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August 22, 1909

BAND CONCERTS FOR THIS WEEK.


Sunday, 2:30 p. m., Swope park.
Monday, 8 p. m., Concourse, St. John and Gladstone.
Tuesday, 8 p. m., West Terrace park, Thirteenth and Summit.
Wednesday, 8 p. m., Budd park.
Thursday, 8 p. m., Penn Valley park, Twenty-seventh and Jefferson.
Friday, 8 p. m., Troost park, Thirtieth and Paseo.
Saturday, 8 p. m., the Parade, Fifteenth and the Paseo.

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April 19, 1909

WILL SHOW THE GIRLS HOW.

Kansas City Boy to Wear Latest in
Gowns and Millinery.

BOSTON, MASS., April 18. -- Frederick Henry Dierks of Kansas City, a special student at the Institute of Technology, will show the girls at fashionable Smith college tomorrow night just how a girl should wear the latest in gowns and millinery. Dierks, adorned with all the customary frills and furbelows, will make his bow to the college girls as a chorus girl. Only the students at Smith will be granted admittance.

The event is brought out by the production of Technology's annual show. The play this year is called "That Pill Grimm." It will be tried out on the Smith girls tomorrow, largely for the purpose of securing expert feminine criticism of the female impersonations. Dierks is a front row girl.




It seems the young collegian gained his first recognition in a limited circle as an interpreter of feminine foibles while spending a vacation not long ago at the home of his father, Herman Dierks, the lumberman, who lives at 412 Gladstone boulevard.

"Yes, Fred is attending Boston Tech," said Mrs. Herman Dierks.

"That's too funny for anything," said Mrs. Dierks between peals of laughter. "He's been writing me about it and he's going to take the part of a chorus girl, all right."

"Did he ever do anything in amateur theatricals while in Kansas City?" she was asked.

"No, he made his reputation at home. While here on one of his vacations a young lady friend of ours was visiting us from New Rochelle, N. Y., and she fixed him up attired as a woman. He is a regular clown, anyway, when he gets started, and it was perfectly killing to see him."

Prior to entering the Boston Institute of Technology Mr. Dierks attended Blees Military academy in Macon, Mo., where he attained the rank of cadet second lieutenant, one of the coveted honors of the school. He is now a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. Although only 19 years old he has already become proficient in other lines than the amateur stage.

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November 20, 1908

TO MOVE WALLACE'S HOUSE.

Family Will Travel Half a Mile in
Their Brick Home.

For the next thirty days Judge William H. Wallace and his family will be distinctly on the move. They still will occupy their two and one-half story dwelling, but the building is to be moved from 3200 Gladstone boulevard to the southeast corner of Norledge and Indiana avenues, a half block away. However, a number of turns must be made before the final point is reached and the distance traversed will be much more than half a block.

Grant Renne has taken the contract to move the house, furniture, folks and all for $1,000 with the understanding that not a brick is to be disturbed in the whole structure. It will be mounted on rollers, and the propelling power is to be a horse and capstan.

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September 5, 1908

BOYS DITCHED A CONDUCTOR.

It Took a Motor to Catch Car Started
in His Absence.

Incorrigible boys played a practical joke on the crew of an Independence avenue street car about 5:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the entrance to Forest park which resulted in the discovery of a new and unique duty for motorcycle policemen. The car had reached the end of the line and the conductor left the car to obtain a drink of water. The motorman changed his controller and was standing on the front end of the car waiting a signal from his conductor to go ahead.

Two bells were sounded over the motorman's head and he started ahead on his return trip. Policeman E. L. Martin, a member of the motorcycle squad, was passing the park entrance and noticed four small boys jump off the car and run into the park. Seeing that the car was running without a conductor, Martin on his motor went in pursuit of the car. He chased the street car to Independence avenue and Gladstone boulevard, where he called the motorman's attention to the fact that he was minus his conductor. The conductor arrived on the next townward bound car.

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September 13, 1907

SHOT DEAD BY BOY

TRAGIC DEATH OF EDNA
CALLAWAY OF KANSAS CITY.
WAS VISITING IN DENVER.

WITTE ELLIS WAS "FOOLING
WITH THE PISTOL."

In a Spirit of Playfulness He
Pulled Trigger and Bullet Passed
Through Miss Callaway's Brain.
Mother Accompanying Body
Home for Burial.
Edna Callaway, Kansas City Girl Shot and Killed in Denver, Co.
MISS EDNA CALLAWAY, A KANAS CITY GIRL, WHO WAS ACCIDENT-
ALLY SHOT AND KILLED IN DENVER BY WITTE ELLIS, A FRIEND.

Death at the hands of a cousin of her fiance was the tragic ending of a summer vacation to Miss Edna Callaway, a young Kansas City society woman, at Denver, Col., Wednesday night. Witte Ellis, formerly of Kansas City, accidentally shot and killed her with an automatic pistol at the home of his mother in the presence of her sweetheart, W. Lysle Alderson, who with his mother and Miss Callaway were visiting at the Ellis home. The tragedy occurred on the evening Miss Callaway was to start upon her return trip to Kansas City.

The shooting occurred after the return of the party, composed of Mrs. J. M. Ellis, of Denver, the hostess; Mrs. D. P. Alderson, of Kansas City; W. Lysle Alderson, Miss Callaway, and young Ellis, from a dinner at the Shirley hotel.

MOTHERS PLAY PRANKS ON BOYS.

It seems that for a prank the two women had gone into their sons' bedrooms and concealed some of their night clothing. When the boys discovered the joke they decided upon a reprisal which would turn the laugh the other way. Accordingly young Alderson produced an automatic pistol with which it was proposed to scare Miss Callaway, whom they believed responsible for the original joke.

The pistol was arranged to be loaded by placing a "clip" full of cartridges in a place provided for the insertion so that the top shell would be in position for firing. Ellis took the pistol and removed the "clip" containing the bullets.

Then the two ran into a hallway, where their mothers were awaiting the outcome of the joke. Miss Callaway,, hearing the commotion and knowing some prank was on, peeped from her door and then came out. They flourished the pistol some moments, Ellis exclaiming,

"Where's the fellow who stole my clothes? I want my clothes!"

He turned from his mother to Mrs. Alderson and then back again to his mother. At that moment Miss Callaway came out, laughing, and asked what the trouble was. Ellis told her that someone had gone into his room and stolen his night-clothes.

"HANDS UP!" CRIED ELLIS.

Then he turned to the young woman, accused her of stealing his clothes and ordered her to put up her hands. She was standing beside Mrs. Alderson, at the time, and both women raised their hands in mock terror. Ellis pulled the trigger and sent a bullet crushing into the young girl's brain. One shell had caught when the clip was removed and remained in position for its work of destruction.

Miss Callaway sank back in the arms of her sweetheart's mother. Death was instantaneous. Mrs. Alderson eased the body gently to the floor and then fainted. Mrs. Ellis also fainted, while her son stood for a moment dumbfounded. When the realization of what he had done came to him, he became frantic, sobbing and crying that he would kill himself. He was prevented from this by friends who heard the noise of the gunshot and went into the house.

ALDERSON RAN TO SWEETHEART.

When his sweetheart fell, young Alderson ran to her, took her into his arms and placed her upon a bed. It was some moments before he realized the awful truth, but when he discovered Miss Callaway was dead, his grief was pitiful In a few moments he became hysterican and had to be led away from his fiance's bedside.

Added sorrow in the tragedy comes from the fact that young Ellis' father, former Judge J. M. Ellis, perished in a hotel fire in Goldfield, Nev., less than a year ago. Mrs. Ellis' health was undermined by that occurrence and she came to Kansas City several months ago for rest and a change of climate. The visit of the party of Kansas City people to her home at this time was in return for the one Mrs. Ellis had made in Kansas City. Witte Ellis accompanied his mother while she was here in this city.

FIRST REPORT BLAMED FIANCE.

Immediately after the shooting word of the unfortunate affair was sent to Kansas City by telegraph. The first reports were badly garbled, one account having it that the shooting had been done by W. Lysle Alderson, fiance of Miss Callaway. The news created a profound sensation in social circles where both the young woman and Mr. Alderson are well known.

The body of the unfortunate young woman will be brought to Kansas City this morning, accompanied by Mrs. Alderson and her son. Mrs Robert Stone, the girl's mother, who had been spending the summer at Excelsior Springs, returned to her home at the Elsmere hotel last night. She was completely prostrated at the news of her daughter's death.

The first report was that young Alderson himself held the revolver which ended Miss Callaway's life in such a tragic manner. This report almost completely prostrated D. P. Alderson, the father of the young man, a member of the firm of Bradley-Alderson Company, but a private dispatch from young Alderson later stated that the revolver was held by Witte Ellis, the son of Mrs. J. M. Ellis, whom Mrs. Alderson and her son and Miss Callaway were visiting at the time. The knowledge that his son was not responsible for the death of his fiancee was a great relief to Mr. Alderson, and mitigated to some extent the circumstances surrounding the unfortunate affair.

Mrs. F. P. Neal, of 318 Walrond avenue, is an aunt of Miss Callaway. Mr. Neal, vice president of the Union National bank, received several telegrams during the day, one of which was from young Alderson, stating that the body of Miss Callaway would be brought to Kansas City at once. The entire party will leave Denver this morning, arriving tomorrow morning.

Mrs. L. F. Rieger, of 426 Gladstone boulevard, is a distant cousin of Miss Callaway.

Miss Callaway was the daughter of Mrs. Robert Stone, who was, before her marriage to Mr. Stone, Mrs. R. P. Callaway. The girl was 19 years old and was a graduate of the Central high school two years ago. She lived at the Elsmere hotel with her mother and stepfather, who were in Excelsior Springs yesterday when the affair occurred. Miss Callaway went to Denver last summer to visit her aunt, Mrs. J. M. Ellis. Two weeks ago young Alderson, to whom she was engaged, went to Denver with his mother to spend his vacation with his fiancee. Young Alderson is also 19 years of age and a graduate of the Central high school in the class of 1905. The two have been sweethearts for years and had been engaged for some time, though no definite time for their marriage had been set.

A specially unfortunate feature of the affair was that it occurred on the eve of the departure of the Kansas City party for home. They were expected to start last night.

D. P. Alderson received a dispatch yesterday from his son which read:

Edna shot tonight; Witte held revolver; death immediate; come at once.

Mr. Alderson had intended to leave for Denver to be with his sone but it was later decided that this would be unnecessary and the arrangements were made to bring the body to Kansas City immediately.

ELLIS HELD BLAMELESS.

The coroner's inquest was held over the body of Miss Calloway in Denver yesterday. W. W. Ellis testified that he held the automatic revolver when it was discharged.

The jury decided that the killing was entirely accidental and did not recommend any disposition of young Ellis. The district attorney was present at the hearing, but gave no indication of any intention to hold Ellis for trial.

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