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December 16, 1909

DOCTORS BUY SITE FOR HOME.

Jackson County Medical Society to
Build on Thirty-First.

The Jackson County Medical Society has purchased a lot at Thirty-first street and Gillham road, and some time after January 1 definite plans will be adopted for the erection of a building, which is to be the ethical home of the physicians of Jackson county. the structure will be used as a meeting place, and will be equipped with a large medical library and a museum. It is the intention to raise the necessary funds for the enterprise by subscription.

About 320 Kansas City doctors are members of the society, and they are working as a body to secure headquarters that will be a credit to the profession and to Kansas City as well.

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May 23, 1909

THE WILL OF GOD IF
I AM HANGED: SHARP

LEADER OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS
DODGES RESPONSIBILITY.

Conflicting Testimony as to Who
Started the City Hall Riot
Brings Protest From
the Defendant.

SHARP TRIAL'S SECOND DAY: Defense still fails to indicate any trace of an insanity plea and continues to question along self-defense lines.
Sharp interrupts and contradicts Captain Whitsett, while latter testifies.
Patrick Clark, captain of police, tells of his fight, barehanded, with Sharp, who had both revolver and knife.
Testimony as to fight on river admitted only sparingly by Judge Latshaw.
Sharp gives out statement to effect that evidence which gets at the cause of the riot is being excluded. Also ridicules introduction of his overcoat as evidence, as not proving anything.

"If they sentence me to hang it will be the will of God."

With these words James Sharp was led back to his cell in the county jail after the second day of his trial on the charge of killing Michael Mullane, a patrolman, in the city hall riot. It was the first time during yesterday that he had mentioned religious matters.

The day closed with the evidence of the state two-thirds finished and with no more traces of an insanity defense than were shown on Friday. A. E. Martin, of counsel for Sharp, stated that he had not announced any defense and that his purpose would be to break down the testimony of the state's witnesses. All of his cross-questioning, however, as told in The Journal yesterday, was directed towards showing that the band of fanatics under Sharp's leadership did not provoke the riot, but that it was started by officers. Self-defense is the logical name for such a theory of the case. The state is expected to finish its testimony by Monday evening.

Police officers gave the greater part of the testimony yesterday. Of them, Captian Walter Whitsett was on the stand the longest time. Whitsett gave his age as 41, his service in the police department as twenty years and his residence as 2631 Gillham road. On the afternoon of the riot he was at his desk in the city hall as captain commanding the headquarters precinct.

CHILDREN WERE SHOOTING.

"I heard the shooting," testified Whitsett, "took my revolver out of my desk and ran to the street. I met Captain Clark, who had been wounded, on the stairs. When I got to the middle of the street I saw Mullane standing with a club in one hand and a revolver in the other. There was a man in front of him with a revolver. The women of the band also were near at the time. There was a man with a long beard standing on the opposite corner firing in the direction of Mullane."

"Who was this man?" asked Prosecutor Conkling.

"That's him right there," said the witness, indicating Sharp.

"What happened then?"

"I fired three or four shots at him and his revolver fell out of his hand. Two or three children came up behind and began to shoot at me. When I got back on the street, after going into the station for another revolver, I saw Mullane staggering toward headquarters and helped him in. Later we searched for Sharp but could not find him. We immediately sent his description to every officer in the city and notified the surrounding towns.

"On the evening of December 10 we got word from Olathe that Sharp was under arrest there. I went there that evening with Inspector Charles Ryan."

Court adjourned at noon with Whitsett still on the stand. In the afternoon he resumed his story of the trip to Olathe. He found Sharp there in the office of Sheriff Steed. Sharp's beard and hair had been cut and he was wounded in both hands. There was a hole through his hat.

"I talked to Sharp in the presence of Mr. Steed, Inspector Ryan and Hugh Moore, a newspaper man Sharp told us--"

Mr. Martin for the defense here objected to Whitsett's telling of Sharp's statement.

"If a written statement was taken that is the best evidence," said Martin.

The statement was shown to Captain Whitsett and identified by him. Weapons used in the city hall riot then were introduced in evidence. First there was Sharp's .45 caliber Colt revolver, the handle scarred by a shot. Sharp told Whitsett the weapon was shot out of his hand. Then there was a .45 caliber colt which Louis Pratt had carried.

"I was told by Sharp that Pratt had bought his weapon in Kansas City," said Whitsett, but Sharp spoke out sharply in court to the witness:

"I didn't say that. Why do you want to tell such stuff as that?"

"I don't know. He might have bought it up the river," responded Whitsett.

EXHIBITED THE WEAPONS.

Then was shown the 38-caliber Colt, which Sharp said his wife brought in her bosom from the houseboat. Lena Pratt's 32-caliber pistol was then exhibited and identified, and the knife, with its four-inch blade.

"What was the purpose of all these weapons, as Sharp told it to you?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"He said it was to resist any officer who might interfere with his preaching. He said he also had two rifles and a shotgun and another revolver, the latter used by Lulu Pratt."

The overcoat worn by Sharp the day of the riot was then shown to the jury, as were the remnants of Sharp's beard.

"Don't see why they want to show the coat," said Sharp to W. S. Gabriel, assistant prosecutor. It doesn't prove anything."

On cross-examination, Captain Whitsett was asked about happenings at the river, following the street fight, but the state objected successfully to most of the questions. Just after an objection had been sustained, Sharp spoke up and said:

"Your honor, can I have a word? This man wants to tell what happened there, and he is cut off. Now ---"

"Make your objection through your attorneys, Mr. Sharp," answered Judge Latshaw.

BARBER TESTIFIES.

Inspector Charles Ryan followed Captain Whitsett on the stand. He recounted substantially the same details of the shooting and the trip to Olathe.

George Robinson, 2905 Wyandotte street, a barber at 952 Mulberry street, was the next witness, and told how Sharp came into his shop sat in the chair of Chester Ramsey and had his hair and whiskers cut off.

"He didn't take his hands out of his pockets. He said: 'My hands were frosted up North, where I've been fishing. I want this job done in a hurry. I want to meet a friend and have to get on a train.'

"When the job was done, Ramsey took a purse out of Sharp's pocket and took 40 cents out of it. Then Sharp went away."

The defense objected to the testimony of Robinson on the plea that the state had given no notification that he would be called as a witness. The objection was overruled. Robinson was not cross-examined, but will be recalled by the defense to give further testimony.

Then came William Thiry, a farmer who lives near Monticello, Kas. "On the evening of December 9 Sharp came to my house," said Thiry. "My son opened the door and then I went out on the porch. Sharp was standing there. He said, 'Brother, I want to tell you my circumstances. Wait till I sit down,' and he sat down on the edge of the porch. 'I'm paralyzed, brother,' he resumed. 'I lay down over there on a strawstack and tried to die, but the laws of nature were against me.'

"He kept his hands in his overcoat pockets and asked for food and a night's lodging. 'I am no ordinary bum,' said he. 'I have money to pay for my keep over night.' I consulted with my wife and we decided we could not keep him, but we took him and fed him. I telephoned Mr. Beaver, my brother-in-law, who lives a quarter of a mile from me and Mr. Beaver said he could keep him. While I was telephoning, Sharp came into the ho use and listened to the conversation.

"At supper he spoke of being a peddler and that his partner had turned him down because he was paralyzed in his hands. He said he wanted to get back to town to a good hospital. It was 8 o'clock when he left my house. I fed him myself. He didn't take his hands from his pockets."

"I am willing to acknowledge anything this man says," remarked Sharp. "He treated me alright while I was there."

The defense fought the introduction of this testimony on the same theory it had advanced in the case of Robinson. It objected further to Thiry's relating some of the conversation. Mr. Conkling insisted it was relevant as combating a defense of insanity, if such was to be the defense.

"We have never announced what our defense would be," said Martin.

"You have done so repeatedly in open court while applying for continuances in this case," said Mr. Conkling.

Court was adjourned after the defense had secured permission to bring a number of witnesses from Lebanon, Mo.

OTHER WITNESSES.

In the course of the morning session Captain Clark, who lost an eye in the riot, gave his testimony. He lives at 538 Tracy avenue, and has been on the police force for twenty-one years. He was sergeant in immediate charge of headquarters station the afternoon of the riot. Testimony was also taken from Howard B. McAfee, business manager of Park college at Parkville, Mo., who was making a purchase on the Fourth street side of the city market when he heard children singing on Main street and went toward the gathering. He saw Dalbow come from the station and shake hands with Sharp. Then someone behind Sharp fired. He saw Mullane trying to get away from the women, who seemed to be pursuing him. then he saw Sharp and Clark in their encounter. He helped Clark into the station and when he looked again Sharp was gone.

Preceding Mr. McAfee, there testified Job H. Lyon, a traveling evangelist. Just before the riot he had a talk in the Workingman's Mission with Pratt. Sharp and Creighton, the last named in charge of the place. Being warned against antagonizing the police, Lyon said Sharp waved his hand and said: "I am God. If any policeman attempts to interfere with me, I'll kill him."

The witness said Sharp made similar statements while brandishing his revolver in the direction of the city hall. Pratt and Sharp, said Lyon, pointed revolvers at Dalbow when he approached. Sharp, said the witness, fired the first shot.

After Sharp had been brought to jail here, Lyon, who often holds Sunday meetings for the prisoners, accused the fanatic of falsehood in regard to the story he told the Mulberry street barber. He asked Sharp to attend the jail services and Sharp said he himself was god, and, of course, would not come. Then Lyon told him that God did not prevaricate and Sharp refused to have anything more to do with the evangelist.

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December 19, 1908

GENERAL HOSPITAL IS
ALMOST INACCESSIBLE.

Roadway Is Muddy, Narrow and
Dangerous, Almost Impossible to
Traverse at Night.

The new general hospital is a great thing. The wards are large and airy, the sanitation is perfect, the nurses and doctors are first class and the facilities for treating emergency cases excellent -- in the emergency cases could reach the hospital. In other words, the matter with the new hospital is that it is almost inaccessible, especially after nightfall.

A complaint comes from the police. The ambulance from the Walnut street station takes a case or two to the hospital every night. Last night a man with a broken leg was taken there. The ambulance spent about a minute getting from Nineteenth and Main streets, the scene of the accident, to Twenty-first street and Gillham road. Then it took fifteen minutes to get the last 100 yards of the journey.

There are only two ways by which vehicles can get to the hospital. One was is by Twenty-fourth and Cherry streets, and the other is by the Gillham road entrance. The ambulance entered by the latter way, because it is closer and safer. There are no lights in the vicinity of the hospital and the whole hill is in darkness. The entrance is by a winding mud road and it is so narrow, twisting and dark that a policeman was compelled to walk in front of the horses to pick out the way and prevent the animals from falling in one of the many ditches. Meanwhile the man with the broken leg was suffering excruciating agony.

If the ambulance had gone around by the other entrance it would have been necessary to climb the Holmes street hill, which the horses are compelled to take at a walk. In either case the vehicle would be in danger of overturning several times.

"It seems strange to me," said a police officer last night, "that a couple of hundred dollars could not have been subtracted from the thousands that it took to build the hospital and used to make the place accessible. It is a strange anomaly to see a dozen doctors waiting inside the hospital in the operating room for the patient, who is meantime stuck in the mud outside and possibly dying for lack of attention.

"Within a block of the place is Gillham road, one of the finest thoroughfares to be found in the city, and half a dozen other streets that are kept in good condition. The new hospital has been built several months now and there has been plenty of time to build suitable approaches. I would like to know who to blame."

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July 1, 1908

ONE DRIVER ON THE SPEEDWAY.

He Found Course Rough and
Didn't Remain Long.

The speedway, which parallels Gillham road from Thirty-ninth to Forty-third streets, was opened yesterday. Only one speeder took advantage of the drive. He drove up and down the course twice and then left.

"The speedway isn't in good shape yet," said A. D. Nolan, mounted park policeman who was patrolling it yesterday. "It is muddy and rough at the south end and probably will not be in good shape until Saturday It needs harrowing and rolling to set it in good condition.

"I don't expect many drivers on the course before Saturday. Probably we'll have a big Fourth of July crowd, and the real opening will be then."

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June 29, 1908

WELL KNOWN ARCHITECT DIES.

Bertram August Von Unworth De-
signed Many Kansas City Homes.

Bertram August Unworth, 69 years old, died at his home, 2903 Gillham road. Born in Germany Mr. Von Unworth graduated from the gynmasium at Glogau and afterwards studied architecture at the University of Berlin. He was an officer for many years on the staff of General Count Von Moltke and served in the campaign of 1859, the Polish campagn of 1864 and the war of 1866. After leaving the army he married Fraulein Moldzio, who is still living, and came to America in 1870. In 1877 he located in Kansas City, and has lived here ever since. He practiced his profession of architect and many of the beautiful homes in Kansas City are the product of his brain.

Besides the widow, six children survive, Hans, Hermann, Frida, Gertrude, Erdmuthe and Margarethe. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock at the home. Burial will be in Elmwood.

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January 27, 1908

AUTOMOBILE RAN OVER HIM.

After He Had Been Assaulted by
Highwayman and Robbed.

Being slugged, robbed and run over by an automobile within the space of an hour, and coming out of it all without serious injury, is what happened to John Meyer, 2425 Locust street, last night at 12:30 o'clock while he was on his way home. As he started to walk across Gillham road at Twenty-third street he was assaulted by a man who struck him over the head. This rendered Meyer unconscious and he lay in the steret for several minutes after the assault.

An automobile happened along at that time, and the driver, not seeing the fallen man, ran completely over him. He then stopped his machine, notified the police and took the unconscious man to the hospital, where his owunds were dressed. When he was able to talk he told the officers that he had been robbed of a little over $2. A pipe, a handkerchief and some matches were found lying upon the ground where he had fallen, indicating that his pockets had been rifled.

After emergency treatment at the hospital he was taken to his home. The name of the automobile driver was not learned.

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January 12, 1908

PROTEST AGAINST SPEEDWAY.

South Side Citizens Meet and Draw
Up Fighting Resolutions.

About forty men, residents in the vicinity of Gillham road, met at the Church of United Brethren, Fourtieth and Harrison streets, last night to protest against the action of the park board in ordering an appropriation of part of that boulevard for the proposed speedway. The meeting was called by Benjaman H. Berkshire, 4018 Harrison street, and J. V. Kendall, Twenty-fifth street and Troost avenue.

A motion was made that those present should resort to every effort to prevent what they thought was the ruin of their roadway, and that every man pledge himself to assist in a financial way if it became necessary for them to resort to the courts. When this motion was put, F. J. Chase, 4100 McGee street, who was chairman of the meeting, asked all those who were in favor of it, to stand. Only four remained seated. The motion was announced, carried and those who voted for it put their signatures to the resolution. This resolution was adopted:

Whereas, The Kansas City park board has assumed to set apart a certain
portion of Gillham road for a speedway in defiance of the purposes for which
that roadway was condemned and paid for, and

Whereas, the use of any portion of this parkway for a speedway will be
detrimental to the interests of those whop were assessed for payment of said
parkway, making it dangerous to life and limb and turning that which was
intended for quite enjoyment of the citizens, over to an entirely different
purpose, to the great discomfort of those living in that vicinity, and to the
depreciation of property values,

Therefore be it
Resolved, That we property owners and residents in the district bounded by
Thirty-ninth street on the north, Brush creek on the south, Troost avenue on the
east and Main street on the west, in mass meeting assembled, do respectfully
protest against the appropriation of any portion of Gillham road parkway for
purposes of speedway or for any other use foreign to the purposes for which the
said roadway was condemned, and ask that your board reconsider your recent
action, and withdraw your consent to such use of any portion of said
roadway.

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December 15, 1907

IT LEAD TO THE SANTA FE TRAIL.

Judge Goodrich Holds That Old Frag-
ment Is Still a Road.

Memories of fifty years ago were revived yesterday by a decision in Judge James E. Goodrich's division of the circuit court declaring the roadway east from Gillham road, through a part of Janssen place, to be a city street, and ordering it graded preparatory to paving. richard and Oliva Smith fought the suit on the contention that the section of road was inclosed and belonged to them.

Fifty years ago that bit of street was a portion of the Independence-Westport trail, the main thoroughfare south to Westport, and practically the only wagonway from what is now the business center of Kansas City to the Santa Fe trail at Westport. There are men in Kansas City who have driven over it in a covered wagon.

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September 12, 1907

GUESTS IN ALARM.

ROWDIES INVADE A GILLHAM
ROAD WEDDING PARTY.
TURNED ON GARDEN HOSE.

DRENCH THE COSTUMES OF SOME
OF THE GUESTS.

Made Deafening Noises With Bells
and Pans and Demolished Veran-
da Furniture -- Would Not De-
sist Until Frightened Off
by Approach of Police.

Two policemen and a patrol wagon were required to quell a miniature riot incidental to a charivari after a wedding at 2716 Gillham road last night. The police were summoned after a gang of hoodlums had smashed furniture and deluged with water the house in which the bridal party was holding an informal reception.

The boisterous charivari followed the wedding of Herman Hampel, of San Francisco, to Miss Edna Spengler, which had been celebrated earlier in the evening at St. John's Lutheran church by Rev. Ernst Schulz. From the church the wedding paty had gone to the home of the bride's father, Carl Spengler, Jr., 2716 Gillham road, where an informal reception was to be held. The house was thronged with guests, among them many women gowned in expensive toilets. Everything went merrily until about 9:30 o'clock.

HOODLUMS CREATE UPROAR.

Then a crowd of boys and young men who had not been invited to the wedding and reception appeared and began a charivari. It was said that the "serenaders" were composed largely of a number of young toughs known to police as the "Holmes street gang." They carried bells and tin pans, with which they created an uproar that drove many of the guests inside the house and aroused the neighbors for blocks. It is presumed their intentions were to keep up the disturbance until they were invited inside. When, after several moments, their importunities were not heeded, they adoped more boisterous tactics. They swarmed upon the front veranda, overturning and breaking a number of chairs and settes placed there for the accommodation of the guests. Then they secured some garden hose, attached it to a hydrant and played a stream of water upon the veranda and in the hallways of the house. A number of the celebrants who happened in the reach of the stream were thoroughly drenched.

CALLS SENT FOR POLICE.

When the rioters first became boisterous, the Walnut street police station was notified and Lieutenant Morley dispatched Patrolman A. N. Metzinger to the scene. Upon a second call a patrol wagon was ordered out. The charivari party learned that the police were coming, however, and dispersed before arrests could be made.

BRIDE WAS UNDISTURBED.

The bride was not at all disconcerted at the untoward incident. She received the congratulations of her friends undisturbed through the turmoil. Beyond a little annoyance while the charivari was at its height, the reception proceeded as merrily as if nothing unusual had happened.

The bride is the daughter of Carl Spengler, a local manager for the Dick & Company Brewing Association, of Quincy, Ill. her husband is an influenctial young business man in California. Their wedding was considered an important social event in German circles, and the annoyance at the reception was deeply deplored by many of their friends.

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April 2, 1907

DENY THEY'RE TO BLAME.

Park Board Not Responsible for a
Disease Breeding Pond.

Complaint was made to the board of park commissioners yesterday by Charles F. Jackles that a pond at Harrison and Gillham roadway caused by park construction work was a breeding spot for mosquitoes and has caused sickness in his family. He threatens to bring legal proceedings against the city unless the nuisance is abated. The board denied all responsibility for the conditions, and set up the claim that the pond complained of is on private property.

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