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February 4, 1910

PATRONYMICS OF THE GREAT.

Sly Attempt of Wrongdoers to En-
list Official Sympathy.

"Did it ever occur to you," asked Inspector Edward P. Boyle last night, "how many men when arrested will take the name of the chief of police, the police judge or some other official with whom they have to come in contact? They hope to gain sympathy by that ruse. We got a man yesterday for horse stealing, and, by gosh, he gave the name of Edward P. Boyle, my full name. He is in the county jail now under my name, but when we looked him up in the National Bureau of Identification, we find that he has a goodly supply of names."

"Boyle" was arrested by L. C. Barber, a motorcycle policeman, on complaint of of the Kirby Transfer Company, Missouri and Grand avenues. It appears that he rented a horse and wagon from Kirby to do a huckster business and disposed of the rig.

"Boyle's" picture is in the book sent out by the National Bureau of Identification at Washington. He appears there under the name of James J. O'Neil, which, bu the way, is the name of a former chief of police of Chicago. He also bears the names of Edward Riley and Edward Connors, the last being believed by the police to be his. He has done time in the Rochester, N. Y., Industrial school, the Elmira, N. Y., reformatory, and two years in the Auburn, N. Y., penitentiary. He was five years in Elmira. The man of many "police" names also has done short terms elsewhere.

When Hugh C. Brady was police judge there hardly was a week that some bum did not give the name of "Hugh Brady, sir, yer honor."

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January 28, 1910

DRUMMER RECOVERS OUTFIT.

Detectives Looking for "Good Fel-
lows" Who Pawned It.

The detective department is looking for four "good fellows" who appropriated the drummer's outfit of William G. Viquesney, a member of H. O. Wheeler's band, during the automobile show in Convention hall. The date on which the drums, tambourines, whistle, etc., were supposed to have been taken was January 19. It was on that night that four well dressed white men, half intoxicated, took the instruments to a pawn broker on Grand avenue and realized about $25 on them. The more valuable of the collections were recovered by Mr. Viquesney yesterday.

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January 23, 1910

BLASTING JARS BUILDINGS.

Tenants of Downtown Structures Feel
Shock of Dynamite Shots.

What seemed like distant earthquake shocks have been felt in all the buildings on both sides of Grand avenue, between Ninth and Thirteenth streets during the last few days, the concussions being due to dynamite blasting in the conduit trench on the east side of Grand avenue.

When a shot is fired in the trenches there is a very perceptible chug and lift in the floors of all the structures in this district, and especially is this noticeable in the basements and first floors of the big buildings. In the basement of the R. A. Long building the concussion is so severe that some of the apparatus in a barber shop there has been moved out of the place. Higher up in the building the shock is not felt so markedly.

Blasting has been going on for several days and is likely to continue for several more. The trench is but partially completed and at present the work is hindered by a vein of rock which has to be blasted out. It isn't at all probable that the blasting will damage any of the big steel buildings, but it is altogether possible for it to do some damage to some of the less substantial structures, it is said.

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January 17, 1910

DABNEY WAITS TO GET EVEN.

Wouldn't Trust His Temper After
Christmas Treat from Bartender.

Dabney had not been seen around the saloon near Eighth street and Grand avenue since Christmas. His absence was noticed by his friends, who asked the reason. Squires, the big, genial bartender, only smiled when anyone asked. "What's become of Dabney? I haven't seen him lately."

A few nights ago Dabney dropped in. He looked at Squires, and it plainly was evident that Dabney had something serious on his mind.

"I'll get even with you," he said, between clenched teeth, "if it takes the rest of my natural life and part of the hereafter."

The the cat was let out of the bag. It appears that the evil day for Dabney was Christmas night. He stood about the saloon most of the evening suggesting, "Most saloonkeepers give patrons a present on Christmas."

The proprietor was away, and Squires spoke of him as being the one to make gifts. Dabney persisted, however. It so happened that while he was making one of his curt suggestions Squires spied an empty whisky bottle beneath the bar. It was a dark red bottle and still had the "bottled in bond" stamp partly intact. The big bartender quietly filled the bottle from the water faucet. He replaced the cork and the stamp without being detected.

"Here," he said, as he wrapped up the bottle of water. "I will break the rules of the house in your case. Here is a quart of as fine a whisky as you ever tasted. Compliments of the house."

Dabney was delighted, for he recognized the brand. The following day was Sunday, and, being so well supplied, he did not take home is customary "life saver."

"Come up, boys," he said, inviting the house to the bar. "I will treat back when I get a quart of good booze like that."

He not only treated once, but twice. Carefully stowing the bottle of water away in his overcoat pocket, he set out for home. He is a bachelor, and a friend who was invited the next morning "to have a nip at some of the best stuff you ever tasted" told the rest.

"Dabney loves his hot toddy," said the friend. "He especially likes it on Sunday, because everything is closed tightly. On this day he called me and two others into his quarters to 'have a toddy' out of his Christmas present from 'Tom.'

"With great care he got his hot water, sugar and lemon all ready. The proper amount was pured into each glass. While the water was steaming and the smell of lemon was perfuming the air Dabney, with a great show of pride in his gift, unwrapped his bottle of 'whisky.' When the cork came out with a 'thop' Dabney smiled and said: 'Get ready for the big treat, boys.'

"After all that preliminary, what was our surprise when the contents of the bottle proved to be plain, old Missouri river water. We had no toddy, as hot and cold water, lemon and sugar make a very insipid drink. Dabney frothed at the mouth, he was so mad. He swore vengeance, for he had to wait until midnight before he could get a real drink -- but he never went to call on Squires that night. He said he feared he might lose his temper and spill blood."

Dabney is patiently waiting on his opportunity to "play even" with Squires. He swears he will "make somebody feel as they made me feel -- Sunday, the day after Christmas, and not a drop to drink."

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January 11, 1910

HADLEY ADDRESSES K. OF P.'S.

Local Lodges Will Celebrate Fortieth
Anniversary May 5.

Governor Herbert S. Hadley was the principal speaker at the special meeting of the Knights of Pythias in their hall at 1330 Grand avenue last night. The occasion was the merger of Brooklyn Lodge No. 118 with Lodge No. 1 of this city, and over 500 Pythians attended. Senator Solon Gilmore, ex-senator A. L. Cooper and Joseph Hawthorne also gave brief addresses.

Prior to the speaking plans were discussed for the big celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the local lodge to take place May 5, in Convention hall, where it is estimated that at least 20,000 members under the password will assemble in secret session. This will be one of the most brilliant Pythian functions ever attempted in the United States.

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December 26, 1909

FREE LIQUOR, MANY SCRAPES.

Broken Heads and Knife Wounds
Result of Saloon Celebrations.

The North End saloons last night gave free liquor to their customers. The result is that there were several broken heads, some cutting scrapes, not to speak of the parched throats to come. A few of the Christmas celebrators were given free rides to the emergency hospital.

Edward Evans, 1077 Grand avenue, a dishwasher at Eighth and Main streets, was cut in the chest with a knife. His cheek also was slit, the knife blade entering his neck and barely missing the jugular vein. After being treated at the emergency hospital he was taken to the general hospital.

Only one saloon in Kansas City was known to be closed yesterday. "Wish you all a Merry Christmas. This place will be closed until Monday morning on account of Christmas day."

This is the inscription which greeted the would-be Christmas patrons of Jack Sheehan's saloon, 2340 Grand avenue. So far as is known, this is the only saloon which observed Christmas by closing.

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December 24, 1909

GAS COMPLETES RUIN
OF RIALTO BUILDING.

FLAMES UNDER CONTROL WHEN
MAIN BREAKS, EXPLODING.

Firemen Grope Way to Street as
Third Roar Is Heard and Fire
Raging for Hours, Leaves
Only Ice-Coated Walls.
Fire and Explosion Destroy the Rialto Building.
CHARRED WALLS OF THE RIALTO BUILDING, ALL THAT REMAINS OF A "FIRE TRAP."

Flames fed by a broken gas main destroyed the Rialto building at the southwest corner of Grand avenue and Ninth street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning. The building was erected in 1887 by Albert Marty, its present owner. The fire started in the basement and raged virtually unchecked for three hours until everything inflammable had been consumed. Nothing remains but the ruined and ice-coated walls. The loss is estimated at $300,000.

The building was one of the few remaining big Kansas City fire traps which are a terror to the fire department. Almost entirely of frame construction inside, it burned like tinder. In the language of Assistant Chief Alex Henderson, "not all the fire companies in Missouri could have stopped it."

The fire was noticed first by J. W. Johnson, a negro janitor, who had for many years been a fixture in the building. Johnson was sitting in one of the offices on the second floor at 3 o'clock in the morning, when he was startled by a rumbling sound like the report of a muffled cannon. He jumped from the chair in which he had been resting after several hours of hard work in policing the building, and bounded down the stairway.

He was confronted by dense smoke, and forgetting everything but that there were several person in the building who were in imminent danger of losing their lives, he bounded up the steps and shouted fire from each landing. In this manner he aroused Dr. J. W. Gaines, Dr. Robert O. Gross, Dr. Emil Thielman, Dr. Oliver F. Jones, Dr. A. Talbot, Dr. B. E. Jordan, Dr. J. B. Jones and Dr. Frank Jones. On the fifth floor Johnson came upon Charles R. Manley, senior physical examiner of the Y. M. C. A., in a semi-conscious condition, the result of striking his head against a post in his efforts to escape while groping his way through the dark, smoke-filled hallways. Johnson himself was beginning to feel the effects of the smoke, but not thinking of his own life in his efforts to save others half carried and dragged Mr. Manley down the stairway and out into the streets to safety. In the meantime, A. E. Perrine, night watchman in the building of McGowan, Small & Morgan, gas grantees, which is the first building south of the Rialto, discovered smoke and noticing the glare of flames which by that time had gained considerable headway in the trunk factory, hastened to a telephone and turned in the alarm.

FIRE FIGHT BEGINS.

The fire department soon was on the scene. The fire at first looked to be easy to extinguish. The firemen had the flames smothered, when a terrific explosion, caused by the breaking of a gas main, shot the flames up through the building to the top floors. At the time of this explosion Assistant Chief Alex Henderson and a squad of men were on the first floor of the building. The force of the explosion shook the entire building and as the flames were spreading to all parts of the structure, it was as much as a man's life was worth to stay inside, as another explosion could be expected at any time. While Chief Henderson and his men were extricating themselves from the trap, Captain Pelletier, with several men, were groping their way about in the basement of the Ninth street entrance. In what seemed to be hours, they emerged through the smoke and debris into the street. It was none too soon, as the third explosion occurred a few minutes later and had any of the firemen remained in the building they would have been buried beneath the floors and walls. By this time twenty companies had arrived and were throwing streams of water into the burning building from all sides, but it was of no use. The interior of the building was mostly wood and the outside wall kept the streams from getting to the center of the building, where the fire was worst.

The Rialto was the only old-time building of any consequence on Grand avenue. Albert Marty, the owner, is an active real estate and building man of Kansas City. He purchased the ground in 1886 and in 1887 constructed a five-story building on the corner. In 1889 he purchased forty-eight feet on the south side of the corner lot and the same year erected the south half of the building which burned yesterday morning.

The building was occupied by many prominent physicians and dentists, some of whom have been in the building twenty-five years.

"The number of occupants is in the neighborhood of 100," said Dr. H. D. McQuade, who had offices in the building for many years. "Many of us will be up against it for offices for some time, but I expect to contract for offices on the fifth floor of the Keith & Perry building tomorrow. Many of us received offers from other physicians to share their offices while looking for locations."

VALUED AT $125,000.

The building was valued at $125,000, although at the time of its erection it cost in the neighborhood of $200,000. That was more than twenty years ago. There was $81,500 insurance carried on the structure. The heaviest loser among the occupants was Hugo A. Brecklein, a druggist, occupying the first floor. Mr. Brecklein estimated his loss at $20,000, with $12,000 insurance.

J. H. Langan, son of John P. Langan, a grocer at 4601 Independence avenue, was walking north on Grand avenue yesterday morning when the fire started, and in attempting to awaken some of the men who were sleeping in the offices, he broke the glass in one of the doors, severely cutting his hand. But he saved the life of a man who was sleeping through all the disturbance, and succeeded in helping him to the street.

At least sixty physicians and twenty dentists lost their office furnishings and instruments in the Rialto building fire yesterday. The average loss for each tenant is said to have been about $700, and that only a small part of it was covered by insurance.

For years the Rialto has been the doctors' office building of Kansas City. Many of the most prominent physicians of the city were established there. Owing to the fact that in many buildings dentists and physicians are not allowed to rent offices, because the odors arising form the mixtures of medicines is objected to by other tenants, this building has long been recognized as the headquarters of men engaged in these two professions.

VALUABLE RELICS LOST.

About 1,000 specimens of prehistoric stone implements and two ancient violins were cherished treasures of Dr. A. H. Cordier, which were lost in the Rialto fire. Dr. Cordier occupied room 310, third floor.

A collector of prehistoric implements, Dr. Cordier, on trips to Mexico, Alaska, Ohio, Kentucky, Arkansas and through Missouri, got several thousand specimens, and he had about 1,000 of them on display in his offices. His is a collector of old violins and had two of these instruments, which he prized highly, in his rooms. Another relic which Dr. Cordier lost was the mounted head of a mountain sheep which he shot while on a hunting trip in British Columbia. Dr. Cordier's office had been in the Rialto building eighteen years.

DR. ANDERSON LUCKY.

A long distance survey of the Rialto ruins makes it appear that Dr. R. V. Anderson, a dentist, is the only tenant of the burned structure whose effects were not destroyed, and he recalls the fact that once before in a fire in the Rialto building he also was lucky.

Dr. Anderson's office has been in the building nearly eighteen years, ever since he began to practice, and some years ago ago fire broke out beneath his office, and his rooms, enveloped in smoke and flame, seemed doomed. The firemen, however, extinguished the blaze before his effects suffered any serious damage.

ORDINANCE NOT ENFORCED.

At the burning of the Rialto building yesterday morning the firemen were greatly handicapped by dangers from exploding gas, and they were in continual danger of being burned by flame of escaping gas. Had the building been equipped with a Siebens' shut-off gas valve it would have been possible for the firemen the moment they reached the fire to turn off the gas in the entire building and thereby lessen the danger occasioned by the escaping gas. The building code requires the installation of gas shut-off devices on all buildings, but for some reason the ordinance has never been enforced.

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December 14, 1909

FAIL TO FIND EVIDENCE
AGAINST THREE YOUTHS.

Robberies or Murder Cannot Be
Traced to Dye, Shay and Clyne, in
Spite of Saloonkeeper's Son's
Identification.

Evidence gathered the past ten days by the prosecuting attorney's office, so it was announced yesterday, completely exonerates Louis Dye, Harry Shay and Ralph Clyne of the suspicion of having murdered M. A. Spangler, killed on the night of November 23 in his saloon at Twentieth and Grand.

Not only this, but the prosecutor's office is convinced that the young men are not guilty of the dozen or more robberies charged against them by the police. The investigation has been practically concluded. Two city detectives and two police officers have worked the past week to gather evidence. Nothing has been found thus far to connect the three boys with the murder.

"Their preliminary will be held before some justice of the peace," said Edward J. Curtin, an assistant prosecuting attorney, "and unless new evidence is found against them the cases will be dismissed."

"The robbery charges, too?"

"Yes, the robbery charges," replied Mr. Curtin. "There have been many persons here to identify the young men as the ones who held them up, not an identification has been positive. In every instance the person has said they thought they were the ones."

The coroner's jury yesterday recommended that Dye be held for further investigation on the murder charge. The verdict was due largely to the testimony of Sam Spangler, the saloonkeeper's son, who was present at the murder.

It is said there is a conflict between the police authorities and the prosecutor's office in the case.

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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December 6, 1909

LONG AND SHORT MEN BUSY.

Victims of Highwaymen Report to
Police the Loss of More Than
$300 on Sunday.

J. S. Hubert, a member of the United Brewery Workers of America, living at 2518 Charlotte, was felled by a blow from behind and robbed of five $20 bills, ten $10 bills and five $5 bills at Twenty-first and Locust at 9:30 o'clock last night by two men, one of whom, he says was very tall and the other extremely short. He says he saw the same men in a saloon at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday night. Hubert immediately reported the case to police and he was taken to his home by Officer Sherry. Upon examination of his head no signs of where he had been slugged could be found.

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November 25, 1909

TO BE SHOWN WIFE'S DIARY.

Detective Joyce Goes After Earl
Deaton, Arrested in Omaha.

Detective Harry Joyce left yesterday morning for Omaha, with extradition papers for Earl Deaton, alias Earl Elbridge, charged with robbing Mrs. James W. Couch, 1711 1/2 Grand avenue, of $90 some weeks ago. Deaton left a diary in the Couch home that had been kept by his wife, Edna Deaton, in which it is alleged that he has been concerned in crimes all over the country. Deaton is expected to arrive in Kansas City tomorrow.

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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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November 17, 1909

BODY ON STOVE EIGHT HOURS.

Stone Mason Found Dead Where He
Had Prepared to Cook Noon Meal.

Peter Gilberg, a stone mason, was found dead in his home, 815 East Twenty-second street at 8 o'clock last night by Matt Gleason, proprietor of a saloon at 921 East Twenty-first street, who sent Gilberg home ill yesterday morning. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, found that a hemorrhage killed Gilberg.

Gilberg lived alone. He evidently was preparing to cook his noon day meal when he was stricken as uncooked fish and some potatoes were on the kitchen table. One side of the body was cooked from the heat of the gas stove, which had been burning for probably eight hours.

Mr. Gilberg was a member of the Woodmen of the World and carried $1,000 insurance. The secretary of the lodge was called last night but was unable to tell who the insurance was made out to. Mr. Gleason's niece was married about two months ago to a union tailor but whose name was unknown to the uncle. The niece was married in Westport. The body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms, Fourteenth street and Grand avenue.

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November 10, 1909

LONG FLIGHT IS DELAYED.

Weather Permitting Carrier Pigeons
Will Be Loosed This Morning.

On account of the hazy atmosphere of yesterday afternoon, the carrier pigeons, which were to have been liberated form the top of the R. A. Long building, Tenth street and Grand avenue, were not turned loose. the pigeons will be set free for their long flight to Colorado at 10 o'clock this morning, if the weather conditions are favorable.

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November 9, 1909

DOCTORS' VISITS TO
SCHOOLS BEGIN TODAY.

Especial Attention Will Be Given
to Throat and Eye Diseases and
Examinations Will Be Made
in Teacher's Presence.

Eight doctors will visit the public schools today to arrange with the principals suitable hours for the medical examination of pupils, the long-cherished project of Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner. Dr. Wheeler hopes to have the system in perfect working order by the end of the week.

In his office at Twelfth street and Grand avenue last night, Dr. Wheeler read his instructions to his assistants and furnished each with blanks and other material. The schools are to be visited at least three days a week and those in the North End and river wards every day.

TO HAVE SPECIAL ROOM.

The examiners are to make arrangements with the principal for a room where the pupils can be examined. Not all the pupils in each school are to be brought before the physician. Those who are suspected of having contagious diseases or who have been absent from school are to be called into the room and placed in charge of the medical examiner.

If it is found that the pupil is suffering from a contagious disease, he is at once sent home by the teacher, and can not return until he has again been examined by the physician, and his condition pronounced improved.

Especial attention will be paid to the diseases of the eye and teeth. The dental colleges have agreed to do work free for all pupils who present the proper credentials.

SPECIALISTS' WORK FREE.

Several specialists on eye diseases have agreed to make medical examinations free of charge for all pupils whose parents are not able to consult oculists of recognized standing.

"Remember," said Dr. Wheeler, "that you are not to make an examination unless in the presence of the teacher or principal. No pupil is to be vaccinated unless with permission of the parents. The office of medical examiner is not to be used as a means to solicit personal business."

Dr. Wheeler has spent more than a year studying the systems in use in other cities of the country. He not only has the advantage of the ideas of other cities, but also his personal experience for several years in Kansas City. By the end of the year he hopes to see the high schools in the list.

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November 4, 1909

HEADS BOW, PENITENT STEALS.

New "Mourner" Asks for Prayer,
Grabs Offering and Runs.

The Gospel Mission on Fourth street opposite police headquarters had conducted a successful service last night. The offering had been taken and the presiding elder had called all repentant sinners forward to testify. One young man, in particular, was vehement in his protestations of conversion to a better life.

"Brothers, I was a drunkard -- yes, at one time I was a thief, but all that is changed now, and I desire your prayers for my complete redemption."

The congregation bowed their heads in prayer and while they were so occupied the hand of the professed penitent slowly moved across the wooden table until it reached a pocket book which contained the nightly offering of the score of faithful.

In a flash it had gone, and with a laugh the man ran down the aisle and out into the street.

The police department was notified by Mrs. I. Hanson, 1406 Grand avenue, the owner of the pocket book. It contained about $5.

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November 2, 1909

SUFFERS SO SHE CAN
LIVE WITH A THIEF.

WOMAN'S DIARY TELLS OF
HARDSHIPS AND ROBBERIES.

Pair Disappear From Couch Hotel,
Where They Had Been Befriend-
ed, Taking New Clothes
and $90 in Money.

A diary, which had been written in plaintive words the sufferings of a woman who loved well, but not wisely, is the only memento Mrs. J. W. Couch, proprietress of the Couch hotel, 1711 1/2 Grand avenue, has of Early Elbridge and his wife, Edna, whom she befriended when they needed help, and who repaid her by robbing her.

There are only two dates in the diary, which was discovered after the couple had departed from the hotel, where Mrs. Couch had given them employment, after hearing their pitiful tale of destitution. They took with them a lot of wearing apparel and $90 in money, belonging to Mrs. Couch.

The writing reveals Bill Sykes and Nancy in real life; a life of theft on the part of one, hunger and suffering on the part of the other, and yet the woman evidently is contented with the love which she seems to think the man holds for her.

The first date is April 18, and the last July 1. In one instance only is it possible to tell where the events recorded occur.

The opening paragraph reads:

"I am sorry to leave this town, but Earl thought we had better get out. As the train started I said to Earl: "We had better get off and go back, so that woman won't suspect we stole her $20," but just then the train started and Earl said it was too late."

HAD BEEN IN ST. JOSEPH.

The next was:

"We have been in St. Joseph now three months, the longest we have been anywhere. Earl split a man's head with a meat cleaver today, though, and I suppose we will have to go away for good."

The next showed some of the hardships she endured with the man she loved and was as follows:

"We haven't had any food for twenty-four hours, and we are nearly starved. We slept last night in an orchard, not being able to get bed or shelter."

Evidently there had been a silver lining to the black clouds of the last paragraph for the next one read:

"Earl is better to me every day. I love him so much. He treats me better than I deserve, I know."

Misfortune and despondency were evidently again knocking at her heart when she wrote the next one:

"I wonder what that woman, Mary, will think of us, we left so abruptly last night. I guess we will always be on the move."

The next one evidenced that the hard luck of the couple was continuing:

"Arrived in the big city yesterday, dead broke and awfully hungry. This is another starving period. If we only could get a job."

STILL LOVES THIEF.

The last paragraph was the most important from a police standpoint. It shows that the hardships have in no wise cooled the ardor of her affections for the man who caused it all. It reads:

"Earl is five feet, eight inches in height and weighs about 145 pounds. He has dark hair and eyes. My love for him grows every day. Isn't it funny we are both 21 years old and there is only a few days difference in our ages."

Mrs. Couch informed the police that the couple came to her house a week ago and related a pitiful tale of suffering. She took them in, nad they had since been working around the place in return for their board.

Saturday night when Mrs. Couch left the couple at home to go to market, they informed her they were going right to bed, and she need not awaken them on her return. Sunday morning when Mrs. Couch went to call them she discovered two dummies, made of old clothes, in the bed.

Further investigation showed that $90 had been taken, together with Mr. Couch's best suit of clothes and Mrs. Couch's entire new fall outfit including shoes, hat, lingerie, etc. Mrs. Couch notified her husband, who was in Baldwin, Kas., and he will arrive here this morning.

Mrs. Couch also learned that Elbridge had failed to pay $15, with which she had entrusted him, to a butcher and furniture dealer to whom she owed some money.

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October 31, 1909

SHIELDS AT 12th AND GRAND.

Well Known Photographer Has Dis-
play in New Studio.

C. Harrison Shields, who is well known as one of Kansas City's leading photographers, having conducted a studio at Eighth and Grand avenue for almost seven years, but now located in the Rookery building at Twelfth and Grand avenue, is displaying a collection of water colors, Vandykes, and sepia portraits. Part of this collection is his own production and some of the work of contemporary artists, friends of Mr. Shields. The occasion of the display is the recent opening of the new Shields studio.

Prior to his residence in Kansas City the name of Shields was associated with high class photography in St. Louis, where Mr. Shields engaged in the business for fourteen years.

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October 30, 1909

CLEAN POLITICS SAFE
IN WOMAN'S HANDS.

MORE CAPABLE TO VOTE THAN
THE AVERAGE MAN.

Ten Years to See Nation-Wide Equal
Sufferage Says Mayor Critten-
den to Woman's Ath-
letic Club.

"I believe the average woman is more capable of clean, honest politics than the average man, and should vote on all local issues. The matter of keeping a city's life clean physically and morally should be entrusted to a woman's hands. It is my firm conviction that within the next ten years this country will have woman suffrage from one end to the other."

These were some of the remarks of Mayor Crittenden before the regular business meeting of the Kansas City Women's Athletic club, in the gymnasium at 1013 Grand avenue, yesterday afternoon. The speech was made on the invitation of Mrs. S. E. Stranathan, president of the club.

"I know that a great many women, as well as the majority of men, are against a suffrage movement or any other movement which would lead the gentler sex into the ungentle game of politics. It has been customary for men to assume that a woman could never understand the tariff; that the value of ship subsidies and river navigation would floor her, and that she is far too impulsive to be of value as a factor in our national government.

"These great issues, however, are not necessarily local. It might take time for the average matron or maid to grasp their details, but give them a few years of experience in town and city or perhaps state politics and it is my opinion that their vote would be as honest and as intelligent as any deposited in the box election day.

"There was a time when I did not believe in women voting, but that was before I held public office and dealt with committees of both sexes."

About seventy-five women, members of the club, heard Mayor Crittenden's remarks and applauded him at his conclusion.

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October 28, 1909

FIRE WARDEN CLOSES
NATIONAL THEATER.

BEGINS CRUSADE AGAINST UN-
SAFE MOVING PICTURE SHOWS.

Every Place in City, and Theaters,
to Be Closed Unless Public
Is Protected Against Fire.

Following the closing yesterday by the Fire Warden Edward Trickett of the National theater, 1112 Grand avenue, every other theater and picture show in the city will be inspected and if found in unsafe condition will immediately be ordered to quit.

The fire warden served notice at 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon on the manager of the National. No shows will be permitted to be given until all improvements ordered by Mr. Trickett have been made and the playhouse placed in a safe condition.

"It is the picture shows that are not complying with the ordinance relative to protection against fire," said Mr. Trickett last night. "Of the fifty that are running in this city one-third are unsafe."

Two weeks ago Mr. Trickett served every theater and picture show house in the city with a written notice, calling the attention of the managers to the rubbish and paper that had been allowed to gather under stages and auditoriums.

ALL MUST CLEAN UP.

"If some one would drop a lighted match in this rubbish a disastrous fire would result with a large loss of life," said Mr. Trickett.

"There are eight theaters in the city. I am not prepared to say how many are violating the city ordinance. Further than to say that every manager would better order a general cleaning and inspection of his fire protection appliances, I will make no comment.

Beginning immediately, Mr. Trickett will visit every show house in the city. The wiring will be inspected and all safety appliances. Mr. Trickett will go from gallery to cellar, and if the house is found lacking in the smallest detail, it will be ordered closed.

"The theaters and picture shows have been given ample warning,"said Mr. Trickett. "Notices were sent out two weeks ago and the attention of the managers called to the city ordinances.

"I have been trying especially to get the National cleaned up. The manager has made promises and done no more. This is the third time in two years that this theater has been closed. This time it will not be allowed to open until the rubbish is cleaned up and it is made safe in every particular."

Mr. Trickett charges that the wiring in the National is defective, and the room in which the moving picture machine is kept is liable to catch fire. He found paper and rubbish under the stage and in the basement under the auditorium.

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October 17, 1909

"JOY RIDER" NOW SORRY.

Didn't Anticipate Arrest for Giving
Another's Name to Auto Firm.

Representing himself as a Grand avenue furniture dealer, a man who yesterday told the police that his name is Charles E. Lach, engaged a motor car from the Royal Auto Company Friday night. After running up a bill of $67.50 he returned the auto and told the company to send up the bill "any time." Naturally the furniture dealer remonstrated yesterday when the bill was presented and then the police were notified. The "joy rider" was discovered and locked in a cell at police headquarters.

"I have always wanted to entertain my friends in a lavish fashion," he told the officers. "You see I'm a stranger in the city and after looking through the city directory to see if there was any one by the name of 'Lach.' Sure enough, I noticed the furniture dealer and decided to place the expenses of a motor trip on him. I didn't anticipate any such result, however, and I'm heartily sorry that I took such a notion."

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September 21, 1909

FRIENDSHIP ENDS IN
MURDER AND SUICIDE.

WILLIAM JACOBIA KILLS MRS.
SADIE STOLL AND HIMSELF.

Young Son of Woman Heard Quarrel
and Shooting -- Risks Life Try-
ing to Protect His
Mother.
Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, Murdered Woman.
MRS. SADIE BROWN STOLL.
Wife of Samuel F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company.

Murder and suicide ended a close friendship last night when William Jacobia, 600 East Ninth street, shot and killed Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, during a quarrel in the front hall of the Stoll home at 9 o'clock and a few minutes later committed suicide on the veranda of his wife's residence, 3217 Forest avenue.

Mrs. Stoll was shot through the heart and died at once. Jacobia shot himself in the head.

The only person in the house at the time Mrs. Stoll was murdered was her 14-year-old son Albert. What passed between the couple before the tragedy is not known definitely, but they were quarreling for nearly a half hour before Jacobia fired the shot. Albert Stoll heard part of the conversation between his mother and Jacobia, but was sent to his room by her just before the shooting.


BOY GETS A SHOTGUN.

That the young son expected serious trouble while Jacobia was there is shown by Jacobia's actions, which Albert Stoll graphically described to the police last night. Immediately after firing the shot which killed Mrs. Stoll, Jacobia started up the stairs, threatening to kill Albert, who had provided himself with a shotgun to protect his own life.

Either the shotgun frightened him or the desire to get away from the scene of his crime, Jacobia gave up the pursuit of the boy, and ran from the house, followed by Albert, who gave the alarm by crying for help.

But few minutes elapsed between the first and second shooting. It is only five blocks from the Stoll home at 3617 Tracy avenue to Mrs. Jacobia's suite in the Alabama apartment house, 3237 Forest avenue, and Jacobia ran all the way.


"I HAVE SHOT MRS. STOLL."

A balcony with no outside steps is front of her apartment, which is on the ground floor. Jacobia made his entrance by way of this balcony and in doing so had to climb over a stone balustrade which encloses it. As he entered with much agitation he said to his wife, who had come to let him in:

"Mamma, I had to come home."

She could see that he was greatly excited, and told him to sit down while she got him a glass of cold water.

"No, no!" he protested, excitedly, "I haven't time. I have just shot Mrs. Stoll. It is awful, it is awful."
William Jacobia; Killed His Friend and Then Himself.
WILLIAM JACOBIA.
Slayer of Mrs. Samuel F. Stoll, who committed suicide when the police traced him to his wife's home at 3217 Forest avenue.

Incoherently he was trying to tell her of the shooting when he heard the sound of steps outside.

"There are the officers coming for me," he said.

"Yes, but you will have to nerve yourself and be calm," she told him.

Mrs. Jacobia went to the door to let in Sergeant M. E. Cassidy and Patrolman Isaac Hull of No. 9 station, and as she did so her husband stepped out on the balcony.

"Where is he?" asked Sergeant Cassidy.


WIFE HEARS DEATH SHOT.

Just then they heard a single shot, and the three went hurriedly to the balcony door.

"There he lies," she answered, pointing to the dead body of her husband, prostrate on the stone floor of the porch. The husband of the murdered woman is S. F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company, formerly at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and now located at 208 and 210 East Twelfth street. He was notified of the death of his wife by W. R. James, 3615 Tracy avenue. Sam Brown Stoll, 18 years old, the oldest son, was at a theater, and friends were unable to reach him by telephone.

According to the facts as told by Albert last night Jacobia telephoned yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock and asked for Mrs. Stoll. Albert answered the telephone and upon recognizing Jacobia's voice hung up the receiver. About 8 o'clock last night he again called up and was answered by Mrs. Stoll, and a half hour later appeared at the house.

Mrs. Stoll fell dead in the hallway at the foot of the stairs. Her head was lying against the bottom step, while her feet pointed to the front door. Soon after Mr. Stoll reached home he asked neighbors and friends to inform the relatives of his wife of her death. J. H. Brown, a brother, who lives in Atchison, Kas., was informed of the tragedy.

"Tell all of them to come," said Albert, who was telling his father what should be done.

The account of the shooting as told by young Albert Stoll soon after the murder, while not full in all details, shows daring in a boy so young as far as his part was concerned. He said that he and his brother did not like Jacobia, and that a week ago Sam had purchased a shotgun with the intention of killing the man who was his mother's friend. The shotgun had been kept in their room until a day or so ago, when his mother removed it to the attic.

"Yesterday afternoon when Jacobia called up and asked for mamma, I hung up the receiver," said Albert. "Then about 8 tonight he called mother, and soon afterwards he came to the house. I was in my room at the time. When I heard mamma and Jacobia fussing I decided I would get the shotgun, which I did. I took a shell and after taking out the wad and shot I went down to the first landing and stood there.

HEARD HIS MOTHER SHOT.

"I told Jacobia to leave the house, that he did not have any business here anyway. At that he got mad at me and told me to keep still or he would beat me. Then to bluff him I picked up the shotgun and put a load into it. Mamma made me go to my room, saying she would get Jacobia awa.

"I'll not let that little pup talk to me that way," Jacobia is said to have repeated to Mrs. Stoll.

"Just as I reached the upper hall I heard the shot, and then mamma say, 'Albert, he shot me.' 'Yes, and I'll shoot him, too,' I heard Jacobia say as I was hurrying back downstairs. Jacobia was coming up the stairs, and knowing my shell was not good, I ran to my room and put a loaded shell in the gun and then came downstairs.

RAN AFTER JACOBIA.

"As I reached the head of the stairway Jacobia was going out the front door, and I ran down the steps and followed into the yard. He was then going up the street. I cried 'Help, help,' and someone across the street asked, 'What is the matter, Albert?' When I said mamma is shot nearly all of the people started to the house and I came back and called up papa, but he didn't answer. Then someone told the police.

"I wish I had shot him," Albert admitted.

"Oh, God, why didn't you shoot the scoundrel, boy?" Mr. Stoll asked of his son.

Albert insisted that he did not know what his mother and Jacobia were talking about. Whenever Albert endeavored to tell the police just what occurred, and how, Mr. Stoll, who was walking the floor of the lower rooms, would tell him to keep still. Mr. Stoll refused to answer any questions immediately after the murder.

HUSBAND STILL LOVED HER.

"I loved her with every drop of blood in my body," he said, "and I will not say anything against her. I would not say a word that would reflect upon her. Oh, God, why couldn't he have shot me?"

Not until Samuel Stoll, the elder son, came home after the performance at a theater, did he learn of the tragedy. As he hurried up the steps, he was met by J. A. Guthrie, a friend of the family.

"For God's sake, what's the matter?" he said with a perplexed face.

Then he saw the white shrouded figure in the parlor with the undertaker and his assistants standing near. Mr. Stoll, who saw him, threw his arms about the boy's neck and shouted:

"Your friend killed her, that's what he did. And you knew he was coming to see her all the time."

WHEN THE TWO FIRST MET.

Then both were hurried up the stairs by friends.

"I'll kill him myself," said the youth.

"He has done that to save you the trouble," said Mr. Guthrie. "He committed suicide just after he killed your mother."

Then the father upbraided the son for several minutes, but the youth declared he knew nothing about it. Then both began weeping hysterically, and were finally reconciled. But the father could not remain seated. He walked the floor in anguish.

"I knew the first day he saw my wife," he said. "One day when he was building those flats up on Forest avenue, he came in to use the telephone, and my wife met him at the door. He introduced himself, which was the beginning of their acquaintance. I began to get suspicious when I saw him at the house several times.

WAS TOLD TO WATCH WIFE.

"Somehow I had a suspicion that all was not right, and at times I felt sick. On one occasion I asked her about it, but she became angry and upbraided me so much that I felt almost humiliated. She went on occasional visits to Atchison, and I was suspicious every time that she left home.

"On one of the visits to Atchison, I found his picture in the close, and I was so angry when she came home that I could wait no longer. She flew into a rage, and I could do nothing but submit, not wishing to make the affair public.

"My feelings were again wrought to a high pitch when I received an anonymous letter, telling me I ought to watch my wife. I then determined to hire a detective agency to watch her, but after hiring two men I thought differently and canceled my contract with the firm.

"It has been that way for months until tonight when I was called to the telephone and was told that my wife had been shot. I won't harbor any ill will against her for my boys' sake. She was their mother.

Mrs. Stoll was a large woman with a rich mass of dark brown hair. Her face was full and her eyes were dark brown, which matched her olive complexion. She was considered one of the handsomest women in the neighborhood, and always attracted attention on the street by her dignified bearing. A dimple in her cheek was heightened by an engaging smile. She always dressed in clothes of the latest fashion, which while not always expensive, always were tasteful. She was 38 years old.

Mrs. Stoll was the daughter of J. P. Brown, a wealthy man who lived at Atchison, Kas., Her father died about three weeks ago. He was well known in and around Atchison being one of the most prominent men in that community. While the Stolls lived in Atchison Mr. Stoll conducted a drug store there.

JACOBIA 46 YEARS OLD.

William Jacobia, the dead man, was 46 years old and rather stout. Those who had known him in life said last night that he was apparently of a happy disposition, with rare conversational powers. He took uniformly with women and men, the former long remembering his bright wit and ready flow of small talk.

When Mr. and Mrs. Jacobia were married October 8, 1890, he was an engineer on a Kansas branch of the Missouri Pacific railway. Later he left the railroad in favor of the banking business and founded the Farmer's state bank, the stock of which was owned mostly by farmers at Corning, Kas., which was his birthplace. Seven years ago he sold out his interest in the Farmers' bank and came to Kansas City to enter the real estate business.

POLICE "DIDN'T KNOW."

The police notified Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, of the double crime and he in turn notified Deputy Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky. The bodies of the murdered woman and suicide were sent to the Carroll - Davidson undertaking rooms by the deputy coroner.

The police who were stationed at the home of Mrs. Stoll and Mrs. Jacobia refused to give any information regarding the tragedy last night. Whenever any of them were asked who shot the woman or why he shot her or an y other question relative to the case the invariable answer was "I don't know."

One policeman was asked if the body lying in the front hall of the Stoll home was a man or woman, and he said, "I don't know."

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September 16, 1909

BUY LAND FOR NEW STATION.

Western Sash and Door Company
Sells Grand Avenue Site and
Buildings for $125,000.

As forcasted in The Journal a week ago, $125,000 was paid yesterday by the Grand Avenue Building Company to William Huttig, president of the Western Sash and Door Company, for the property and building of the company at Twenty-third and Grand avenue.

There are 45,000 square feet in the tract, wh ich faces 168 feet on Grand avenue and runs through to Walnut street. About 5,500 square feet will be taken by the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company in the building of the Union passenger station, and it is understood that eventually a hotel will be built on the remaining part of the property.

The offices of the sash and door company will be occupied and used at once by the engineering forces of the terminal company, and the balance of the building will be used by the Huttig company for one year.

"A year from today the Western Sash and Door Company will have a big new plant built somewhere along the line of the Belt railway," said Mr. Huttig yesterday. "We have three different sites under construction."

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September 13, 1909

USED DIAMOND ON
THE STORE WINDOWS.

PLATE GLASS CUT FOR BLOCKS
ON MAIN STREET.

J. E. Stivers Arrested on Charge of
Damaging Property from Fifth
to Thirteenth Street --
Denies He Is Vandal.

All records in plate glass window cutting were broken last night by J. E. Stivers, a candymaker for the Loose-Wiles Cracker and Candy Company. In years past the record in Kansas City has been a few straggling windows, entailing a cost of from $300 to $400, but Stivers's cutting began at Thirteenth street and Grand avenue and he carried the line of march to Main street and down that street to Fifth, where he was arrested. In all, Stivers damaged sixty-three plate glass windows. If the glass has to be replaced, the total cost would not fall short of $5,000, it is estimated. Most of the places which suffered most carry plate glass insurance.

Edward Clark, recently appointed a Gamewell operator at the Walnut street police station, saw Stivers when he made his first cut on a plate glass window at the Ayres Clothing Company, 1309 Grand avenue. He followed him to Main street, along Thirteenth and down Main to Fifth, seeing him use a 1/4 karat diamond ring on all of the most valuable windows along Main street. It did not occur to Clark to make an arrest. The arrest took place while Stivers was making a final slash at a large window of the Hub Clothing Company at Fifth and Main streets. Herman Hartman, a police officer, chanced to be passing and arrested the culprit.




After leaving Thirteenth and Grand, Stivers made his way to Main street, where he wrote his initials on a glazed monument of the M. H. Rice Monument Company at that point. It was shortly after 9 p. m. when he reached Jones' Dry Goods Company's store and many persons were on the street so he succeeded in cutting but seven of the valuable windows. Some of them are cut so deeply that a tap would knock out part of the glass.


Stivers' route from here was made by jumps, he evidently passing some places on account of the night crowds. He missed most of the stores in the block between Eleventh and Twelfth streets on Main. Altogether, he damaged the windows of more than thirty clothiers, milliners, saloons, flower shops, fortune tellers and other retailers and unoccupied buildings.

When Stilvers began by the Jones Dry Goods Company, when his diamond was in good working order, he appears to have done the greatest damage.

When seen in the holdover after his arrest, Stivers was awakened from a stupor. He told who he was and said he had been working for the Loose-Wiles company for twenty years. He is now 22 years old.

"If any of those windows are damaged I did not do it," he said.

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September 12, 1909

FINEST WEST OF CHICAGO.

Kansas City Women's Athletic
Club's New Home Ready.

The Kansas City Women's Athletic Club expects to be in its new quarters, 1015 Grand avenue, by next Wednesday, and a formal opening has been planned. The rooms will be open all day and in the evening a ball will be given for club members and their friends.

The club formerly occupied quarters at 1024 Walnut street, but on the second floor of the new Mancuitt building, 1015 Grand avenue, it will have what are said to be the finest club rooms west of Chicago. Its magnificent tea room will be a feature in the new quarters.

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August 25, 1909

BANK'S 25TH ANNIVERSARY.

Reception Today from 10 to 3 at
German American.

Officers and directors of the German-American bank at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue will hold a reception today. The reception will mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the bank. Special decorations have been arranged and visitors will be entertained from 10 o'clock until 3. The bank was instituted by Louis A. Lambert and his five sons, one of whom, Henry C. Lambert, is cashier.

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August 4, 1909

START ON TROLLEY LINE.

From Kansas City to St. Joseph in
Fifty-Five Minutes.

Former State Senator Ernest Marshall of Saline county, while in Kansas City yesterday, said that within ten days graders will start work upon one of the proposed trolley lines from St. Joseph to Kansas City.

"This is the company which has its headquarters in St. Joseph," said Senator Marshall. "Nearly all the money we want is in sight. We will come into Kansas City over the Winner bridge piers. It will be forty-eight and a half miles from Ninth and Grand avenue here to Francis street in St. Joseph, and we will carry passengers from one street to the other in fifty-five minutes."

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July 30, 1909

PIONEER BLACKSMITH DIES
LEAVING $150,000 ESTATE.

Henry Nevins Came to Kansas City
in 1869, and Opened Shop
on Third Street.

Henry Nevins, pioneer horseshoer of Kansas City and in the early days a fair prototype of Longfellow's "Village Blacksmith," died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 1032 Olive street. He was 70 years old.

He was born in Tipperary county, Ireland, and came to this country when a young man, spending some years in Canada, where he learned the blacksmith trade and where he married. Later he crossed the line into the United States, settling first in Burlington, Ia., and from there removing to Kansas City in 1869.

He first opened a shop at Third street and Grand avenue and for twenty years Nevins's blacksmith shop was a landmark.

In those early days when railroads were in their infancy and mules and horses were yet the main standby for transportation, the blacksmith was a most important person.

Nevins met the situation with an energy that never seemed to tire, and it is on record that during rush seasons he has been known to stand in the smith forty-eight hours at a stretch, without sleep, eating in the shop meals brought to him by his wife.

Early in his career in Kansas City Mr. Nevins began to put his savings into real estate, and this policy he continued throughout his career. But once in his life did he part with real estate he had purchased, and that was about eight years ago, when he sold to the Armour Packing Company the property at 306 West Eighth street for $10,000, and for which he had paid $900 in early days. For an other property next to the Gillis opera house, which cost him $800 he recently refused an offer of $800 a foot.

Practically all his wealth is in inside Kansas City real estate and a conservative estimate of his estate places the figure at $150,000.

Later he moved his blacksmith shop to 512 Walnut street, and when that property became too valuable for a blacksmith shop he moved once more to 512 Grand avenue, where he continued in business until five years ago, when he retired, owing to advancing age and continued ill health.

He leaves a wife and six children, three sons and three daughters. The children are: John M., James H., William J., Elinore, Catherine Marie and Rose.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Aloysius's church, and burial will be at St. Mary's cemetery.

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July 24, 1909

STRUCK BY OUTLAW HORSE.

Former Cowboy Is Injured in
Attempting to Quiet Animal.

George Peterson, 435 Hardesty avenue, attempted to quiet an outlaw horse whch had gotten beyond control of his driver at the corner of Eighth street and Grand avenue yesterday afternoon and received a kick on the upper lip. The wound is not serious.

The horse, with its mate, was hitched to a delivery wagon when it became fractious and tangled the harness. The driver was compelled to loosen it from the wagon and then it furnished amusement for several hundred people. Peterson, who has had considerable experience with outlaw horses, grabbed the reins, but the animal reared and struck him on the face.

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July 21, 1909

"ALTON" RESUMES SERVICE.

All C. & A. Trains Now Running
Over Their Own Tracks on
Regular Schedule.

The popularity of the Chicago & Alton railroad was again demonstrated Tuesday morning by the number of people who appeared at the C. & A. downtown ticket office, following the announcement that all Alton trains were again running over their own lines.

Although the tracks at Glasgow suffered several bad washouts, the Alton completed their reconstruction with unusual promptness and were able to announce the restoration of their train service a full day ahead of their expectations.

For the convenience of their patrons who prefer a downtown depot, the C. & A. also recently began operating their "Red Hummer" train to and from Chicago daily through the Twenty-second and Grand avenue station.

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July 19, 1909

LURE OF THE CIRCUS
AS STRONG AS EVER.

CROWDS STREAMED THROUGH
SHOW GROUNDS YESTERDAY.

Performers Were Not in Evidence,
as It Was a Day of Rest.
Parade in Downtown
Section.
The Circus Makes Everyone Feel Young Again.
WE ARE ALL "SMALL BOYS" TODAY.

PARADE STARTS AT 9:30

The route is north from the grounds, on Indiana avenue to Fifteenth street, west of Fifteenth to Walnut street, north on Walnut to Fifth street, west on Fifth to Main street, south on Main to Fourteenth street, east on Fourteenth to Grand avenue, south on Grand to Fifteenth street, east on Fifteenth to Indiana avenue, south on Indiana to the circus grounds.


You have heard people say that the circus is no longer the magnet it once was, but if you were able to persuade yourself into this opinion, take a car out to Seventeenth street and Indiana avenue, where Ringling's circus city is encamped, and behold your mistake; for it's dollars to dill pickles that you'll suddenly be bereft of your enthusiasm.

Crowds streamed through the grounds all day yesterday just because it was a circus that held all the charm that circuses have always held in the popular heart. Big red wagons; forests of pegs and guy ropes; great hollow mountains of belying canvas; roustabouts seeking a minimum of warmth in the scant shade of the vans; squads of cooks and scullions making the next meal ready for the circus army vendors of cool drinks and hot meats, barking their wares; the merry-go-round, grinding out its burden of popular airs, all these things to be seen and heard constituted the lure that drew perspiring thousands to the show grounds, even though no performance was given Sunday.

PERFORMERS' REST DAY.

It was remarked that few of the performers could be seen on the grounds.

"That's because it is their day off," said one who has eleven years of circus experience behind him. "They're at all the parks and other places of interest. More of them are in church than you would guess, too."

No one was allowed in the menagerie yesterday and the animals had the big tent largely to themselves and their keepers. Beasts ranging in disposition from mild to fearsome, crouched, paced and slept behind the bars. A large herd of elephants was lined up on one side of the tent and the huge pachyderms stood quietly swaying their trunks, and munching the wisps of hay they would now and then tuck under their proboscises.

Jerry, the Royal Bengal tiger. lay peacefully asleep in his cage. He is the Apollo Belvedere of the feline species. Out of all tigers and near-tigers in captivity, he was chosen as a model of his kind for the two bronze guardians of the entrance of old Nassau hall, Princeton.

TIGER AS A MODEL.

Jerry was chosen as a model by A. Phimister Proctor, the sculptor, who was commissioned by the class of '79 to replace the two lions that now stand before the famous old hall.

Weather and undergraduate ebullience made their marks on the lions and the class of '79 decided to have them replaced by two bronze tigers which will not only be more durable but more emblematic. They will be presented to the university by the class next commencement week.

Two performances will be given today, the first at 2 o'clock in the afternoon and the second at 8 o'clock at night. The parade will start at 9:30 a. m. The circus will give two performances at Manhattan, Kas., Tuesday.

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July 10, 1909

CUT IN TWO ON CAR TRACK.

Body of Unidentified Man Discov-
ered at Walnut and Second.

While rounding the curve in the old Holmes street cut on Second street between Walnut street and Grand avenue at midnight last night, J. A. Franklin, the motorman of a Vine street car, noticed that his car bumped slightly at one particular place. He stopped the car, got off and went back to investigate.

In the middle of the track was the body of a man which had evidently been lying there for several hours. More than a dozen cars had passed over the body before any one noticed it. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered it taken to an undertaker.

From papers found in the dead man's pockets it was presumed that his name is Walter A. Rosh of Enid, Ok.

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July 9, 1909

HE RODE THE BICYCLE.

But Fred Collins, a Baker, Is Now
Under a Surgeon's Care.

To ride a bicycle was the ambition of Fred Collins, a baker, 1526 1/2 Grand avenue, and yesterday afternoon he secured a wheel and went out on Kensington avenue near Independence avenue to experiment. He started at the top of a hill and when he reached the bottom the machine struck a telegraph post. Dr. E. D. Twyman of the emergency hospital was summoned and set a broken right clavicle.

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July 3, 1909

HEAT CRAZED; RUNS AMUCK.

Right From Harvest Fields, Man
Causes Panic on City Street.

Affected by the sun of the Kansas harvest fields, Lewis Wright of Paris, Ill., ran amuck at Seventh street and Grand avenue at 8:30 yesterday morning with a pocketknife, and began slashing passersby.

Jennie Rolfe, 23 years old, a clerk, was stabbed in the left arm. She lives at 3010 Dunham avenue. Wright knocked another woman down with a brick, and ran several other persons away. Thomas Craig, an engineer, 2325 Chelsea avenue, Kansas City, Kas., was stabbed on the left hand and left shoulder. He retorted by knocking his assailant down and taking the knife away from him. A police ambulance took Wright to the emergency hospital.

When he was revived by Dr. W. L. Gist, Wright said that he could remember nothing of what had occurred, except that he thought someone had stabbed him in the leg. He said that he had been prostrated by the heat in the harvest fields. He thinks he is married.

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