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June 4, 1909

JOHN W. SPEAS, LONG
ILL, KILLS HIMSELF.

With Pistol and Poison Makes Sure
of Death After Writing a
Farewell Note.
John W. Speas, Victim of Suicide.
JOHN W. SPEAS.

After writing a brief farewell note to his family, John W. Speas committed suicide yesterday morning at 6:30 o'clock in a bedroom at his home, 1028 Summit street, by drinking carbolic acid and shooting himself.

Mrs. Speas, who was in the dining room downstairs, hurried to the bedroom when she heard the report of the revolver, and found Mr. Speas prostrate upon the floor. She summoned the family physican, Dr. R. T. Sloan, who said death had been instantaneous. Before firing the fatal shot, it is believed that Mr. Speas swallowed the carbolic acid. According to the deputy coroner either method would have resulted in death.

Mr. Speas has been an active member of the Commercial Club for a longer period probably than any other man in it, and once refused the presidency. He was active in the building of the first Convention hall, and also was conspicuous in the work of reconstructing it after the fire. As a member of the Commercial Club he was looked upon as the most popular active worker. He was president several years of the Priests of Pallas, and a member of the board of directors.

Mr. Speas was a native of Missouri. He came to Kansas City at the age of 10 years, and for several years sold papers, and later carried a paper route. He studied bookkeeping at Spalding's Business college, and then allied himself with the Kansas City Distilling Company. Much of his business career was interwoven with that of E. L. Martin, president of the distilling company. Later Mr. Speas became interested in the Monarch Vinegar company, and eventually became the sole owner.

An enthusiastic baseball fan, he identified himself with National League in the '90s, and for three or four years owned or controlled the franchise in Kansas City. He was a member of the Masons, Elks and Mystic Shrine.

Mr. Speas was born on a farm near Kansas city, October 18, 1862. In 1884 he married Miss Evelyn Southworth. Besides his widow he leaves one son, Victor Speas. Continued ill health of three years' duration is believed to explain his suicide.

The pallbearers for the Speas funeral, which will be held Saturday morning, are F. A. Faxon, L. W. Shouse, E. M. Clendening, William Barton, J. C. Schmelzer, D. P. Thompson, F. S. Doggett and W. H. Holmes.

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April 24, 1909

WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL
IS FORMALLY OPENED.

3,000 PEOPLE LAST NIGHT IN-
SPECT NEW BUILDINGS.

Entire Equipment Represents Out-
lay of Nearly $500,000 -- Elabo-
rate Programme of Speeches
and Music Is Presented.

The formal house warming of the Westport high school at Thirty-ninth and Locust streets took place last night, nearly 3,000 people participating. The building was thrown open for inspection at 8 o'clock. There was no conspicuous array of decorations and festooning of school pennants and class colors, only the building was brilliantly lighted by electricity in each of its four stories. There was enough to see and appreciate in the common equipments of the school.

The patrons of the school began to arrive in automobiles and street cars at 7:30 o'clock. Before the opening time came the better part of the better part of the crowd had arrived and was strolling about the grounds admiring the strictly modern buildings which, on their completion, September 15, had cost close to $500,000.

Two features of the school equipment brought forth more comment, perhaps, than all the others combined. They were the gymnasium, said to be the finest of its kind in the West, and the domestic science department, where pretty girls in neat white aprons stood ready too tell their mothers modern ideas concerning pastry making and undiscernable patchwork.

The domestic science department has over 100 pupils. Not all of them are girls, and it is said the class record in fancy work has several times been broken by the deft fingers of boys also adept on the baseball diamond.

The art department and the chemical and zoological laboratories are also expensively fitted with the latest models and appliances. In the zoological room are thirty compound microscopes. The water color work and free hand drawing of some of the students of the art department created favorable comment among the amateur and professional painters who are patrons of the school and who were among the visitors last night.

At 9 o'clock the crowd was ushered into the auditorium, where an excellent programme was the piece de resistance of the house warming. This part of the school equipment was in perfect accord with the others, expense apparently having been overlooked in making it among the best of its kind anywhere.

The auditorium seats 1,400 people. In times of emergency, like last night, chairs can be placed int eh aisles so that 200 more can easily be accommodated and all hear.

After the "Coronation March" had been played by the high school orchestra, Frank A. Faxon, vice president of the school board, made a few remarks of welcome. Addresses were given by Judge H. H. Hawthorne and Dr. Herman E. Pearse, both of whom were instrumental in procuring the big and modern high school building for Westport.

One of the features of the programme was a bass solo by Reid Hillyard, a pupil of the school. Mr. Hillyard received his musical training at the school.

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April 6, 1909

MONUMENT TO A. R. MEYER.

Sculptor Here to Discuss Unveiling,
Which May Take Place May 7.

Daniel Chester French, sculptor and designer of the monument to be erected to the memory of A. R. Meyer, first president of the park board, on the Paseo near Twelfth street, was here yesterday to consult with the committee of the Commercial club in regard to the unveiling. The members. The members of the committee are: E. M. Clendening, Frank A. Faxon, William Barton, H. D. Ashley, C. J. Schmelzer and George Kessler. The committee and Mr. French visited the site of the memorial and practically decided on May 7 as the date of the unveiling.

The sculptor said that the bronze statue was about finished and would be here in about two weeks. It will be seven and a half feet in height and will be supported by a bronze background.

Mr. French said that it was his second visit to Kansas city and he spoke in admiration of the parks and boulevards. He left for New York last night.

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April 25, 1908

MEYER STATUE WILL
STAND ON PASEO.

SITE IS CHOSEN BETWEEN NINTH
AND TENTH STREETS.
Statue of the late A. R. Meyer
BRONZE STATUE TO BE ERECTED TO THE MEMORY OF A. R. MEYER ON THE PASEO, BETWEEN NINTH AND TENTH STREETS.

After spending almost the entire day yesterday going over the boulevards and through the parks of the city, the members of the Meyer statue committee, together with Daniel Chester French, the sculptor, late yesterday agreed upon a point on the Paseo between Ninth and Tenth streets, for the location of the bronze statue to be erected of the late A. R. Meyer, first president of the park board. The statue will be near the south end of the block and will face toward the south. The immediate surroundings for the statue will be decided upon by the park board.

This will be the first public statue to be erected in Kansas City, and will be in honor of the man to whom perhaps more credit is due for the splendid park and boulevard system for which Kansas City is now noted, than any other.

The model for the monument was sent ahead by Mr. French with the request that it not be opened until his arrival. It was first opened at 10 o'clock yesterday morning in the Commercial Club rooms, in the presence of Mr. French and the members of the statue committee. The model was unanimously accepted by the committee and, on recommendation of that body, was later accepted by the city art committees. A committee composed of E. M. Clendening, H. D. Ashley and Frank A. Faxon was named to frame a suitable inscription for the base of the monument.

The monument consists of a main structure of Knoxville marble fifteen feet in height, about seven feet in width and two feet in depth from front to back, resting on a base of the same material about ten by six feet.

The monument is surrounded by an ornamental cap, and the main stone, containing the portrait of Mr. Meyer, is supported by an ornamental stone, resting on the base proper. The portrait of Mr. Meyer will be in bronze, let into the main stone of the monument, and will show a figure seven and a half feet in height. It has been the endeavor of the sculptor to suggest Mr. Meyer as the originator of the park system, and he is represented as standing out of doors with his right hand resting on an open map, which lies upon a marble Pompeian table. The left hand holds a pair of field glasses, and a tree under which he is standing is introduced at the right.

Mr. French will remain in Kansas City until tonight. He expects to have the statue finished in about a year.

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September 27, 1907

WIPE OUT TUBERCULOSIS

OBJECTS OF A SOCIETY FORMED
LAST NIGHT.

Building and Endowing of a Tent
Colony and a Sanitarium
Among the Purposes
of Promoters.

Fresh Air, Fresh Milk and Fresh Eggs.

That's the motto of the Jackson County Society for the Relief and Prevention of Tuberculosis, organized last night. The leading men of the city -- doctors, ministers, priests, lawyers and officeholders -- attended the meeting and promised their assistance in putting the society in shape to do real work.

The programme of intentions outlined for the next few months is:

The building and endowing of a tent colony and a sanitarium near the city for the treatment of tuberculosis patients.

The employment of nurses to visit in the homes of consumptives and teach the people how to live properly when afflicted with the disease.

The enactment of laws by the city council to compel the reporting of all cases of tuberculosis, and to clean and disinfect all houses in which consumptives had lived or died.

The distribution of literature and the holding of public meetings to educate the people in healthy living -- fresh air, baths and wholesome food.

"Kansas City is twenty years behind Eastern cities in dealing with tuberculosis," said Dr. C. B. Irwin, one of the organizers of the society, last night. There is no fumigation, no reports of deaths from the disease, and practically no effort to check the spread of the plague. I know one house in this city from which there men have been carried out dead from consumption in the past five years. It's easy to know how the last two got it. As fast as one family moved out another moved in.

"Since in 1880 New York city began fumigating houses in which tuberculosis patient had died, began educating the people and commenced a systematic fight upon the disease, the death rate from it had fallen 50 per cent. The same is true of Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore.

"In the Western cities one death in every seven is from the white plague."

The directors of the society, chosen last night, are: Rev. Father W. J. Dalton, Dr. E. W. Schauffler, Judge H. L McCune, Mayor H. M. Beardsley, Frank P. Walsh, R. A. Long, Rev. Matt S. Hughes, Hugo Brecklein, Dr. St. Elmo Sauders, Congressman F. C. Ellis, Mrs. Robert Gillam, Ralph Swofford, Albert Bushnell, F. A. Faxon, George F. Damon and J. W. Frost.

The others are: Dr. R. O. Cross, president; Dr. C. B. Irwin, secretary, Albert Marty, treasurer; John T. Smith, Rev. Wallace M. Short, J. W. Frost and E. A. Krauthoff, vice presidents; chairman finance committee, Mrs. Kate E. Pierson; chairman soliciting committee, Mrs. E. T. Brigham; chairman legislative committee, J. V. C. Karnes, and publication committee, Dr. E. L. Stewart, chairman; Dr. E. L. Mathias and Clarance Dillon.

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August 19, 1907

FOUNT FOR ANIMALS

DEDICATORY EXERCISES FOR
FIRST OF ITS KIND HERE.
FLOW OF WORDS AND WATER

ANIMALS IMBIBE WHILE GIFTED
ORATORS EXPOUND.
Fountain Given to Kansas City by
National Humane Alliance, of
New York, Begins Career
of Mercy Under Fa-
vorable Auspices.

During the dedication of the $1,500 granite horse and dog fountain at Fourth and Broadway yesterday afternoon, thirteen teams, nine horses in single harness and three dogs stopped, dipped their faces in the flowing water and drank deep. Frank Faxon, one of the speakers, kindly said:

"I am sorry there are no more horses and dogs present. I would like to ask them all to step up and have a drink with us."

Mr. Faxon was more generous than he thought, as he learned at the close of the exercises, when he and the other speakers and the audience rushed over to the fountain to get a drink. There are no cups on the fountain. It is strictly a place for birds, and four-footed beasts. President E. R. Weeks, of the Kansas City Humane Society, who wore a Panama hat, essayed to drink out of the rim of his headgear, mountain brook fashion, but most of the water ran down his shirt front. Mr. Faxon, Police Commissioner Elliot H. Jones, Mrs. L. O. Middleton and others looked on and declined to try to use the hat which Mr. Weeks proffered them.

The humans held a meeting around the fountain and argued the question of having cups chained there, but decided adversely.

"During a busy and hot work day," John Simmons, secretary of the Teamsters' union, said, "the teams line up from all directions awaiting their turns at the fountain. There is no chance for a man to get a drink. Besides, if there were cups, children who tried to drink might be trampled by the horses which rush to the fountain."

Nearly every department of city life was represented in the dedication exercises. E. R. Weeks was chariman, Hale H. Cook appeared for the school children, Mrs. L. O. Middleton for the T. T. U. F. M. Furgason carried a Judge Jules E. Guinotte proxy, George Hoffman spoke for the city hall, Father Dalton for the church people, Harry Walmsley apeared for the birds and Frank Faxon for "Old Dobbin."

No one had a word to say in condemnation of any bird or beast. The speakers tried to outdo each other in praise. Mr. Faxon said that a horse "was always faithful and kind," and Mr. Walmsley declared that the birds are symbols of the heavenly life." But Mr. Furgason, reading Judge Guinotte's speech, went then all one better when he quoted George Elliot as saying: "The more I associate with men, the more I like dogs."

In calling attention to the fact that the fountain dedicated yesterday was the first permanent one in the city, Mrs. Middleton recited the history of attempts made by various charities in past years to erect public drinking fountains. The most successful of these schemes was the setting in place of twelve ice water casks on downtown corners by the W. C. T. U. many years ago.

The beautiful piece of granite dedicated yesterday afternoon, which Thomas Wight, secretary of the Kansas City art commission, described as "a permanent bit of art and a forerunner of a new era in municipal life," was presented by the National Humane Alliance of New York. The purchase price came from a fund bequeathed by the late Herman Lee Ensign of New York, whose name is on a bronze plate on one side of the fountain. The Kansas City Humane Society and the city council were among those most instrumental in securing the gift for this city. The society hopes that other fountains may be erected on busy corners through gifts by local philanthropists.

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May 15, 1907

J. C. HORTON DEAD

OPERATION PERFORMED LAST
SATURDAY IS FATAL.
HAS LIVED HERE SINCE 1878.

PROMINENT IN BUSINESS, SOCIAL
AND POLITICAL AFFAIRS.
Was Born in New York State and
Settled in Lawrence, Kas., in
1857 -- Would Have Been
70 Years Old
Today.
James C. Horton

On the eve of his 70th birthday, James C. Horton, a resident of Kansas City since 1878, and actively identified with its commercial, civic, social and religious upbuilding, died last night shortly after 10 o'clock at the South Side hospital. His death was the result of an operation performed Saturday for a stomach derangement. But very few of the thousands of friends of the deceased knew of his illness and the announcement of his death came as a shock and a surprise.

At Mr. Horton's bedside were a niece, Mrs. William R. Jacques, and her husband, who live at 1432 West Prospect, the Horton homestead; Mr. and Mrs. Frank F. Faxon of 2615 Troost avenue, and others.

Until fifteen minutes before Mr. Horton's death, he was conscious. The last words he spoke were: "I'm very tired."

He spoke this with an effort, seeming suddenly to grow weaker. Immediately he fell into a stupor from which he never aroused.

No man was better or more favorably known, and no one man was more highly esteemed, beloved, trusted and appreciated than was James C. Horton. In business pursuites he was teh acme of honesty; in private life a man of the highest type of morality and noble and edifying things and thought. In church affairs he was active and sincere, and as senior warden for years of Grace Episcopal Church he contributed largely to its support and prosperity; in politics he was an unflinching Republican, and while standing for its principals he never permitted himself to be led about by venal politicians or to waver from what he considered to be right and to be to the best interests of the people; he was a fast and consistent friend, lovable in disposition and character; liberal and unselfish, he devoted the better part of his life and savings to lighten the burden of the poor, unfortunate and oppressed, and thousands there are who can lend testimony to his goodness of heart and liberality of purse.

James C. Horton died a widower, his wife having passed away in 1901, and her body laid tenderly away in the cemetery at Lawrence, Kas. Although born in the East at Ballston Spa, New York state, Mr. Horton might be properly referred to as a Western man, born and bred, for he had been a resident of the West since 1857, and was a prominent and active figure in its growth and development. Int that year he located in Lawrence, Kas., as the agent of an express company. Young, vigorous and ambitious, he took a prominent part in many of the affairs of Kansas that have now become history. He filled county offices of trust with credit to himself and the satisfaction of his constituency, and was a state senator for one or two terms.

While a resident of Lawrence he married Mrs. Robinson, a widow, and in 1878, Mr. Horton came to Kansas City and became associated with the drug firm of Woodwward, Faxon & Co. In 1897 the firm name was changed to Faxon, Horton & Gallagher. February 3, 1906, Mr. Horton retired from business pursuits to pass his declining years in rest, free from mercantile burdens. He lived with his neice, Mrs. Jacques, wife of W. R. Jacques, at the Horton homestead, 1432 West Prospect, from where the funeral will be conducted.

No children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Horton. The body will be temporarily held at Stine's undertaking rooms awaiting funeral arrangements.

During his residence in Kansas City Mr. Horton was always active in Republican politics, and his last notable fight was the one he put up in advocacy of the nomination of J. J. Davenport for mayor at the last municipal election. Mr. Horton was the unrelenting foe of ballot box stuffers and crooks, and in 1894 when a number of Kansas City men were prosecuting ballot box stuffers and he was short on funds he contributed out of his own pocket $786.50. Later his admiring friends got up a popular subscription, and insisted upon him being reimbursed against his own expressed wishes that it not be done. Although continually solicited by party leaders here to accept political office, he steadfastly declined, and a year ago when an attempt was made to elect him to a seat in the upper house of the council his remonstrance was so pronounced and determined that his name was withdrawn.

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