Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

July 2, 1908

OVERHEAD FUSE
SET CAR AFIRE.

PANIC AMONG PASSENGERS FOL-
LOWED EXPLOSION.

CORINNE TALIAFERRO HURT.

SEVERAL OTHERS WERE IN-
JURED, BUT ONLY SLIGHTLY.

Trolley Car in Flames Ran Wild
Through Wyandotte Street Un-
til Pedestrian Turned
Off the Current.

When the "overhead" blew out on a Grand Central depot bound car at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets at 9 o'clock last night, half a dozen passengers were momentarily shrouded in flames. Miss Corinne Taliaferro, 1747 Pennsylvania avenue, became hysterical and jumped from the car w hen released by a passenger who had removed her from immediate danger from fire Her back and shoulder were wrenched, and she was so hysterical when taken to emergency hospital that an examination of her injuries could not be attempted.

A. L. Perry, 513 Locust street, who made a brave attempt to save the women passengers who tried to jump from the car, was treated at the emergency hospital, and Edward H. Bly, 5617 East Ninth street, who set the brakes on the car after it had been deserted by the crew, was burned severely. An unidentified woman passenger whose ankle was inured sent for a carriage and was taken home.

E. G. Combs, motorman of the car, No. 713, says he was thrown from the front vestibule by the explosion. The car had just crossed the Twelfth street tracks when the overhead blew out and the motorman left his brakes. Immediately the front of the car was enveloped in flames and the passengers fled to the rear vestibule. The first of the passengers, eager to leave the burning car, which was then under ordinary speed, pushed the conductor into the street and the car was left running wild.

It was then that Perry and Bly, the latter with an ambition to be a motorman, and with his application for a job placed with the Metropolitan Street Railway Company earlier in the day, attempted to rescue the passengers While Bly aided the two women to the rear of the car, Perry braced himself on the steps and refused to allow them to jump from the car.

Mrs. Taliaferro, who had been touched by the flames, stooped low and leaped straight into the street under Perry's outstretched arm. The rest of the passengers crowded upon the young man with such force that he was pushed to the pavement and his right ankle was twisted and his left shoulder bruised. The car, running wild and burning, had passed Eleventh street.

Bly, who could no longer aid the passengers, turned his attention to the brakes. The front vestibule was full of smoke and fire but he stepped in and fumbled for the levers. He brought the car to a stop near Ninth street, just as the insurance patrol company swung into Wyandotte from its Eleventh street station. The flames were soon extinguished The car was pushed to a switch in the North End.

The conductor and motorman, bruised, went to their barn and Bly sought a physician, while Perry went to the emergency hospital. Miss Taliaferro for two hours was too hysterical to receive treatment and was given opiates to quiet her nerves and brace her for examination . In the meantime Jack Bell, a traveling man acquaintance, had reached the emergency hospital and later D. H. D. McQuade was summoned. At midnight Miss Taliaferro was removed to the Wesley hospital, Eleventh and Harrison streets.

D. H. D. McQuade stated last night that the injuries may prove more serious than at first indicated by the examination. He thinks the girl has been injured internally and that several bones have been broken. A further examination will be made today. An opiate was given her last night in order that she might get rest and recover from the nervous shock sustained at the time of the accident.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 13, 1908

WILLIE PICKED HIS TEETH.

Boy From Gravette, Ark., Used a
Fierce Weapon and Was Arrested.

Willie Davidson is a product of Gravette, Ark. Last Monday night he was found in the women's waiting rooom of the Grand Central depot, Second and Wyandotte streets. He held in his right hand a large Bowie knife, the sharp end of which was stuck between his teeth. It frightenend the women and Patrolman Samuel Nichols took him in tow and landed him at headquarters.

When searched Willie -- they call him "Willie" at home, he said, because he was not yet of age -- yielded and automatic pistol, loaded, and an extra box of shells.

"I came up here to get some shells for my gun -- couldn't get 'em at home," Willie told Judge Kyle yesterday. "The Bowie knife? Oh, I bought that just because it was pretty. I wasn't doin' nothin' with it but pickin' my teeth. Jest pickin' my teeth, that's all, and not harmin' nothin' or nobody. 'Tain't no harm to pick your teeth, is it?"

"Not with a toothpick, no," replied the court. "But we bar the Bowie knife for that purpose here. I know where you come from. The town is full of rocks. Now you take your automatic and your 'toothpick' and catch the first train for home. If you flash that weapon in Gravette I'll bet the town boys chase you to the tall grass with it and that 'toothpick.' "

"Willie" gathered up his belongings and left for the first train.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

February 23, 1907

DRAGS A DOCTOR
THROUGH STREETS.

INSANE WOMAN CAPATURES HER
WOULD-BE CAPTOR.

ESCAPES FROM A HOSPITAL.

SECURES A SURGEON'S KNIFE AND
MENACES INTERNES.

Even After Being Strapped to Her Bed
She Makes Her Escape For
The Second Time --
Finally Subdued.

Attendants at the emergency hospital have had lively times with insane people, but the most strenuous time so far was Friday night and yesterday morning with Mrs. Emma Lucas, a demented woman, en route from Los Angeles, Cal., to Toledo, O. The woman was acting suspiciously at the Grand Central depot, Second and Wyandotte streets, and was taken to Central station late Friday night for investigation. When it was seen that she was demented she was transferred to the emercency hospital.

Mrs. Lucas, who is 27 years old, is a large woman and strong. She was confined in the women's ward but in a short while some one discovered her ponderous form climbing over the fence surrounding City Hall park. She had escaped through a window.

Dr. Ralph A. Shiras, who is not large, sallied forth in pursuit He overtook the big woman on Fifth near Delaware street and grabbed hold of her. The woman shook him off with ease and in turn grabbed the doctor. Dragging him along behind as she would a toy wagon she walked nearly to the Wyandotte street depot with the struggling doctor before aid in the form of two policemen who loomed up on the horizon. Emma was subdued and again landed in the women's ward.

Early yesterday morning Mrs. Shiras, who is night nurse at the emergency hospital, was busy attending a case and did not notice Mrs. Lucas. She had entered the operating room and, from a case, secured a large surgical knife. The woman was as sly as a fox, as all insane persons generally are, and in concealing the deadly weapon under her garments she went stealthily back to her ward. Her actions were noticed, however, by a patient and the alarm given.

Mrs. Lucas was made to give up the knife and she was then placed to bed and restraining straps put on her. To this she objected very much and was continually crying to be released. When her breakfast was served yesterday morning the insane woman used the knife sent up with the meal to cut her straps.

Once more the big woman made her escape by a window and was not seen until she was climbing over the fence of City Hall park. Across the street she fairly flew into a clothing store, where she demanded the use of a telephone to call for help, she said.

The stream of doctors, attendants and board of health attaches which followed the demented person would remind one strongly of a chase seen almost weekly in the kinodrome pictures at the Orpheum theater. She was corralled and returned, a restraining strap dangling from one of her feet.

In what was thought to be a lucid interval later Mrs. Lucas told Colonel J. C. Greenman, who looks after the insane for the police, that she had hidden a sum of money in the women's wash room at the Grand Central depot. Colonel Greenman searched for it but found nothing. Mrs. Lucas said that when she arrived here the money was in a stocking and that a woman passenger had advised her to take it out. She said she did so and hid it in the washroom.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

August 31, 1907

WILL GO IN A PRIVATE CAR.

North End Children to Travel to Lex-
ington in Luxurious Style.

Owing to the failure of the steamer Tennessee to arrive on schedule time a change of mode of transportation of the fifty North end children by the Helping Hand to the battlefield of Lexington, Mo., for a week's vacation has been made necessary. The youngsters, through the liberality of William Voelker, are to ride to their destination in a private car that will leave the Grand Central depot at 5 o'clock this evening. The people of Lexington will assist in entertaining the visitors.

Labels: , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory