey."

A bill appropriating $3,000 to pay for markers for the old Santa Fe trail, introduced into the legislature by the Daughters of the American Revolution, was signed by the governor yesterday morning. Another bill was one requiring an examination and registration for public accountants in Missouri. A bill making it a misdemeanor to bet on a game of pool or billiards was also signed.

Bills vetoed proved to be duplicates of laws already on the statute books.

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April 29, 1909

DANCE IN FULL UNIFORM.

Governor's Staff at Mansion Hop in
Honor of Colonel Andrae.

JEFFERSON CITY, April 28. -- Governor Herbert S. Hadley tonight gave a dance in honor of Colonel Henry Andrae, warden of the state penitentiary and a member of the governor's staff,, who is to be married tomorrow to Miss Gussie Neff.

For the event the governor invited all the members of his official staff, and about twenty of them reported in full regimentals. None made a braver showing than Colonel E. S. Jewett of Kansas City, who was in full uniform, and smothered in gold lace.

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March 17, 1909

SUGAR CREEK WORKMEN.

Are Afraid the Refinery Is Going to
Close Up.

JEFFERSON CITY, March 16. -- There was never a more pathetic little delegation called upon any governor than tonight called upon Mr. Hadley. It was made up of workmen from the Sugar Creek district who have been building homes near the oil refinery.

In it were Frank Woodward, George V. Hackett, W. H. Harvey, B. F. Karkin and Edward Linn. The delegation called first on Representative N. R. Holcomb, who made an appointment for a meeting with the governor.

"We are all working men, governor," said Harvey, "and we have started to build homes for our families. The plasterers are ready to go to work in some of our houses. We have been told that the oil works are to be closed and that every one of us will be thrown out of work and our homes destroyed. Is it true?"

"I can not tell you what will be the ultimate outcome in law, but I can tell you that I do not think you need lose any sleep over your work or your homes," said the governor.

"How long will it take to get a final decision?" Woodward asked.

"It will take several months to get the case on the supreme court docket, and then six or nine months to get it argued," the governor answered. "When it is all done, I think the refinery will still be running. You are, like many others, laboring under a misapprehension. The decision of the court puts the Standard Oil Company out of the state, but it does not put the Sugar Creek refinery out of the state," the governor concluded.

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March 5, 1909

MISSOURI SHOWED THEM.

Governor Hadley With His Gaily
Caparisoned Staff Attracted the
Attention of Thousands.

WASHINGTON, March 4. -- Governor Herbert S. Hadley admirably performed the duty of putting Republican Missouri well to the fore in the inaugural ceremonies today. After President Taft and Governor Hughes of New York, the Missouri Republican governor and his richly caparisoned staff occupied public attention on the line of march, and received the plaudits of thousands who faced the March blizzard of cold wind and snow to witness the great events.

It was evident all along the line of march from the capital to the White House that the people realized that distinctive honor was due Missouri's representation in the inaugural festivities, and great was the applause Governor Hadley and his escort received.

The governor attended the exercises in the senate chamber, where he witnessed the first indoor installation of a president in seventy-six years. As he took his place at the head of his staff with Adjutant General Rumbold, he was given command of a regiment of cadets at the reviewing stand facing White House. Governor Hadley and staff were given distinctive salutations by President Taft. The dinner given the governor and Mrs. Hadley at the Shoreham tonight was a splendid success. After the dinner the governor and party attended the inaugural ball.

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February 27, 1909

POLICE BOARD IS
NAMED BY HADLEY.

R. B. MIDDLEBROOK AND THOS.
R. MARKS APPOINTED.

Mr. Middlebrook Is to Serve Until
the Time When He Can Be Ap-
pointed to Board of Elec-
tion Commissioners.

R. B. Middlebrook and Thomas R. Marks were yesterday appointed by Governor Herbert S. Hadley members of the police board. In making the announcement, the governor gave out the following statement:

"I have offered the positions of police commissioners of Kansas City to R. B. Middlebrook and Thomas R. Marks and they have somewhat reluctantly consented to serve. Neither was an applicant for the position. I have given almost as much time to the selection of police commissioners in Kansas City as to all of my other appointments.

"The question has not been the selecting of two commissioners, but the selection of a commissioner that would meet the requirements of the situation. In my effort to secure such a commissioner I have offered the appointments to R. C. Meservey, D. J. Haff, Henry M. Beardsley, Eugene H. Blake, Clyde Taylor, Thomas H. Reynolds and John H. Thatcher. None of these gentlemen felt that they ought or could accept the position.

"I feel that in Mr. Middlebrook and Mr. Marks, I have finally secured two men who are familiar with the conditions existing in the police department in Kansas City, and know how a good police department ought to be conducted. I feel confident that they will meet my expectations and the requirements of the situation."

Mr. Middlebrook is to serve as police commissioner only until there is a vacancy on the board of election commissioners, when he will be appointed to fill it.

Both of Governor Hadley's appointees to the Kansas City board of police commissioners were of the opinion yesterday that the announcement of any particular brand of reform would be presumptuous as well as premature. Neither was inclined to go into generalities concerning the duties of the members of the board, but even with the short notice on which their appointments were made, each had a number of ideas that promise much in the way of curbing criminal activities.

"I have no swamp-root remedies or sweeping reforms to proclaim," said Thomas R. Marks last night at his office in the First National bank building. "I have a well-imbedded idea that the police service should become one of the military arms of the state, with its efficiency raised to the highest possible degree by the enforcement of discipline and promotion for the men, based on merit alone. It should be the alm of the police department to win the confidence of respectable citizens and not submit to the machinations of a lot of political gangsters.

"It appears to me that the published reports of an epidemic of crime are not exaggerated. Of course, you can't put down crime with a theory, and I hope I'm not a crank on such matters, but it seems to me that the problem can be boiled down to this: Law enforcement."

"Will a chief of police be appointed from within or with the force?" Mr. Marks was asked.

"Personally, I would much prefer that a head of the department be selected from those attached to it, provided a man who can meet the qualifications can be found. On the other hand I should not hesitate to go outside of the force for a chief, if I thought it were for the benefit of the service. This same applies to other appointments to be made by the board./

"Governor Hadley called me up this afternoon and told me I simply must accept the appointment," said Robert R. Middlebrook last night at his residence, 1800 Linwood boulevard. "It could not but militate against good taste for me to make any statement as to reform," Mr. Middlebrook went on. "The trouble with most so-called reformers," he said, "is that they do not preserve the rotundity of the law as they would have it enforced. They vigorously enforce the statutes against certain classes of criminals, while other classes, not so conspicuous perhaps, go unchecked. That is lop-sided reform. I am for a clean, orderly administration, with the explicit understanding that the compensation fixed by law shall be the only remuneration. In other words -- no graft."

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February 18, 1909

SMALLPOX EPIDEMIC
SPREADS IN LIBERTY.

ALL PUBLIC PLACES THERE
HAVE BEEN CLOSED.

Investigation by Secretary of State
Board of Health Shows Condi-
tion to Be Serious -- Twen-
ty New Cases.

LIBERTY, MO., Feb. 17. -- Twenty new cases of smallpox; six more residences quarantined; four fraternity houses under quarantine; high school, ward schools, churches, skating rink and theaters ordered closed; house-to-house canvass to be made, and all suspected places placed under temporary quarantine; outgoing mail from quarantined places refused at postoffice; laundry work from William Jewell college refused and students now doing their own washing.

Briefly, this is the smallpox situation here tonight.

Under orders from Governor Herbert S. Hadley, Dr. J. A. B. Adcock of Warrensburg, Mo., secretary of the state board of health, came here today and investigated, it having been alleged that in reality students and citizens were suffering from an aggravated form of chickenpox. When Dr. Adcock arrived he held a conference with Dr. F. W. Matthews, county member of the state board, Dr. Bert Maltby, city physician, and Mayor C. F. Murray.

The William Jewell gymnasium, which is being used as a pesthouse, was visited, and the smallpox diagnosis in every case was confirmed.

STUDENTS DO LAUNDRY WORK.

The Swan Laundry Company of Liberty, the only one here, refused bundles from the gymnasium today, even though thoroughly fumigated. The boys are washing their clothes in the bathrooms.

A. Z. York is a painter and paper-hanger, at whose wife's boarding house the initial case of smallpox was discovered. It was learned that he, too, had developed the disease, and his home was promptly quarantined.

The disease was discovered in six more residences today and the houses quarantined. The four fraternity houses here also were placed under quarantine. At the Sigma Nu chapter house Dr. Adcock examined ten students and found that eight had the disease.

Drs. Adcock, Maltby and Hooser visited four places in two hours and there discovered twenty cases of smallpox that had not been reported. Eleven of the new cases are students and nine are citizens. Five had just broken out yesterday and today.

Following the investigation, a meeting of physicians and citizens was called by Mayor Murray.

Dr. Adcock suggested the immediate closing of the high school, all of the ward schools, all churches, the skating rink and the theaters. All these places will remain closed until the city physician and his assistant raise the quarantine.

Tomorrow Drs. Maltby and Hooser will begin a house to house canvass of the entire town. The physicians are of the opinion that the college may be able to open in two weeks. After tonight the postoffice here will refuse all mail from quarantined places.

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January 12, 1909

BRILLIANT INAUGURAL BALL.

Reception at Executive Mansion and
Dancing at Madison House.

JEFFERSON CITY, Jan. 11. -- (Special.) Never before has there been a more brilliant inaugural ball than the one given tonight in honor of Governor Herbert S. Hadley. The crowd at the mansion calling on the Governor and Mrs. Hadley was so great that it was early seen that there would be no room for dancing, so the old dancing room of the Madison house was requisitioned. To this place the guests of the governor and first lady of the state were ushered after they had paid their respects at the official residence.

There was no grand march, the dancing being most in formal. The entire time of the governor was taken up receiving guests at the mansion. The grand old house, admittedly one of the most imposing official residences in the country, was one mass of cut and growing flowers and plants. Musicians occupied a place under the grand staircase, and it was intended to have the ball in the great reception hall and the salons.

The Governor and Mrs. Hadley received in the main hall, but were forced to retire to one of the adjoining rooms to permit dancing, which began shortly before 9 p. m. in the mansion, and by 9:30 in the Madison.

The prevailing intense cold weather caused many to telegraph their congratulations from the large towns and cities, but nevertheless the assembly was large and brilliant.

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January 12, 1909

FIRST REPUBLICAN
IN FORTY YEARS.

HERBERT S. HADLEY SWORN IN
AS GOVERNOR OF MISSOURI.

INAUGURAL IS
CEREMONIOUS.

ESCORTED TO CAPITOL BY THE
THIRD REGIMENT.

Batteries Fire Salute of Seventeen
Guns in Honor of the New
Executive -- Hadley De-
fines Policies.
Herbert Spencer Hadley, Governor of Missouri
GOVERNOR HERBERT SPENCER HADLEY.

JEFFERSON CITY, Jan 11. -- (Special.) With the inauguration today of Herbert S. Hadley, Missouri, for the first time in nearly forty years, has a Republican governor.

Governor Hadley was inducted into office in a snowstorm. A week ago Governor Joseph W. Folk informally surrendered the mansion house to Mr. and Mrs. Hadley, but in order to have everything ceremonial today, the Folks and Hadleys returned to their old homes. At 11 o'clock Governor Folk left the mansion house, attended by the Third regiment of infantry from Kansas City, and a detachment of artillerymen from St. Louis, and made a ceremonial call upon Mr. Hadley, traveling in a carriage.

Mr. Hadley joined the retiring governor in the carriage, and the two made their way to the capitol, reaching there shortly before noon. The retiring and incoming state officials, excepting the lieutenant governor and the claimants, were assembled in the executive offices. When the party was completed by the arrival of Mr. Hadley and Governor Folk, all of them went to the house of representatives to be sworn in.


CROWD PACKS THE CORRIDORS.

The hall was packed to its full capacity, and there was tumult in the corridors, caused by hundreds fighting for admittance, which they were unable to gain. The members of the supreme court occupied the speaker's stand, Justice Henry Lamm acting as president. He is the only Republican member of the supreme court.

With little ado Mr. Hadley, walking by the side of the retiring governor, went to where Mr. Justice Lamm was standing, and, being told by the justice to do so, raised his hand and the administration of the oath began.

John C. McKinley, the retiring lieutenant governor, acting as president of the joint session of the legislature which was in session for the inaugural, caused some apprehension when, because of the noise in the corridor, he loudly ordered the sergeant-at-arms to "eject the disturbers from the state house."


ALL TAKE THE OATH.

The prospect of hostilities caused the chief justice to pause in the administration of his oath. Hie own hand, which had been raised aloft, dropped to his side. Mr. Hadley did not do this. His hand was up for keeps, and he kept it there until the justice could resume and conclude. A

As soon as Governor Hadley was in office and Governor Folk automatically out of office the other officers were lined up and sworn in en masse. These were James Cowgill, treasurer; John D. Gordon, auditor; Cornelius Roach, secretary of state; Elliot W. Majors, attorney general; John A. Knott, railroad and warehouse commissioner.

Cannons began booming after the inauguration announcing the fact to the world, whereupon Governor Hadley made his inaugural address. He said:

"In the performance of the duties of the office of governor, my sole ambition and desire will be to continue to deserve the confidence and approval of the people of Missouri.

"Forty years have come and gone since a candidate of the Republican party was inaugurated as governor of this state. It will be sufficient for the purposes of this occasion to learn from the last half century of Missouri's history a lesson of conservatism and official fairness in the conduct of public affairs. And the political differences need not interfere with the performance of official duties, has been emphasized during the course of the last four years. For during that time, the state officials, partly of one party, and partly of another, have worked together in complete harmony and effectiveness.

"And the people have thus learned that no political party is entirely bad, and that no political party can claim a monopoly of official honesty and virtue.

"It is also necessary that we should be ever mindful of the fact that the powers of government are divided between the legislative, the executive and the judicial departments. While the rights and authority of each are intimately related with the others, yet it is also necessary that each should exercise its own powers, without interference from the others.


THE QUESTION OF EDUCATION.

"There will be no questions considered by you which are more important than those connected with the work of education. It has been frequently charged that too much money is being expended for the conduct of the state university. I do not believe that there is any substantial basis of complaint on account of any disparity in the distribution of revenues of the state between the state university and the other parts of our educational system.

"But that something is wrong with our work of education is readily apparent by the examination of the statistics as to the illiteracy of our children of school age. According to the statistics of 1900, among the forty-eight states of the national Union, our rank in literacy was 31.

"It is worthy of notice that Missouri is one of four states in the Union that has no provision for superintendents of schools in each county of the state. And the fact that the other three states, namely Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi all have a lower rank of literacy than Missouri may tend to explain this unsatisfactory condition.

"While I claim no special knowledge or experience in matters of education, I do feel that the effectiveness of the common schools of the state must be raised if we are to make any substantial progress in the correction of the present unsatisfactory conditions.

"In no department of work has greater progress been made than in the study and investigation of agriculture, horticulture and the raising and care of live stock. The importance of this work in increasing the wealth and happiness of the people of the state cannot be overestimated. There should be no lack of funds to carry on this work in the most thorough manner possible.

"Under the scientific direction of the representatives of the state, and those whom it educates, should be conducted: The investigation of mineral deposits; the means of improving fertility and productivity of the soil; the growth and conservation of our forests; the use of our water power; the development of our water highways; the improvement of the conditions of life and the protection of the health and welfare of our people.


MISSOURI, THE PIONEER.

"The Missourian has bee the great pioneer. Missouri was the first state lying wholly west of the Mississippi to be admitted to the union. Maine entered the Union upon the shoulders of Missouri.

"For forty years Missouri stood as an outpost of civilization, reaching out into the unknown and undeveloped West. From her borders radiated those two great highways of Western exploration, travel, commerce and of conquest, on ending in the Northwest on the shores of the Pacific, and the other in the Southwest, in the land of the Mexican and the Spaniard. And along these great highways marched those hardy Missouri pioneers, hunters, trappers, traders and soldiers who were to bind our national domain, that great empire that lies between the Mississippi and the Pacific, by stronger ties than treaties and laws.

"The Missourian has been the pioneer of the West, leading the westward march of civilization across the American continent.

"The glory of Missouri is not alone in the glory that comes from things done in the past. She lives today in the active, throbbing, eager life of the civilization of the twentieth century. And in that great moral awakening which has swept across the country, creating an increased interest in the exercise of the duties of citizenship, raising the standard of honesty and efficiency in the public service and in the working out of those great problems which, as the product of our complex and commercialized civilization, confront us today, Missouri has also been something of a pioneer."

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January 11, 1908

TO HADLEY'S INAUGURATION.

Kansas City Republicans Leave for
Jefferson City on Special Train.

It was a shivering crowd of soldiers and citizens which rushed from the street cars to the warmth of the Union depot in Kansas City at midnight last night. They were members of Kansas City's delegation which left on two special trains over the Missouri Pacific at 12:30 and 1 o'clock this morning for Jefferson City to attend the inauguration of Governor Herbert S. Hadley. The special train bearing the Third Regiment, Missouri national guard, pulled out for Jefferson City shortly before 1 o'clock. The special train bearing the Kansas City politicians and friends of Governor Hadley did not leave until after 1 o'clock.

The Kansas City special was made a part of the St. Joseph, Mo., special. In spite of the cold there was plenty of elation in the departure. Brass bands and plenty of enthusiasm made some of the brave travelers who were waiting for trains venture out on the platform right in the face of the blizzard from the north to see the display of the Kansas City political spirit.

But there were many among the Kansas City delegation who are not politicians. Some were business and professional men, friends of Governor Hadley, who wanted to see Kansas City well represented at the inauguration and who wanted to extend friendly greetings to the new governor.

"It has been more than one score years and ten since we Republicans -- " began a St. Joseph, Mo., politician who wanted to make a speech of welcome to the Kansas City delegation as they climbed aboard the special. But he was interrupted with "Save your ammunition until four years hence, when another Republican governor will be elected."

"It's too great a tax on the memory to recall incidents that happened thirty-seven years ago when the only Republican governor we have elected in that period was inaugurated," remonstrated a Kansas City man.

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January 9, 1909

INAUGURATION OF
GOVERNOR HADLEY.

Monday, January 11, 1909, at Jef-
ferson City, Mo.

This is to notify all Republicans that desire to be present at the inauguration of the first Republican governor of Missouri since the civil war, that the Republican clubs of Kansas city will have a special train to Jefferson City via the Missouri Pacific railway.

The train will be at readiness to receive passengers at Kansas City Union depot, Sunday evening, January 10, at 11:50, and will arrive at Jefferson City at 7 a. m. Monday.

Tickets will be good going only on the special train.

Excursion tickets can be secured from any of the following members of the Republican special train committee:

Roy S. Davis, 1002 N. Y. Life; E. A. Norris, Ricksecker bldg; H. E. Barker, 15th & McGee; Leo Koehler, city hall; W. E. Griffin, 810 N. Y. Life bldg., or Missouri Pacific city ticket office, No. 901 Main street.

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January 5, 1909

ASK FOR MORE RECOGNITION.

Homeopathic Physicians Want to
Help Control Insane Hospitals.

The homeopathic physicians of the state will demand of Governor Hadley greater recognition. C. A. Young, ex-alderman of this city, will present several petitions to Governor Hadley today, requesting that he give the homeopaths at least two members on the board of control of the hospitals for the insane and greater recognition on the state board of health. The homeopaths now have only one member on the board of control of the hospitals for the insane.

The plnas for gaining greater recognition were talked over last night at a meeting of the Kansas City Homeopathic Medical Society at the Coates house.

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November 28, 1908

LIFE THREATENED,
SAYS WALLACE.

HAS RECEIVED LETTERS FROM
ALL PARTS OF COUNTRY.

ONE MAN SPEAKS OF
A ROPE.

ANOTHER HOPES HE'LL BE PRES-
ENT AT EXECUTION.

Because of These Threats the Judge
Declines to Surrender Bench
Until His Commission Ex-
pires -- His Statement.

"Since I have taken office I have received many threatening letters on account of my attitude as to Sunday law enforcement."

This sentence, delivered near the close of an address of ninety minutes' duration, startled the hearers of Judge William H. Wallace from their lethargy yesterday afternoon. For the greater part of that time they had sat with half closed eyes, especially the policemen who were witnesses in city appeal cases, while the judge expounded his reasons for wishing to continue on the bench until January 1. The legal precedents and cases cited by the court had almost lulled the coppers, who had worked all night and who wanted to sleep, into the land of Nod. Then came mention of threatening letters and open eyes.

"These letters have come from all parts of the country," continued the judge. "From Denver, where they shoot ministers in the pulpit; from Paterson, N. J., the hotbed of anarchy; from Chicago, St. Louis, and other cities. One man wrote that he hoped to be present to witness, within five years, my execution. Another spoke of bringing a rope. Still another has written to me every day a postal card not fit to go through the mails."


DIETY DIVERTED BULLET.

By this time the judge's audience was very much awake. The story of the threatening letters had never been alluded to in any of Wallace's former explanations or statements. The judge continued to state that the enforcement of the law was a thing that had to come, saying in this connection:

"God directed the bullet that was fired at Francis J. Heney in San Francisco so that it would not interfere with the enforcement of the law."

Judge Wallace commenced his statement by letting another secret escape. It was to the effect that E. C. Crow, formerly attorney general of Missouri, had given him legal advice upon which he based his contention that he should hold office until January 1. The basis of Mr. Crow's opinion was the act of 1871, which created the criminal court. Judge Wallace said that court decisions had failed to disturb this act.

"And besides," said Judge Wallace, speaking of the succession as soon as a successor qualifies, "is it good law? If so, then the appointive judge is absolutely at the caprice of the man who comes in and that ends it. The new judge might want to come in in two weeks, maybe in four. The man in office has some rights.


SPOILED A SPEECH.

"Take my case, for instance. I was to have delivered on Monday night an address before the Sabbath Association of America, a national gathering. Then this judgeship muddle came up and I was forced to decline. I was also invited to join, in the East, in the organization of a world-wide law enforcement league. I could not go on account of this matter."

Then, after citing a number of cases of what might happen if there was no judge of the criminal court, Judge Wallace said:

"Of course there are a lot of fellows who say: 'If there is a technical case, dump Wallace. No matter if it is reasonable or not. The public demands it.' But see what the constitution says and the statutes," and the supreme court and so on for an hour and a half.

Then the tired policemen were told to go home and return again on Monday.

Judge Wallace made a hurried exit from the court room at 5 o'clock. "If I can get into my house and get my grip I will go to Jefferson City tonight," were his parting words. He is to confer with Attorney General H. S. Hadley tomorrow.

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November 5, 1908

HADLEY'S VICTORY
IS CELEBRATED.

SUPPORTERS MARCH STREETS IN
CHEERING THRONGS.

COULD HARDLY
BELIEVE NEWS.

COMING ON HEELS OF WHAT
LOOKED LIKE DEFEAT.

Men Shouted the Winner's Name as
They Crowded the Streets.
Herbert Spencer Hadley, Governor-Elect of Missouri
HERBERT SPENCER HADLEY.

Republicans in Kansas City and Jackson county awakened yesterday morning to learn that their hope of seeing a Republican elected governor in the present generation had been fulfilled, and that for the next four years the commonwealth will be ruled from the governor's mansion at Jefferson City by Herbert S. Hadley. At first the news was too good to be believed, and there were many doubting Thomases, especially in view of the fact that when tired, exhausted humanity sought rest a few hours before from the fatigue of watching the returns, advices at hand indicated the success of W. S. Cowherd, the nominee of the Democrats.

True, from the standpoint of Republican estimates the night before the meager returns then at hand pointed towards Hadley's election, but they were so indefinite that not even the most sanguine partisan could make himself believe that the complete returns would show anything but the often repeated story of Democratic success.

Like the wind, the cheerful news that Hadley was gaining as each report came in from belated voting places, and that his majority in St. Louis was something unheard of, swept over the city. Enthusiasts shouted the glad tidings until they were hoarse, and by noon newspaper office bulletins gave out the information that Hadley had been elected without a doubt.

SHOUTED IN THE STREETS.

Above the din and racket of commerce shouts and cheers for Hadley rent the air along the crowded downtown streets, and as by magic an impromptu parade was formed. Headed by a band of music, hundreds of shouting, enthusiastic Republicans fell in behind the musicians and marched through the streets. An immense framed portrait of Hadley was borne at the head of the procession, and a large American flag that, when unfolded, almost spread its patriotic colors the width of the street, was grasped by willing and enthusiastic men and carried far above their heads.

The crowd took the building of The Journal by storm. They marched into the building hundreds strong, the band playing patriotic airs. The marchers, cheering and their spirits at high tide, made a circle of the business office corridor, and marched up the stairs to the rooms of the editorial and local departments.. It was an unusual and unique demonstration, the like of which had never before been undertaken in a political campaign.

COWHERD'S BATH OF GLOOM.

While the Republicans were rejoicing, W. S. Cowherd, the Democratic nominee for governor, was in his law offices in the American Bank building greatly depressed over the outlook. He was surrounded by friends and supporters, and they were undertaking to figure out a bare possible majority for their defeated idol. The best they could do was to make the majority possibly 2,000, a most discouraging concession in view of Missouri's normal majority in the past of from 35,000 to 40,000.

"Pretty slim drawing of figures, boys," painfully conceded Mr. Cowherd. At 2 o'clock he complained of weariness after his trying campaign, and he went to his apartments in the Roosevelt. He said he was going to try and forget it in the sweet dreams and left orders not to be disturbed.

"I'm not making any claims. It may take the official count to determine the result," is all Mr. Cowherd would say when questioned.

DEFEAT IS ADMITTED.

Two hours later R. J. Ingraham, his law partner, had a conference with former Governor A. M. Dockery, Bernard Corrigan, James A. Reed and other Democratic leaders, and the defeat of Mr. Cowherd was practically admitted. It was conceded that it would be impossible to overcome Hadley's strong lead in St. Louis and the complexion of the returns that were coming in from Southeast Missouri. They signed and sealed their verdict complacently, but with expressions of deep regret.

Mr. Dockery said he had ideas as to what had contributed to the defeat of Cowherd and added that it would do the party no good to make them public. Others in the conference also decided that they did not want to see in the newspapers what they thought of a lot of men whom they freely blamed for the result.

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November 3, 1908

HADLEY CLOSES
THE CAMPAIGN.

UNPRECEDENTED DEMONSTRA-
TION GREETS CANDIDATE.

KERENS AND WARNER SPEAK.

ROWDIES ATTEMPT TO MAR EN-
THUSIASTIC MEETING.

Mr. Hadley Asks Jackson County and
Kansas City to Give Him
the Majority They Did
Four Years Ago.

The most enthusiastic audience Convention hall has housed this year, with estimates varying from 14,000 to 18,000, welcomed Colonel R. C. Kerens, Republican candidate for the United States senatorial nomination; Congressman E. C. Ellis, candidate for re-election; Selden P. Spencer of St. Louis; United States Senator William Warner of Missouri and Herbert S. Hadley, and helped the latter close his campaign for governor of the state.

Despite an apparently organized attempt to break up the meeting, which broke out three times wile the gubernatorial nominee was speaking, the hall was crowded before the first speaker was introduced.

Near-hysteria had the followers of Hadley, Kerens, Ellis and the balance of the Republican ticket, and the applause which greeted Mr. Hadley was deafening for twenty minutes after he was introduced. It was entirely genuine, and it was not possible for the chairman of the meeting to control the house.


MADE A JOYFUL NOISE.

The scene which followed the introduction of Mr. Hadley was wild in the extreme, and for several minutes the speakers' stand in the center of the arena floor by the lowering of the big curtain, was in danger from the crowds pushing toward it from all sides. On the stage, stretching clear across the hall, the vice chairmen of the meeting joined in the demonstration. Beside the immense crowd the audiences of other rallies during the campaign appeared as mere reception committees of the real members of the party in Kansas City.

Disorder which the chairman could not abate took possession of the great crowd when United States Senator William Warner named the nominee for governor. Time after time Mr. Hadley advanced to the edge of the platform in an attempt to be heard, but his voice was drowned by the cheers of his admirers. The newspaper men were routed from their tables and an improvised platform of but a few square feet was arranged in the center of the stage. When Mr. Hadley mounted this stand it was but a signal for further demonstration.


ROUGHNECKS IN EVIDENCE.

It was not until Mr. Hadley had delivered several hundred words of his address that the first attempt to disturb the meeting broke out in the crowded west balcony. There was a second attempt and then a third; and the disturbers were hissed from every corner of the hall. Women in the section where the disturbance occurred were forced to leave their seats and places were provided for them in the boxes below. There was a general shout for the police, but the hissing of Mr. Hadley's admirers served to drive out the disturbers.

Mr. Hadley talked as a Kansas Cityan to his home folks. He made a plea for the entire state ticket and then asked his friends to support Fred Dickey and William Buchholz for the senate, and the nominees for representative in the interest of the candidacy of Colonel Kerens for the United States senate. Senator Warner had previously made a plea for support of Colonel Kerens and the candidate had had a chance to speak in his own behalf, but had modestly confined his remarks to other party issues and his confidence in the success of the ticket in Missouri.


A WORD FOR KIMBRELL.

Mr. Hadley also asked support for I. B. Kimbrell for county prosecutor and called attention to the four candidates for the circuit bench. He mentioned the Democratic attempts to discredit the party with circulars intended to create race prejudice. He read a letter from a Kansas City Democrat who is going to support him because members of his own party had made the mistake of showing him what he considered dirty plans to defeat a clean candidate.

After Mr. Hadley reached the hall several questions were asked him and these he answered from the platform. One request was for a statement if he would enforce the Sunday saloon closing law. It was signed by "several Democrats who wished to know before voting." Mr. Hadley answered that he intended, if elected, to make the Sunday saloon closing laws affecting Kansas City and St. Louis mean just exactly what they state upon the books. He said he did not desire the support of any special interest, nor did he want any special interest to make an unfair fight against him. He offered a square deal to the saloonist who obeys the law and respects the qualifications of his license.

As a closing word of his campaign, Mr. Hadley stated that he would decline to qualify in office if elected, should any taint be charged against his nomination. He said he was nominated by honest votes and wanted no tainted election. He asked that Jackson county and Kansas City give him the 4,000 majority he received four years ago when a candidate for attorney general.

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October 3, 1908

CRITTENDEN FLAYS HADLEY
IN LETTER TO COLLIER'S.

Former Governor Tells Eastern
Publicantion Truth About At-
torney General -- Praises
William S. Cowherd.


Former Governor Thomas T. Crittenden has addressed a letter to the editor of Collier's Weekly in which he takes that publication to task for its intentional and inadvertent misrepresentation of Missouri political conditions and "takes the hide off" Herbert S. Hadley.


The Crittenden letter is written to Collier's in reply to the article it published two week s ago recommending to the voters of Missouri that they elect Herbet S. Hadley instead of William S. Cowherd. The former governor claims that the article was entirely unfair to Cowherd and and gave Hadley credit for much that he has not accomplished.

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September 2, 1908

HONEST ELECTION THE ISSUE.

Hadley Declares Folk's Police Must
Furnish Protection at Polls.

Herbert S. Hadley, Republican candidate for governor of Missouri, will insist on a fair, square election. He said yesterday afternoon that if the people of Missouri wanted him for the next governor it must be the people who elect him. He believes that the question of an honest election will be one of the issues of the campaign.

"It was very plainly indicated at the primaries that there had been some crooked work," said he. "Now, one of the great problems of this campaign is to see that every man gets his vote. I don't intend to be jobbed or robbed, so in order not to be we must have the assurance that Governor Folk's police boards and police departments will give us protection at the polls.

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September 1, 1908

HADLEY'S BACK FOR BATTLE.

Stops Here on His Way Home From
New Mexico.

Herbert S. Hadley, Republican candidate for governor of Missouri, arrived in Kansas City last night at 10:40 o'clock from Santa Fe, N. M., where he has been since the middle of June recuperating. Mr. Hadley went immediately to the Hotel Baltimore and retired. He will remain over here today in conference wtih political leaders before going to Jefferson City.

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July 15, 1908

WILL HANDLE SILVER TROWEL.

Judge J. Patterson to Cement Cor-
nerstone of Poor Farm Buildings

Final arrangements for the laying of the cornerstone at the new county poor farm building will be made Friday afternoon,when the committee which has the matter in charge will hold a meeting. J. D. Jackson, superintendent the farm, is chairman.

It has already been decided to observe the day, July 29, with a picnic, which will be in the nature of a county holiday, for all the county offices will be closed. Noel Jackson will be master of ceremonies and J. M. Patterson, presiding judge of the county court, will handle the silver trowel which is to be presented to him. Choice of mementos to be placed in the stone will be made by the Rev. C. W. Moore. The following have been invited to speak at the cornerstone laying:

Senator William Warner, Attorney General H. S. Hadley, Governor Joseph Wingate Folk, Champ Clark, H. M. Beardsley, Judge John F. Phillips, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Judge H. L. McCune, the Rev C. W. Moore, the Rev. S. M. Neel, the Rev. George Reynolds, the Rev. William J. Dalton, Rabbi H. H. Mayer and Llewellyn Jones, mayor of Independence.

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April 9, 1908

HADLEY WILL NOT
BE A CANDIDATE.

Attorney General's Health
Won't Stand Campaign.

JEFFERSON CITY, April 8. --(Special.) Herbert S. Hadley will not be a candidate for the Republican nomination for governor. This announcement was made by the attorney general today, just before he left the capital for Kansas City with his family. He does not think he should, in his weakened condition, assume the risk to his health involved in a state political campaign.

Mr. Hadley's declination to become a candidate has stimulated speculation as to who will take his place at the head of the ticket. Among the names mentioned are those of Liutenant Governor John C. McKinley, James T. Neville of Springfield, Secretary of State Swanger, former State Senator John M. Williams of California, Congressman Richard Bartholdt, Judge R. S. Ryers of Osage County, John Kennish, General Hadley's assistant; John H. Bothwell of Sedalia and Charles Nagle of St. Louis.

UNDER DOCTOR'S ORDERS.

The statement given out by Mr. Hadley follows:

"I have been urged by a large number of party leaders to withhold for the present a definite decision with refernce to becoming a candidate for governor, with the plea that in the course of two or three weeks, I might view the matter differently than I do now.

"While personally I have no objection to complying with these requests, I feel that in view of the many published statements with reference to the condition of my health, and my intentions as to becoming a candidate for governor, that the party should at once be definitely advised as to the facts, in order that it may take such action as it may deem advisable.

"I have been advised by my physicians that the labors necessarily incident to a campaign for governor would, in their opinion, seriously impair my health. And as it is necessary under our primary election law for candidates to file a declaration of thier candidacy by June 5, I feel that the party should at once begin the consideratioin o fthe many qualified candidates to be found in the ranks."

"I have also been urged by many to be a candidate with the understanding that I would not be expected to make an extensive or laborious campaign. I cannot bring myself to believe that such a course would be satisfactory either to the party or to myself. I sincerely appreceiate the confidence and approval that are expressed in these requests, and it is only because I feel constrained by my duty to our family that I have been unable to accept the position of honor and responsibility that has been so generously offered to me."

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April 8, 1908

CRITTENDEN WINS BY
LARGE MAJORITY.

MOST REMARKABLE DEMONSTRA-
TION EVER WITNESSED IN KAN-
SAS CITY TAKES PLACE WHEN
RESULT IS LEARNED.

KYLE RE-ELECTED
POLICE JUDGE.

BAEHR IS ALSO ELECTED
CITY TREASURER --
THE REST IS DEMOCRATIC
-- CRITTENDEN'S MAJORITY
1,320.

THE WINNING TICKET (Majorities).

Mayor -- Crittenden, D ..........................1,320
Police Judge -- Kyle, R ...........................2,213
Treasurer -- Baehr, R ............................1,220
Auditor -- Greene, D ..............................2,478
Attorney -- Langsdale, D .......................1,708
Upper House President, Gregory, D .....1,344

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Democrat, was elected mayor of Kansas City yesterday over Mayor Henry M. Beardsley, Republican, by 1,320 majority, with one precinct of the Twelfth ward missing. Harry G. Kyle, Republican, was re-elected police judge over Michael E. Casey, Democrat, and William J. Baehr, Republican, was elected city treasurer over Thomas S. Ridge, Democrat. Kyle's majority was 2,213.

The upper house Democratic ticket, with Robert L. Gregory president, elected three of its candidates, making that branch of the council still Republican. The lower house is overwhelmingly Democratic.

It was a big Democratic victory, and for the first time in four years the Democrats will be back in the city hall for a term of two years one week from next Monday.

While in the city ten days ago Attorney General Hadley warned his Republican friends that the issues advanced were false, and he quietly passed the word that if they were persisted in it could mean nothing but defeat. The result proves that Hadley was right.

Overcast clouds and intermittent showers ushered in the day. Despite the unfavorable aspect of the weather, voters were up and astir long before the break of day, and at 6 o'clock, when the polls opened, the voting places of the 164 precincts in the fourteen wards were besieged by long and patient lines of men awaiting the time and opportunity to cast their ballots.

The voting was rapid, the record in some precincts being one to the minute. Merchant, banker, professional man vied with the laborer to get to the ballot boxes.

SOME ARRESTS MADE.

In a majority of the precincts over half the total registration had been voted by noon, and from that time to the close of the polls at 7 o'clock the voting was by jerks and starts. It was stated in some of the precincts as early as 6 o'clock that all the votes that could be depended upon to be cast had been delivered, and this seemed true, for the judges, clerks and workers sat around idle.

Assertions of fraud were made during the early hours, and some arrests resulted It was charged that men had tendered money for votes, and that voters had accepted money. The early arrests of these offenders put a stop to any more such work so far as was observable, although at several times during the day Alderman Pendergast openly charged that Republicans were paying $3 a piece for negro votes in the First ward. Watchers sent into the ward by the Civic League said they had seen no vote-buying.

BUSINESS MEN REVOLT.

Up to noon the Republican headquarters felt sure of victory and the Democrats felt uneasy The first alarm was felt at 1111 Grand when the Republican precinct workers telephoned in that the noon hour vote of business men was against the Republican ticket. The excuse offered was that retail merchants were in a revolt against an evening newspaper.

The Democrats had not counted on this vote at all. As soon as they saw they were getting it they sent their runners into the stores after the clerks. With oodles of money to pay for carriages and automobiles to hurry them to their home wards, the Democrats found the store proprietors willing to let the men off to vote. It was a fully fledged rebellion in the Republican party.

As early as 4 o'clock it was announced at Democratic headquarters that the Democratic ticket was in the ascendancy. News came that Walter Dickey, Republican state chairman, had joined Mayor Beardsley in the Ninth ward, and with it came the news that negroes were beginning to vote the Republican ticket there. Dickey was understood to have wagered, for friends, about $18,000. One negro said he had been offered $8 for his vote. High as this was, $8 apiece for votes to save heavy bets would not be out of the way. There was Democratic money seen in the ward immediately. Twenty-four negroes voted the Democratic ticket straight at Fifteenth and Tracy. This looked like commercialism, but the retort was that the Republicans were at the same game. Governor Folk was hurried to the ward to see Democratic tickets voted by negroes. He expressed surprise.

There were only three fights reported at either headquarters, and both headquarters said they had heard of very little challenging. This presaged clear tally sheets, an early count and all judges signing.

ENTER CRITTENDEN, EXIT BEARDSLEY.

At 7 o'clock the mayor arrived at 1111 Grand, thinking he had squeezed through, but by 8 o'clock he admitted to a Journal man that "it looks blue." An hour later he conceded his defeat. This was while he sat in headquarters with a crowd taxing the capacity of the big hall.

Crittenden was sent for. He was not able to get to the Democratic headquarters until about 10 o'clock, just as Mayor Beardsley was leaving his own headquarters, a defeated man.

CROWDS FILL THE CITY.

The rival city chairmen, the rival candidates for mayor, the commissioners and governor Folk all admitted that there had been a reasonably fair election, marked by the absence of repeating and ruffianism. The most sensational spectacle at night was of Republicans going in squads to the Democratic headquarters to share in the demonstrations of victory. Full importance was given at the Republican headquarters to the weight the defeat will have on the Republican chances this fall, unless there is a new alignment and new issues found... while the Democrats claimed to see ahead far enough to make James A. Reed United States senator. Reed arrived at his headquarters about 10 o'clock. He was called on for a speech and made one from his automobile. He congratulated the entire party upon its success as an organization as a whole, but credited the enormous majority, by comparison, to the opposition of an evening newspaper. When afterwards Mr. Reed went past Eleventh and Grand on his triumphal tour, his car was halted and once more he was compelled to make a speech. He repeated what he had said at Democratic headquarters. From there he went to The Journal office, arriving just as two Democratic bands and processions met, one from Democratic headquarters, traveling from the west, and another form the Sixth ward, headed by the Italian band, coming from the east. The meeting was unexpected and most dramatic. From The Journal the crowd went back to Democratic headquarters and at midnight it was roving about the city.

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