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November 21, 1909

BOY JUMPS OFF CAR;
KILLED BY AUTO.

NOT THE HOPPING KIND, JUST
PLAYING, COMPANION SAYS.

Edgar Palin, Aged 12, Dies in Hos-
pital From Injuries Received in
Alighting in Path of Machine
Giving Children Ride.
Edgar Palin, 12-year-old Killed by Automobile.
EDGAR PALIN,
Twelve-Year-Old Boy Who Leaped from Street Car Fender and Was Mortally Injured by Automobile.

As Edgar Palin, 12 years old, 2802 East Sixth street, jumped from the back fender of an eastbound Independence avenue car yesterday afternoon at Prospect avenue, he was run over and fatally injured by a motor car driven by E. T. Curtis, 3338 Wyandotte street. He died at 7 o'clock last night at the German hospital, without recovering consciousness.

With Allen Compton, 400 Wabash avenue, the boy had been playing all afternoon. About 3 o'clock the two lads started northward on Wabash avenue, and at Independence avenue both noticed an approaching street car.

"Let's catch the fender," called Edgar, as he waited along the curbing. The car was moving at moderate speed and the boy ran behind, and caught hold of the fender. His companion, 10 years old, ran behind on the sidewalk. At Prospect avenue Edgar, without looking around, jumped from the fender directly in front of an approaching auto, barely fifteen feet behind him. Curtis attempted to dodge the boy. The left fender of the auto struck the child and he was sent tumbling on the pavement. He was picked up by Curtis. Several children were in the auto. With Curtis was Herman Smith, of 3606 Olive street, whose father owned the car. In a nearby drug store it was found the boy had been injured seriously.

GIVING CHILDREN RIDE.

"I was driving at about fifteen miles an hour," Curtis said. "The auto belonged to young Smith's father and I was running it because I had the most experience. A party of school children were with us. We were taking them for a ride around the block. I noticed the child on the fender and did not have the least idea that he was going to run in my path. I swerved to one side, but the machine skidded and the fender of the auto struck him in the back. I realized at once that he had received a fearful blow."

After the child was given emergency treatment in the drug store by two neighboring physicians, he was taken to his home in the motor car, and after being attended by Dr. Max Goldman, was removed to the German hospital. Dr. Goldman found that the boy's spine was broken and that his skull was probably fractured.

Allen Compton, his playmate, was in a condition bordering on hysterics last night. The two had been gathering old papers during the forenoon and had just been to the paper mill, where they had received a few pennies with which they intended to buy Christmas presents.

"Edgar wasn't no car hopper," Allen said last night, in defense of his friend. "He was just running behind and holding on to the fender. Edgar wasn't that kind."

With Judge J. E. Guinotte, a friend of the family, young Curtis went to police headquarters last night and made a statement to Captain Walter Whitsett. After consulting Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, it was decided not to hold him. He promised to come to the prosecutor's office Monday and make a complete statement. He said that he had been running a car for eight years. He is the son of W. E. Curtis, a live stock commission man.

The injured boy was the son of W. M. Palin, a real estate dealer in the Commerce building. The body will be taken to Gridley, Kas., for burial.

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November 4, 1909

SAMUEL LIEBERMAN DEAD.

The End Comes to The Journal's
"Sammie, the Office Boy."

Samuel Lieberman, 15 years old, son of Rabbi Max Lieberman, pastor of the Kenneseth Isreal congregation, died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the German hospital, after an illness of one day. The cause of his death was arterial sclerosis, or hardening of the arteries -- a disease that rarely attacks persons in their youth. The funeral will be at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the family home, 1423 Tracy avenue.

Samuel Lieberman was known to readers of The Journal as "Sammie the office boy." Small of body, quick of wit and cheerful to a degree rarely encountered even in hopeful youth, he became a favorite with editors and reporters, who encouraged him to write the small news stories he occasionally picked up on his daily rounds. At first the stories he wrote were given to the copy readers to be edited, but one night one of his stories was published just as he had written it, and credited to "Sammie, the Office Boy." Mr. Taft felt no greater elation when the wires conveyed to him the information that he had been elected president of the United States than did Sammie, the office boy, when he saw his first signed story in print. He became a frequent contributor to The Journal's columns and numerous inquiries were received at the office as to whether "Sammie, the Office Boy" really was an office boy or a reporter concealing his identity under the pseudonym.

Never strong in body, Sammie taxed his physical strength to the uttermost. He kept the same hours as the reporters, though it was not necessary for him to do so, and on election nights when the men were on the "long stunt," from noon to dawn, he stayed with them and it was useless to try to get him to go home. He liked the atmosphere of the local room. He said he hoped, one day, to become a great editor.

Once he ran away. He visited and worked in Milwaukee, Chicago, Cleveland, Buffalo and other places. He was at home in the larger cities. He had early learned that the peregrinating reporter always gravitates to Central police station, where the "dog watch" men from the various papers hold out. Sammie could talk shop like a veteran who had worked "with Dana of the New York Sun." Whenever a group of reporters gathered in the local room Sammie could be found lurking on the outskirts. He learned the reporters' distinction between a "good story" and a "bad one" and on occasions aired his knowledge with the positiveness of a managing editor.

Not many months ago a veteran reporter, after hearing Sammie talk about newspapers and newspaper making, removed his pipe from between his teeth, pointed a long finger at the door through which the boy had just passed out and said:

"That boy isn't long for this world. He's going to die young. He's smart beyond his years -- too smart. Why, he's a man, almost, already. He thinks and reasons better than lots of men I know. And there's a peculiar brightness in his eyes that doesn't look good to me. Mark my words, that boy isn't long for this world, and it's a pity, too, for he would be heard from if he should live to manhood."

The random observation of the veteran soon came true. Sammie was at the office Sunday. "I don't feel very good," he told one of the boys, "but I'll be all right when I rest up a bit." There was a hopeful smile on his face Tuesday afternoon as he lay on a cot at the hospital. "I'll be back to the office soon. I hurt awful at times. I ain't going to stay here long."

Soon after dawn of the following day his final words were verified. "Sammie, the office boy," had heard the fateful "Thirty" that, in newspaper offices, signifies the end.

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October 9, 1909

FREDERICK GEHRING DIES.

Editor of Staats Zeitung Passes
Away at 68 Years.

Frederick Gehring, editor of the Missouri Staats Zeitung, the offices of which are located at 304 West Tenth street, died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the German hospital. Mr. Gehring was 68 years old, having been born in Griessen, Germany, March 4, 1841. One relative, a son, Carl, employed by the Moore Transfer Company, survives.

The funeral services will be conducted from the home, 3152 Oak street, at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial in Mount Washington cemetery.

Mr. Gehring was secretary of the German-American Citizens' Association and a member of the Turner society. In both of these organizations his long residence in the city, his position as editor of the only German weekly paper in the country and his evident honest and ability as a worker for the good of the community gave him prestige.

Coming from Germany when he was 12 years old, Mr. Gehring's parents took him to Lafayette, Ind., where he grew to manhood. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer infantry June 14, 1861. He was mustered out of the service in June, 1864, carrying a scar from a minie ball wound with him into private life.

After marrying Miss Catherine May of Indanapolis, immediately after the close of the war, Mr. Gehring moved to Springfield, Ill., where he started the German Free Press. He was twice elected to the city council in Springfield, and from 1876 to 1877 was a member of the legislature.

Mr. Gehring came to Kansas City twenty-five years ago and established the Staats Zeitung, or State News, in 1894. His wife died last December.

A special meeting of the Turner Society will be called at 8 o'clock this evening to arrange for the funeral.

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May 25, 1909

CRUELTY CHARGES ARE
DENIED BY WITNESSES.

TEN ARE HEARD IN REBUTTAL
AT HOSPITAL INVESTIGATION.

Visitors and Empolyes Testify No
Cruelty Was Shown to Patients.
Records Back Up Their
Statements.

Ten witnesses, most of them in rebuttal, were put on the stand yesterday by the defense, when the hearing before the joint council committee in the matter of the charges preferred against the management of the new general hospital was resumed in the lower house council chamber.

In explaining how she came to tell a Mrs. Dougherty that a woman friend of the latter was "sitting up and doing well," w hen the woman was really dead, Mrs. Myrtle Keene, telephoneoperator at the hospital, said: "When the call came in the woman did not speak plainly, and all I understood was 'Mc.' I looked on the chart and found but one Mc., a Mr. McVey. I asked if McVey was the name and she was that it was. I was informed by McVey's nurse that he was sitting up and doing nicely, and told the woman so.

"Later I learned that the woman was asking about Mrs. McKay, who had died the night before and whose card had been taken out of the chart at my side. It was purely a mistake and when the woman called up later and I tried to apologize she would not let me explain."

A copy of the hospital chart for the date in question was introduced in evidence to show that McVey was the only "Mc" on the list that day.

Peter Doran, referred to quite often as "Dad," said that he had not beaten a patient because the latter asked for a crust of bread, as charged by the promoters. He said he never struck a patient, and had never known of any such treatment. Doran said that F. A. Wolf, who made serious charges, had bade him a fond goodby when he left the hospital, and had volunteered to take along his hat and clean it for nothing, returning it two weeks later in person.

Dr. S. C. James said the hospital compared favorably with any of its kind in the country.

Dr. W. A. Shelton, police surgeon, told of his connection with the Charles Newell case. He said that Newell was taken to the emergency hospital soon after his injury and hurried out to general hospital as soon as it was seen that his case was serious. Although Dr. J. D. Griffith and Dr. J. Park Neal were in the operating room ready to attend Newell, Dr. Shelton said the injured policeman refused all aid and demanded to be removed to the German hospital, where he could be treated by Dr. J. S. Snyder. He died shortly after being moved.

Fred Bowen, an orderly, explained how a patient named Starr came to leave the hospital. Money was sewed up in his undershirt, and when Starr was informed that he would have to leave it in the office for safe keeping, he dressed and left the institution, Bowen said.

Rev. T. B. Marvin, an evangelist who has visited the hospital for the last sixteen years, and the Rev. J. C. Schindel of the English Lutheran church, told of their many visits there, and said they heard no complaints from the patients, although they had made close inquiry. Mr. Schindel told of a Mrs. Merkle, who had made charges. He said she had written him since, and stated that she had been asked to make the charges, which she now regretted. He promised to send her letter to the committee.

To impeach, if possible, the evidence of Arthur Slim, who testified that "a whole quart of raw acid was poured over my ulcerated leg," Fred Freeman, the ward orderly who dressed the leg, was placed on the stand. The treatment blank, showing what dressing and medicines were used, was placed in evidence. Nothing was used to burn.

Slim also swore that he was "thrown out of the hospital at 11 o'clock on a cold night, with no shoes." The records showed that he was discharged at 11:45 a. m., and R. E. Crockett, property clerk at the hospital, testified that Slim had come to him and complained that his shoes were full of holes. Crockett said he gave the man a new pair of hospital slippers, after he had stated that they would suffice until he reached his room. The discharge blank also showed that Slim was sent away from the hospital for violating rules and for being abusive and profane. The record is an old one and was made long before charges were even contemplated.

Ernest A. Baker testified that while he was dangerously ill with pneumonia his wife called up every hour for two whole nights, and each time was given his pulse, temperature and general condition.

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April 20, 1909

NEW HONOR FOR OSCAR SACHS.

Appointed Imperial German Con-
sular Representative for K. C.

The unprecedented growth of Kansas City has presumably been noticed by the German government and more direct commercial relations between Kansas City and Germany are desirable. Oscar Sachs was offered the post as representative of the Imperial German consular service and the office was readily accepted by him. Mr. Sachs came to Kansas city from Berlin in 1881 but never lost interest in his old fatherland. He has been for many years an officer of the Elks club, secretary and director of the German hospital since its foundation twenty-three years ago, a member of the City Club, secretary of the German-American Fraternal Alliance and member of other charitable institutions. Although he never held public office, he always took great interest in municipal and civic affairs.

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July 24, 1908

SLEEPS IN A WINDOW;
FALLS OUT ON A WOMAN.

Major Richardson, Negro, Injures
Himself and Mrs. Dave Gross-
man by Falling From Perch.

Major Richardson, a negro stonemason, 30 years old, has a bad habit of siting down in the window sill of his room in the second story at 1802 East Eighteenth street and falling asleep. Several times his roommate has narrowly saved him from falling out on the granitoid paving below. Yesterday, Major did an unusually hard day's work in the hot sun and about 10 o'clock last night he set in the open window and, of course, fell asleep.

Just at the moment that Major was slipping into slumberland, Mrs. Dave Grossman, 45 years old, who lives in the shop below, was carrying a tub of waste water out into the street, assisted by her daughter, Mary. As Mrs. Grossman opened the screed door directly below where Richardson was sitting, the latter entered the gates of sleep and came tumbling down upon her. In his descent one of his feet passed through the transom over the door and he was turned over so that he alighted on Mrs. Grossman's chest on his head. Then he bounced off and fell on the paving, almost fracturing his skull.

Mrs. Grossman's shrieks called neighbors to the scene and they took her into the house. The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called, and the negro was taken to the general hospital, where he was reported in a serious condition last night. Mr. Grossman refused to go to the hospital at first, but after Dr. E. L. Ginsberg was called he recommended that she be taken to the German hospital, which was done. Mrs. Grossman's chest was severely bruised.

Mrs. Grossman is the wife of Dave Grossman, an express driver, and had charge of the little grocery store. She has four children and lives in rooms behind the store. They have only been in the neighborhood two weeks.

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January 31, 1908

HE ASSOCIATED WITH NEGROES.

Harry Hopkins Makes Out a Poor
Case Against His Comrades.

The negroes charged with throwing Harry Hopkins, 18 years old, over a twenty-foot embankment after assaulting and cutting him, at 919 Oak street, Nov. 16, were discharged yesterday by Justice Shoemaker. They were Dave Foster and Cleve Penn.

Hopkins worked under his father at the postoffice in the special delivery department. Foster, the negro, had also been employed at that work, and there was evidence that they had been very intimate, even spending nights together in the basement of the Keith and Perry Building, where special delivery boys gathered to gamble and drink.

The two boys, the afternoon of Nov 16, were locked in a room at 919 Oak street with two negro women where there was drinking and card playing. The evidence upon which the judge ordered a discharge was coroborated by five witnesses. It was that Cleve Penn, regular attendant of one of the girls, came from work in the barber shop in the Long Building, rapped, told who he was and Hopkins, evidently under the influence of liquor and fright, jumped through a window, ran around two houses and at full sped plunged into Oak street, twenty feet below. Here he was found by strangers, both wrists cut, his left ankle, right leg and right arm broken. He was treated at the Emergency hospital and taken to the German Hospital, where his life was several times despaired of.

Hopkin's testimony was that he had gone to the place to collect $2 from "Cyclone Dave" Foster, who, he asserted, ruled over a number of the special delivery boys, caling himself the "Invincible King." "Bull of the Mill," a professional pugilist, making them at times pay him money. "Cyclone Dave," however, had a witness to prove that Hopkins that morning got $2 of his money on a note sent to a tailor on Twelfth street. This, he said, was spent for candy and liquor for the girls.

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January 4, 1908

GREEK LABORER LOSES A LEG.

Anoynostopoulos to Be
Amputated.

Alexios Anoynostopoulos, a Greek laborer, fell off a Burlington work train in the Murray yards in Clay county shortly after 5 o'clock last evening, the wheels passing over his right leg. He was brought to the emergency hospital, and then was taken to the German hospital. There hs leg will be amputated at the knee. He is 29 years old, and lives at 609 Bluff street.

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August 30, 1907

WOODMAN IS DEAD.

Man Assaulted and Robbed in Store
Dies From Injury.

H. A. Woodman, the furniture dealer, who was found unconscious in his store at 1112-14 East Eighteenth street Wednesday afternoon, the result of a blow over the head from a hammer used by a robber, died about 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the German hospital. From the time he was found until his death Mr. Woodman never regained consciousness. The police have no clue to the murderer, and it is probably this will be added to the list of mysterious murders the police have been unable to run down.

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August 3, 1907

WAS FIRST IN COUNCIL

DEATH OF FRANK MUELSCHUS-
TER, HERE SINCE 1860.

Prominent in Lodge and German
Circles -- Enthusiastic Baseball
Fan and Friend of the Late
Churchill White.
The Death of Frank Muehlschuster
FRANK MUEHLSCHUSTER.

Frank Muehlschuster, one of Kansas City's oldest residents, died yesterday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, after being ill for seven months, at his home, 2338 Main street, from paralysis. He had lived in Kansas City for forty-six years.

During his long residence here he took an active interest in the welfare of the city. He was a member of the upper house of the first city council orgainzed in Kansas City, and was elected five times to a seat in that body. He was prominent in Masonic circles asn was a Knight Templar, a Scottish Rite Mason and a member of Ararat temple.

Mr. Muehlschuster was born in Bavaria, July 25, 1846. He was brought to Milwaukee by his parents when he was 4 years old, and received his education there. In 1860 he came West to seek his fortune, and decided to make his home at the mouth of the Kaw river.

When the war broke out he enlisted in the home guard and served as a private during the struggle.

He was a member of the firm of Muehlschuster & Jaiser, fire insurance agents. Mr. Muelschuster was considered by fire insurance men to be the dean of the local profession, and was widely known in insurance circles.

Mr. Muehlschuster was one of the founders of the German hospital, and always was to be numbered among the leaders in the enterprises of the local Germans. He was an enthusiastic baseball "fan," and for years he could be seen day after in the grandstand at the ball park, "rooting" for the local team. The late Churchill White and he were usually to be found sitting together in the grandstand when the home team was in the city.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. The services will be under Masonic direction, and burial will be at Mount Washington Cemetery.

He leaves a widow and three children -- Frank, Jr., Augusta and Arthur C. Muehlschuster.

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March 23, 1907

TO A BEAUTY DOCTOR AT 74.

Death of Mrs. N. R. Stripe Was
From Natural Causes

Dr. Frank Hall held an autopsy yesterday upon the body of Mrs. N. R. Stripe, of Parsons, Kas., who died here at the German hospital Thursday afternoon. After the body had been removed to Stone's morgue, Coroner George B. Thompson received a message from H. G. Stripe, a son in Parsons, notifying him that Mrs. Stripe had died of poisoning and demanding an autopsy and an inquest.

"We found death to have been due to natural causes," said Dr. Thompson last night. "It was plain to be seen that myocarditis, a form of heart disease, had caused her death."

Dr. Thompson said that a son from New York and A. M. Glick, a son-in-law, living here at 1012 East Twelfth street, were present at the autopsy and were satisfied with the result. Another son, the doctor said, suspected something wrong and asked that one of the prosecutors be present, as he feared an attempt would be made to "whitewash" someone.

"The woman is 74 years old," continued Dr. Thompson, "and she came here to be treated by a beauty doctor -- to have wrinkles removed. Some cosmetics had been given her to use on he face, and when she was taken ill about a week ago she became delirious and scratched the skin where the cosmetics had been used.

"That caused a skin eruption, and the children here became suspicious that the mother was being slowly poisoned. It would have been impossible, however, for poison to have had an effect that way. We talked with the doctor who treated her and are satisfied that everything was all right, so far as being poisoned is concerned."

Mrs. Stripe, after a short service, was buried in Elmwood cemetery at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. All of her children and the son-in-law are stage people.

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March 17, 1907
CLAIMANTS APPEAR.

THREE AFTER THE ESTATE OF
ADOLPH HUNTEMANN.
ONE LIVES IN WISCONSIN.

WRITES TO CHIEF HAYES AND
ALLEGES RELATIONSHIP.
The second is Detective Huntsman, of
Kansas City, Who Says His Family
Name Was Modified --
The Third in Cincinnati.

An heir to the estate of Adolph Huntemann, who died at the General hospital here March 12, leaving an estate valued at $400,000, has turned up. Chief Hayes yesterday received a letter in which was an Associated Press clipping telling of the death of the aged German and stating he had no heirs so far as known here. The letter follows:

Allenville, Wis., March 14, 1907
Gentlemen find inclose a Duplick to refer to. My Father Conrad Eckstein Had a Sister Married to Huntemann in Germany & She was Born in 1819 in April, so if you Find the reckords of his mother berth corspond with this rite me the full dat
yourd Truly,
L. W. ECKSTEIN, Allenville, Wis.

"Mr. Eckstein is not quite clear," said Chief Hayes, "but I take his letter to mean this: Go back to Germany, and if you find that this man's father's sister, Miss Eckstein, and anybody named Huntemann were born about the same time, send the $400,000 to the man in Allenville, Wis."

Adolph Huntemann was born in Hanover, Germany. He came to America in 1843 with his parents and later emigrated to Lawrence, Kas. He and his family lived in Lawrence during the Quantrell raid. Huntemann later moved to Kansas City and bought real estate. He was a frugal man and watched his interests well. The property which he got for practically a song then has increased in value so that at the time of his death the old German was worth nearly half a million dollars. He had about $75,000 in cash in the bank.

It is possible that Huntemann has an heir in Kansas City. John Huntsman, a city detective, is now investigating the records back in Germany before he makes any formal claim. His granfather's name was Peter Huntemann and he was born in Hanover, the same town as was Adolph Huntemann.

Mr. Huntsman says that when his father came to this country he changed the name to Huntsmann and later on, within the last few years, kin fact, Mr. Huntsman himself dropped teh final letter "n" from his name. He did it, he said, because he thought the final letter superfluous and teh spelling of the name was unchanged materially by it. An attorney has the matter in charge for Mr. Huntsman.

CINCINATTI, O., March 16 -- (Special.) Herman Hunteman and his daughter are to lay claim to the estate left by Adolph Huntemann, who died in Kanas City leaving an estate valued at half a million dollars. According to the announcement of death received here Adolph Huntemann left no heirs, but it is claimed that Herman Hunteman is his cousin and that the two men came to this country together fifty years ago from Germany, Herman stopped in this city and Adolph went on west and accumulated a fortune. Herman Hunteman makes his home in Osgood, Ind., but he has a daughter who lives in Avondale, a fashionable suburb of this city. It is said to be their intention to bring action to gain a share of their relative's estate.

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