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November 16, 1909

WON'T GO TO SCHOOL
'CAUSE HIS DOG CAN'T.

FOX TERRIER HELD RESPONSI-
BLE FOR BOY'S TRUANCY.

Two Pals, Lawrence and Jack, Re-
ceive Same Sentence in Juvenile
Court and Do Penance
Together.

One of the newest types of juvenile offenders, a small fox terrier, whose master is Lawrence Hanson of Fifth and Gilliss streets, was locked up yesterday at the detention home by the juvenile officers. "Jack," for that is the dog's name, is charged with being an accessory before the fact. His master has been playing "hookey" from school, and Jack has been held responsible.

Yesterday morning Lawrence Hanson, 10 years of age, and Jack, were brought to the detention home. The boy has been attending the Karnes school. The past month he is said to have been absent more days than he has been present.

"Why won't you go to school?" asked the juvenile officer.

The boy sniffled. Suddenly there was an outpouring of tears and the little chap hid his face in his sleeve.

"They won't let me take Jack with me. And I said I wouldn't go to school unless he could go too."

Jack, who had followed the boy to his home, sat at his master's feet. He looked up into the little boy's face. When Lawrence began to cry, Jack also was affected. He jumped up into the boy's lap and slipping his nose under his master's sleeve, licked away the tears as fast as they came.

The dog appeared to take the disgrace even worse than the boy for Jack had been charged with being an accessory before the fact. It was he who had caused his master's arrest.

Presently the clouds disappeared. The boy dried his eyes. Lawrence smiled. The dog jumped down from the boy's lap. He wagged his tail vigorously.

It was decided to lock the little boy in a cell with the other incorrigibles.

"But what should be done with Jack?" was asked.

"The dog seems equally guilty with the boy," suggested Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer. "It seems to me that he should suffer as well as his master."

So Jack was locked up with his master. The boy considered it a disgrace. But not so with the dog. He skipped up the stairs ahead of the boy and the officers.

Yesterday afternoon, dog and master sat together. The dog was cuddled in the boy's arms, sleeping peacefully. He did not realize that he was doing penance for leading his young master astray.

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January 2, 1909

SUSPECTED MEN ARRESTED.

Police Are Holding Four Italians in
Connection With Dynamite Case.

Suspicion has been directed against four Italians by the police department in connection with the dynamiting of the apartments of Antonio Armenio, 550 Gillis street, early Wednesday morning. Detectives Lum Wilson and Alonzo Ghent, who have been working on the case, found it very difficult to make much progress among the Italians, and Patrolman S. P. Spizzirri, an Italian, was assigned to assist them.

While conclusive evidence against any one person has not been secured by the police, they have made four arrests, Frank Bruno and Palermo Venato were arrested yesterday morning, and Francisco Stuzlone and Dominico Olivo were arrested in the afternoon. A charge of investigation was placed against them. The men refused to talk to the police.

Their rooms were searched and all papers containing writing were turned over to the postoffice inspectors, along with the three Black Hand letters received by Armenio. If the police fail to connect the men under arrest with the crime, they will charge them with vagrancy.

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December 31, 1908

BLACK HAND TRIES
TO MURDER FAMILY.

TONY ARMENIO'S HOUSE BLOWN
UP BY DYNAMITE.

Inmates Escape Injury, but Front of
Building Is Wrecked -- Money
Had Been Demanded of
the Saloonkeeper.

Coming to the country twenty-one years ago, Tony Armenio prospered in business but gained the enmity of the Society of the Mafia, or Black Hand, members of which early yesterday morning attempted to kill Armenio and his wife and child by exploding a dynamite bomb in his living apartments. The Italian owns a saloon at 550 Gillis street and lives on the fourth floor above the dramshop.

Preceding the explosion yesterday morning Armenio on Monday received a letter, which was unsigned, demanding $5,900. If Armenio failed to give the money to "friends," the writer stated, his entire family would be killed. The Italian saloonkeeper did not heed the warning and thought but little of it, because he received a similar letter about a year ago.

A tenement house four stories high with storerooms occupying the ground floor, situated at 536 to 550 Gillis street, is owned by Armenio. Along the rear of the tenement is a porch, and it was upon this porch that the Black Hand arranged the bomb.

NOISE WAS FAR REACHING.

An explosion, the detonation of which was heard as far as Sheffield, occurred at 1:30 o'clock yesterday morning and wrecked the rear rooms of the apartments occupied by Armenio and his family. In the front room were Armenio and his wife, while in the room to the west was their daughter, Mary, 16 years old. The dining room is directly west of that in which the daughter was asleep. A window opens out onto the rear porch.

Just beneath the window ledge the Black Hand agent had removed a brick from the wall, and placing a bomb on the window ledge, balanced it with the brick. A fuse was attached and set off. The force of the explosion tore the window casing out and knocked bricks out of the wall, and caused the plaster to fall off the ceilings and walls of every room.

Mary Armenio was covered with debris and unable to get out of bed until her father and mother assisted her. The shock greatly frightened the Armenio family and the other inhabitants of the tenement house. Window panes were broken in houses a block away. As soon as the first excitement was over the Italian family joined the throng in the street below. Luckily none was injured by the flying debris.

The explosion played havoc with the tenement, but also performed many peculiar tricks. A two-by-four scaritling torn from the porch was driven through the door from the dining room leading into Mary Armenio's room. A bird cage, imprisoning a canary bird, was hanging to a window casing. All of the casings was blown away except a small part to which was attached the cage. The glass and plaster fell into the cage, but the bird was uninjured.

THEY'RE AFRAID TO TALK.

Nails were driven into the walls and door frames and the police believe that the bomb was composed of a beer bottle filled with nails and iron slugs.

As is always the case where trouble has occurred among the Italian inhabitants of Little Italy, the police are at a loss. When asked, the Italians invariably shake their heads and mutter: "I don't know." Never have the police been able to make the Italians say they believe a murder has been committed by members of the Black Hand, so powerful is the influence of the society.

The report of dynamite explosion was heard by practically every policeman on duty in Kansas City. Immediately afterwards the patrolman called up their various stations and reported. But not one of them was able to give definite information as to where the explosion occurred. At police headquarters at 2:45 o'clock they learned that the explosion occurred at 559 Gillis street. And it was 3 o'clock before they learned that it was caused by a dynamite bomb placed in the building with murderous intent.

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January 28, 1908

CRUSHED BY WAGON WHEELS.

Miguel Condino, 5 Years Old, Killed
While at Play in the Street.

Miguel Condino, 5 years old, was killed in Missouri avenue near Gillis street yesterday afternoon by being run down by a candy wagon. He was knocked down by the horses, the front wheels passed over his neck and the rear wheels had to be lifted from his crushed skull. The boy, a son of Dominick Condino, a laborer, lived at 725 Missouri avenue.

The wagon which crushed the child belonged to the Brown-Gibbons Candy Company, jobbers, 547 Walnut street, and was driven by W. H. Brown, senior member of the firm. Brown, who lives at 305 Walrond avenue, wept bitterly after the accident. After the boy had been taken into his home nearby Brown drove immediately to police headquarters and surrendered. He was released on his own recognizance.

"I was driving west on Missouri avenue at an ordinary gait," Brown said in his statement to police. "As I cleared an alley between Gillis and Harrison streets, four or five small boys scampered out to the south right in front of my team. I was not driving fast. I never drive fast through that district, as there are always children in the streets. I called, 'Look out there,' to the boys and one of them -- the little fellow who was killed -- turned and ran directly into my near horse. He was knocked down. To show that I was not driving very fast, I stopped my team by the time the rear wheels caught the boy. I have a little child of my own and the accident was a great shock to me. I did all I could to prevent it."

An inquest will probably be held.

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January 8, 1907

MANY OBJECT TO PLAYGROUNDS.

Some Say They're to Be Too Near
Railroad Yards.

Many property owners east of Main Street, north of Independence avenue and west of Highland are contemplating a petition to the board of park commissioners to protest against two sites said to have been chosen as playgrounds. A committee selected for the purpose reported Monday that it would recommend two sites, one bounded by Tracy and Lydia avenues, Second and Third streets, and another bounded by Gilliss, Campbell, Third and Fifth streets. The former is said to have been selected for a playground for negroes.

Many of the residents in the districts adjacent are complaining as they say both sites are too close to the railroad tracks. They claim that boys will be constantly tempted to "hop trains."

Property owners in the space bounded by and Forest avenues, Missouri avenue and Pacific street are the biggest objectors. A petition probably will be started in that neighborhood today.

"Twice this block has been selected by a committee," said a property owner in that block yesterday. "At least that was published and it gave rise to the report that our property was to be condemned for park or playground purposed. Many of us had sales consumated, even to the point of a deposit being made. No one would buy our property with the condemnation proceedings staring them in the face."

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October 17, 1907

SOLD BEER TO CHILDREN.

Licenses of Two Italian Saloonkeep-
ers are Revoked.

The police board yesterday revoked the saloon licenses of John Rebasto, 1822 Pacific street, and George Priesto, Missouri avenue and Gillis street. Representives of the Humane Society tated that they investigatied the report fo the board of education that a family was being neglected in the vicinity of these saloons, and found that the children in question were habitually buying "can" beer at the two saloons.

A half dozen children, ranging in ages from 10 to 13 years, testified to buying the beer and each saloonist admitted the same, but protested that the statutes give the right to sell to a minor when the beer is ordered by a parent, guradian or master. The old statute did give a saloonkeeper this right, but the privelege was revoked two years ago. Pleading ignorance of the new statute, the two saloonkeepers will file a motion asking the board to reconsider the case.

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October 2, 1907

SHE SAT ON HER GRIP.

Old Lady Waited Placidly for a Car
While Police Ran.

The police ambulance made an exciting run through crowded streets to Fifth and Gillis streets last night. Three babes had narrow escapes from being run over and several grown persons were badly frightened, and all for a "water haul." Af Fifth and Gillis streets an old woman, evidently from the country, and carrying a large grip, seated herself on the grip in the middle of the street and waited for a street car.

A man saw her and thought she was ill. He telephoned for a police ambulance. When the ambulance arrived the old woman was still sitting in the street. She was very much surprised when she learned what had happened and hastened to inform the police surgeons that nothing was wrong with her.

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