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October 16, 1909

REED ENTERS RACE
TO SUCCEED WARNER.

FORMER MAYOR ASPIRES TO BE
UNITED STATES SENATOR.

His Candidacy the Result of Con-
ferences Held Here Last Week
Between Local and Out-
side Party Leaders.

Among the Democrats of Kansas City, Jackson county and portions of the state it was given out yesterday that James A. Reed has entered the race for United States senator to succeed Major William Warner.

The close political and personal friends of Mr. Reed last night confirmed the report that he is a candidate and added that his candidacy is the result of several conferences held in this city during the week with representative Democrats of Jackson county and throughout the state.

"All of Mr. Reed's old friends and many new ones were present at these conferences, and they all promised support and encouragement to his cause," said a well known politician.

"Mr. Reed goes into the fight in much better shape than he was in when he sought the governorship against Joseph W. Folk. Then he had a divided Democracy against him in his own county, but now he starts out on his senatorial canvass with every element of Jackson county Democracy at his back. Delegates from throughout the state that came to the conferences and which resulted in Mr. Reed coming out full fledged for senator, stated that the report is being circulated over the state that he has built up a large law practice and does not want to be senator. While it is true that Mr. Reed has a big practice it is of that kind and character that will not suffer by his becoming senator. The out-of-town supporters of Mr. Reed were authorized to make such a statement and to add emphasis among their constituency that Mr. Reed is an aspirant for the high honor."

Mr. Reed was prosecuting attorney of Jackson county when in response to the demands of the Democrats of Jackson county he resigned to accept the nomination for mayor. He was elected by the biggest majority ever given a candidate for that office and two years later again succeeded himself. Were it not that he entered the race for governor he could have had a third nomination for mayor. Two years ago he was solicited to run for congress but declined on account of his law practice.

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May 30, 1909

MANY EXTEND SYMPATHY.

Gov. Crittenden's Family Receives
Telegrams from Prominent Men.

From all parts of the United States telegrams expressing condolence and sympathy have been received by the family of Governor Crittenden. Many are from men prominent in public life. The following message addressed to H. H. Crittenden was received from Colonel Henry Watterson of Louisville, Ky.:

"My profound and heartfelt sympathies to your dear mother and all you children. None loved him better than I."

From former Senator F. M. Cockrell at Washington:

"I tender deepest sympathy in your great loss. May God bless and comfort you."

From Joseph W. Folk, Colorado Springs:

"Accept my most sincere sympathy in the death of your father, former Governor Crittenden."

From John G. Hurd, Washington:

"Am keenly distressed to learn of Governor Crittenden's condition. Be assured of my sympathy and sincere hopes for his recovery."

From G. W. Zevely, Muskogee, Ok.:

"Greatly distressed by reports of your father's illness. Mrs. Zevely and myself extend our deepest sympathies."

From Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Marmaduke, St. Louis:

"Our sympathies. The governor's kindly nature won him many warm friends."

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April 29, 1909

WIFE SLAYER ESCAPES
FROM ST. JOSEPH ASYLUM.

J. M. Crane, Convicted of Murder,
but Committed as a Lunatic,
Coming to Kansas City.

ST. JOSEPH, MO., April 28. -- J. M. Crane, who was committed to the state hospital for the insane at this point about a year ago after having been given a life sentence in the penitentiary from Kansas City, for the murder of his wife, escaped late today. He had been given many privileges at the asylum of late, and it is believed made his escape after carefully planning to elude detection.

Superintendent Kuhn of the asylum is out of the city, and his assistant declines to give any information about Crane or his manner of escape. It was admitted, however, that Crane was gone.

It is said that Crane has a grievance against several persons in Kansas City, who testified against him, and assisted in prosecuting him for the murder of his wife. There is some apprehension that he will endeavor to do these persons bodily harm.

MURDERED HIS ESTRANGED WIFE.

John M. Crane shot and killed his wife, Henrietta Crane, on the evening of July 8, 1905, at her home, 1101 Bales avenue. Mrs. Crane, from whom her husband had been separated for some time, was sitting on the front porch when Crane came up the walk.

When she saw him coming, Mrs. Crane ran into the house. Crane followed. After a struggle in the hall Mrs. Crane ran across the street. As she ran, Crane fired several times, three of the shots taking effect. The woman fell dead in a neighbor's dooryard.

Crane was tried for the crime, and in spite of his plea for insanity was convicted and sentenced to be hanged. Five days before the sentence of death was to be carried out, Governor Folk granted a reprieve of thirty days in order that a commission might examine into the sanity of the man. The reprieve was given upon the request of deputy prosecutors. A number of physicians had examined Crane, and all said he was insane. Several said he was hopelessly demented and could live but a short time.

On May 5, 1907, after having been in the jail hospital for seven months, Crane was pronounced insane by a commission and was taken to the state asylum at St. Joseph.

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April 1, 1909

HAMMIL WEARIED OF
SITTING ON A BOMB.

GREW NERVOUS THINKING OF
WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN.

Police Lieutenant Resigns to
Become Private Detective for Hotel
Baltimore -- Succeeds Ed Hickman
at the Hostelry.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.

Police Lieutenant H. W. Hammil yesterday resigned to become a private detective at the Hotel Baltimore. Hammil succeeds Edward Hickman, who leaves the hotel to go into business with his brother.

Lieutenant Hammil has been a member of the police department for nineteen years. Seven years ago he was promoted to a seargency and two years ago was made lieutenant. While his advancement may not have been as rapid as many who went on the force after he did, there were reasons for it. He was always averse to turning "crooks" loose because some petty or big policeman requested it and he always did his full duty in spit of who it hurt or what political interests were disturbed. That one thing, more than anything else, mitigated against rapid promotion.

REMOVED FROM HEADQUARTERS.

Hammil was made a lieutenant during the Governor Folk "rigid police investigation," while it was in its incipency, in fact. One day an officer who had made charges against John Hayes, then chief of police, was cursing the chief and Frank F. Rozzelle, then a commissioner, down in Central station. Hammil ordered the man to stop such talk or something "would be doing." As soon as Governor Folk had peremptorily removed Commissioner Rozzelle by wire and the new board had been organized and John Hayes dropped from the department, Hammil was ordered removed from headquarters, where he had served the better part of his life, to No. 4 station at Fifteenth and Walnut streets.

The records will show that while other districts, notably headquarters, have had a full quota of men and more, too, No. 4 has been handicapped with barely half enough men to do proper police duty. Hammil's watch, especially, never had a full complement of men the whole time he was there. It is said that if an officer got sick, crippled or otherwise "defunct," he was detailed to Hammil's watch. Handicapped as he was, however, he always went along with out complaint and kept up his end of the string.

As soon as Hickman resigned from the detective position at the Hotel Baltimore, D. J. Dean sent for Hammil and offered him the place. It is better pay and far more pleasant work -- no more knockers, no politics.

GLAD TO GET AWAY.

"I am sorry to leave some of my old friends on the department," Hammil said yesterday, "but I am glad to get away from a place where you felt all along like you were sitting on a dynamite bomb. If one 'crook' was arrested here would come a kick from his political friend, and when another fell into our hands here would come another 'gang' of political kickers. I always let 'em kick, though they always threatened to get my job."

The board took no action on Hammil's successor yesterday, Commissioner Elliott H. Jones being away hunting ducks. It may be left for the new board to fill.

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January 12, 1909

FIRST REPUBLICAN
IN FORTY YEARS.

HERBERT S. HADLEY SWORN IN
AS GOVERNOR OF MISSOURI.

INAUGURAL IS
CEREMONIOUS.

ESCORTED TO CAPITOL BY THE
THIRD REGIMENT.

Batteries Fire Salute of Seventeen
Guns in Honor of the New
Executive -- Hadley De-
fines Policies.
Herbert Spencer Hadley, Governor of Missouri
GOVERNOR HERBERT SPENCER HADLEY.

JEFFERSON CITY, Jan 11. -- (Special.) With the inauguration today of Herbert S. Hadley, Missouri, for the first time in nearly forty years, has a Republican governor.

Governor Hadley was inducted into office in a snowstorm. A week ago Governor Joseph W. Folk informally surrendered the mansion house to Mr. and Mrs. Hadley, but in order to have everything ceremonial today, the Folks and Hadleys returned to their old homes. At 11 o'clock Governor Folk left the mansion house, attended by the Third regiment of infantry from Kansas City, and a detachment of artillerymen from St. Louis, and made a ceremonial call upon Mr. Hadley, traveling in a carriage.

Mr. Hadley joined the retiring governor in the carriage, and the two made their way to the capitol, reaching there shortly before noon. The retiring and incoming state officials, excepting the lieutenant governor and the claimants, were assembled in the executive offices. When the party was completed by the arrival of Mr. Hadley and Governor Folk, all of them went to the house of representatives to be sworn in.


CROWD PACKS THE CORRIDORS.

The hall was packed to its full capacity, and there was tumult in the corridors, caused by hundreds fighting for admittance, which they were unable to gain. The members of the supreme court occupied the speaker's stand, Justice Henry Lamm acting as president. He is the only Republican member of the supreme court.

With little ado Mr. Hadley, walking by the side of the retiring governor, went to where Mr. Justice Lamm was standing, and, being told by the justice to do so, raised his hand and the administration of the oath began.

John C. McKinley, the retiring lieutenant governor, acting as president of the joint session of the legislature which was in session for the inaugural, caused some apprehension when, because of the noise in the corridor, he loudly ordered the sergeant-at-arms to "eject the disturbers from the state house."


ALL TAKE THE OATH.

The prospect of hostilities caused the chief justice to pause in the administration of his oath. Hie own hand, which had been raised aloft, dropped to his side. Mr. Hadley did not do this. His hand was up for keeps, and he kept it there until the justice could resume and conclude. A

As soon as Governor Hadley was in office and Governor Folk automatically out of office the other officers were lined up and sworn in en masse. These were James Cowgill, treasurer; John D. Gordon, auditor; Cornelius Roach, secretary of state; Elliot W. Majors, attorney general; John A. Knott, railroad and warehouse commissioner.

Cannons began booming after the inauguration announcing the fact to the world, whereupon Governor Hadley made his inaugural address. He said:

"In the performance of the duties of the office of governor, my sole ambition and desire will be to continue to deserve the confidence and approval of the people of Missouri.

"Forty years have come and gone since a candidate of the Republican party was inaugurated as governor of this state. It will be sufficient for the purposes of this occasion to learn from the last half century of Missouri's history a lesson of conservatism and official fairness in the conduct of public affairs. And the political differences need not interfere with the performance of official duties, has been emphasized during the course of the last four years. For during that time, the state officials, partly of one party, and partly of another, have worked together in complete harmony and effectiveness.

"And the people have thus learned that no political party is entirely bad, and that no political party can claim a monopoly of official honesty and virtue.

"It is also necessary that we should be ever mindful of the fact that the powers of government are divided between the legislative, the executive and the judicial departments. While the rights and authority of each are intimately related with the others, yet it is also necessary that each should exercise its own powers, without interference from the others.


THE QUESTION OF EDUCATION.

"There will be no questions considered by you which are more important than those connected with the work of education. It has been frequently charged that too much money is being expended for the conduct of the state university. I do not believe that there is any substantial basis of complaint on account of any disparity in the distribution of revenues of the state between the state university and the other parts of our educational system.

"But that something is wrong with our work of education is readily apparent by the examination of the statistics as to the illiteracy of our children of school age. According to the statistics of 1900, among the forty-eight states of the national Union, our rank in literacy was 31.

"It is worthy of notice that Missouri is one of four states in the Union that has no provision for superintendents of schools in each county of the state. And the fact that the other three states, namely Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi all have a lower rank of literacy than Missouri may tend to explain this unsatisfactory condition.

"While I claim no special knowledge or experience in matters of education, I do feel that the effectiveness of the common schools of the state must be raised if we are to make any substantial progress in the correction of the present unsatisfactory conditions.

"In no department of work has greater progress been made than in the study and investigation of agriculture, horticulture and the raising and care of live stock. The importance of this work in increasing the wealth and happiness of the people of the state cannot be overestimated. There should be no lack of funds to carry on this work in the most thorough manner possible.

"Under the scientific direction of the representatives of the state, and those whom it educates, should be conducted: The investigation of mineral deposits; the means of improving fertility and productivity of the soil; the growth and conservation of our forests; the use of our water power; the development of our water highways; the improvement of the conditions of life and the protection of the health and welfare of our people.


MISSOURI, THE PIONEER.

"The Missourian has bee the great pioneer. Missouri was the first state lying wholly west of the Mississippi to be admitted to the union. Maine entered the Union upon the shoulders of Missouri.

"For forty years Missouri stood as an outpost of civilization, reaching out into the unknown and undeveloped West. From her borders radiated those two great highways of Western exploration, travel, commerce and of conquest, on ending in the Northwest on the shores of the Pacific, and the other in the Southwest, in the land of the Mexican and the Spaniard. And along these great highways marched those hardy Missouri pioneers, hunters, trappers, traders and soldiers who were to bind our national domain, that great empire that lies between the Mississippi and the Pacific, by stronger ties than treaties and laws.

"The Missourian has been the pioneer of the West, leading the westward march of civilization across the American continent.

"The glory of Missouri is not alone in the glory that comes from things done in the past. She lives today in the active, throbbing, eager life of the civilization of the twentieth century. And in that great moral awakening which has swept across the country, creating an increased interest in the exercise of the duties of citizenship, raising the standard of honesty and efficiency in the public service and in the working out of those great problems which, as the product of our complex and commercialized civilization, confront us today, Missouri has also been something of a pioneer."

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January 8, 1909

TO ESCORT THE GOVERNORS.

Third Regiment to Play Important
Part in Inaugural Ceremonies.

"All plans for the visit of the Third regiment, M. N. G., in Jefferson City have been perfected," said Colonel Cusil Lechtman last night. "The regiment will depart at 12 o'clock Sunday night on the special train, arriving at Jefferson City Monday morning. The boys will go in full dress uniform and looking as spick and span as possible.

"The regiment will form and march to the residence of Governor Folk, escort him to the residence of Governor Hadley and then escort both to the capitol, where the regiment will pass in review before them. After inaugural ceremonies the boys will be at liberty, which will probably give them the afternoon in Jefferson city. The train will return home to Kansas City Tuesday night.

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December 13, 1908

JUDGE WALLACE LEAVES
CRIMINAL COURT BENCH.

PRIDES HIMSELF THAT HE HAS
CAUSED REFORMS.

Some Likelihood That Indictments
Returned by the Grand Jury
Will Be Dismissed by
Judge Latshaw.

Leaving the bench before Governor Joseph W. Folk had accepted his resignation, Judge William H. Wallace yesterday morning declared that his official connection with the criminal court was severed. Before adjourning court at noon Judge Wallace reviewed his work as criminal judge since his appointment to the bench.

"My resignation is in the hands of Governor Folk and I believe he will accept it in due time," Judge Wallace said. "I informed him that I would vacate at this time and I feel I should keep my promise."

In reviewing his work Judge Wallace recalled that he had kept up with docket and tried all cases promptly. He said that he had brought the parole system into its highest degree of efficiency. Besides his Sunday crusade, which he averred had been a success, Judge Wallace claimed that he had practically put a stop to the practice of carrying concealed weapons.

As soon as Judge Wallace left the bench, after telling the officers of the court goodby, he left the room, and a few minutes later Ralph S. Latshaw, the criminal judge-elect, entered. He at once opened court and informed the clerk and prosecuting attorney, I. B. Kimbrell, to set a number of cases for trial next week.

The arraignment of indicted persons was then begun and Judge Latshaw spent the afternoon hearing them.

Special Prosecutor A. O. Harrison, who had resigned before Judge Wallace vacated the bench, was summoned by Judge Latshaw, who told him that he understood that the indictments signed by the special prosecutor would be attacked. While the judge intimated that he would throw them out, he said he wanted to give Mr. Harrison an opportunity to present any argument why they should not be dismissed. Saturday was the time set for hearing the arguments of Mr. Harrison and Mr. Kimbrell.

A bill for $1,122.50 for services as special prosecutor was presented to Judge Wallace by Harrison and was O. K'd. The county court has signified its intentions not to pay the bill and Mr. Harrison will probably mandamus it.

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November 14, 1908

WANTS MONEY FOR HIS IDEA.

Dave Wilkins Proposes a Deal With
Convention Hall and Folk.

Dave Wilkins of Curryville, Mo., does not claim to be a "frenzied financier," nor yet the chairman of any national campaign fund, but he has aspirations which would do credit to either calling if his letter to Manager Louis W. Shouse of Convention hall is taken as a criterion of his financial ability. Mr. Wilkins's rather unique offer is contained in the following letter to Manager Shouse:

"Place your hall at disposal of Gov. Joe Folk of Missouri for Saturday, Nov. 14, 1908. Wire hem to come and deliver one of his most forceful lectures on "Good Government and the Evils of Corrupt Money Powers." Retain 20 per cent for the use of the hall; pay Mr. Folk 40 per cent for the lecture and have him to deliver to me, personally, 40 per cent as my part of the proceeds."

Mr. Wilkins does not state whether he speaks for Mr. Folk in thus offering a date for a lecture, or whether the recent defeat of the governor for the Democratic nomination for United States senator would have much influence in the choice of a subject, but seems to think that there must be some easy money somewhere and wants his share.

Mr. Wilkins further does not state whether or not h e is the manager of a lyceum bureau or simply a plain citizen who seeks to work for the good of his fellow man.

His offer has not been accepted.

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November 3, 1908

HIS CITIZENSHIP RESTORED.

Disabilities in Case of Dr. Goddard
Removed by Folk.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., Nov. 2. -- (Special.) Dr. J. D. Goddard of Kansas City, who recently completed a long term in the penitentiary, had his disabilities removed by an order from Governor Folk today. Dr. Goddard was sentenced for twenty years on conviction of murder in second degree. Governor Dockery cut this time to ten years. The doctor was released under this commutation last month. At the penitentiary his medical knowledge was utilized in the hospital, and it is said that he was really on duty night and day. He is now said to be at Pleasant Hill, Mo.

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September 17, 1908

THEY WANT FOLK FOR SENATOR.

Kansas City Friends of Governor
Organize in His Behalf.

The Folk-for-senator club was organized in the offices of Judge E. P. Gates, Scarritt building, yesterday and the following officers elected: President Judge E. P. Gates; vice presidents, E. L. Scarritt and J. B. Sampson; treasurer, Walton H. Holmes; secretary, Arthur F. Jacoby; chairman executive committe, F. P. Walsh.

The club offices, in the Scarritt building arcade, will be opened today and kept open until after the election. It is the intention of the organization to exert every influence to bring about the election of Governor Folk for senator, and to accomplish this will hold meetings in almost every city and villiage in the state.

During the meeting yesterday about forty were in attendance and marked enthusiasm was shown

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September 12, 1908

RUTHEY GOT SCRUBBIN' JOB.

Mayor Crittenden's Old Nurse Will
Keep General Hospital Clean.

"I nursed you an' bathed you when you was a baby, an' a mighty stubborn chile you was," said Ruthey Miller, a grey-haired negro mammie, to Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr.

"Well, if there ain't my old black mammie, Ruthey," exclaimed the mayor as he proffered a seat to the woman in his private office yesterday. "What can I do for you, Ruthey?"

"There's a $30 a month job out at the hospital for a scrubbin' woman. I wants that job, I do," replied the old woman.

"You can have it, for you are of that class of negroes of whom I said in my campaign speeches, if they wanted a friend I would walk across the state for them," declared the mayor.

"Ize obliged to you. Ize gwine to be out to that der hospital bright an' early in the mornin'" shouted Ruthey with glee, as she left the city hall.

"That old black mammie has been cook in the governor's mansion for my father, and Governors David R. Francis, John A. Marmaduke and Governor Joseph Folk," remarked the mayor, "and I do wish she wouldn't throw up to me the shortcomings of my boyhood days."

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September 2, 1908

HONEST ELECTION THE ISSUE.

Hadley Declares Folk's Police Must
Furnish Protection at Polls.

Herbert S. Hadley, Republican candidate for governor of Missouri, will insist on a fair, square election. He said yesterday afternoon that if the people of Missouri wanted him for the next governor it must be the people who elect him. He believes that the question of an honest election will be one of the issues of the campaign.

"It was very plainly indicated at the primaries that there had been some crooked work," said he. "Now, one of the great problems of this campaign is to see that every man gets his vote. I don't intend to be jobbed or robbed, so in order not to be we must have the assurance that Governor Folk's police boards and police departments will give us protection at the polls.

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August 29, 1908

STATE OFFERS REWARD FOR
EARL HAMILTON.

Deserter Is Believed to Have Mur-
dered George Pickle, Whose Body
Was Found in River.

Governor Joseph W. Folk yesterday offered a reward of $200 for the arrest and conviction of Ira Earl Hamilton, the deserter from the United States army, who is believed to have killed George W. Pickle in a swampy place near the mouth of the Blue river on June 20. The reward stands good for one year from the date.

On June 20, Pickle, who was only 17 years old, left his home at 1429 Summit street with Hamilton, 28 years old, ostensibly in a search of work. Five days later a body was found in the underbrush near the mouth of the Blue. Hamilton, who at that time was not suspected, was sent a few days later to see if he could identify the body. He reported that it was the body of a negro, 35 years old.

At the point where the body lay had been several feet of backwater during the flood. Trees and brush grew thick and neither the body nor the clothing could have floated away. Near there detectives found a piece of gas pipe about one foot long. It had been cut with a machine which crushed the ends together. The pipe was yesterday identified by a woman who lives at the home of Hamilton's aunt. She said she had often seen it among his tools. He is a constructural iron worker.

Hamilton was arrested shortly after the boy disappeared, but at that time Pickle's body had not been found. Hamilton was turned over to the military prison at Fort Leavenworth to serve time as a deserter. He succeeded in making his escape from there in less than a month. Prosecutor I. B. Kimbrell says he has a strong case against Hamilton.

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July 15, 1908

WILL HANDLE SILVER TROWEL.

Judge J. Patterson to Cement Cor-
nerstone of Poor Farm Buildings

Final arrangements for the laying of the cornerstone at the new county poor farm building will be made Friday afternoon,when the committee which has the matter in charge will hold a meeting. J. D. Jackson, superintendent the farm, is chairman.

It has already been decided to observe the day, July 29, with a picnic, which will be in the nature of a county holiday, for all the county offices will be closed. Noel Jackson will be master of ceremonies and J. M. Patterson, presiding judge of the county court, will handle the silver trowel which is to be presented to him. Choice of mementos to be placed in the stone will be made by the Rev. C. W. Moore. The following have been invited to speak at the cornerstone laying:

Senator William Warner, Attorney General H. S. Hadley, Governor Joseph Wingate Folk, Champ Clark, H. M. Beardsley, Judge John F. Phillips, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Judge H. L. McCune, the Rev C. W. Moore, the Rev. S. M. Neel, the Rev. George Reynolds, the Rev. William J. Dalton, Rabbi H. H. Mayer and Llewellyn Jones, mayor of Independence.

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July 7, 1908

IS REED TO MAKE THE
NOMINATING SPEECH?

THIS WORD COMES TO THE KAN-
SAS CITY MAN'S FRIENDS.

They Also Hope to See a Deadlock
in Convetion and Reed's Name
at the Head of the Ticket
As a Result.

Friends of former Mayor James A. Reed were told yesterday unofficially that Mr. Reed had been decided upon to place William J. Bryan in nomination for the presidency. The distinction , which would in a measure reflect upon Kansas City and Missouri, was enough to make the most ardent friends of the former mayor on good terms with themselves, but there were some of the most enthusiastic who looked so far as to see a deadlock and Reed's name put at the head of the ticket.

"That is how General Garfield got to be president," said one man, who was discussing the tip. "Garfield went to Chicago to place the name of John Sherman before the delegates. He did so in such a tremendous speech that when it came to balloting the convention showed it had been carried away by Garfield's presence and speech, for it nominated him. Reed can make a speech on Bryan and Democracy that can stampede that convention, if it is true that seventeen states are in caucus this afternoon trying to find somebody to stampede them.

Mr. Reed is one of the "big four" from Missouri. Governor Folk, another of the squad, is in Denver, but is not getting a word in edgeways, according to the news dispatches. But Folk is to be heard from. He has a speech of his own and it is a trick of his to have a claque organized to call for him at the psychological moment. His speech is a most temperate one. Folk is running in Missouri for the senate. To make a pro-Folk anti-Bryan speech in Denver would mean to invite certain assassination in the senatorial election in November. Folk wants to be president or senator, and his speech is cut to fit either job. It will disappoint the ultra Folkites at home.

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May 31, 1908

BUTLER WAS TUTOR
TO MICKEY O'HEARN.

STUDIED HORSESHOEING AND
POLITICS UNDER THE BOSS.

Came Here With Honors of Gradua-
tion Fresh Upon Him and Began
His Eventful Career.

Since it has been charged that, through the influence of Alderman Mickey O'Hearn, the police force in Kansas City has been governed "in a quiet way" ever since Governor Joseph W. Folk's "rigid investigation" nearly one year ago, it might be interesting who Mickey O'Hearn is.

When signed to a legal paper the alderman's name is Michael J. O'Hearn, but to "the boys" he has for years been known as plain "Mickey." Mickey was born in St. Louis, Mo., and lived there until about 25 years old. In St Louis he learned the horseshoeing trade three years ago the present alderman opened another place, at 1205 Walnut streets, where he is still. He then put trade under the private tutelage of that smooth politician, Edward Butler. From Butler it is said that Mickey probably got his first lessons in how to use a copper when you need him; also how to put the kibosh on a cop that you can't use.

It was about twenty years ago when O'Hearn first landed in Kansas City with the intention of making it his home. While he was a horseshoer by trade, and an expert at the business, it is said that he worked at his trade but a short time. Mickey soon found that in those days when the town was "wide open" there were too many soft things floating about for a man of his talents to waste his energies on labor.

When he left his trade Mickey worked at many places as bartender and that gave him an opportunity to "meet the boys." It was not long before he was identified with some of the biggest crap games in town. He is known to have dealt craps on Missouri avenue near Main, and later on Main street, between Ninth and Tenth streets. It beat hanging onto the hind leg of a Missouri mule all hollow.

STRUCK A NEAT BLOW.

Mickey O'Hearn was, and still is, a man to be feared when in his cups. The horseshoeing trade gave him solid bone and tough sinew, and he at one time had the reputation of striking the hardest blow with his fist of any man in Kansas City.

"Whenever he hit a guy it meant the hospital or the Morgue," said a close friend yesterday. "But Mickey always would take the part of the under dog. If he came along the street and saw a big guy cleanin' a little one, that fight had to stop or Mickey would take a hand and put the big one to sleep. I never knew him to start a fight on his own accord, except on election day, when lots of fellows are apt to get too fresh."

In the breast of Alderman Mickey O'Hearn is said to beat a kindly heart if touched in the right place. He is said to be charitable and ready with his money if he can relieve suffering. Being a man who has affiliated a great deal with the sporting fraternity, he, like the many others of that ilk, is superstitious. It is said of him that he will not pass an aged organ grinder, especially a woman, without giving a coin. Again it is said that when he "feels lucky" and intends to take a chance at cards, dice or the races, he will walk blocks to rub a hump-backed man or a bald-headed negro. "It gives me luck," they say.

Many years ago Mickey ran the Pike's Peak saloon at Twelfth street and Baltimore avenue. In the day s of the wine room agitation by the board of police commissioners the place was closed. After that he is said to have been interested in a road house at Thirtieth street and Southwest boulevard. That house was closed by many previous boards and by the present one as a disorderly place. O'Hearn then tended bar for Robert Murdock at 1128 Walnut street, and was there several years. When Murdock died, O'Hearn ran the place in his own name, but was said to have belonged to the estate. The board of police commissioners refused to give Mickey another license, giving as the reason that it as not going to allow another saloon at that place. When he was out, however, the place was opened by George Schuri, who is there now.

HIS SALOON HISTORY.

The saloon business suited Mickey's fancy, so his next venture was a saloon on the southwest corner of Twelfth and McGee streets, in partnership with Jack O'Flaherty, a brother-in-law, by the way, of the present chief of police, Daniel Ahern.

When Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was inducted into office, Mickey succeeded in landing the job of superintendent of the workhouse for his brother, Paddy, and the job of matron for Mrs. Paddy O'Hearn. He is also said to have placed some of his most valuable lieutenants with Paddy as guards at the works.

While the reputation of Alderman Mickey O'Hearn would not have admitted him to membership at the recent Presbyterian general assembly, it an be said in his favor that he has never been arrested in Kansas City or charged with a serious offense. He has always been a "friend" to the police, especially those who handle the police.

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May 29, 1908

RECORDS PROVE
MEN WERE MOVED.

AFTER BEING THREATENED BY
MEN WITH A "PULL."

ONE ARRESTED
WRONG WOMAN.

SHE HAD BEEN FINED 106 TIMES,
BUT WAS EXEMPT.

"Ain't You Next?" Said O'Hearn's
Friend; "You're to Let Her
Alone." -- More of the Pow-
er of Mickey O'Hearn.

After the order of the board of police commissioners Wednesday a reporter for The Journal had no trouble in seeing the books at No. 4 police station yesterday. And a view of these books proved the charges that every man since the first of the year, who has been active in arresting women "night hawks" has been taken out of plain clothes and removed from the district. One man was left in the district but he was taken from that special duty and put back into uniform.

The records showed that officers had been taken from that duty even before January 1 -- in fact, any man who has been too active since the reorganized police department took charge of affairs after Governor Joseph W. Folk's "rigid investigation" has been shifted. This is not only true of No. 4 district by even in No. 1 district, headquarters. This does not pertain alone to the arresting of dissolute women but to interference with certain saloons which were selling liquor on Sunday. That charge is made in regard to No. 1 district more than any other. Of course, some saloons have been caught; but they are not the influential ones; those run by "our political friends."

While the records at No. 4 station practically prove all the assertions made in regard to that district it is said that no blame can be laid at the door of Captain Thomas P. Flahive. It is not he who has had the men taken out of citizens clothes and transferred Those who know say he has been handicapped by having only a few men to do the work in his district and by an unseen power which has been able to have men removed when they did their full duty.

ARRESTED MANY WOMEN.

The records show that Daniel Doran, who worked there for years, arrested thirty-five women just before January 1. He was threatened by well dressed vagrants and told that he would be moved. And by the grace of the unseen power he was moved January 1, last, going in uniform to No. 9 -- the "sage brush" district.

The commanding officers and sergeants under whom Edward Prewett worked in No. 4 precinct speak well of him. He was there nearly eight years, and it was never said that Prewett did not do his full duty. In fat, it has been said that "Prewett would bring in his grandmother if ordered to do so."

In December, Prewett was detailed alone to bring in women of the streets. In eighteen days he brought in thirty-five of them. But from all sides, even from the women and especially the dude vagrants, he heard, "You won't last beyond January 1." One night Prewett arrested a woman named Kate Kingston. Last year this woman was fined $500 by Police Judge Harry G. Kyle, and at that time the records showed that she had been fined 106 times in police court.

"YOU AIN'T NEXT, ARE YOU?"

As he started away with the woman, "Ted" Noland appeared on the scene. "Turn that woman loose," he said; "you ain't next are you? She's to be let alone." Prewett was not "next," for he was also arrested Noland, and that was his undoing. Noland threatened the officer and told him he would personally see to it that he was moved. And Prewett was moved January 1, going in uniform to No. 6. Noland was fined $50 in police court the day following his arrest.

Noland is well known to the police, and in January, 1907, was fined $500 on a charge of vagrancy. That same Kate Kingston, over whom he threatened the officer, testified then that he and a man named Deerwester had beaten her at Thirteenth and Main streets. Deerwester got a similar fine. Their cases were appealed and the men were soon out out on bond.

Noland is a friend of Alderman "Mickey" O'Hearn, and, until recently, could be seen almost any day about his saloon at 1205 Walnut street; also about the saloon of Dan Leary at Fourteenth and Walnut streets. The records show that Leary has gone the bonds of scores of street women. At one time Judge Kyle objected to the n umber of personal bonds that Leary was signing and required that they be made in cash.

JUST SEE MICKEY.

The influence of Alderman "Mickey" O'Hearn may be better understood when it is known how he is reverenced by many members of the police department. When the Folk "investigation" was begun in May last year the commissions of probably half the department were held up. This conversation was overheard one day between two of the officers out of commissions.

"I'll tell you these are ticklish times," one said. "I have all my friends to work and am assured that I am all right."

"I'm up a tree," the other replied. "I don't know what to do. I have always tried to do my duty and can't imagine why I am held up."

"Why don't you see 'Mickey'?" his friend said with astonishment. "I thought you were wise. You know 'Mickey,' don't you You do; then go and see him and the whole things squared. That's what I did."

From that day to this the word has gone out through the whole department, "See 'Mickey' if you are in bad. He'll fix it."

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April 8, 1908

CRITTENDEN WINS BY
LARGE MAJORITY.

MOST REMARKABLE DEMONSTRA-
TION EVER WITNESSED IN KAN-
SAS CITY TAKES PLACE WHEN
RESULT IS LEARNED.

KYLE RE-ELECTED
POLICE JUDGE.

BAEHR IS ALSO ELECTED
CITY TREASURER --
THE REST IS DEMOCRATIC
-- CRITTENDEN'S MAJORITY
1,320.

THE WINNING TICKET (Majorities).

Mayor -- Crittenden, D ..........................1,320
Police Judge -- Kyle, R ...........................2,213
Treasurer -- Baehr, R ............................1,220
Auditor -- Greene, D ..............................2,478
Attorney -- Langsdale, D .......................1,708
Upper House President, Gregory, D .....1,344

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Democrat, was elected mayor of Kansas City yesterday over Mayor Henry M. Beardsley, Republican, by 1,320 majority, with one precinct of the Twelfth ward missing. Harry G. Kyle, Republican, was re-elected police judge over Michael E. Casey, Democrat, and William J. Baehr, Republican, was elected city treasurer over Thomas S. Ridge, Democrat. Kyle's majority was 2,213.

The upper house Democratic ticket, with Robert L. Gregory president, elected three of its candidates, making that branch of the council still Republican. The lower house is overwhelmingly Democratic.

It was a big Democratic victory, and for the first time in four years the Democrats will be back in the city hall for a term of two years one week from next Monday.

While in the city ten days ago Attorney General Hadley warned his Republican friends that the issues advanced were false, and he quietly passed the word that if they were persisted in it could mean nothing but defeat. The result proves that Hadley was right.

Overcast clouds and intermittent showers ushered in the day. Despite the unfavorable aspect of the weather, voters were up and astir long before the break of day, and at 6 o'clock, when the polls opened, the voting places of the 164 precincts in the fourteen wards were besieged by long and patient lines of men awaiting the time and opportunity to cast their ballots.

The voting was rapid, the record in some precincts being one to the minute. Merchant, banker, professional man vied with the laborer to get to the ballot boxes.

SOME ARRESTS MADE.

In a majority of the precincts over half the total registration had been voted by noon, and from that time to the close of the polls at 7 o'clock the voting was by jerks and starts. It was stated in some of the precincts as early as 6 o'clock that all the votes that could be depended upon to be cast had been delivered, and this seemed true, for the judges, clerks and workers sat around idle.

Assertions of fraud were made during the early hours, and some arrests resulted It was charged that men had tendered money for votes, and that voters had accepted money. The early arrests of these offenders put a stop to any more such work so far as was observable, although at several times during the day Alderman Pendergast openly charged that Republicans were paying $3 a piece for negro votes in the First ward. Watchers sent into the ward by the Civic League said they had seen no vote-buying.

BUSINESS MEN REVOLT.

Up to noon the Republican headquarters felt sure of victory and the Democrats felt uneasy The first alarm was felt at 1111 Grand when the Republican precinct workers telephoned in that the noon hour vote of business men was against the Republican ticket. The excuse offered was that retail merchants were in a revolt against an evening newspaper.

The Democrats had not counted on this vote at all. As soon as they saw they were getting it they sent their runners into the stores after the clerks. With oodles of money to pay for carriages and automobiles to hurry them to their home wards, the Democrats found the store proprietors willing to let the men off to vote. It was a fully fledged rebellion in the Republican party.

As early as 4 o'clock it was announced at Democratic headquarters that the Democratic ticket was in the ascendancy. News came that Walter Dickey, Republican state chairman, had joined Mayor Beardsley in the Ninth ward, and with it came the news that negroes were beginning to vote the Republican ticket there. Dickey was understood to have wagered, for friends, about $18,000. One negro said he had been offered $8 for his vote. High as this was, $8 apiece for votes to save heavy bets would not be out of the way. There was Democratic money seen in the ward immediately. Twenty-four negroes voted the Democratic ticket straight at Fifteenth and Tracy. This looked like commercialism, but the retort was that the Republicans were at the same game. Governor Folk was hurried to the ward to see Democratic tickets voted by negroes. He expressed surprise.

There were only three fights reported at either headquarters, and both headquarters said they had heard of very little challenging. This presaged clear tally sheets, an early count and all judges signing.

ENTER CRITTENDEN, EXIT BEARDSLEY.

At 7 o'clock the mayor arrived at 1111 Grand, thinking he had squeezed through, but by 8 o'clock he admitted to a Journal man that "it looks blue." An hour later he conceded his defeat. This was while he sat in headquarters with a crowd taxing the capacity of the big hall.

Crittenden was sent for. He was not able to get to the Democratic headquarters until about 10 o'clock, just as Mayor Beardsley was leaving his own headquarters, a defeated man.

CROWDS FILL THE CITY.

The rival city chairmen, the rival candidates for mayor, the commissioners and governor Folk all admitted that there had been a reasonably fair election, marked by the absence of repeating and ruffianism. The most sensational spectacle at night was of Republicans going in squads to the Democratic headquarters to share in the demonstrations of victory. Full importance was given at the Republican headquarters to the weight the defeat will have on the Republican chances this fall, unless there is a new alignment and new issues found... while the Democrats claimed to see ahead far enough to make James A. Reed United States senator. Reed arrived at his headquarters about 10 o'clock. He was called on for a speech and made one from his automobile. He congratulated the entire party upon its success as an organization as a whole, but credited the enormous majority, by comparison, to the opposition of an evening newspaper. When afterwards Mr. Reed went past Eleventh and Grand on his triumphal tour, his car was halted and once more he was compelled to make a speech. He repeated what he had said at Democratic headquarters. From there he went to The Journal office, arriving just as two Democratic bands and processions met, one from Democratic headquarters, traveling from the west, and another form the Sixth ward, headed by the Italian band, coming from the east. The meeting was unexpected and most dramatic. From The Journal the crowd went back to Democratic headquarters and at midnight it was roving about the city.

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April 1, 1908

FOLK ACTED TOO SOON.

Unless He Grants Biles Another Re-
spite He'll Be Hanged Friday.

JEFFERSON CITY, March 31 (Special.). -- The supreme court today denied a rehearing of the murder case of A. C. Biles, alias Frank Daly, of Kansas City, under sentence to be hanged in St. Louis on June 3, to which date Governor Folk yesterday respited the condemned man. Biles was convicted of the murder of Thomas Harvey for the purpose of robbery.

Governor Folk, having on yesterday granted respite to Biles, and the supreme court having today denied a motion of Biles's counsel for a rehearing of the case, it developes that Governor Folk acted without jurisdiction yesterday in granting respite before the decision of the supreme court, and unless the governor again grants a stay of execution Biles must be hanged on April 3, the date fixed by the supreme court.

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August 20, 1907

AGGIE MYERS TIRES OF PRISON.

She May Try to Interest Her Friends
in Getting a Pardon From Folk.

Aggie Myers is taking the first step toward getting out of the Missouri penitentiary, where she is under life sentence. She has written friends in Kansas City to the effect that the hard work to which she is asigned in the close confinement of the prison are undermining her health. She is employed at one of the big sewing machine factories in the overall factory.

The fact that Folk commuted the sentences of Edgar Bailey, "Lord" Barrington and other murderers, including Aggie Myers and Frank Hottman, probably gives the Myers woman hope of extreme executive clemency from the governor before he goes out of office.

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August 3, 1907

KNEW IT WAS COMING

CAPTAIN WEBER MERELY WAIT-
ING ORDER OF DISMISSAL.

When Hayes Was Dropped He Pre-
pared for the Ax -- Other Captains
and Lieutenants Commissioned.
Hammil Is Transferred.
Captain William E. Weber
CAPTAIN W. E. WEBER

Continuing Governor Folk's policy of removing "political enemies" from the police department, Captain Weber was yesterday dropped from the force by Commissioners Gallagher and Jones, Mayor Beardsley voted to recommission the captain. All other captains were recommissioned.

Whitwash spread over the actions of Patrolman Athur who, it was charged, attempted to draw a revolver on former Commissioner Rozzelle at Wednesday's board meeting.

Lieutenant Hammil, who refused to return Patrolman Arthur's club and gun after the overt act until ordered to do so by Acting Chief Ahern, was transferred from headquarters to the Walnut street station. Lieutenant Hammil also took an important part in impeaching Arthur's testimony before the board regarding Arthur's vitriolic attack on Chief Hayes and former Commissioner Rozzelle in police headquarters.

Lieutenant Walter Whitsett, who has been mentioned as a possibility for chief, and who it is said is friendly to the Kemper forces, is given Hammil's place at headquarters. Many believe this is the first step toward making Whitsett chief.

The transfers of Lieutenants Hammil and Whitsett were upon the resolution of Commissioner Gallagher "for the good of the service."

Commissioner Jones, in his first resolution, moved to reappoint James Vincil to serve three more years as secretary to the police board.

Captain William E. Weber has been on the police force since he was appointed jailer November 4, 1889. He was appointed a probationary patrolman the following day and May 30, 1890, was made a patrolman. He walked a beat for five years and won his promotion to sergeant by an act of bravery.

In a fight in Grand avenue, a liquor crazed salesman rushed at an intended victim with a butcher knife. Captain Weber coolly shot the butcher knife from the hand of the would-be slayer. His promotion to sergeant came on September 4, 1895. He was made a lieutenant of police October 1, of the same year, and was recommissioned after serving three years.

To take advantage of the raise in salary, Lieutenant Weber resigned and under the Cleary law, August 15, 1900, was at once appointed to his former rank with the increased pay allowed a law just passed. August 29, 1901, Lieutenant Weber was commissioned captain.

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August 2, 1907

NEW CHIEF IS LAX.

Ahern Returned Arthur's Revolver
Without Making an Investigation.

After the disgraceful proceedings at the meeting of the police board Wednesday, when Chief John Hayes was removed so unceremoniously and Patrolman Harry Arthur had made what many thought was an attempt to shoot former Commissioner Rozzelle, the patrolman remained about headquarters until late in the evening. He was grumbling in an undertone and at intervals, demanding his revolver and club, which had been taken away from him by Chief Hayes and turned over to the board. Mayor Beardsley, in fact, ordered the chief to remove Arthur's revolver after Commissioner Gallagher had requested that "the new chief" be sent for to preserve order, even though several policemen were in the room and a human live seemed in danger.

Arthur demanded his revolver several times of Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, in charge of the desk, but that official would not give it to him. Finally the policeman left the room and returned with Lieutenant Charles Ryan, recently elevated by Mr. Gallagher on request from Governor Folk, and now acting inspector of detectives.

"Give this man his gun," Ryan commanded of Hammil. "The board took no action on the matter, and you have no right to hold it."

"The revolver was sent down to this desk from the board room," said Hammil. "I know nothing of what took place up there. It will not be returned, however, until I get some order from the board or some responsible authority.

Lieutenant Hammil then called up Elliot M. Jones, the new Folk commissioner, who had voted to oust Chief Hayes without hearing one word of testimony.

"Better give it back to him, I guess," the commissioner said. "It is not being held by order of the board."

The revolver was held until after roll call yesterday morning, when it was returned to Arthur. He was told to remain at the station, however, as Acting Chief Ahern wanted to see him. When Ahern was seen he said:

"I heard rumors of what had taken place up in the board room yesterday, and I wanted to get a report from Arthur about it. I held him there thinking that if the board wanted to suspend him him for what he did some action would surely be taken and I would be notified what course to pursue. As no one called me up about the case, however, I let Arthur go after he had made a statement to me regarding his actions in the board room. He said he had no intention of shooting anybody, that his club simply fell on the floor and he had stooped to pick it up."

Acting Chief Ahern said he had examined no other witnesses about Arthur's action in the board room. "I am going to investigate that," he said, finally. "I will look into the matter further and have a talk with the commissioners to get their opinions."

The members of the board were not in the position to see as much of the patrolman's actions as the men who stood nearest to him -- behind him, in fact. Chief Hayes was watching him closely, as Arthur is known to have a violent tempter, so when he saw the club fall to the floor and the man's hand go back under his coat he took the initiative, ran to the man and pinioned his arms to his side and held him, with the assistance of others.

It is not known that Mayor Beardsley had anything to do with the returning of Arthur to work yesterday morning. He said later in the day that Arthur would have to answer to the board for his actions before that body. He also said that at the meeting today he would produce several witnesses who will swear that Arthur tried to draw his revolver at the time he was seized by Chief Hayes.

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August 1, 1907

POLICE FORCE
IS DISRUPTED


Folk's Machine-Building
Results in Most Disorderly
Meeting of Board


LIE IS BANDIED ABOUT


Patrolman Arthur, Chief Folk
Witness, Attempts to Draw
"Gun" on Mr. Rozzelle

HAYES IS REMOVED AS CHIEF

Testifies That Men Were Shifted
on Their Beats on Order of
Commissioner Gallagher
NEW CHARGE OF GRAFT MADE.

Hayes Declares That Gallagher's Son
Got Business on Strength of His
Father's Position -- A Lie
Says Gallagher.


Governor Folk's attempt to turn the police department into a political machine came very near to resulting in bloodshed yesterday afternoon. Prompt action on the part of ex-Chief Hayes in hustling Patrolman Arthur out of the board room probably averted a tragedy. The lie had passed between ex-Commissioner Rozzelle and Arthur, when the latter suddenly dropped his club and reached for his "gun."

The board room was filled with men, many Shannon "rabbits" being in the throng.

Chief Hayes, who did not know he had been deposed, grabbed Arthur.

"Leave that man alone!" shouted Commissioner Gallagher. "You are no longer a police officer."

But Hayes, mindful of his duty, hustled Arthur out of the room.

It was a day fraught with numerous incidents, all tending to show that Folk and Shannon are building an air-tight police machine out of a police department thoroughly demoralized by a "reform" governor.

In the first place Folk's new commissioner voted to supplant Hayes with Daniel Ahern without hearing any evidence. To a Journal reporter last night he admitted that Commissioner Gallagher had shown him the resolution deposing Hayes in the hallway a few moments before the board went into session. Mayor Beardsley voted against the resolution.

His Testimony Disproved.

It was shown that Patrolman Arthur, Mr. Gallagher's chief witness, misstated fact after fact on the witness stand, witnesses and official records disproving the assertions on which Gallagher and Folk hoped to prove Hayes unfit for chief.

Chief Hayes testified that the men on the force were juggled by Gallagher for political reasons. Officers who were alert in closing saloons on Sunday were moved to other beats, on Gallagher's order, the chief said. He gave a list of the men Gallagher had ordered changed to other beats. Gallagher did not deny the chief's statements.

In the lobby of Central police station Patrolman Arthur became so abusive of Rozzelle and Hayes -- who were in an upstairs room -- that Lieutenant Hammil had to order him from the room.

Chief Hayes made the charge that graft existed in the police department to the extent that a son of Commissioner Gallagher had written insurance for the keepers of North end saloons and resorts on the strength of being in position to call the police down on them if they refused to give him business.
Said the Chief Lied.

Gallagher denied the assertion and said Hayes lied. Former Detective Bert Brannon leaped into the room and called Gallagher a ----- ----- liar and said he could prove that young Gallagher had done all Hayes charged against him. Brannon was hustled out of the room. No subpoena was issued for him to delve deeper into the charges.

A more disorderly meeting of a Kansas City police board probably was never held. The one man responsible for yesterday's disgraceful scenes is Joseph W. Folk, the reformer. He has spread the seeds of disruption among the Kansas City police in his efforts to further his candidacy for the senate until today the force is one of the most thoroughly disorganized in the country.

POLICE OFFICERS NEARLY
FIGHT IN THE STATION.


The first row at the police board meeting yesterday was precipitated when Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, in command at police headquarters under Captain Weber, ordered Patrolman Arthur out of the station. Arthur, according to several witnesses whose testimony was afterward used, became abusive and said uncomplimentary things of former Commissioner Rozzelle and Chief Hayes. He called Rozzelle and unprintable name, and Hammil, according to his own statement before the board, ordered him to "shut up."

Lieutenant Hammil was called before the board by Mr. Kimbrell and he detailed the row with Arthur at length. "Arthur said Chief Hayes had dogged him around and was responsible for his reduction in rank and that he will holler on some one if hey don't stay off him."

Arthur, according to his custom, interrupted Lieutenant Hammil. He charged that Hammil did most of the talking and taunted him with the mark that Hammil had said: "There's liable to be a hell of a lot of changes around here today."

Officers Contradict Each Other.

"Hammil told me three months ago," continued Arthur, "that someone has been jobbing me. He said he could very easily use me down town and that he was sorry he had to send me to the suburbs. He said he needed men at the theaters and that over in Broadway thieves were kicking in front doors and $1,000 robberies were of nightly occurrence, but that the chief had given strict orders that I be kept on duty at the theater or sent to an unimportant beat.

"Hammil said, 'Arthur, there is no use of your putting your head into the halter. This fellow Rozzelle has lots of friends and they are going to get you.' "

This statement was made under oath, as were all of the other statements made by Arthur during the day. Lieutenant Hammil was also under oath. He denied positively ever having talked over such matters with Arthur and said he had not spoken to Arthur in three months except in the line of duty. Arthur declared that chief Hayes leaves the station at 3 or 4 o'clock and that Hammil then directs him and assigns his duty. Chief Hayes made Arthur take back his word as soon as uttered and Arthur supplemented his statement by saying that sometimes the chief remains on duty until 5:30 o'clock in the evening.

A. C. Durham, an attorney, who at one time represented Arthur when the latter was preparing charges against Chief Hayes, testified that Arthur told him if they didn't show reason for his reduction in the department he would expose the misconduct in office of Chief Hayes. Durham said he was later dismissed and the charges dropped. He did not know why.

Arthur's Story Discredited.
By this time Lieutenant Hammil had found two witnesses to his row with Arthur and they were sworn. They were Sergeant Eubank and Patrolman Lukehart. Neither heard Hammil say "there might be a hell of a lot of changes in the department," as Arthur had charged, but each testified that he heard Arthur abuse Rozzelle and Hayes and heard annd saw Hammil eject him and order him to "keep his mouth shut."

Arthur boldly stated to the board that Lukehart was testifying to a lie. He stated that Lukehart is sore at him over a judgment for $40, which the court ordered Lukehart to pay him. Secretary Vincil quieted Arthur by stating that the money had long since been paid to him by Lukehart but that Arthur had refused to accept it.

ARTHUR TRIED TO DRAW
"GUN" ON MR. ROZZELLE.

It looked as though a tragedy were about to be enacted in the police board room near the close of the hearing yesterday. Harry A. Arthur had testified against Chief Hayes, but his evidence was discredited by other witnesses and the records. Arthur precipitated a row that threw the meeting into uproar.

Commissioner Rozzelle was on the witness stand at the time. Arthur was disarmed by Chief John Hayes and taken from the board room by patrolmen. It was the second time the services of patrolmen were needed to clear the room during yesterday's session of the police board's investigation of the department.

County Prosecutor Kimbrell, acting as attorney for Chief Hayes, had drawn his net of impeachment tightly about Arthur as the investigation proceeded and lacked by the testimony of one witness to discredit the patrolman's denial that he had ever threatened his chief. This witness was Frank F. Rozelle, the police commissioner removed by Governor Folk by wire on the eve of the recommissioning of John Hayes as chief of police.

In combating the charges brought by Arthur against Hayes, Mr. Kimbrell, in cross examination, secured Arthur's statement that he had never in his life mentioned the name of Chief Hayes to Commissioner Rozzelle and that he had never called the commissioner "crooked." Contrary to the expectations of Patrolman Arthur and Mr. Gallagher, the former commissioner promptly took the witness stand when called by Mr. Kimbrell. Mayor Beardsley explained that Mr. Rozzelle need not give his testimony until the notes of the day's investigation had been transcribed that he might know just what had been said about him by witnesses.

"But I am willing to answer any questions," said Mr. Rozzelle, and Kimbrell's examination proceeded. Harry Arthur was an attentive auditor while the former commissioner was on the stand. He had previously broken into the testimony of other witnesses and his actions throughout the afternoon had been countenanced by Chairman Beardsley who knew the other two commissioners were eager to hear all Arthur had to say.

"Mr. Arthur has testified that he never discussed Chief Hayes with you repeatedly here today," Mr. Kimbrell said to Mr. Rozzelle. "Will you tell the board of any conversation you may have had with Arthur about the chief?"

"Arthur came to me to see about getting a promotion to his former rank," replied Mr. Rozzelle. "He told me if I did not vote for his promotion he would go to Commissioner Gallagher with charges against Chief Hayes. He said the chief had been responsible for his reduction in rank, and that he would get even through Mr. Gallagher unless I voted for his reinstatement."

"I never made such a statement in my life," cried Arthur. "You told me you had heard it, and that you did not believe a word of it."

"Be careful," admonished Mr. Rozzelle, never rising from his seat. "That statement is a falsehood."

Immediately the room was in an uproar. Harry Arthur reached for his club and arose. He was nervous. His eyes protruded and his hands shook. He dropped the club to the floor. Then he reached for his pistol pocket.

Chief of Police Hayes was the first man to realize his duty. He was sitting by his attorney at the other end of the long table. His eye had been quicker than the hand of the angry patrolman. In an instant he had pinioned the arms of the belligerent patrolman and was searching for the pistol. A dozen men started to assist him.

Police Commissioner Gallagher arose and demanded that Chief Hayes release Arthur. His command could be heard throughout the board room.

"That man is not an officer. Take him off!" yelled Gallagher. "Let Arthur alone. You are only a citizen. We have a new chief of police downstairs. Call him to keep order -- if such a course is necessary."

Chief Hayes had disarmed Arthur, who fought his captors and shouted to Commissioner Gallagher: "Well, what do you think of that. I'm not trying to shoot anybody, Mr. Gallagher."

Didn't Know He Was Deposed.

The chief's work was done and he allowed patrolmen, who appeared to be in good standing with the board, t remove Arthur from the room. Then he turned inquiringly toward the commissioners. He had heard for the first time that he had been succeeded in office. The very first action of the board had been to appoint his successor, but the matter was done in an undertone and the chief had not been informed. Even his attorney, Mr. Kimbrell, was dumbfounded. He asked the meaning of Gallagher's statement.

Chairman Beardsley called Chief Hayes to the table, and, for the first time, the head of the Kansas City police department was told that he is no longer a police officer.

"I will have to ask for your emblem of authority," said Mr. Beardsley.

Chief Hayes unpinned the gold badge from his left breast and handed it to the mayor.

"Your successor was named by resolution introduced by Mr. Gallagher, Commissioner Jones concurring," said the mayor. "I guess it is customary to ask for the badge. I really don't know."

Since Chief Hayes has been without a commission since May 4 no action of the board was necessary to remove him from office. When the board met yesterday afternoon Chief Hayes did not last five minutes. But a half a dozen sentences were spoken. Elliot H. Jones, the new commissioner, entered the room and Chairman Beardsley pointed out his seat to him.

"I have two resolutions to introduce," said Commissioner Gallagher. The room was still noisy. Persons who were to appear as witnesses before the board were entering the room and searching for seats. The first resolution, naming Inspector Daniel Ahearn as temporary chief of police and Lieutenant Charles Ryan as inspector of detectives, was passed by him to Mr. Beardsley. The mayor read the resolution and passed to silently to Commissioner Jones, who gave it to the secretary of the board without any notice whatever.

"Do you think he is the proper man for the place?" asked the mayor of Mr. Gallagher.

"He is the ranking officer," volunteered Commissioner Jones, who had not looked at the resolution but apparently was familiar with its contents.

"I move its adoption," said Mr. Gallagher.

"I vote aye," echoed Commissioner Jones.

Mayor Beardsley was silent. He appeared in a deep study. When he was sufficiently recovered to speak, he said: "I am going to vote against the resolution. I will make a minute of my vote and hand it to the secretary. I want it to get in the record."

None of this transaction could be heard a dozen feet from the members of the board and Chief Hayes and his attorney, Mr. Kimbrell, whose seats were at one end of the table, remained ignorant of the resolution until after the meeting and the fight which called for the chief's star.

As Commissioner Gallagher protested against the action of Chief Hayes in disarming Patrolman Arthur, Mayor Beardsley jumped to his feet. "The police board is in control of the room," he said. "Chief Hayes, disarm that man." The mayor did not see the necessity of sending down stairs for the new chief of police to disarm a man who was apparently in the act of attempting to do violence to the witness.

The lie had been passed earlier in the session between Commissioner Gallagher and Chief Hayes and patrolmen had been called to clear the room. Gallagher had taunted Chief Hayes by producing in evidence a letter from Chief Hayes to Sergeant Caskey about changing the beat of a patrolman. The chief had stated on the stand that if he had written the letter he did not recall the language. Gallagher insinuated that the chief was lying several times and finally, referring to various passages in the Arthur testimony, said: "You see how easy it is to impeach the testimony of a witness. I had made you out a liar already. Be careful of the statements you make before this board hereafter."
"If I wrote the letter I did it to shield you," rejoined Hayes, "for you had caused the patrolman to be sent back to his former beat after I removed him because he had been gambling."
Chief Hayes was angry as he stepped forward to the table and faced the board. "I'm tired of exposing the things forced upon my by Mr. Gallagher and then having my word doubted when I probably wrote a letter saying the changing of Patrolman Thomas Park's beat was a mistake merely to shield the commissioner.
New Charges of Graft.
"I wish now to make a further statement. It is an apology to Mayor Beardsley for a statement I recently made. I know the mayor nor Mr. Rozzelle ever thought I was referring to either of them, but I wish now to tell the whole truth of my statement.
"I stated early in this investigation that if there is any graft in the department it is higher up than me. That statement was directed at Commissioner Gallagher. I am in a position to prove that he is guilty, too. Mr. Gallagher's son is using his father's name and office to secure business for his father's firm. He goes about amongst the disorderly houses, saloons and resorts in the North end soliciting fire insurance policies. He tells proprietors that his father is a police commissioner and that they must "come through" with their insurance business or trouble will result in their licenses."
"Any man who makes that statement is a liar," shouted Commissioner Gallagher.
"I have the proofs here," suggested Chief Hayes.
"You are a liar ---" began Gallagher.
At this point in the heated proceedings Bert Brannon, a former detective, burst through the crowd and came inside the railing. Shaking his fist at Commissioner Gallagher, he shouted angrily: "I made that statement to Chief Hayes of the graft you and your sons have built up out of your office. I know it's true. The man who denies it is a --- damned liar."
Mayor Beardsley, always the peacemaker and protector of lives and the pursuit of liberties in the board room, sprung to his feet and summoned patrolmen to remove Brannon.
As Brannon made his charge a man near the entrance chimed in: "I am a saloon man and Gallagher's son held me up for insurance the same way." He said he did not know Brannon and asked a neighbor his identity.

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