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December 5, 1909

PNEUMONIA EPIDEMIC HERE.

Other Infectious Diseases Are
Prevalent Throughout City.

Pneumonia is quite prevalent throughout the city, and physicians say it has reached serious proportions. The severe and variable weather is a promoter of the malady. During December there were forty-two deaths from pneumonia. This is twelve more than for December of 1908.

Smallpox is another cold weather affliction, but thus far the city has been quite free from its ravages. Yesterday the second smallpox case since June 7, 1908, reached the attention of the health authorities. The victim was a white man and he was taken to the hospital for the treatment of infectious diseases from a house on Harrison street, between Seventh and Eighth.

Measles is another malady that is demanding the attention of the health authorities. It had its inception in the northeast part of the city, and has been steadily spreading.

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December 29, 1909

DIES IN GROCERY STORE.

Nebraska Visitor Had Just Pur-
chased Cigars When Stricken.

While handing the clerk a dollar to pay for some cigars he had just purchased, Isaac N. Mothershead, 57 years old, a farmer of Niponee, Neb., died of heart disease in Edward Kendall's grocery store, at Fourteenth and Harrison streets, yesterday morning. Mr. Mothershead and his wife had been spending the Christmas holidays at the home of their daughter, Mrs. O. P. Haslett, 1420 Tracy avenue.

The body was taken to the Stine undertaking rooms in the police ambulance. A widow and five daughters survive him.

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October 24, 1909

EVERY HYMN BOOK GONE.

Hymnless Service Today Threaten-
ed Central Presbyterian Church.

The janitor of the Central Presbyterian church on Harrison street, between Ninth and Tenth streets, was sweeping out the church yesterday morning in preparation for today's services when he found there was not a hymn book in the building.

Thieves had taken them, he believed. He notified W. S. Canine, treasurer of the church. The police were notified. Detectives were assigned to the case. They found that the books had been borrowed by the Y. M. C. A. for the dedication of its new home.

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October 19, 1909

WORKING MEN ATTEND SCHOOL.

Night School for Foreigners Is
Opened With 101 Enrolled.

The Jewish Educational Institute opened its night school for foreigners at 7 o'clock last night in its new building, Admiral boulevard and Harrison street, with 101 enrollments.

The purpose of the night school, which is open on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings of each week from 7 to 9, is to teach the foreign class of people in Kansas City the English language and to Americanize them as far as possible. Five different divisions are taught, mainly elementary English, arithmetic, civil government and architectural drawing, the latter being taught by Walter Root and Thomas Green.

The classes are composed mostly of working men and women between the ages of 20 to 45 years, most of them having a good foreign education, a few being unable to read or write a word of English.

This work has been carried on for the past six years under the same management at 1702 Locust street. Jacob Billikopf, superintendent of the institute, expresses himself pleased with the enrollment for the opening night, that he expects to increase it considerably in the next few weeks. A fee of $1 per month entitles the scholar to all the privileges of the institute, prominent among which is the gymnasium and shower baths.

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October 2, 1909

CALVIN SMITH, MISSOURI
PIONEER, IS DEAD AT 96.

Came to the State With His Father
in 1816 -- Gave Smithville
Its Name.
Calvin Smith, Whose Father Gave Smithville Its Name, Dead at 96.
CALVIN SMITH.

Calvin Smith, who was born December 19, 1813, who perhaps was the oldest living Jackson county pioneer in the point of residence, died at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon at his home, 2495 Harrison street.

Besides a widow, Mr. Smith is survived by six children, Henry, James and Evaston Smith, and Mrs. J. S. Setord, Mrs. Anna Goodenough Smith and Mrs. G. McCleary. Henry and James are lawyer practicing in this city. Burial will be Sunday afternoon in Valley Falls, Kas., under direction of the Masons.

Mr. Smith was born at Humphrey Smith's Mills on Buffalo Creek, New York. His father was a farmer. When tales of the rich French province of Missouri were first wafted East he was quick to catch their inspiration and migrate. In his memoirs written for the benefit of relatives a few years ago, Mr. Smith tells the story of the trip.

"On February 29, 1815," he said, "my father prepared for a trip to the West. He had $4,000 in gold which he put in a belt and buckled it around his waist. In an old style two-wheeled ox cart, drawn by a yoke of oxen, he put his famly and started for Missouri. We went to Olean, a point on the Allegheny river. With his wife and four children he embarked there on a canoe At Pittsburgh, Pa., father had to attach the canoe to a flat bottom boat going to New Orleans.

TO MISSOURI BY BOAT.

"At Louisville, Ky., we met three or four families who were going to the new territory of Missouri. Father chipped in with them and bought a keep boat and we floated down the Ohio river to its mouth.

At the moth of the Ohio river we turned into the Mississippi and the boat was propelled up that river by men who walked along the shore and drew the boat after them, while a man on the boat with a long pole kept it from running ashore.

In time we reached St. Louis, 190 miles from the mouth of the Ohio river. We stopped there two or three weeks. Then we all boarded the keel boat again for another move.

IN CLAY COUNTY IN 1822.

"Eighteen miles brought us to the Missouri river and we went up that river 300 miles to a place called Cole's fort, now Boonville, Mo. We reached there on the first day of July, 1816, just four months to a day from the time we left New York.

"On the 14th day of July my sister, Missouri, was born and about five weeks later, August, 1816, father and his family crossed the Missouri river and settled eight miles east of Old Franklin, Howard co unty. We moved several times, but stayed in that county until 1819. We then moved to Carroll county, Mo. This was during the 'Missouri question,' whether the new incoming state should be a slave state or a free state. The missouri compromise in 1822 settled in favor of a slave state.

"In 1822 father took another move to Clay county, Mo., and settled at a place now called Smithville, in the northwest part of the county. It was then a wilderness, being ten miles to the nearest neighbor."

Mr. Smith came to Kansas City in 1882. Two years later his wife died adn he married a second time in 1889. The second wife, who was Miss Fannie Burton of Kansas City, is living.

During the civil war Mr. Smith sided with the North.

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September 20, 1909

MARKS ASKS MATRON'S
RESIGNATION; GETS IT.

Commissioner Says Mrs. Burns Dis-
obeyed Orders in Various Ways.
She's Off the Force.

Mrs. Elizabeth Burns, for nearly two years a police matron, resigned yesterday upon the request of Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner. Mrs. Burns left police headquarters soon after and went to her home, 1509 Harrison street.

Mrs. Burns said she was accused by Mr. Marks of having allowed a reporter for The Journal to talk with Ethelyn Collins, held by the police as a material witness. The Journal printed no interview with the Collins girl. It was said that strict orders had been given that no one except police officers should talk with the Collins girl.

"I left the matron's room but a minute Saturday night," Mrs. Burns said. Mrs. Maud Fontella, where the Collins girl lived, brought the girl $31. As prisoners are not allowed to have money at police headquarters, I asked Henry C. Smith, a special investigator for the police board, who brought Mrs. Fontella to the matron's room, to wait in the room until I got back.

"When I returned three minutes later a reporter for The Journal was talking to Smith. So far as I know he did not talk to the girl nor make any effort to. I told him he could not talk to her and he laughed and said he 'had the whole story.'

"When Mr. Marks asked for my resignation, I was so stunned that I complied without thinking that he was not the entire board. I would not work at headquarters again, but I would like to be tried by the police board in order that my record may be cleared, as I am guiltless of any charge made."

Mrs. Burns is the widow of William Burns, for many years a member of the police force and a captain at the time of his death. She has four children.

Commissioner Marks denied last night that he had taken into consideration the fact that a Journal reporter had talked to the girl, in the presence of Henry Smith, a patrolman, when he asked Mrs. Burns for her resignation. He said that as far as he was concerned the fact that she had allowed a visitor to see Tony Cruie against expressed orders was not used against her.

She had allowed two men, one an old man and the other a young one, to speak with the girl against orders, he said, and had disobeyed orders in other ways, he intimated.

Soon after taking oath as a commissioner Mr. Marks informed reports that there would soon be two good-hearted matrons at police headquarters. It was rumored last night in police circles that Mrs. Joanna Moran was to be asked for her resignation also. Mrs. Burns and Capt. Walter Whitsett have had little difficulties several times.

Soon after Mrs. Burns left the station yesterday, Mrs. J. K. Ellwood, formerly matron of the detention home, was sent for by Mr. Marks. Her husband is the secretary to Inspector E. P. Boyle. She was placed in charge of the matron's room and spent the night at the station.

She said that Mr. Marks had asked her for forty-eight hours of her time, and then she was to be through. Asked if she expected to receive the appointment as a permanent position she refused to answer.

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July 12, 1909

3 DEAD AS RESULT
OF BOMB EXPLOSION.

FIREWORKS DISPLAY NEAR A
CHURCH ENDS FATALLY.

Italians of Holy Rosary Congrega-
tion Were Celebrating St. John's
Day -- Two Negroes Are
Instantly Killed.

The upright figure is sketched from a duplicate of the iron pipe which was also to have been fired. The upper figure is a sketch of the piece which killed the woman and the lower figure is a sketch of the piece which was hurled through the house at 511 Campbell street.


Amidst a throng of 700 persons who gathered at Fifth and Campbell streets last night to watch the celebration of St. John's day, a bomb exploded, instantly killing Clarance Harrington, a negro of 511 Lydia avenue, and Anna Fields, a negro woman of 568 Harrison street; and so seriously wounding Tony Grassiffe, an Italian living at 311 East Third street, that he died at 10:45 o'clock.

The bomb was one used in the pyrotechnical display being held under the direction of the Holy Order of St. John, an organization of the Holy Rosary Roman Catholic church, Fifth and Campbell streets. Tony Grassiffe, one of the victims, was the master of ceremonies and for almost an hour he had been lighting bombs, rockets and Roman candles, while the crowd gathered denser in the street.

Grassiffe finally planted the huge cast iron pipe, loaded with dynamite and a bomb, in the center of a low corner lot. He had been warned to completely cover the bomb with dirt, and to plant it deep. Ignorance or carelessness caused him to leave the bomb in its two feet of iron pipe standing uncovered in the lot. He lighted the fuse and before he could gain his feet the explosion occurred.

NEGROES INSTANTLY KILLED.

Grassiffe's left leg at the knee was completely severed by the bursting projectile. A huge piece of the iron was hurled westward and struck the negro woman full on the right side of her face, tearing it away, and leaving only a small portion of the skull. Another, and smaller piece, struck Harrington in the center of his forehead, crushing his skull and tearing part of it away. The two negroes dropped in their tracks, dead. The woman lay across the sidewalk grasping a palm leaf fan in her hand. The man fell close by her side.

Sergeant D. J. Whalen was standing within three feet of the woman when she fell. He was struck in the chest by a piece of mortar, but was uninjured. Officer Lee Clarry was standing still closer to the negro, and escaped without a scratch.

PENETRATES HOUSE WALL.

One piece of the iron pipe was hurled northward with a force which caused it to penetrate the wall of a house, seventy-five feet distant, and continue its course within, plunging through a two-inch door and spending its force against the other wall of the building.

Seated at a window, not three feet from the point where the projectile entered the wall, was Tony Gafucci. He was thrown from his chair, and lay on the floor of his room, momentarily stunned. The house number is 511 Campbell street.

Instantly after the sound of the explosion, the great crowd surged forward to where the dead bodies were lying. The police officers held them back, and themselves ascertained the condition of the negroes. Seeing that both were dead, the officers hastened to aid Grassiffe, whom they heard groaning and crying for help. They picked the injured man up from the hollow and carried him into a nearby drug store.

The police ambulance was hastily called, and Dr. E. D. Twyman accompanied it to the scene of the explosion. As he alighted at the spot where the negroes were lying on the sidewalk, and stooped down to make examinations, the uncontrollable crowd of negroes and Italians surged forward closer still, knocking over the surgeon.

COULDN'T SAVE ITALIAN.

When Dr. Twyman reached Grassiffe he found the injured man to be in a dangerous condition. Nothing could be done to stop the terrible flow of blood from the severed limb. The surgeon ordered a record drive to the emergency hospital, where every effort was made to save the life of the injured man. He was kept alive until 10:45 o'clock, by means of artificial respiration and then died.

By some means Grassiffe's wife gained entrance to the hospital and, gazing upon the form of her husband, became hysterical. It was necessary for Dr. H. T. Morton to administer an opiate to quiet the woman, who was shrieking strange Italian chants at the top of her voice, pausing now and then to cross herself and mutter a hurried prayer.

The coroner was notified of the deaths and ordered the negroes bodies taken to Moore's undertaking establishment, 1033 Independence avenue.

The celebration last night was held in spite of the constant warnings given out by Father Charles Delbecchi, in charge of the Holy Rosary church. He had just left his church, where he had warned once more of the dangers of fireworks.

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June 29, 1909

WOMAN FIRST FOURTH VICTIM.

Mrs. Williams Sharp Injured While
Playing With a Toy Pistol.

Mrs. William Sharp, 26 years old, 1025 Harrison street, was last night distinguished by being the first person in Kansas City to be injured by the premature explosion of Fourth of July noisemakers. She was in her home and picked up a toy pistol loaded with a blank 22-caliber cartridge. In some manner the cartridge was exploded and the index finger on her right hand was badly lacerated. She was treated at the emergency hospital.

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June 24, 1909

WANT A MILE OF QUARTERS.

Masons Solicit for New Home.

A unique collection ins being made by Mason just now, who have set about raising funds for building and furnishing a new temple at Ninth and Harrison streets.

Strips of perforated card have been sent to the places of business of all members, on which are places for twelve coins, and printed on them the legend: "We Want One Mile of Quarters."

There are places for twelve silver quarters on each one foot strip. when the mile of quarters is measured up it will be found to contain $15,840.

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June 10, 1909

CLAIM HE HYPNOTIZED
ATHENAEUM WOMEN.

SIX MEMBERS CAUSE ARREST OF
AFFABLE BOOK AGENT.

A. W. Johnson Alleged to Have In-
duced Them to Give Up Money
and I. O. U.'s Totaling $120.
Held by Justice.

Six members of the Athenaeum Club went to the prosecutor's office yesterday and on behalf of themselves and three others declared that A. W. Johnson, a book agent, had hypnotized them into giving up money and I. O. U.'s totaling $120.75.

The women who complained to M. M. Bogie, assistant prosecuting attorney, were the following: Mrs. Anna S. Welch, wife of a physician; Mrs. E. T. Phillips, wife of a physician, residence the Lorraine; Mrs. Paul B. Chaney, 3446 Campbell street; Mrs. George S. Millard, 4331 Harrison street; Mrs. W. W. Anderson, 2705 Linwood avenue; Dr. Eliza Mitchell, 1008 Locust street.

Besides these, the following complained of Johnson, but did not appear yesterday: Mrs. Willard Q. Church, 3325 Wyandotte street; Mrs. Wilbur Bell, 200 Olive street, and Mrs. S. S. Moorehead, 3329 Forest avenue.

The women confronted Johnson in Mr. Bogie's office. It was declared that he had exercised hypnotic power. Said Mrs. M. H. Devault, 3411 Wabash avenue, prominent in the Athenaeum:

"This man sold a set of books called 'The Authors' Digest' to these members of the Athenaeum on representation that I had purchased the volumes and had recommended them. They bought largely on this recommendation."

"Yes, and we were hypnotized," said the women.

In addition to the books, Johnson sold a membership in the "American University Association." This, the women say he told them, would enable them to buy books, and especially medical works, at less than the usual price. After correspondence it was found that the lower prices could not be secured.

From all but one woman named, except Mrs. Devault, Johnson secured $5.75 and an order for $115. From Mrs. Millard he got $20 in money.

Johnson, a well dressed, affable young man, was arraigned before Justice Theodore Remley on a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a bond of $500. He said he had an office in the Century building.

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May 18, 1909

"TRY TO LAY IT ALL
ON ME," SAYS SHARP.

SELF-STYLED "ADAM GOD" DE-
MANDS A HEARING.

Misunderstood Court Proceedings
Yesterday When Witnesses Were
Being Examined -- Change of
Venue Has Been Asked.

James Sharp, self-styled "Adam God," appeared as his own counsel in the criminal court yesterday afternoon. Disregarding protests from his attorneys, who tried to make him sit down, Sharp arose and interrupted a witness who was on the stand.

"Judge, your honor," said the leader of the fanatics, "haven't I got any right to say anything? I'd like to say something in my own behalf."

"You have your attorneys," said Judge Latshaw, for by this time Sharp was beginning to talk.

"OUGHT TO BE HEARD."

"I hear all this talk against me," resumed the fanatic, "but there's nothing said about these officers that tried to take my family from me. They shot at me from in front and from behind. If this is the house of God -- and the house of God is where they judge between the just and the unjust -- then I ought to be heard. That's the truth, and just the truth. They're trying to lay it all on me and not showing about these people who forced me into this."

"We are only seeing whether the people are prejudiced against you, Mr. Sharp," the court said. "You are not on trial right now."

"Excuse me, I see now," remarked Sharp and sat down.

The outburst from Sharp came after a number of witnesses had testified as to whether Sharp could get a fair trial in Jackson county. His attorneys had asked a change of venue for him and for Melissa Sharp, his wife, whose trial on the charge of killing Patrolman Michael Mullane was set for yesterday. Judge Latshaw gave the attorneys twelve witnesses to make their showing of prejudice. Nine were examined yesterday afternoon. The others and the state's witnesses are to be heard today.

LIKE A REAL TRIAL.

Should the court overrule the application for a change of venue, the selection of the jury will be begun at once.

It was all so much like a real trial yesterday that Sharp, seeing witness after witness take the stand, believed his trial was in progress. This is what prompted his address to the court. Throughout the testimony he sat by the side of his while listening intently to every question.

Sharp's beard has been allowed to grow, but otherwise he presents little change from his appearance last December, when he was first placed in the county jail. The most noticeable change is in the use of his hands when he speaks. Of old he waved them with many gestures, but now he holds them awkwardly. He was shot in both hands during the fight with officers. His wife's appearance has altered to no perceptible extent.

THE WITNESSES.

Among the witnesses examined yesterday were the following: Henry Hunt, a horseshoer at 1619 Grand avenue; W. W. Correll, special government agent, Thirteenth and Harrison; James Cole, W. R. Heath and L. M. Dempsey, attorneys; M. T. Crume, saloonkeeper at 1225 1/2 Grand avenue.

All of them were asked questions as to whether they believed the Sharps could have a fair trial in Jackson county. Practically all of them said many people believed the Sharps were insane. As the defense is to be insanity, this did not strongly back up the plea of prejudice. Unless the showing of the defense as to prejudice is materially strengthened today, the prospects are strongly against a venue change being granted. All the witnesses so far examined live in the city and nothing has been introduced to show that prejudice exists in the county outside city limits.

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April 23, 1909

OWE MORE CHARITY
THAN WE CAN REPAY.

DR. EMIL HIRSCH DISCUSSES
DUTY OF SOCIETY.

In Dedicatory Lecture at Jewish
Educational Institute, Chicagoan
Talks of Discrimination
Against the Jews.
The Jewish Institute.
NEW JEWISH INSTITUTE.

Spurred on by a desire to better the condition of the Jewish emigrant to this country and this city, the Jewish educational institute was organized six years ago and occupied a small building at 812 East Fifteenth street. After the fourth year of its existence the officers in charge decided to make it more of a power among the Jewish communities of Kansas City. To this end the late home of the institution, 1702 Locust street, was secured and the work was taken up with renewed vigor. During the past two years the utility of the institute has been demonstrated by its growth in popularity and the number of Jews who have attended the night school. The consequence of this growth was that the institute outgrew its home.

The handsome new building, at Admiral boulevard and Harrison street, is constructed of vitrified brick and is three stories in height. In the basement of the building is located a gymnasium and bath rooms for both men and women. The second floor will be given over to educational work of all kinds. Chief among the educational branches is the class in English for those who have recently come to America, and classes in civil government will be given special attention. Besides these classes, manual training, such as cooking and sewing, is to be established for the women.

The new building will contain a library composed of good fiction and reference books. The top floor is given over to a large auditorium in which weekly lectures are to be held for the patrons of the institute. This room will also be used for social events as well. The day nursery department will be one of the most praiseworthy features of the institute, and there the children of the women who are forced to work for a livelihood will be cared for during working hours.

HIRSCH GAVE DEDICATION.
Rabbi Hirsch of Chicago.
DR. EMIL G. HIRSCH.

Before an audience that filled the auditorium last night, Dr. Emil G. Hirsch of Chicago, in his dedicatory lecture, spoke on the duties of society.

"We are what we are through others," said he. "What little charity we give by no means measures what we owe. The property which you own has increased in value through no effort of yours. Its situation and mainly the incoming population has made it increase. You have not so much as touched a spade to it. This is Socialism, but what of it?

"Under Jewish law, land belonged to God, and no man had a right to the same property more than fifty years. Man, today, holds his possession in a title to which society is a determining element. Since you receive great returns from society you must give something to society.

"OUR BROTHER'S KEEPER."

" 'Am I my brother's keeper?' questioned the first murderer. That is indeed a murderer's question. Society is never better than the worst in society. We are our brother's keeper. Insane and evil are individual and perpetual elements, but society is responsible with the individual for the blood spilled and the sighs which are winged to heaven.

"As we keep our brother, in that manner shall we improve or degrade society."

From the question of general society Rabbi Hirsch turned to the matter of the discrimination against the Jews as a class.

"It is the greatest insult when one approaches a Jew and tells him that since he looks so little like a Jew he will be welcomed into a certain sect. I tell the man who utters such insults that I am better than he.. In the University clubs throughout the country, Jews are barred for no other reason. When I pass the University club in Chicago, I feel that I should pass on to Lincoln park and stand before the monkey cage.

VENEER OF CULTURE SICKENING.

"There no monkey holds his tail a little higher because it happens to be a little longer than any of the others, and I can derive more benefit by watching the monkeys. This veneer of culture is sickening, and it shows the lack of true refinement under the surface.

"Let the leanest of us Jews be mightier than the mightiest of them; let the weakest of us be stronger than the strongest of them. We are our brother's keeper and by them shall we be judged."

At the beginning of the dedicatory services and after the building had been accepted from A. Rothenberg of the building committee by Alfred Benjamin, president of the United Jewish Charities, Mr. Benjamin was presented with a loving cup form the Jewish population of Kansas City. For the past five years Mr. Benjamin has been the president of the organization and it was to express their appreciation of his services that the people presented him with a token of their esteem.

The opening prayer was delivered by Rabbi L. Koplowitz of the orthodox church and the benediction was pronounced by Rabbi H . H. Mayer of the reformed church.

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April 12, 1909

JIMMIE WAS BUM LEADER.

Started With Three Girls to Ceme-
tery and All Got Lost.

Three little black-eyed girls, who could not have been over 6 years old, all garbed in white dresses, in harmony with Easter, were found near Twelfth and Washington streets yesterday afternoon by Sergeant James Jadwin. The officer's attention was first attracted when he noticed that the fourth member of the company, a boy about 8 years old, was crying.

"We're all lost," he managed to tell the officer.

"Yes, we are lost," said the older of the three girls. "We live way over by Fifth and Harrison streets. We were going to the graveyard to put flowers on the graves, but Jimmie don't know the way."

Sergeant Jadwin surmised at once that they were Italian children, though it would have been impossible to have told by their manner of speech. Jimmie cried until the quartette reached the station, where he recognized the locality. The children were soon surrounded by the officers, who were more than amused by the oldest girl's plain English, and her denunciation of Jimmie.

"He told us he would take us to the graveyard," she said, her black eyes snapping. "Then he took us away and away," and she dramatized the description by motioning with the hands the direction which they had taken. "Then, he's a cry-baby, too," she continued, "for as soon as he saw he was lost, he began to cry."

"Can you write your name?" asked James Cummings, the telephone man.

In answer, the child took the officer's pencil, and, with childish scrawl which was perfectly legible, she wrote the names of the three others, as well as her own name.

"Maggie Saoa" was her own name, she said, as she showed her skill to the officer. Her two companions, she said, were her cousins, Marie and Josie Saoa, who all lived in the same flat at 532 Harrison street. The boy was identified as James Scarcello, who lives at 536 Harrison street. Thee children were taken home by the wagon driver.

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April 10, 1909

NEW JEWISH BUILDING.

Impressive Two-Day Ceremony to
Mark Dedication.

Final arrangements have been made for the dedication of the new Jewish educational building, located on Admiral boulevard at Harrison street. The dedicatory services will be held April 21 and 22. Owing to the lack of room in the auditorium of the new building the services on the night of April 21 will be held in the Temple on Linwood boulevard at Flora avenue.

The programme for the first services ill consist of an address by Rabbi H. H. Meyer and a sermon by Dr. E. G. Hirsch of Chicago. Dr. Hirsch's topic will be "Jewish Opportunities."

On the following day the services are to be held in the new institute building. Rev. Isadore Koplewitz will give the dedicatory prayer. He will be followed by A. Rothenberg, chairman of the building committee, who is to deliver the institution to Albert Benjamin, president of the Jewish charities, for its dedicated purposes. Dr. Hirsch and Rabbi Meyer will deliver addresses.

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March 24, 1909

MAY HAVE REMNANT SALE.

Dry Goods Stock Likely to Become
Police Property.

It is probable that the police department will be richer by $2,000 if the cases against William Gilbert, Thomas O'Neill, Ruth Hester and Grace Harris do not come up soon in the criminal court where they were appealed last October after the four persons were convicted of shoplifting in the municipal court.

At that time, the representatives of most of the dry goods stores in the city identified goods which were found at 1221 Harrison street, where the alleged shoplifters were rooming.

But of late, the representatives of the dry goods stores have not been coming to the city hall to ask for the property as they did formerly. They say that styles will change before the criminal court will try the cases against the accused persons and that the goods, though they were valued at $2,000 last October, will not be nearly so valuable.

Since the release of the four the police in New Orleans arrested four suspects who correspond in description to the four released on appeal bonds in Kansas City.

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November 8, 1908

PAID A FREAK BET.

H. D. Gibson Pushed E. L Yeat
Through Streets in a Wheelbarrow.

Amid the shouts and laughter of a big crowd, H. D. Gibson, a traveling salesman for a wholesale jewelry house, last night paid off an election bet by wheeling the winner in a wheelbarrow from Twelfth street and Forest avenue to Twelfth and Harrison streets and back. The bet was made with E. L. Yeat of Twelfth street and Forest avenue, and Mr. Gibson wagered that Taft would carry Nebraska. Friends of the two men had been informed that the ride would come off last night and had gathered to witness the humiliation of the loser. A whellbarrow festooned with flags and a large banner on which was printed "I bet Taft would carry Nebraska" was teh paraphernalia used. At the starting point at Twelfth street and Forest avenue nearly 500 people had congregated. The crowd followed the principals over the coucrse. Mr. Gibson lives at 1211 Virginia avenue and tips the scales at 240 pounds. Mr. Yeat, the winner, weighs 180 pounds. Both men have red hair and the friendly crowd took advantage of that circumstance to poke fun at them.

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July 5, 1908

WEDDED 2 DAYS;
KILLS HIMSELF

FIRES BULLET INTO BRAIN IN
PRESENCE OF WIFE.

AFTER BIDDING HER GOODBYE.

NO REASON FOR JOS. P. THOMP-
SON'S ACT IS KNOWN.

Married Pearl A. O'Shea on July 2.
It Was a Mild Elopement, and
Her Parents Didn't Ap-
prove of Wedding.

One July 2 Joseph P. Thompson and Miss Pearl A. O'Shea took a trip to Leavenworth and were married by a justice of the peace.

Last night at 7 o'clock when the young wife entered her husband's room at 3102 East Twentieth street he said goodby to her and, pointing a pistol at his right temple, shot himself in the brain.

Thompson was a woodturner and worked for the American Sash and Door Company. He was 26 years old and had been in the city three years. A quiet young man, he never spoke much about himself to anyone, but there were rumors that he had once been married before.

For the last year, Thompson had boarded at the house of Mrs. Alma D'Avis, 3102 East Twentieth street, and it was there that he met the girl that afterward became his wife. Mrs. D'Avis has weak eyes, and requires the attention of a nurse. Her niece, Pearl O'Shea, was a nurse, so Mrs. D'Avis had her come and stay with her. That was two months ago. An attachment sprang up between the young people living in the same house, and the runaway marriage was the result.

After the marriage they told the girl's mother and he stepfather, John Reed, who lives at Twentieth an Harrison streets. The latter did not approve of the union at all. the girl was their only support, they said, and they had lost much of their property in the recent flood.

This is the only reason that the young man's friends can give for the suicide. Yesterday afternoon he came home, apparently in a normal frame of mind. He was not known as a drinking man, and was said to have no bad habits. He did not even own a revolver, so that he must have especially purchased the one he used.

Last night the young wife was hysterical with grief and had to have the care of physicians. The tragic ending of the short romance of her life affected her so seriously that the doctors fear for her mind.

Thompson came to this city three years ago from Hot Springs, Ark. He was a member of the lodge 73 of the West Side branch, W. O. W., and was well liked by all his associates. At no time did his actions give any trace of insanity.

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July 2, 1908

OVERHEAD FUSE
SET CAR AFIRE.

PANIC AMONG PASSENGERS FOL-
LOWED EXPLOSION.

CORINNE TALIAFERRO HURT.

SEVERAL OTHERS WERE IN-
JURED, BUT ONLY SLIGHTLY.

Trolley Car in Flames Ran Wild
Through Wyandotte Street Un-
til Pedestrian Turned
Off the Current.

When the "overhead" blew out on a Grand Central depot bound car at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets at 9 o'clock last night, half a dozen passengers were momentarily shrouded in flames. Miss Corinne Taliaferro, 1747 Pennsylvania avenue, became hysterical and jumped from the car w hen released by a passenger who had removed her from immediate danger from fire Her back and shoulder were wrenched, and she was so hysterical when taken to emergency hospital that an examination of her injuries could not be attempted.

A. L. Perry, 513 Locust street, who made a brave attempt to save the women passengers who tried to jump from the car, was treated at the emergency hospital, and Edward H. Bly, 5617 East Ninth street, who set the brakes on the car after it had been deserted by the crew, was burned severely. An unidentified woman passenger whose ankle was inured sent for a carriage and was taken home.

E. G. Combs, motorman of the car, No. 713, says he was thrown from the front vestibule by the explosion. The car had just crossed the Twelfth street tracks when the overhead blew out and the motorman left his brakes. Immediately the front of the car was enveloped in flames and the passengers fled to the rear vestibule. The first of the passengers, eager to leave the burning car, which was then under ordinary speed, pushed the conductor into the street and the car was left running wild.

It was then that Perry and Bly, the latter with an ambition to be a motorman, and with his application for a job placed with the Metropolitan Street Railway Company earlier in the day, attempted to rescue the passengers While Bly aided the two women to the rear of the car, Perry braced himself on the steps and refused to allow them to jump from the car.

Mrs. Taliaferro, who had been touched by the flames, stooped low and leaped straight into the street under Perry's outstretched arm. The rest of the passengers crowded upon the young man with such force that he was pushed to the pavement and his right ankle was twisted and his left shoulder bruised. The car, running wild and burning, had passed Eleventh street.

Bly, who could no longer aid the passengers, turned his attention to the brakes. The front vestibule was full of smoke and fire but he stepped in and fumbled for the levers. He brought the car to a stop near Ninth street, just as the insurance patrol company swung into Wyandotte from its Eleventh street station. The flames were soon extinguished The car was pushed to a switch in the North End.

The conductor and motorman, bruised, went to their barn and Bly sought a physician, while Perry went to the emergency hospital. Miss Taliaferro for two hours was too hysterical to receive treatment and was given opiates to quiet her nerves and brace her for examination . In the meantime Jack Bell, a traveling man acquaintance, had reached the emergency hospital and later D. H. D. McQuade was summoned. At midnight Miss Taliaferro was removed to the Wesley hospital, Eleventh and Harrison streets.

D. H. D. McQuade stated last night that the injuries may prove more serious than at first indicated by the examination. He thinks the girl has been injured internally and that several bones have been broken. A further examination will be made today. An opiate was given her last night in order that she might get rest and recover from the nervous shock sustained at the time of the accident.

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June 2, 1908

ELOPED FROM POOR
FARM TO BE MARRIED.

WILLIAM MEADS AND BRIDE DE-
FIED COUNTY COURT.

He is 66 and the Bride, Formerly
Mrs. Eliza Anderson, Is 76.
They'll Live in a
Candy Store.

Neither age nor circumstance can stand before the will of Dan Cupid. Among the twenty-one women in Kansas City who became brides yesterday, the earliest June bride of them allow as Mrs. William Thomas Meads, 76 years old, who, as Mrs. Eliza Anderson, eloped from the county poor farm with the groom in the early morning and was married at the court house at 10 o'clock by Justice Mike Ross. And among the twenty-one none is more happy or more thrilled with dreams of the future.

"The county court wouldn't let us marry at the farm," she explained last evening in the room at 727 Harrison street, which she and the groom rented for a week. "There is absolutely no sense in them not allowing us to get married, but since they wouldn't , we up and ran away. We were up at 5 o'clock, for it takes William a long time to get over the two miles to the station. The other women there bade me goodby last night.

"Now that we are here and married, we are ready to face the world again. We fled from it once. But William has saved his salary as librarian, and I have many friends in Kansas City. We are going to open a little confectionery store and live in a room in the back. We are certain that we can make a living and are never going back to the poor farm.

"They never treated William right out at the farm. He had charge of the library and had to be on his feet day and night to answer two telephones. And they only gave him $5 a month. He can make lots more than that in Kansas City."

The bride, who had been standing back of Meads's chair, here stopped her flow of talk to push her spectacles back on her forehead, stoop, put an arm around Meads's neck and kiss him on the brow. The old man petted her with his one able hand.

"She's a mighty good little woman," he put in. "Don't you dare to poke fun of her in your paper."

"No," interrupted the bride, straightening suddenly. "It is an outrage the way we have been treated. People seem to think our running away is a joke. I've just as much right to get married as I had fifty years ago. I'm an old settler in Kansas City. I have been here forty years. My husband died twenty years ago and I went to work for Bullene, Moore, Emery & Company. I was with them a long time until I got the asthma so that I couldn't work nor live in the city. So I went out to the farm where the air is pure. I know some of the finest people in Kansas City. Two members of the grand jury, who visited the home, recognized me and were astonished. I told them it is no disgrace to be on the poor farm. It's no crime to be poor, after one has worked hard for years and years, as I did. It's just inconvenient.

"William and I are going to start life all over again, aren't we, William?"

The groom gave a "yes" pat with his hand.

That is about all -- Oh, yes, there is the groom. William Meads is 66 years old and paralyzed on one side. He fought during the entire civil war under General Joseph Shelby. After the rebellion he was employed for fifteen years on a Kansas City evening newspaper During the latter part of the period he was foreman of the composing room. When he was stricken with paralysis he went to the poor farm. He has better use of his right arm and leg now than he had ten years ago, but his general health has been worn down by the passing of years. he did not attempt to rise from his chair either to greet or bid farewell to his visitor.

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Date Here

FELL 11 STORIES IN
COMMERCE BUILDING.

LANDED ON SKYLIGHT AND RE-
CEIVED BROKEN BONES.

L. E. Trout and Charles Pepperdine
Plunged From High-Swinging
Scaffold -- Injuries May
Be Fatal.

L. F. Trout, 411 Chestnut street, and Charles Pepperdine, 3112 Bell street, were working in the light shaft of the Bank of Commerce building at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, when their scaffold broke, precipitating them from the thirteenth to the second floor, a distance of eleven stores. The men landed on the heavy glass skylight just above the second floor.

Trout sustained a fracture of the right thigh and a large muscle in the thigh was severed near the knee. Three bones in his right foot were broken and a gash was cut in his scalp. Both of Trout's hands were burned almost to the bone where he held to a steel cable part of the way down. That fact, however, broke his fall and may be the cause of yet saving his life.

Pepperdine was more seriously injured and the attending physicians said they had little hope for his recovery. He has a compound fracture of the left knee and right ankle. His right elbow was burned to the bone by a small rope to which he attempted to hold. He was also internally injured.

In an attempt to lower the scaffold to another floor, it is said to have swerved and then broken. As the men grabbed for a safety line, which is always on the back of a scaffold, just about the hips, they found that it was not fast. That all took very little time, for they grabbed for the line as they fell, each uttering a cry that was heard all through the big building. Both were taken to the Wesley hospital, Eleventh and Harrison streets.

Pepperdine had a narrow escape from death at the same building just about the same time of day on the afternoon of May 6. He, with Paul Jacoby, was washing the building at the seventh story on the south side. In trying to pass the ladder was pushed out from the building. Both men fell from the ladder, but managed to catch the safety rope at the back of the scaffold. Hanging to that they managed to get their toes on the sill of the window below. Then they pulled their bodies up and climbed into the window. Both had received a ducking from a bucket of water which fell from the ladder with them. They went home, got into dry clothes, and went back to work. A large crowd of people on the street witnessed the narrow escape of Pepperdine and Jacoby, but there were few who saw the fall yesterday. The two men treated the accident lightly on May 6, joking each other while dangling in midair.

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May 10, 1908

SAYS HE DIDN'T WANT TO DIE.

James Rowland Revises His Story
Now That He Is Well.

James Rowland, 14 years old, 1516 Harrison street, was discharged from the general hospital yesterday afternoon as out of danger. He was taken to his home by his father.

Young Rowland is the boy who, late last month, was knocked from the north approach of the Hannibal bridge and fell thirty feet. A step on the baggage car of the Rock Island train which struck him fractured his skull on the left side and the fall broke and dislocated his right arm. Drs. J. P. Neal and H. R. Conway trephined the lad's skull at the emergency hospital an hour after the accident, and to that quick work the boy owes his life. They removed several pieces of bone which were pressing on the brain.

On the night the boy was injured, he was walking across the bridge from Harlem when James Knowlden, a farmer, called to him and said, "Look out! There's a train coming across the bridge."

Not seeing the train himself, and, being of a joking turn of mind,, Rowland called back: "Oh, I don't care. I want to die anyway." On that account it was believed that the boy had tried to commit suicide. He says now that he made the remark just in fun and did not see the train until it was upon him.

Rowland said that on that day he played "hookey" from school and was induced by a boy called "Rusty" to go to Harlem. After reaching there, Rowland changed his mind and concluded to go home. He had only 5 cents left and intended to go home by way of the toll bridge. He walked onto the trestle approach instead of the wagon road below.

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April 23, 1908

GIRL IS SCALDED TO DEATH.

Upsets Bucket of Water With Which
Mother is Scrubbing.

While her mother was preparing to scrub the kitchen Tuesday afternoon, 2-year-old Helen Horton was playing on the floor. She caught the rim of a bucket of scalding suds which stood near, pulling it over and scalding her body from shoulders to feet. She died in the South Side hospital yesterday afternoon.

The accident occurred at 3496 Harrison street, the home of H. L. Courtwright, father of Mrs. Horton, with whom the Hortons reside. The child's father is Henry Horton.

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April 21, 1908

INTERESTED THE WOMEN.

An Inspection Trip to the Handsome
Rooms of the Eastman Sanitarium.

A large number of men and women inspected in detail all the various rooms and departments of the new Eastman sanitarium for women, which was opened yesterday at 1316 Harrison street.

On the first floor is the reception room, furnished in mission style, and adjoining it, the consultation rooms of Dr. B. L. Eastman, with the modern equipment of a specialist in this line Beyond this is the dining room, and in the rear the kitchen and pantry, fitted with special appliances for sanitary hospital cookery.

On the second floor are the patients' rooms, and here the visitors, especially the women, were surprised and delighted. The furnishings of these rooms are an innovation in hospital regime. Prettily decorated walls, elegant brass beds, polished oak floors and meal service of silver and Haviland china at the bedside, give the luxury of the finest home, rather than the plainness usual in hospitals.

The operating room is all in white, and with its polished nickel, plate glass and porcelain equipment, shows the most scientific developments in surgical appliances and instruments.

The third floor, used for nurses' rooms, is comfortable, airy, and pleasant.

On the whole, the impression given by the new institution was very favorable. While it is not large, the new Eastman Sanitarium for Women is complete, modern to the minute, and affords comforts and luxuries for its women patients not to be had elsewhere in the West.

Limiting its patients to women, and excluding all contagious, infections and maternity cases, this sanitarium is in a class by itself, and is well worthy a visit from every woman in Kansas City.

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April 19, 1908

A HOME FOR LITTLE "PAT".

Tracy Avenue Couple May Adopt the
Little Foundling.

If everything goes well today a good home may be secured for the foundling who was discovered in a dark hallway at 584 Harrison street late on the night of March 17 and later christened "Little Pat" by Mrs. Lizzie Burns, police matron , in honor of St. Patrick's day.

Seeing in the news yesterday that a baby girl had been left with the matron for adoption Friday, Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Kelly of 1403 Tracy avenue, called to see the little one. They were told that it had been taken to the detention home and were just about to leave when Eugene Burns, a son of the matron said: "What's the matter with 'Little Pat?' Why can't you take him and adopt him? He's a boy, you know."

Mrs. Kelly said she thought that Patrick had long ago been given a home, but when informed that illness had kept him at St. Anthony's home, though now he had thoroughly recovered, she at once spoke for "Little Pat."

"Yes, Mrs. Kelly was out here with Eugene Burns," said Sister Cecilia at the home. "She is coming back tomorrow with her husband. It looks very much like Pat is to secure a good home at last."

Mr. Kelly is a traveling salesman. He and his wife have no children.

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April 4, 1908

LITTLE "PAT" IS VERY SICK.

Leavenworth Woman Offers to Adopt
the Little Foundling.

It was learned yesterday that little "Pat," the foundling left in a hallway at 584 Harrison street late on the night of St. Patrick's day, is in very poor health at St. Anthony's home, where he was taken later by a police matron. Sister Cecelia has hopes, however, that he will pull through all right He has been suffering from jaundice and the exposure following his desertion did him no good.

A young married woman from Leavenworth, Kas., who said she had read in The Journal of the finding of the little waif, called at the matron's room and offered to adopt the baby. She was referred to St. Anthony's and in that way the illness of little "Pat" was heard of. The woman said that she and her husband, who recently moved from Oklahoma to Leavenworth, expect to locate here. They are childless and and had settled upon little Pat as a likely child to adopt.

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March 22, 1908

HE WENT HUNTING THE CARS.

And Little Leo, Just a Baby, Wan-
dered Into Railroad Yards.

"What are you doing down here?"

"Oh, des tum down on treet tar to see choo-choo tars."

The foregoing dialogue took place shortly after noon yesterday in the yards of the Kansas City Southern Railroad Company between a railroad man and a tiny "Buster Brown" boy 2 1/2 years old.

The little wanderer was taken to police headquarters and turned over to Mrs Joan Moran, matron. When asked where his mother was he indicated that she had gone on a "treet tar." His name could not be understood.

After the baby boy had been at the station a couple of hours a frantic mother, followed by two other boys, appeared at police headquarters looking for a lost boy. She was directed to the matron's rooms The police told her that a boy of her description was there.

"Oh, Leo, Leo, where did you go?" the mother cried as she snatched the little Buster Brown boy to her breast.

"Oh, mamma," he replied gleefully, "I seen all big choo-choo tars an' a man took me away."

The mother, Mrs. Abraham Rubenstein of 1417 Harrison street, said that shortly after noon she was entering the Jones dry goods store with her three boys -- Harry, 7; Marion, 5 1/2, and Leo, 2 1/2 years old. When she reached an elevator she missed Leo, the baby.

The little fellow is believed to have taken a street car to Third and Main streets, from where he walked down into the railroad yards. When found he was in among box cars and engines, but looking with wondering eyes at all that was going on. It was then that a railroad man found him and took him in charge.

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March 19, 1908

MANY WOMEN WOULD
ADOPT LITTLE PAT.

THERE'S ALWAYS A DEMAND
FOR BABY FOUNDLINGS.

Post Card Picture May Lead to the
Identity of This "Doorstep
Youngster's" Mother.
Was Well Supplied.

Late yesterday afternoon little Pat, the week-old baby who was found in a hallway at 584 Harrison street at 11:45 Tuesday night, was taken from the matron's room at police headquarters to St. Anthony's home, at Twenty-second street and College avenue. Mrs. Lizzie Burns, the police matron who went with the ambulance and got the little fellow and named him Pat in honor of St. Patrick's day, remained up all day to care for the baby. She is on night duty.

The baby was found in a hallway adjacent to the home of Mrs. E. T. Pope, and her son notified the police. The child was well supplied with all baby necessaries, and was wrapped in a black cloak. In searching the cloak yesterday, Mrs. Joan Moran, the other matron, found a picture postcard. The card is addressed to Mrs. Addie Esters, 301 Kickapoo street, Leavenworth, Kas. It was mailed in that city on May 4, 1907, and on the side with the picture is signed the name of Mattie Adams. The card was turned over to F. E. McCrary, Humane agent, who said he would write to both parities and see if any information could be gained.

A boy baby is the most easily adopted, so managers of foundling homes say. After the story of the finding of little Pat got around there were several applicants for him. Mrs. Burns, the matron who went out and got him, came near keeping him herself.

Mrs. Burns became so attached to the little fellow after she had washed and dressed him yesterday morning that she insisted on keeping out a souvenir of his visit. Pat had plenty of clothes, so Mrs. Burns kept out a pair of tiny little white shoes which were immediately placed on the wall of the matron's room.

"Pat is the finest specimen of real young man that I have seen in a long while," said Mrs. Burns. "Young as he is I tickled him under the chin today and made him laugh. He is also a healthy baby, and just as pretty as can be. He deserves a good home."

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March 7, 1908

PRIEST LOSES THE BEQUEST.

Katie McGinty Was Very Ill When
She Made Her Will.

It was decided by a jury in Judge H. Slover's division of the circuit court yesterday that Katie McGinty was too ill to know what she was doing when she made her will bequeathing all of her property to the Rev. A. G. Clohessy, pastor of St. Joseph's church, Nineteenth and Harrison streets, and that the will should be set aside and the property given to her blood relations.

Miss McGinty served as housekeeper for Father Clohessy for fourteen consecutive years prior to the illness, which, on January 26, 1907, caused her death. She was paid $2.50 a week, and out of this she saved, in the fourteen years,, $1,128. The money was kept in the Fidelity Trust Company. A few days before her death in St. Margaret's hospital, she called Father Cloheesy in and asked him to accept the money. He refused to accept it. Then she made a will, in his presence, leaving everything to him, after he should expend $25 for her funeral and gravestone and $200 for masses to be said for her soul. The funeral was held, the headstone erected and the masses were said. Then when Father Clohessy probated the will, James McGinty, a brother of the dead woman, brought the action in the circuit court.

Miss McGinty left no property other than the $1,128, excepting her clothing and personal effects. The residue of the estate will be divided among James, Patrick and Dennis McGinty, three brothers in Kansas City, and seven nephews and nieces in St. Louis.

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March 1, 1908

WOMAN DRINKS CARBOLIC ACID.

Mrs. J. T. Woodford Was in Ill
Health and Despondent.

Mrs. J. T. Woodward, 50 years old, the wife of J. T. Woodford, formerly an elevator man at the city hall, drank a half ounce of carbolic acid at her home, 1121 Harrison street, about 6 o'clock yesterday evening. A call for a physician was sent to the emergency hospital from this address at 10:20 o'clock last night. Dr. R. A. Shiras answered the call and found Mrs. Woodford in a semi-comatose condition from the effect of the acid. She was revived and may recover.

Woodford had not called in a physician before he sent the call to the emergency hospital. He told Dr. Shiras that he had not thought it necessary, knowing that his wife had swallowed only a half an ounce of the liquid. He thought that she would recover without the assistance of a physician, And he would thus escape the notoriety.

Mrs. Woodford is said to have been despondent and in ill health.

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February 29, 1908

MASONS TO BUILD TEMPLE.

York Rite Bodies Have Practically
Raised the Money.

The project to build a $125,000 temple for the York Rite Masons at Ninth and Harrison streets, it is now believed, will be carried out within a year. W. F. Stine, one of those especially interested in the enterprise, said yesterday that building plans are to be taken up by early this spring. The lot is paid for and stock is being subscribed by fifteen or more local Masonic bodies, the two commanderies, the council, the two chapters, a number of the blue lodges, and the three Eastern Star organizations.

The Kansas City Masonic Building Company, the corporation which will erect the building, is composed of one representative of each of these bodies. The undertaking had its start about a year ago. The most that can be said of the plans at present is that there will be four spacious halls or lodge rooms for the various organizations' use, and a grand assembly room or auditorium, adequate for convention use, for balls, banquets and drill hall purposes, and there will be a kitchen and many cloakrooms and ante-rooms. Whether all stone or fancy brick construction will be used has not been decided.

The York Rite Masons feel that their selection of a location at the southeast corner of Ninth and Harrison streets is particularly fortunate in that it is quite removed from noise, though not far out that it is very close to five car lines, without being on any one of them, and it has for neighbors on two opposite corners the Calvary Baptist church and the Central Presbyterian church.

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February 21, 1908

WALLACE REFUSED
TO TOUCH THE WINE.

WOULD NOT DRINK FROM JEW-
ISH WEDDING CUP.

Was Guest of Honor at Marriage of
Rose Mandelcorn, bot Offended
Parents by Failing to
Drink Her Health.

Judge William H. Wallace was the guest of honor at a wedding feast last night, and a Jewish wedding feast at that. That is he was the guest of honor for a little while, until he refused to drink from the wedding cup. Then he rememered that he had an "important engagement" and unceremoniously departed.

It happened this way: Rose Mandelcorn, daughter of a grocer at 1029 Independence avenue, who lives at 510 Harrison street, was to be married to Dr. Adolph Miller of Nashville, Tenn. Much time had been spent in decorting the bride's home, many anxious hours had been passed by the bride's good mother in working out the details of what she had dreamed of since Rose was a tiny bud of feminity -- her daughter's wedding, the event of her life. Father Mandelcorn, too, had his concern in the affair. Besides the thousand dollars he had laid aside as his daughter's dowry, he had spent much on the feast, but it seemed to him that something lacked to raise it all above the sluggish swirl of lower Harrison street society.

Father Mandelcorn accordingly consulted Mother Mandelcorn. Their Rose was to be clipped from the parental stem. It was up to the Mandelcorn family to make it a noteworthy event.

"Judge Wallace!" said Father Mandelcorn.

"He is a hard and cruel man," said Mother Mandelcorn.

"He has had me indicted by his grand jury because I did not keep the Christian Sabbath, I know," admitted Father Mandelcorn, "but we shall now heap coals of fire upon his head. We shall invite him to the wedding of our daughter, to the marriage of our Rose."

So, he was invited; the guests were assembled, the feast was spread, the marriage cup was filled; he came. Rabbi S. J. Shapiro read the ceremony and the father gave away the bride. Then after she had been kissed by kinsmen and guests, the marriage cup was passed. It was brimming with wine, and when it reached Judge Wallace he refused to drink.

To refuse to drink form a Jewish wedding cup when offered is an insult to bride and parents and groom. If Judge Wallace didn't know it before he shortly found it out form the clouded countenances which hedged him like the threat of a storm. Then he made his plea of anohter engagement and departed.

There was some gloom and considerable heat among the crowd which gathered around the festal board. J. R. Shapiro arose to make a speech, in which he scored Judge Wallace and his political ambitions.

Shapiro said that this reform wave of the judge's was merely a business move. He illustrated in this way: "When my business is run down and my shop becomes unattractive, I start out in a new way to boom the business and I paint my shop a new color and put out new signs. When Judge Wallace ran for congress some time ago, he lost the race. This time, he has come out with a new platform, one which he has built from this make-believe reforom of his. This is his way of booming business and painting his shop and putting out new signs."

Dr. Miller and wife left on an early train for a tour of the Southern states, after which the couple will go to Nashville, Tenn., which is to be their home. The bride was the recipient of many handsome gifts.

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January 28, 1908

CRUSHED BY WAGON WHEELS.

Miguel Condino, 5 Years Old, Killed
While at Play in the Street.

Miguel Condino, 5 years old, was killed in Missouri avenue near Gillis street yesterday afternoon by being run down by a candy wagon. He was knocked down by the horses, the front wheels passed over his neck and the rear wheels had to be lifted from his crushed skull. The boy, a son of Dominick Condino, a laborer, lived at 725 Missouri avenue.

The wagon which crushed the child belonged to the Brown-Gibbons Candy Company, jobbers, 547 Walnut street, and was driven by W. H. Brown, senior member of the firm. Brown, who lives at 305 Walrond avenue, wept bitterly after the accident. After the boy had been taken into his home nearby Brown drove immediately to police headquarters and surrendered. He was released on his own recognizance.

"I was driving west on Missouri avenue at an ordinary gait," Brown said in his statement to police. "As I cleared an alley between Gillis and Harrison streets, four or five small boys scampered out to the south right in front of my team. I was not driving fast. I never drive fast through that district, as there are always children in the streets. I called, 'Look out there,' to the boys and one of them -- the little fellow who was killed -- turned and ran directly into my near horse. He was knocked down. To show that I was not driving very fast, I stopped my team by the time the rear wheels caught the boy. I have a little child of my own and the accident was a great shock to me. I did all I could to prevent it."

An inquest will probably be held.

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January 20, 1908

RAN AROUND IN SCANT ATTIRE.

Peter Mettlach Raced the Streets in
Unseasonable Raiment.

Running races with automobiles and street cars in his underclothes was the strange pastime of Peter Mettlach of 901 East Eighteenth street last night. Mettlach was placed in a sanitarium at Thirty-first street and Euclid avenue about two weeks ago.

Last night about 7 o'clock he told a nurse that he wanted to go home. She refused to give him his clothes, telling him that he was not in condition to go home yet. Mettlach, however, took a different view of the situation and went on back into his room on the second floor of the house, opened up a window and climbed down the fire escape and to freedom. He then entered his wild gambols over the southeast part of the city.

Patrolmen from No. 9 and No. 5 police stations were detailed to pick him up. After several hours he was seen by the motorman of a Swope park car, running by the side fo the car. Seeing the man in his underclothes, bareheaded and barefooted, the motorman stopped the car and urged the man to get in the car. When the car arrived at Forty-eighth and Harrison streets two policemen took the man on up to Thirty-first and Troost avenue, where his relatives met him with some clothes and took him home.

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January 12, 1908

PROTEST AGAINST SPEEDWAY.

South Side Citizens Meet and Draw
Up Fighting Resolutions.

About forty men, residents in the vicinity of Gillham road, met at the Church of United Brethren, Fourtieth and Harrison streets, last night to protest against the action of the park board in ordering an appropriation of part of that boulevard for the proposed speedway. The meeting was called by Benjaman H. Berkshire, 4018 Harrison street, and J. V. Kendall, Twenty-fifth street and Troost avenue.

A motion was made that those present should resort to every effort to prevent what they thought was the ruin of their roadway, and that every man pledge himself to assist in a financial way if it became necessary for them to resort to the courts. When this motion was put, F. J. Chase, 4100 McGee street, who was chairman of the meeting, asked all those who were in favor of it, to stand. Only four remained seated. The motion was announced, carried and those who voted for it put their signatures to the resolution. This resolution was adopted:

Whereas, The Kansas City park board has assumed to set apart a certain
portion of Gillham road for a speedway in defiance of the purposes for which
that roadway was condemned and paid for, and

Whereas, the use of any portion of this parkway for a speedway will be
detrimental to the interests of those whop were assessed for payment of said
parkway, making it dangerous to life and limb and turning that which was
intended for quite enjoyment of the citizens, over to an entirely different
purpose, to the great discomfort of those living in that vicinity, and to the
depreciation of property values,

Therefore be it
Resolved, That we property owners and residents in the district bounded by
Thirty-ninth street on the north, Brush creek on the south, Troost avenue on the
east and Main street on the west, in mass meeting assembled, do respectfully
protest against the appropriation of any portion of Gillham road parkway for
purposes of speedway or for any other use foreign to the purposes for which the
said roadway was condemned, and ask that your board reconsider your recent
action, and withdraw your consent to such use of any portion of said
roadway.

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December 4, 1907

MRS. CROWLEY'S MISFORTUNES.

Her Husband Died, Her Home Burned, a
Child is Ill and She is Penniless.

For several days the doctors at the Emergency hospital have been caring for Mrs. Maria Crowley, and trying to find a place where she can earn enough money to support herself and three children. Three months ago Mrs. Crowley's husband died. Then about a week ago her youngest child, 6 months old, became ill with pneumonia. Saturday the house in which Mrs. Crowley lived, at Fifth and Harrison streets, burned, destroying all her clothing and furniture. The Associated Charities is caring for two of the children. The other is at the emergency hospital.

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December 1, 1907

BUT HER MONEY WAS BURNED.

Sick Woman Rescued With Diffi-
culty Wanted to Go for It.

Fire was discovered in a grocery store at the southeast corner of Fifth and Harrison streets this morning at 12:30 o'clock. An alarm was not turned in until the fire had gained considerable headway and the whole upper story, which was used as a residence, was in flames.

While the firemen were fighting the flames a report was spread about that Mrs. J. W. Taggart, who lived over the grocery store, was still in the building and too ill to save herself. Firemen were sent into the house and, after some difficulty, succeeded in rescuing the woman. After she was safely placed upon the ground she remembered that her husband had about $150 in the burning room. She made an attempt to go after the money, but was held back by firemen and the police. The money was in paper and gold and was not found.

The building was owned by William Hall. It was a large two-story frame and was used for stores and residences. The first floor was occupied by Salvato Trapino, who ran a grocery store, and a barber shop owned by Juan Laroso, who lives at Fifth street and Troost avenue.

The fire was supposed to have started from a gasoline tank which was kept in the rear of the grocery store. The loss is estimated at $5,000.

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November 13, 1907

SAID SHE SOLD THE FURNITURE.

Three Sets in Seven Years Frank
Grantella Said He Had Bought.

"That was a neat job of justice," John Swenson, city attorney, told Judge Remley yesterday morning, after the judge had dismissed the case of Frank Grantella.

Grantella was charged with non-support of his wife, Laura, of 584 Harrison street. The judge resisted the temptation to fine him and instead made him promise to pay $6 a week toward the support of Mrs. Grantella and three babies.

"I'd be tickled to death to live with my wife if she wouldn't sell the furniture," said Grantella.

"How much furniture have you bought her?"

"Three sets in seven years."

Then came the judge's decision and the city attorney's compliment.

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