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October 31, 1909

SWOPE MONEY AND
LAND TRANSFERRED.

INSTITUTE'S NAME CHANGED IN
HONOR OF BENEFACTOR.

Thousands of Dollars Contributed
After Announcement That Re-
quired $50,000 Had
Been Obtained.

No longer is it the Franklin institute. Satisfied with the great response made to the institute's appeal for aid, S. W. Spangler, agent for Thomas H. Swope, who gave $50,000 in land and cash conditionally to the institute, and John J. Paxton and S. S. Fleming, administrators of the Swope estate, yesterday gave to the directors of the institute the deed to the land on which the Thomas H. Swope Institute is to be built, and Mr. Swope's pledge of $25,000 in money. The deed was filed yesterday afternoon.

The officers of the institute received about $55,000 in the canvass for funds. there was $9,101.29 in cash and the rest in pledges. Ralph P. Swofford, president of the institute, Fletcher Cowherd, treasurer; and Benjamin B. Lee, H. D. Faxon, Herbert V. Jones, D. L. James, directors, and James T. Chafin, head resident of the institute, took the certificates of deposit and the pledges to Mr. Spangler's office yesterday. Mr. Paxton and Mr. Fleming, Mr. Swope's nephew, arrived soon after.

ENTIRELY SATISFIED.

"We are satisfied entirely with the result of the campaign and with the pledges," Mr. Paxton said. "Speaking for Mr. Fleming and myself, I wish to say that every one of the Swope family sympathized with your effort to raise the fund and with the purpose for which Mr. Swope made the gift."

"My uncle was deeply interested in the institute," Mr. Fleming said. "I am glad you were successful and trust that you will be able to make the institute all that you wish it to be."

A photograph of Mr. Swope was given the institute officers. It will be framed and placed in the new institute, which is to be named for Mr. Swope. Thousands of dollars were given to the institute fund yesterday after the announcement was made that the fund was complete. The latest mail yesterday brought more and it is believed that the flood of subscriptions which started Friday will not end for several days.

DR. WOODS GIVES $500.

Dr. W. S. Woods, of the Commerce Trust Company, gave $500 after the fund was complete. The Kansas City Live Stock Traders' exchange considered a motion to give $100 to the fund. A member suggested that a collection be taken instead. The collection was $225. The Kansas City Live Stock exchange also gave $100. More than that amount was given by the employes of Emery, Bird, Thayer's, when nearly 300 persons working in the store gave 25 or 50 cents each, after the fund had closed. Six church societies, half of them Christian Endeavor bodies, also contributed.

"Personal Help," by Churchill Bridgeford, a live stock commission man, netted the institute $1,-34 from the stock yards district in the campaign. The board of trade raised $450 and its members gave, or solicited, $2,500 for the fund.

Officers of the institute will visit other cities for ideas before the plans of the new institute will be agreed upon. One of the great needs of Kansas City, the officers say, is a modern creche. The institute now cares for children 2 years old and more, but has not been equipped to care for infants. It has been necessary to refuse to care for the babies of several mothers who are employed because of this. It is probable a creche will be added to the activities of the institute in the new building.

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October 4, 1909

HE DIDN'T FLATTER HIMSELF.

Colonel Swope Told Kelly Brent He
Was Not the Smart Man Many
Thought Him.

"Many persons think me a smart man but the truth of it is I'm an old fool," Colonel Thomas H. Swope said one day to Kelly Brent.

The two had a real estate deal on, and the colonel concluded at the end of long negotiations not to make the investment.

"Some years ago I concluded to sell off a great deal of my real estate holdings," said Colonel Swope, "and hang me if I didn't sell for a song the best of it. What I sold is worth millions today and a great deal I have left is not worth paying taxes on."

When the park board a few years ago suggested placing of a brass medallion of Colonel Swope at the entrance to Swope park he protested earnestly. He wrote to the board saying that while he lived he wanted no monument to be erected. It was explained that the medallion was not intended as a mark of the memory of the donor of the beautiful park, but as a slight token of appreciation and esteem from the city. After a long parley Mr. Swope reluctantly gave his consent to the installation of the medallion.

No man was more averse to publicity in the making of public bequests than was Colonel Swope. Just a hint being dropped that he contemplated a gift would anger the philanthropist and he would abandon his purpose. Some years ago Colonel Swope visited Roosevelt hospital in New York and asked to be shown through the institution. He incidentally remarked to the attendant that he was from Kansas City and that it was his purpose some day to build a hospital here and present it to the city.

A reporter for The Journal heard of the colonel's intentions and printed the story. The colonel became exasperated over the premature announcement and asked the reporter to visit him at his offices. The reporter to this day remembers the wrath displayed by the colonel and his ears still tingle with the tongue lashing administered.

"By your interference, sir," the colonel loudly declaimed, "you have deprived Kansas City of one of the best hospitals in the country. When people get to knowing my business it is time for me to quit."

It is unnecessary to state that Colonel Swope did not build the hospital, but he did give the ground on which it stands.

"I have known Mr. Swope a great many years, and knew him to be a kind, generous man," said J. J. Swofford last night. "Several times in the past five years I have approached him for donations for the Y. M. C. A. building fund and other funds for the promotion of the association's enterprise. He usually contributed from $100 to $400 a year.

"I know very little of Mr. Swope's business tactics, but I remember a peculiar thing about the manner in which he made these donations. He kept absolutely no account of his charities and when he signed a check to give me for the fund he used a check without a number and stub. He seemed very modest and sensitive about what he gave away.

"About three months ago, I think it was, he made and arrangement with my son Ralph Swofford of Thirty-first and Summit streets, who is president of the executive board of the Franklin Institute, to endow the institution with $50,000 providing as much more could be raised. A campaign has already been started and I believe is pretty well under way to raise the required $50,000.

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August 4, 1909

GIFT OF $50,000 TO
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE.

Thomas H. Swope Offers $25,000
in Cash and Ground on Camp-
bell Near Sixteenth Street
for New Building.

Thomas H. Swope, already Kansas City's manifold benefactor, has given $50,000 to Franklin institute, half in land, half in cash. Unless the donor should extend the time limit the gift will be forfeited November 1 if an additional $50,000 is not raised by that date.

A noon meeting of the directorate of the institute was held yesterday and the members decided to supplement the donation by $5,000 or $10,000 to be raised among their own number. No city-wide campaign for funds will be made, but a quiet effort will be put forth to obtain the money from friends of the social settlement.

Little apprehension that the required amount cannot be raised is entertained.

Henry f. Holt of the architectural firm of Howe & Holt, is one of the directors of the institute. He will set about at once planning the building which the Swope gift makes possible. The site donated lies on the west side of Campbell street between Sixteenth and Seventeenth. Its dimensions are 105 x 142 feet.

Established six years ago, Franklin institute has grown amid adverse conditions. It is now located at Nineteenth and McGee streets, in a two-story frame house which is rented from month to month. In spite of the obstacles which had to be overcome, the work of the settlement has attracted the substantial attention of many Kansas Cityans interested and informed on matters of charity.

For some time Mr. Swope has entertained a strong interest in the results of institutional work, and after acquainting himself with the philanthropic activity of Franklin institute made known his intention to help it to the extent of $50,000. His gift was made with absolutely no solicitation on part of friends of the institute.

Ralph P. Swofford is president of the institute, and J. T. Chafin is head resident. The other officers are Henry D. Faxon, vice president; Fletcher Cowherd, treasurer, and Herbert V. Jones, secretary.

The directorate is made up of William Cheek, Henry F. Holt., R. H. McCord, Rabbi Harry H. Mayer, Howard F. Lee, Benjamin B. Lee, H. J. Diffenbaugh, W. J. Berkowitz, George T. Vance, I. D. Hook, D. L. James and E. L. McClure.

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June 18, 1909

SYSTEM OF CHARITY
WORK IS CRITICIZED.

CLAIMED THERE IS NEED OF
REORGANIZATION.

Manner in Which Associated Chari-
ties Is Operated Doesn't Meet
With Approval of Some
of Its Members.

Criticism of the manner in which the Associated Charities of Kansas City is being operated at the present time, and an appeal for reorganization, were voiced at a meeting of the Men's club at St. Paul's Episcopal church last night. The heads of the three charities, J. C. Chafin of the Franklin institute, E. T. Brigham of the Helping Hand and the Rev. Edwin Woodruff, in charge of the institutional work of Grace Hall, spoke.

The demand for an efficient organization among the charities of the city was made. It was pointed out, particularly by Messrs. Chafin and Woodruff, and strongly seconded by Dr. John Punton that the present organization was an associated charity in name only.

"There is in charge of the Associated Charities," said Mr. Woodruff, "a man who has many worthy qualities, but his interests are with the Providence Associated, of which he is secretary."

NEED OF LOCAL CHARITIES.

Mr. Chafin said that the most urgent need among the charitable institutions of Kansas City today is a competent Associated Charities.

"The secretary of the present association does not give the attention that he should to that part of his work," said Mr. Chafin. "We have not dared to say anything about it for fear of complications, and I want you men to understand that we have gone further in this matter tonight than we have dared go before. It has been done with the hope that you as a body will take some action in the matter."

Dr. Punton spoke for a reorganization of the present Associated Charities, though he did not refer to the present secretary.

The Men's Club gave the speakers to understand that it would take action in the matter forthwith.

The meeting was arranged so that the work of the Helping Hand, Franklin Institute and Grace Hall might be put before the churchman.

Referring to recent criticism of the Helping Hand, Mr. Woodruff said:

NOT FOR FASTIDIOUS MEN.

"I have been to the Helping Hand and have eaten there. It seems to me that the institution is very well managed and organized. It is a peculiar fact that this criticism comes in summer time when the bums can sleep in the parks, under the trees. In the winter time they all flock to the institution for shelter. It is true that you and I would not choose to sleep at the Helping Hand. Nor does any millionaire tramp have to live in the North End."

The Rev. Mr. Ritchie of St. Paul's church further defended the Helping Hand:

"I have stood in front of the Helping Hand and watched the men come in. They carry an odor about their persons which would not please fastidious men, that is true. But fastidious men need not go there. The work of the Helping Hand is an admirable one, deserving of much credit."

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May 24, 1909

BATH COSTS A NICKEL NOW.

Personal Ablutions Almost Prohibi-
tive Luxury in McClure Flats.

They're bathing less in the McClure flats. Private bathtubs have always been an unknown luxury there. Personal ablutions formerly were performed by most of the residents at the bathhouse provided by the United Jewish Charities at 1820 Locust street. There a child could get a bath, including the use of a towel, for the sum of one penny. An adult might bathe for a nickel.

More aristocratic people went to a private bathhouse at 310 East Nineteenth street, where children paid a nickel and grown ups 15 cents. Each of the bathhouses had five tubs, but only the penny shop was ever crowded, for there are few in the neighborhood that can afford to pay a nickel to have their children washed.

Since the opening of the beautiful new Jewish charities building on Admiral boulevard, the bathhouse on Locust street has passed into private ownership. Free baths are furnished at the new charities building, but it is very far from McClure flats.

With the passing of communal ownership of the bathhouse passed the penny baths, and now the price is a nickel for every child, and 15 cents for adults.

Therefore is McClure flats abstaining from baths, and is likely to partake of them sparingly until the completion of the free public bathhouse in Holmes square.

Yesterday afternoon a member of the park board stated that it would be August 1 at t he earliest before the bathhouse at Holmes square is completed. Work has been delayed from unavoidable reasons.

"A few of the children more strongly imbued with the gospel of cleanliness than others make an occasional pilgrimage to the bathhouse on the Paseo when it is warm," said Mrs. J. T. Chafin, wife of the head resident at the Franklin institute. "But for most of them the walk is too long, and many who need the bath most are too young to march such a distance."

In the McClure flats district there are not half a dozen private bathtubs. An investigating committee last summer estimated that there were approximately 10,000 people in the city who had not the use of a bathtub.

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December 27, 1908

KIDS TRY TO REPEAT
AT THE GIFT GIVING.

More Presents From Mayor's
Christmas Tree.
It was announced in yesterday's Journal that about 700 children had failed to get a present at the mayor's Christmas tree in Convention hall on Christmas, and that tickets had been given them to return Saturday at 2 p. m., when sacks would be given them. About noon a telephone message was sent to police headquarters that over 2,500 boys were massed at the hall and police were asked for to keep order.

A great many of the policemen who were sent had been on duty there the day before and they recognized scores of boys whom they had seen get a package on Christmas day. When the kids were asked what they were doing there they answered, "We are after what we kin git that's what we're here fer." That class of repeaters were put out of line and only those who had tickets were admitted. With all of that care the little sharpers managed to get in on the second day's festivities.

After the packages fell short Christmas day -- on account of so many children from the outside which were not counted on -- Captain J. F. Pelletier, head of the purchasing committee,, went that evening and bought 1,000 more substantial toys and candy, nuts and fruit to go in the bags. Early yesterday morning, in response to a notice in The Journal, about twenty of the tired women who had worked so hard all week, reported at the hall and when the gifts arrived began work. All was in readiness at 3 p. m., but there was no crowding or jamming in the hall, as only those with tickets were admitted.

J. C. Chafin of the Franklin institute arrived at the hall soon after the long line of boys had been formed. As he walked up the line many of them ducked out, hid their faces and ran to the end of the line and got in again.

"Every child from my district was here yesterday," he said as he came in the hall. "They all got something, for I saw them. They are all outside again."

E. T. Bringham, superintendent of the Helping Hand institute, recognized many familiar faces from the North End which he had seen in the lines with sacks on Christmas day.

Many women came yesterday with one ticket and from two and a half dozen children. They wanted one ticket to admit them all. They swore that they had been overlooked, but when the little fellows were taken aside -- those little ones who know only the truth -- they would tell just what they had got when they were there the day before.

One woman with one little girl and one ticket was admitted. "I have four at home with the whooping cough. I want a bundle for them." She was given four extra bundles, appropriate for the sick ones and asked where she lived. "Over in Armourdale," she said, "and I want one of them whips for each one of them, and one of them tops that dance, and one of anything else you've got." She was given a street car ticket for her little girl and told to try and be satisfied with her five packages. She was mad and showed it by what she said in the most spiteful manner.

Two small boys who had succeeded in washing the stamp from their hands Christmas day in time to get back to the hall and get tickets of admission to yesterday's event, were heard to say after they examined their sacks, "Huh, dis is better'n we got yesterday, ain't it?"

Most of those who were admitted on tickets yesterday and who got sacks were of the very deserving kind. The were of the more timid ones who had been crowded out Christmas day and their joy was depicted in their faces as they marched happily away, bundles in arms. Between 500 and 700 packages were given out yesterday on tickets. The rest were put aside and will be sent out to the homes where there are sick children who could not get to the hall.

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December 22, 1908

FREE TICKETS FOR ALL TO
THE GRAND TOMORROW.

A. Judah's Gift to the Children Will
Be Distrubted From Different
Charities Today.

Manager A. Judah of the Grand has invited the poor children of the city to a matinee performance by Corinne and her company tomorrow afternoon. The entertainment is being given in connection with the Christmas tree, and Manager Judah promises a surprise for the little ones who will be his guests for the afternoon. Admission will be by ticket, and the distribution of tickets will begin today, in charge of the following charitable organizations:

Associated Charities, 1115 Charlotte street (will also distribute tickets among colored population); Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street; Helping Hand, 408 Main street; Franklin institute, Nineteenth and McGee streets; Grace hall, 415 West Thirteenth street; Humane Society, city hall, second floor; United Jewish Charities, 1702 Locust street; Italian Charities, offices with Associated Charities; juvenile court, county court house; Bethel mission, 43 North First street, Kansas City, Kas; Catholic Ladies' Aid Society, Eighth and Cherry, St. Patrick's hall.

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July 30, 1908

THEY FOUND A SWEET SINGER.

Juvenile Court Ward Surprised
Young Women Settlement Workers.

"San-Ann-toe-nee, Ann-toe-nee-oh ---"

Thirty childish voices split the air with popular music at the Franklin institute yesterday afternoon. It was the singing hour for the children who attend the playgorund next door, and they were having their first lesson in popular music. They sang freely and sweetly and picked up the words of the songs quickly.

The singing hour was instituted by Miss Elenore Casny, who has charge of the playground, yesterday afternoon, as a life-saving device to keep the children from overheating themselves at play. Miss Amos Nichols and Miss Frances Canny volunteered to furnish the music, and the scheme was put through with perfect success. One 12-year-old, Willie Zinn, a ward of the juvenile court, was discovered to have a beautiful voice, and an effort will be made to have it cultivated. Another session of the class will be held today, in the hottest part of the afternoon, and the lessons probably will be continued during the summer. An upstairs room, designed for a kindergarten, will be used.

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