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December 4, 1909

ZONES OF CONTAGION
NEAR THREE SCHOOLS.

SCARLET FEVER AND DIPH-
THERIA IN SEVERAL SECTIONS.

Tin Drinking Cup Blamed by Medi-
cal Inspectors, Especially at
Benton -- Several Parochial
Schools Involved.

The medical inspectors going the rounds of the public schools have unearthed diphtheria and scarlet fever zones within the confines of Benton, Washington and Karnes schools. They are also learning from the daily returns of practicing physicians, of the existence of the two maladies among pupils of two or three of the parochial schools, but as the authority of the inspectors does not extend to schools of this description Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary commissioner, has not felt justified in taking any voluntary official notice or action.

Of the parochial schools the worst afflicted is St. John's Parochial school, 534 Tracy avenue. This school, located in a district largely inhabited by Italian children, is conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Yesterday Sister Superior Monica appealed to the health authorities to make an investigation. Dr. H. Delamater, chief inspector, made a personal visit to the school and was informed that ninety of the 160 pupils are detained at home by sickness. Within the last six days cases of scarlet fever have developed among the pupils, and Dr. Delameter fears that many who are home at home may have it. He will have an examination made of the school building as to its sanitary condition, and will have class rooms fumigated.

Washington public school is at the southwest corner or Independence avenue and Cherry street, and the Karnes school is at the northwest corner of Troost avenue and Fourth street. Large numbers of the pupils have scarlet fever, the majority of victims predominating among those attending Karnes school. The diphtheria is not as epidemic as scarlet fever. The attendants of these two schools live in the territory bounded on the south by Admiral boulevard, north by the river, west by Grand avenue and east as far as Lydia avenue. The majority of the cases are north of Fifth street and scatter as far to the east as Budd park. As an assistance to the health authorities in keeping in touch with the exact location of the disease, a large map of the city has been prepared, and when a case of diphtheria develops a green-headed pin is driven into the map, designating a particular territory, and when one of scarlet fever is reported the map is perforated with a red-headed pin.

MAP RAPIDLY FILLING.

The map describing the Washington and Karnes school districts is rapidly filling up with the pin indicators, but not as noticeably as the district in which Benton school is situated. At the latter school diphtheria is the most prevalent, and is giving some alarm. The infection is spreading with rapidity. Benton school is at the southwest corner of Thirtieth street and Benton boulevard, in a fashionable and well-to-do neighborhood. There are from twenty to thirty cases of diphtheria among pupils going to this school, and it is feared that the disease got its start from the drinking cups in use there.

"The drinking cup in the public schools is a menace to health and is a communicator and spreader of disease," said Dr. Delamater yesterday. "Its frightful possibilities were fully described by Dr. W. S. Wheeler in his last annual report, and he advises that it be relegated and sanitary fountains installed in the schools. The health of no child is safe when the tin cup is in use. While I am not directly charging the appearance of diphtheria at Benton school to the drinking cup, still there is plenty of room for that suspicion as the school building is new and should be sanitary."

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November 18, 1909

PROPOSE $14,000 HOME FOR
THE CRITTENTON MISSION.

Fireproof Building at Thirtieth and
Woodland Will Be Ready by Next
Summer.

Captain J. H. Waite, at the head of the Florence Crittenton mission and home, located in an old dwelling at 3005 Woodland avenue, made the statement last night that by next summer the institution hopes to be in a new fireproof building. It is to be erected, he said, on the corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue, where they own 156 feet fronting on the latter street.

"The foundation should be laid within the next ninety days," said Captain Waite, "so that work on the super-structure may begin in the spring. We have planned a building to cost between $10,000 and $14,000. As we want to make it absolutely fireproof and of reinforced concrete, we anticipate that the cost will be nearer $14,000. It is a grand institution and has done and is doing the noblest kind of work."

The Florence Crittenton Mission and Home for unfortunate girls was started in this city on February 4, 1896, with an endowment of $3,000 from Charles N. Crittenton, the millionaire philanthropist of New York, who died suddenly in San Francisco Tuesday. It first was situated on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main streets in a large three-story brick building which now has been torn down to make space for a city market.

After being at the original location for a short time it was decided to abandon the downtown mission work and establish a home. The institution then moved to Fifteenth street and Cleveland avenue into rented property. In June, ten years ago, the property at the southeast corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue was purchased for the home.

"A debt hangs over our heads for some time," said Miss Bertha Whitsitt, superintendent of the home yesterday, "but now we have 156 feet frontage on Woodland avenue on which we expect soon to erect our new building.

"Since the beginning of the mission and home," continued Miss Whitsitt, "we have cared for 582 young women, the majority of them with children. Just during the last year we cared for twenty-eight young women and twenty-three children. When totaled the number of days spent in the home by all of them amounts to 4,612, which we record as so many days of charity work."

Captain J. H. Waite, who has been at the head of the home for many years, said that Mr. Crittenton had given the home and mission $3,000 to start on. When the property at 3005 Woodland was purchased the National Florence Crittenton Home at Washington gave about $1,500 toward buying and improving the property.

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November 5, 1909

CITY'S UNEMPLOYED
TO HAVE NEW HOME.

HELPING HAND INSTITUTE AC-
QUIRES ADKINS HOTEL.

With Aid of Four Story Building
1,000 Men Can Be Cared For --
Plenty of Light, Baths --
Has Disinfecting Room.
New Helping Hand Institute Building.
NEW QUARTERS AT FOURTH AND WYANDOTTE STREETS.

With the acquisition of the old Adkins hotel at the southeast corner of Fourth and Wyandotte streets, the Helping Hand Institute has solved the problem of taking care of the city's unemployed. Carpenters are now at work overhauling the four-story structure and by the beginning of cold weather it is believed that the building will be ready for occupancy.

With the old building at 408 Main street, where the main offices are located, the Helping Hand institute will be prepared to take care of more than 600 men without the least crowding. In extremely cold weather little difficulty will be experienced in caring for 1,000 men.

Current Helping Hand Location.
PRESENT HOME OF THE INSTITUTE.

But the new building will have many features not possessed by the old quarters on Main street. Plenty of light, the best of ventilation, high ceilings, a laundry, shower baths and disinfecting room will make it very little inferior to the municipal lodging house in New York city. On the north side of the building are forty-one windows which makes the light and ventilation problem easy.
INSTALLING SHOWER BATHS.

But the main feature is the shower baths and disinfecting room. On the lower floor the plumbers are at work installing baths that will accommodate twenty-five men at one time. No one will be allowed to go to bed without first taking a bath and allowing his clothes to be placed in the disinfecting room, where they will remain over night. The laundry in the basement will keep the linen clean and eventually save the institution hundreds of dollars. Particular care will be exercised in guarding against tuberculosis. Before the year is over it is hoped that a physician will examine every man who applies for a bed.

Without doubt Kansas City will have as good a system for taking care of her unemployed as any municipality in the country. It is true that many of the large cities in the East, particularly New York and Philadelphia, have larger municipal lodging houses but they suffer disadvantages. In most cities bread lines are formed and the man without employment does not feel obliged to work for a night's lodging. In Kansas City, however, the city and county have made the Helping Hand an official charity institution.

WORK IS PROVIDED.

Men are not allowed to sleep in saloons or in other public places where the conditions are not sanitary. There is no other avenue for the unemployed man but to go to the Helping Hand institute, where he is given a chance to work for his meals and lodging. The mere fact that he must work keeps the professional "moocher" from making his headquarters in Kansas City.

The credit for the acquisition of the Adkins building belongs mainly to William Volker, one of the directors of the institute. Mr. Volker clearly recognized the need of more room for the institute, and believing that the employment system is the best, he used his influence in getting the building. E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the Helping Hand, is directing the work.

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November 4, 1909

HEADS BOW, PENITENT STEALS.

New "Mourner" Asks for Prayer,
Grabs Offering and Runs.

The Gospel Mission on Fourth street opposite police headquarters had conducted a successful service last night. The offering had been taken and the presiding elder had called all repentant sinners forward to testify. One young man, in particular, was vehement in his protestations of conversion to a better life.

"Brothers, I was a drunkard -- yes, at one time I was a thief, but all that is changed now, and I desire your prayers for my complete redemption."

The congregation bowed their heads in prayer and while they were so occupied the hand of the professed penitent slowly moved across the wooden table until it reached a pocket book which contained the nightly offering of the score of faithful.

In a flash it had gone, and with a laugh the man ran down the aisle and out into the street.

The police department was notified by Mrs. I. Hanson, 1406 Grand avenue, the owner of the pocket book. It contained about $5.

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October 25, 1909

FIFTEEN SLEEP IN CHAIRS.

Helping Hand Institute's 500 Beds
Not Enough for Cold Nights.

Every bed in the Helping Hand Institute was occupied at 1 o'clock yesterday morning and fifteen men, for whom the officers could find no accommodations, slept in the chairs of the assembly hall. The drop in temperature Saturday night was responsible for the large number of applicants.

Indications now are that the plan to add 600 more beds will fall through. At present there are accommodations for 500 men. The officers expected to double the number of beds. The officers had gone as far as to order some new equipment.

The building on Fourth street between Walnut and Main, owned by the city, the officers expected to get. The city, however, has refused to donate the use of this building. Consequently the plan of increasing the number of beds has been abandoned.

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October 21, 1909

FOR CITY'S TRIBUTE TO SWOPE.

Relatives in Letter to Mayor Thank
Kansas City People.

In a communication addressed to Mayor Crittenden, Mrs. L. O. Swope, sister-in-law of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, yesterday formally thanked the citizens of Kansas City for the public funeral tendered him. Mrs. Swope's letter follows:

"I wish to express to you, and to all of the city officials, on behalf of the Swope family, our high appreciation of the most beautiful tribute of honor and affection shown our dead. We feel that not a stone was left unturned to show him honor and gratitude.

"The services at the church were all that could have been. All the singing was sweet, but the solo, "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," was almost a voice from heaven. Once more thanking you for your great kindness, I remain, very sincerely, MRS. L. O. SWOPE. October 15, 1909."

It is said that the last legal transaction performed by Colonel Swope was the signing of a deed to a piece of property to the city on the north side of Fourth street, between Walnut and Main. It is a part of the square bounded by Walnut, Main, Third and Fourth, to be used for market purposes. There is a three-story brick building on the land, and this will be razed together with the four remaining buildings which the city will soon get posession of. there has been a delay in the formal transfer on account of the city having to deal with heirs.

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August 2, 1909

TO BUILD NEW GREEK CHURCH.

Priest's Ambition Is to Have Hand-
some Place of Worship.

A Greek church, the finest in the country, is the ambition of the Rev. Father Harlton Panogopoules, of Kansas City, who, with a delegation of members of his parish, departed yesterday afternoon for Topeka, where the first steps will be taken toward raising the money to this end. In the party were James Maniaties and G. Alexopoules. They act as Father Panogopoules's secretaries and interpreters.

The present church is at the corner of Fourth and Locust streets and has about 400 communicants. In a few months, however, it is said there will be more than 2,000, and perhaps twice that many, due to the coming of the Greeks who work as section hands and as laborers in mines and other places. It is with the assistance of these men that the priest expects to build his church. Father Panogopoules came to Kansas City from Athens two months ago. Since that time he has endeared himself to the local Greeks, and they are enthusiastic over his plans for a fine edifice.

To attain this end it will be necessary for him to communicate with the Greeks who are now at work in the railroad territory contiguous to Kansas City, and his first step is to go to Topeka, where there is quite a colony of Greeks, and interest them in the project.

Father Panogopules was attired in a long black cassock, with high felt turban. A great cross was suspended on a heavy chain from his neck. He and his party attracted much attention at the Union depot, where they were met by some of the Greeks who live in that section and to whom Father Panogopoules gave his blessing before he departed.

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July 3, 1909

HELPING HAND PLANS
BATH FOR NORTH END.

Public Showers From Fire Plug Will
Be Suspended Over Gutter -- Is
Superintendent Brig-
ham's Idea.
'The
The "Brigham Bath" for North End Youngsters.

Large numbers of children living in the North End have been without necessary baths for many moons. With the approach of hot weather the demand for some place where the youngsters of Little Italy and adjoining districts can get enough water to clean and cool their skins has become an imperative, and the Helping Hand institute proposes to come to the rescue with a novel device for free public baths on the street corners.

"The old swimmin' hole is a thing of the past," said E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the institute, last night. "The river is too swift for swimming and free public baths for the North End exist only in the minds of theoretical social workers, as yet, so that some substitute must be found. I have conceived the idea of putting up a half dozen public shower baths where the little ones can get their skins soaked nightly and have a great deal of pleasure besides."

Mr. Brigham has in mind a contrivance which he hopes will answer all the purposes of a miniature Atlantic city for Little Italy. An inch iron pipe will conduct the water from a city fire plug to a point seven feet over the gutter, where a "T" will be formed, the branches containing five horseshoe-shaped showers.

One of the portable baths has already been constructed and will be tried out tonight at Fourth and Locust streets.

Bathers will be expected to wear their ordinary dress, that is, a single garment, which is the mode for children in the North End. Thus the shower will serve the double purpose of a recreation and a laundry.

For years something in the line of this free, open-air public bath has been in operation at Nineteenth and McGee streets in the vicinity of the McClure flats. Nightly during the summer the children collect when the fire plug is to be turned on to flush the gutters, and stand in the stream. The stream is too strong for them to brave it for more than a second at a time, but many of them manage to get a bath which they probably would not get any other way.

"Children are naturally cleanly," said Mr. Brigham. "Although they like to get dirt upon themselves, they also like to get it off. I think the shower bath on the street corner should prove one of the most popular institutions in the North End."

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June 30, 1909

PALE ALE AT AUCTION.

Customs Officials Also Will Sell Her-
ring and Garlic Saturday.

Loyal Britons may be expected to rally when eight and a half casks of pale ale is put up, and Scotland ought to be heard from when fifteen kegs of Glasgow herring are cried at a government rummage sale scheduled for Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at No. 228 West Fourth street. C. W. Clarke, surveyor of the port, is sending to the hammer imports which were not cleared during the present year.

The customs officers find that the ale arrived without any manifest and, though it is a knock to admit it, the herring were "abandoned," whatever that may mean.

Great Britain is not to have everything her own way. Two hundred and nine pounds of Garlic will tempt the Italians. "Coke" fiends will get a chance at two dozen hypodermic syringes. Six rolls of Japanese matting and 12,000 Japanese postal cards and some jute from India complete the offering for the grown ups.

The surveyor also will put up for sale a case of souvenirs, brought to Kansas City by a globe trotter, who evidently went broke buying the toys, for he could not or would not pay the duty on them. In this lot are four dolls, a cuckoo clock and twenty-five pieces of carved wood representing Santa Claus, bears, dogs, deer, cows and jumping jacks.

Some of the bears, so says the custom house list, are smoking, one is playing a piano, a quartette are gambling and one is painting a picture.

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June 13, 1909

CAN'T USE NELSON BUILDING.

Helping Hand Committee, Looking
for Location, find it Unavailable.

After a thorough inspection of the Nelson building, Missouri avenue and Main street, the committee from the Helping Hand institute passed unfavorably upon it for the institute's use.

George W. Fuller, one of the committee, said last night:

"We found the Nelson building of such a style of construction as to render it unavailable for our use. The executive board of the Helping Hand institute muss pass upon the matter as yet, but our report will be an unfavorable one.

"There are two or three other places which we have in view for a new location, but there is nothing definite about them as yet. We are very anxious to get the Pacific house, Fourth and Delaware streets, but we have been unable to do so."

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March 29, 1909

FOOD WAS WELL COOKED.

Street Lunch Car Destroyed by
Fire in North End.

A large lunch wagon which is hauled to the corner of Fourth and Main every night by William Elliott, a negro, teaming contractor, caught fire and the heat scorched the paint on the buildings on each side of the street last night. Elliott unhitched his horses and drove them down the street to a safe distance. The fire department was notified and a hose wagon responded. The lunch car was in ashes when the water was turned on. The fire originated from the lighted gasoline stove in the wagon.

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February 2, 1909

WILL GET THE SQUARE NOW.

One North of the City Market Is to
Be Acquired.

Both houses of the council last night authorized the city comptroller to spend $250,000 acquired from the sale of bonds for the purchase of the square bounded by Main, Walnut, Third and Fourth streets. The buildings will be razed and sheds erected for the use of farmers having produce to sell. It was stated that an arrangement had been perfected with the several owners of the property to dismiss court appeals from the verdict of the condemnation jury.

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January 31, 1909

LEADER OF FANATICS
SUGGESTS A COVENANT.

WILLING TO 'FORGET AND FOR-
GIVE HIS ENEMIES.'

Reviews the Killing of Policemen
and Asks Permission to Locate
Followers on Govern-
ment Lands.

"Adam God" wants to make a covenant. Since December 10 the bearer of this title, whose real name is James Sharp, has been in the county jail awaiting trial on a charge of murder. It was his band of fanatics that participated in the city hall riot nearly two months ago.

Now, after thinking matters over, Sharp is prepared to forgive anybody who may have wronged him, provided everybody forgives him. He is ready to take his followers and with them colonize vacant government land, to live there annoyed by no one and annoying nobody.

The offer of Sharp is contained in a letter which he mailed Friday to the judge of the criminal court. Judge Ralph S. Latshaw received it yesterday. The entire document is unique, considering only its import and not the grotesque manner in which Sharp treated the English language.

HIS VERSION OF THE RIOT.

A number of versions of the riot are given by Sharp. Once he says "they began to shoot at me and I became absent-minded." That was just before he began to fire. In another place he says that he now knows why he was "shooting straight up in the air." Again he writes that he does not remember "shooting up in the air," and calls the whole riot a "foolish dream." Still in another place he says he acted in his "blindness."

Sharp also denies the right of officers in Kansas City to interfere with the children of his band. He says he is not a resident of the city, county or state, but that his home was on "government waters." This refers to the habit held by his band of traveling on a houseboat on the Missouri.

The letter, stripped of grammatical and orthographical errors, as nearly as possible, is as follows:

HIS TERMS FOR PEACE.

"I wish to make a covenant of peace with my brethren, as I am heartily sorry of the affair that has happened. As to my part, I have not killed anybody, neither can they prove that I have. I have been honest before God and man in my faith. I did not carry guns to do evil with, but to defend myself. If I carried a gun to defend myself in doing evil deeds, it would be altogether different -- and the Humane Society officer that came to take our children away from us, he came contrary to the laws of the land, because I was a non-citizen of this city, or county, or state. My home was on government waters, traveling doing the work of evangelistic preaching of the Bible. We were paying our way, asking for nothing. We did not take up any collections, nor tell people that we were even in need of anything, and the police told us we could preach along Fourth and Main streets, or about there, any time we wanted to.

"The police had moved us from other places where the Salvation Army would hold their meetings, and we moved without a word. We had done all we could to get along with the officers and do the will of the good Lord. We have been misused and mistreated in different places, contrary to the law. When an officer of the law breaks the law to persecute you, he is not an officer of the law, but a violator of the law. When the riot started a man dressed in citizens' clothes did not say, "Consider yourselves under arrest," neither did he say he was an officer. He pointed a gun in my face and at that my partner -- which was Louis Pratt that got killed -- he shot him, and then they began to shoot at me, and I became absent minded. There were two of my friends killed, and the greater sin is for those who were against me. So the covenant that I wish to make is this:

WILL COLONIZE HIS FOLLOWERS.

"That I will quit street preaching and stop my followers from street preaching and colonize them in a colony to ourselves. There are lots of government lands in the West to be taken as homesteads. As we are a strange people, but we can't help it. We are of your brethren chosen out from you. We are a working people, do not believe in harming anyone. We mean to do good. So if we can make a covenant of this kind we would like to do it. And if the Lord don't send signs of approval the faith will come to naught as all false prophets do. And if I am a prophet that God has sent He will prove me as He has proved all prophets that He has sent. So if we can live in quietness it looks like it would be much better. As for me I am done fighting with instruments that men have made. What I have done was done in my blindness. As it is written, 'who is blind but my messenger that I have sent.'

"So I will heartily forgive my enemies for their mistake if they will forgive me for my mistake. Though I meant no harm, I broke the peace, as they well know.

WILL TRUST IN THE LORD.

"Well, I hope and trust to the Lord you will ponder this over in your heart and judge with righteous judgement. Since I have been in prison I have seen why I was shooting straight up in the air. It was because the Lord did not want me to be a bloody man. Although I don't remember shooting up in the air. The whole thing was like a foolish dream that a man could not remember. If we made a covenant of peace through righteous counsel then the Lord will be with us. We are all brethren here; can't help being here. We are born, not at our will. So if we can't forgive one another in a case of this kind, how can God forgive us? If you can see where I have done evil, it would be a different matter. If a man wants to be a Methodist, or a Baptist, or a Catholic, let him alone. Don't prosecute him on account of his belief; that is my motto. The Lord has asked me to write this letter, asking a covenant to be made with my brethren. Then their blood will not be required at my hands. I don't know the lot that the Lord has laid out for me, but that which the Lord shows me I am required to show to my brethren.

"Well, I will close, hoping and trusting that my enemies will become my friends, as I am willing to become their friend. May the Lord be with you. Amen. -- JAMES SHARP."

Accompanying the letter is a note, a sort of preface to the longer epistle. It makes an attack on a witness who testified at the coroner's inquest.

As the judge who probably will preside at the trial of Sharp and Melissa Sharp, his wife, Judge Latshaw will, of course, take no official cognizance of the letter. The Sharps will be arraigned in the criminal court, probably this week, on new informations which have been prepared since the first arraignment. Both will be charged with murder in the first degree.

In jail, Sharp and his wife are model prisoners. They spend much time reading the Bible, finding in it, so they say, passages to back up their strange doctrines of things spiritual.

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January 23, 1909

TWO JOHNS IN TROUBLE.

One Finds Way to Hospital and the Other
to Police Station.

"You are jollying, John, John Jones said to John Birmingham last night as the two sat in a store at 250 West Fourth street. For some reason the insinuation was objected to by Birmingham and he swung one of his crutches against John Jones's head. The crutch broke and so did Jones's head. Jones was taken to the emergency hospital and Birmingham to Central station. Both men were later arrested and charged with disturbing the peace.

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December 22, 1908

"ADAM GOD'S" MARKED BIBLE.

Shows What Passages Influenced
Religious Fanatic.

A little Bible belonging to James Sharp, "Adam God," the religious fanatic, who with others of his kind started a riot in the North End two weeks ago, is now in the possession of Police Captain Walter Whitsett at headquarters. It is much worn and looks like a book that had been carried by a soldier through a four years' campaign. Throughout the two testaments dog and pot hooks indicated the paragraphs upon which the peculiar sect of which "Adam God" was the head based its belief.

One of the quotations underlined is from the first book of Corinthians and says:

"But I say that the things that the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice unto devils, and not to God; and I would not that ye would have fellowship with devils. Ye can not drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of the devils; ye cannot be partakers of the Lord's table and of the table of devils."

In the third chapter of James this verse is underscored heavily:

"From whence comes wars and fighting among you? Come they not hence even of your lusts that was in your members? Ye lust and have not, ye kill and desire to have and cannot obtain. Ye fight and war yet ye have not because ye ask amiss. Submit yourselves, therefor, to God; resist the devil and he will flee from you."

The following verses in the twenty-second psalm were enclosed. Above them also was a cross made with a lead pencil apparently to signify their importance:

"Thine hand shall find out all thine enemies; thy right hand shall find out all that hate thee. Thou shalt make them as a fiery oven in the time of thine anger. Their fruit shalt thou destroy. For they intended evil against thee' they imagined an evil device which they are unable to perform."

"Adam God," as he is known to his followers, apparently was not able to read Roman numerals, for every chapter in the little Bible is numbered with a lead pencil or in ink.

"Sharp was sure a close reader of the scriptures," said Captain Whitsett yesterday. "I notice nearly all of his favorite quotations are of a morbid nature and calculated to cause a weak minded person to do something rash.

"As a founder of a sect, believing himself to be God, the verses probably would appeal to his sense of divine power to an extraordinary degree. No one can read them without understanding the reason for the vicious fight put up by the fanatics at Fourth and Main streets."

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December 17, 1908

RIOT GUNS FOR
POLICE STATIONS.

BATTLE WITH FANATICS EXPOSED
DEPARTMENT WEAKNESS.

To Be Available When Needed, and
Not Locked Up, as Were the
Rifles During the Re-
cent Riot.

The board of police commissioners yesterday decided that it had been taught a lesson by the riot of December 8 and that it wound never again be caught unprepared. When riot guns were called for on that day, not knowing the magnitude of the trouble or how many men might be encountered at the river, a key to the gun case first had to be sought. Then there was no ammunition for the old Springfield rifles in store there, and there was another twenty minutes' delay until loads were secured from a vault in the commissioners' office. If the trouble had been more serious the town could have been sacked before police were properly armed.

Yesterday the board examined the latest make of riot gun, a weapon that shoots six loads, nine buckshot to each cartridge. It is worked the same as a pump gun, and one alone will do fearful damage, if handled properly.

It is the intention of the board to purchase a sufficient number of these guns and place them in glass cases in stations Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6. Those stations are situated at headquarters (Fourth and Main), 1316 St. Louis avenue, 906 Southwest boulevard, 1430 Walnut street and Twentieth street and Flora avenue, respectively. They are regarded as the most likely districts in which riots might break out.

The glass cases containing the riot guns are to be built near the floor so that, in an emergency, they may be broken and weapons, loaded for just such an occasion, may be found ready for action.

The question of a reserve force of men to be kept on hand at headquarters all the time, was also taken up. It was decided, as a nucleus, to assign two men on duty there from 10 a. m. to 10 p. m. who, with the "shortstop" man, would make three who could get into action on a moment's notice. Had that number of men been sent out to deal with James Sharp and his band of fanatics, the board believes that the result would have been different.

"We have been taught a terrible lesson," said the mayor, "and the fault should rest on our shoulders if such a thing should ever occur again and find us unprepared. Henceforth we intend to be ready for any situation that may arise."

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December 11, 1908

INTENDED TO TAKE THE CITY.

And After That "the Whole World,"
Said Mrs. Sharp -- Didn't Be-
lieve "Adam" Was Shot.
Melissa Sharp, alias Eve
MELISSA SHARP, "EVE."

When Sharp was safely landed in a cell at police headquarters a reporter called to see his wife who was incarcerated in a cell in the women's quarter. She was asked:

"What would you think if you were told that y our husband had lost faith in the belief that he was the reincarnation of Adam and you of Eve?"

"Have they got him?" she asked. "I didn't think he would ever be caught."

"If he has forsaken the faith what will you do?"

"I guess there's nothing for me to do but forsake it, too," she said, rubbing her head in a bewildered fashion.

"Did you think bullets would strike him?"

"Of course, not. And he didn't, either. If we had, we never would have been so foolish as to go into a fight like we did. l We believed, and believed firmly, too, that while our bullets would take effect in the bodies of the officers, nothing could harm us. We believed that after we had started the fight, those who tried to oppose us would become paralyzed and their weapons fall useless to the ground."

"Then it was your intention to take the city?"

"To take the city? Yes, to take the whole world. We intended to do that from the moment the fight started."

"Do you realize, Mrs. Sharp, that you could have been killed at any time during that fight, but that the police refrained because you were a woman? Do you know that the big policeman, Mullane, whom you shot and who died today, could have killed you at any time he chose?

SHE DIDN'T BELIEVE IT.

"I have thought a little of that since I have been here. I guess they could have killed me, all of us, maybe. It's strange they didn't. I don't see how I came out alive."

She seemed to waver on the forsaking of her faith. She said she did not believe it when told that "Adam" had even been struck with a bullet. She didn't see how it was possible. When asked if she would go back to her old faith, as had Mrs. Pratt, she said: "I had no faith when I took up this. My mother and father down in Texas country were Methodists and when I was little I, of course, was prejudiced toward that denomination. Now it's hard for me to think. I don't know whehter I am receiving new light or the world is getting darker. I don't know what is the right thing to do. I wish I did. I would be more at rest."

When asked about her shooting of Patrolman Mullane, and the fight by the wagon on Fourth street was described to her, she rubbed her brow in a bewildered fashion again and said: "I remember seeing a big officer; remember seeing a wagon, too, but it is not clear to me. All is in a haze now. It's all like a dream, a bad dream."

She was asked if she recalled the time when her husband ran a saloon and a poker room in Texico, N. M., and if it was after he embraced the faith.

"Yes, I recall when he played poker and when he had something to do with whiskey, but it wasn't a saloon. He just sold it at the room. I don't know if it was after we had the faith. He quit drinking when he got the faith."

HE DRINKS NOW.

"Does he ever drink now?"

"Once in a while. We believed that it was not went into the mouth that defiled. It was what came out of it."

Anticipating trouble of some sort a detail of about thirty police spent the night in and about police headquarters. Every entrance to the city hall even was guarded and every person who approached was scanned and asked his business.

Sharp was photographed by Lieutenant Harry E. Stege soon after his arrival. Then his wounds were dressed by Dr. Fred B. Kyger in the matrons room, the police not caring to take Sharp to the emergency hospital. As he was being led to his cell in the holdover he was asked if he didn't think the devil had him. "No, you fellows all look like angels to me," was his quick reply.

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December 11, 1908

'ADAM' SHARP IS
TAKEN IN KANSAS.

JOHNSON COUNTY SHERIFF CAP-
TURES RELIGIOUS FANATIC.

IS WOUNDED IN BOTH HANDS.

BROUGHT TO KANSAS CITY AND
LOCKED IN HOLDOVER.

Offers No Resistance and Declares
He's Glad That His Fight Is
Over -- Abjures His "Faith."
City Hall Guarded.
James Sharp, Leader of Religious Fanatics
JAMES SHARP,
Religious Fanatic Who Styles Himself "Adam God."

After fifty hours' search by the local police and officers of nearby towns, James Sharp, who styles himself "Adam" and "King David," was captured three miles south of Zarah, Johnson county, Kas., yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. It was James Sharp who started a riot at Fourth and Main streets Tuesday afternoon, resulting in the death of Patrolmen A. O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane; bystander A. J. Selsor; and Louis Pratt, one of the religious band, and his 14-year-old daughter, Lulu.

News of Sharp's arrest reached police yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and Chief of Police Daniel Ahern sent Captain Walter Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan to Olathe, Kas., after the prisoner.

A farmer named W. C. Brown living eight miles northwest of Olathe telephoned to J. S. Steed, sheriff of Johnson county, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning that a man resembling the description of the fanatic, James Sharp, had been seen in that neighborhood Wednesday night and yesterday morning. He said that the suspect had spent the night at the home of Joseph Beaver, a farmer living about two miles from him. Beaver, he said, was in Olathe and the sheriff could talk to him and get a good description of the man.

Sheriff Steed found Beaver and after having him describe the stranger who had stayed at his home decide that the man was Sharp and drove to the Brown farm, leaving Olathe about 1 o'clock yesterday. When he reached the Brown farm he deputized a young man who worked on a nearby farm, and the two men started a search for the mysterious stranger.

ASLEEP IN STRAW STACK.

A large wood pasture was first gone over, and then the officers separated and searched the ravines for several miles. A straw stack in the middle of an old wheat field was seen by the sheriff's deputy and, going around it, he found a man sleeping under the straw.

When Sheriff Steed reached the straw stack the man was called and told to come out. As he rolled from under the stack the men noticed he kept his hands in his pockets, and when they made him take them out they saw that he was wounded in both hands. After being searched by the sheriff, Sharp was placed in a buggy without being handcuffed and driven to Olathe.

Sharp told his captors that he was praying and contemplating while he was in the haystack as to what he should do. Weary with the long tramp from Kansas City and exhausted for the want of food, Sharp welcomed arrest and surrendered without any show of making a fight.

He was taken into the office of the county jail and his wounds, which had not been treated, were washed and bandaged by Sheriff Steed. He was then given a supper, which he devoured with eagerness.

ANXIOUS TO GO BACK.

While he was eating his meal the police officers from Kansas City arrived. Sharp greeted them and said he was anxious to go back with them. After finishing eating he told of his trip from Kansas City to the place of his capture.

"I shot five times at the police and when I had emptied my revolver I went into the saloon there on the corner and gave my pistol to the bartender. I told him that I was through, that I was not sure of the Lord, and asked him to take me to a policeman.. The man seemed to be frightened and did not move. I then tried to load the gun, but my two hands were wounded, so I could not do it. The cylinder would not turn. I was going to put the barrel in my mouth and blow off the top of my head."

Sharp said he then walked outside and stood in the crowd and watched the police and citizens gathering around Pratt across the street. Continuing Sharp said, "God then directed my steps south on Main street to Fifth street, and west up Fifth street. I went on down Fifth street to the bottoms. When I reached a barber shop I went in and had my hair clipped. I told the barber that my hands were frozen. Leaving the shop the Lord's will seemed to take me farther away from the shooting scene and I walked and walked.

"I WAS LOSING FAITH."

"I was losing faith in my religion because things had not come about as the revelation made it out. I continued walking all that night. In the morning I slept in the woods. That evening I went to a house and asked for something to eat and a place to sleep. The people gave me my supper, but said they did not have any place to put me for the night. They directed me to a house about 300 yards distant, to a cousin's. I stayed there all night and had my breakfast there.

"I could not use my hands and the man fed me. They asked me what was wrong with my hands, and I told them that I was paralyzed. I told them I was a peddler and that my partner had left me. I was afraid they would suspect that I was wanted in Kansas City and left as early in the morning as possible.

"After leaving that house, which was the Beaver farm, I went to that straw stack and hid. At first my only intention was to get away, to escape. Then I began to fear that I had done wrong and was debating whether I should go to some farmer and pay him to take me to a town and give me up. I had money to pay the man for my trouble.

"When the officer arrested me it seemed like I was going to heaven. I was so worried and had lost such a quantity of blood. I told the sheriff that I was glad he had me and the j ail would not be a bad place for me."

HAD PLENTY OF MONEY.

When the officers searched Sharp he had a number of cartridges in his pocket and a large knife, which he carried in his left hand and cut Sergeant Patrick Clark in the eye with. A large roll of bills containing $105 and a purse with $4.92 in it was also found in his pockets.

A large crowd of persons gathered in the jail yard at Olathe, and attempted to get into the room where the prisoner was. Everybody in the city wanted to see the man that caused so much grief by inciting his followers to murder and riot.

Captain Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan left Olathe and Sharp at 9 o'clock last night over the Frisco railroad, and arrived in Kansas City at 10 o'clock. The officers with their prisoner left the train at Rosedale and took a street car to Fourth and Wyandotte streets. They were afraid that friends of the dead and wounded officers who might have heard of Sharp's capture would attempt a demonstration against the prisoner. When the officers and prisoner got off the car he was placed between the two and hurried to police headquarters, where a large force of policemen and detectives were inside the station and also guarded the doors.

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December 9, 1908

BULLETS KILL TWO AND WOUND FIVE IN FIERCE BATTLE BETWEEN POLICE AND BAND OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS

FIGHT BEGAN IN FRONT OF CENTRAL POLICE STATION AND ENDED AT MISSOURI RIVER BANK.

MAN AND GIRL AMONG DEAD

YOUNG GIRL, MEMBER OF THE BAND,
PIERCED BY BULLETS AFTER FLEE-
ING TO THE RIVER.

Three Policemen Wounded.
Houseboat Where Religious Fanatics Sought Refuge
Tent on Missouri River Flat Boat Where the Women and Children Members of the Religious Fanatics Took Refuge.


THE DEAD.

ALBERT O. DALBOW, policeman
-- Shot through the breast, abdomen and thigh.
LULU Pratt, 14 years old, fanatic
-- Shot through back of neck at base of brain. Bullet came out through left cheek


THE INJURED.

-- Shot through the right chest and cut through right eye and upper lip with dagger. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Michael Mullane, patrolman
-- Shot in the right chest, right kidney and left hand. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Louis Pratt, fanatic
-- Shot in forehead. Right ankle crushed and shot in calf of same leg. Leg amputated at general hospital later.
J. J. Sulzer, retired farmer living at 2414 Benton boulevard
-- Shot in right hip, also in right chest. Latter bullet glanced and severed the spine. Paralyzed from shoulders down. Taken to University hospital; will die.
Lieutenant Harry E. Stege
-- Shot through left arm. Ball passed along his chest from right to left, grazing the skin, taking piece out of arm. Went back into fight.

In a battle between police and religious fanatics which began at Fourth and Main streets at 3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and ended at the Missouri river bank, two persons were killed and five were injured. The trouble came about through the police trying to break up a religious street meeting, at which revolvers and knives were carried by the exhorters.

Just a few minutes before the tragedy occurred George M. Holt, a probation officer, found Mrs. Melissa Sharp, Mrs. Della Pratt and the latter's five children singing near Fifth and Main streets. He asked why the children were not in school, and was answered with an insult.

"Do you belong here?" he asked of one of the women.

"No, we have a house boat on the river," she replied.

The fanatics, after a collection amounting to about $3 or $4 had been made, started north on Main street with Mr. Holt following. They went into what is known as the Poor Man's mission, 309 Main street, conducted by J. C. Creighton and wife. Mr. Holt then approached J. A. Sharp, husband of one of the women, and addressed him and Louis Pratt, the other's husband.


ASSAULTED HOLT.

"I am the father of Jesus Christ," said Sharp. "I have been sent to reorganize the world. You are no more than damned sheep. Get out of here. I am going to preach with my children right in front of that police station. You'll see what they'll do to me. Get out!"

With that Sharp drew a big revolver and struck Mr. Holt over the head. He left the "mission" with the fanatics following, all of them but two having revolvers, Sharp with both revolvers and knives. The fanatics consisted then of Mr. and Mrs. Sharp, Mr. and Mrs. Pratt and the latter's children, Lulu, 14, Lena, 12, Mary, 11, Dewey, 8, and Edna, 4 years old.

While Mr. Holt hurried into police headquarters, his head bleeding, the fanatics ranged along the curb in front of John Blanchon's saloon, 400 Main street, and the men began to flourish revolvers and knives and talk in wild tones about what God had commanded them to do. While all this was going on Patrolman Dalbow, who was sent from the station to see what the trouble was, walked up to James Sharp, who styles himself as "Adam God." Witnesses say that Dalbow spoke kindly to the man and told him he must cease, as a crowd was gathering.


"I'LL SHOOT THE SERGEANT."

"Do you come as a friend, brother?" Sharp asked.

"Yes," replied the officer," the sergeant wants to see you.

"I am going over and shoot the sergeant," said Sharp, his wrath rising again.

Just at that juncture Lieutenant Harry E. Stege, who had followed Dalbow out of the station, arrived on the scene and said to Sharp, "Drop that knife," at the same time drawing a revolver and pointing it at Sharp.

Then the trouble began in real earnest. Louis Pratt, who, up to that time had stood mute by the curb, a little in the rear and to one side of Sharp, raised a revolver which he was carrying in his hand and shot at Lieutenant Stege.

Louis Pratt, Religious Fanatic
LOUIS PRATT.
Religious Fanatic, Whose Leg Was Shot
Off in Fight With Police.

The ball tore through Stege's clothing form the right to the left side along the chest, taking a chunk out of the left arm. Stege retreated, shooting, and a general fusillade was opened on the police. Pratt shot Dalbow through the chest, just as he was drawing his revolver, and one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, witnesses say, shot him in the back as he retreated.

DIES IN EMERGENCY.

Dalbow staggered across the street south to the door of the emergency hospital. As he pushed open the door his revolver fell from his hand. "I am shot bad," he said to Dr. R. N. Coffey. The officer caught him and carried him to a cot in the hospital. He died in a few minutes without regaining consciousness.

The shooting by that time had attracted the attention of all the officers in police headquarters. Sergeant Patrick Clark, in his shirt sleeves and unarmed, went out and into the thickest of the fray. The big leader, Sharp, was tackled by the sergeant and, though the latter was armed with both a knife and a revolver, the sergeant went after him with his fists. Clark was stabbed twice in the face and as he turned, was shot through the shoulder.

Captain Walter Whitsett, Inspector Charles Ryan, Detective Edward Boyle and others went into the street, emptied their revolvers and returned for more ammunition.

The gamest fight against the greatest odds was made by Patrolman Mullane, who ran down Fourth street from Delaware street just in time to meet the enraged fanatics fighting their way toward him. Louis Pratt, Mrs. Sharp and Lulu, the oldest Pratt girl, all attacked him, paying little heed to the shots of others. He at that time was the only policeman in uniform in range. Mullane would shoot at Pratt and when the woman and girl would walk right up to him and shoot at him, the big Irishman, realizing that they were only women, only clubbed his gun and struck at them.

The three-cornered fight lasted until Mullane's gun was empty and they had him cornered behind a small wagon on the north side of Fourth street. While he was attempting to get at Pratt the woman and girl pumped shots into him from the rear. He soon followed Sergeant Clark into the station, where both men fell to the floor. Doctors attended them there. They were later removed to the emergency hospital, their wounds dressed, and sent to St. Joseph's.

SPECTATOR IS SHOT.

While there were no fewer than 500 spectators in the crowd when the shooting began, only one was shot. That was J. J. Sulzer, 2414 Benton boulevard, a retired farmer. He was an onlooker and was hit by two bullets, the fanatics evidently taking him for an enemy. He was shot in the right hip first and almost immediately afterwards in the right chest. That ball ranged in such a manner that the spinal cord was severed. Mr. Sulzer dropped on the car tracks in front of city hall. He was treated at the emergency and sent to the University hospital. The doctors think he cannot live, as he is paralyzed from the shoulders down.

SHARP, RINGLEADER, ESCAPED.

There was not a moment while the fight was on that the police could not have killed all of the women and children, but they refrained from doing so. Seeming to realize the fact, the women and older Pratt girls -- Mary, Lena and Lulu -- constantly gathered around the two men who were doing most of the shooting. The women and girls would circle about the men, thereby blanketing the fire of the police, and would then fire point blank at the officers themselves.

Among the fanatics, Pratt and Mrs. Sharp made the gamest fight. Sharp, the leader of the bunch, disappeared during the fight, as if the earth had swallowed him. Pratt was so badly wounded that he had to be left on the street, but even then one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, ran to him and gave him a loaded revolver. Struggling to position, he fired again until his weapon was emptied.

Chief Ahern turned in a riot call, and all the police in the city that were available appeared there as soon as possible, under commands of captains and lieutenants.

When it was found that Sharp, the ringleader, had escaped, the chief scattered his men in all direction over the city. It is believed that he was wounded. The houseboat was guarded last night.
WOUNDED RESTING EASILY.

At midnight Dr. Eugene King of St. Joseph's hospital said that Sergeant Patrick Clark was in a serious condition, but that he was doing nicely, and stood a good chance to recover. Patrolman Michael Mullane had shown some little improvement during the hour preceding 12 o'clock. Dre. King said that his chances of recovery were very slight.

The condition of J. J. Sulzer at the University hospital was reported by Dr. A. W. McArthur at midnight to be very critical. Dr. McArthur said that one of the bullets was lodged just beneath the skin on the left side of his body, but that he would not attempt to remove it until this morning.. Hope for Mr. Sulzer recovering from his wounds was slight, the surgeon said.

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December 9, 1908

GIRL IS KILLED ON RIVER.

Police Attempted to Sink Skiff in
Which Mrs. Pratt and Chil-
dren Were Escaping.

Information that men and women who had participated in the shooting had escaped and were making their way to a houseboat they had moored in the river was given to the police. Chief of Police Daniel Ahern ordered Captain Walter Whitsett, Lieutenant Al Ryan and Inspector of Detectives Charles Ryan to go to the river with thirty detectives and patrolmen.

When the officers arrived at the river bank, foot of Delaware street, they found one woman, two girls and a boy guarding the boat. Inspector Charles Ryan acted as the spokesman for the police and, climbing down the sand embankment, approached the gang plank. He was stopped by the woman, Mrs. Della Pratt, who threatened to shoot. The woman stood at the head of the scow gesticulating with her left hand as she warned the officers not to come any nearer, while she kept her right hand on a rifle hidden behind the canvas flap of the boat covering. Lining the top of the bank for a block in each direction, people stood watching the police trying to induce the woman way from the boat. She refused to allow anyone to approach the boat nearer than the end of the gang plank.

When ordered to come out on the bank she said she would give herself up if the police would bring Mrs. Melissa Sharp to the river and allow her to talk to her. The police refused to grant her request. Then she asked them to have James Sharp, whom she called "Adam," brought to the house boat.

REFUSED TO SURRENDER.

For forty-five minutes the police argued with the woman and pleaded with her to surrender, but she stubbornly refused. Her two daughters, Lula, 14, and Mary, 11, joined the tirade against the police. While the officers did not want to shoot the woman and two girls, they were afraid to make a run for the boat, as it was believed that some of the men might be in it.

Finally a woman allowed William Engnell, a 15-year-old boy, to leave the boat and the police officials urged him to try to influence the woman to give up. He returned to the boat, but he did not have any success and again left the boat and was placed under arrest.

Untying a skiff which was alongside of the small houseboat, the woman ordered the two girls into it, and taking several revolvers and a rifle, the woman entered it and shoved off toward midstream. As the skiff, which had a canopy over it in the bow, floated out into the current, loud cheers rent the air from many of the persons in the crowd who sympathized with the woman and her kind.

ORDERED NOT TO SHOOT.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., and Police Commissioner Andrew E. Gallagher were spectators along the river bank, and had ordered the police not to shoot the woman and children. But it was seen that the woman and children would soon be out of reach, Mayor Crittenden gave the police permission to attempt to shoot holes in the boat in an attempt to endeavor to compel the woman to put back to shore.

Immediately upon receiving the order, Lieutenant Harry E. Stege, armed with a riot gun, shot at the boat and his fire was at once returned by the woman, who used a Winchester. As the bullets from the skiff were aimed at the crowd and were heard to sing as they passed overhead, the crowd wavered and finally broke and ran. The police fired volley after volley at the skiff, but could not tell whether the bullets were having any effect. After using all of the ammunition in the boat, the woman sat down and the girls got under the canopy.

Previously, and during the shooting, the three had been standing up in the boat, singing and waving their arms. It was seen that the boat had passed behind the range of the police guns and a new form of attack had to be planned. Mayor Crittenden ordered several patrolmen to enter a skiff and follow the fanatical woman and her children. He ordered them to stay out of rifle range but to keep them in view and arrest them at the first opportunity.

FOLLOWED BY FERRY BOAT.

But as the crowd of police officers and followers ran east along the river bank they came to the Ella May, a ferry boat, and impressed it into service. The captain of the boat was ordered to follow the floating skiff and near the piers of the old Whiner bridge the Ella May drew alongside of the skiff and its occupants. Inspector Ryan and Captain Whitsett asked them to take the woman out of the water.

The water became so shallow that the ferry boat had to back up, and it was then steered to the regular Harlem landing and the police ran up to where McCoy was standing on the bank with Mrs. Pratt and her daughter, Mary.

The woman informed the officers that her other daughter, Lula, 14 years old, had been shot in the cheek and was in the boat. The little girl's dead body was huddled in the bow of the skiff. It was placed on some bedding found in the skiff and two patromen rowed it back to the foot of Main street, where an ambulance was waiting. The woman and living child were put on the ferry boat and brought to police headquarters. The dead child's body was sent to Wagner's morgue.

PITY FOR THE CHILD.

With her clothes wringing wet from dropping into the water as she attempted to get out of the boat after her mother said they would surrender, Mary Pratt, 11 years old, stood shivering on the sand bank near Harlem. An officer shed his coat and wrapped it around her. Pity was expressed by every police officer for the girl, but none was shown for the woman who was led to the boat with her wet clothes clinging to her body.

They were placed in the engine room while the ferry boat crossed the river, and then taken to the station in the police ambulance. While crossing the river Mary, who is a sweet-faced intelligent little girl, told about the shooting.

"Our faith you know teaches us that we have the right to kill police who interfere with us. We were strangers and did not know we had to have a permit to sing in the street. When the officer came out there and told us to get off the street, then we believed that they were not peaceful and we had a right to shoot them."

"Does your religion teach you that it is right to kill people?" was asked. "No, you be just and understand my position," Mary said. "We are a peace-loving people and believe that this country is free and we have a right to preach on the streets. If the police try to stop us our religion teaches us to believe that they are wrong and should be killed."

"Did you all have guns with you up town, Mary?" was asked by Lieutenant Al Ryan.

"Yes, we all had guns except Dewey and Edna. Papa had given them to us and we always carried them when we went up town to preach," she said. As she told her story she smiled every little while, and the fact that her sister had been killed did not seem to trouble her.

She told the police that the tribe of religious fanatics had drifted down the Missouri river from North Dakota, where they had spent the summer. Two boys named William and Alexander Engnell joined the clan at Two Rivers, S. D. The boys lived at Pelan, Minn. Alexander fell from the faith, Mary said, and left the band before they reached Iowa. William is still with the people and was arrested at the houseboat.

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December 9, 1908

HORSE KILLED IN THE FIGHT.

Driver of the Unfortunate Beast Had
a Narrow Escape.

One horse was killed in the fray. It was attached to a delivery wagon of the National Paper Box Company and driven by C. D. Woodey.

"I was driving down Fourth street from Wyandotte," said Woodey, "and got into the crowd just as the shooting began. One bullet grazed my cap and I whipped up. The horse was excited and prancing. When I got through the whizzing bullets and was down almost to the market, a shot struck my horse and it fell. Then I made tracks."

The horse was the property of Clark Wix, who has a transfer barn at Fourteenth and Walnut. It was rented to the box company.

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December 9, 1908

"EVE" THREATENED TO SHOOT.

But Ryan and Joffee Rushed Upon
the Frenzied Woman and Captured Her.

Samuel Joffee, clerk in the city auditor's office, ran out of the city hall as soon as the firing began, and he, in company with Inspector of Detectives Charles Ryan, captured Mrs. Melissa Sharp, the woman who calls herself Eve, and disarmed her at Second and Delaware streets, whither she had fled form the scene of the battle. Mr. Joffee made the following statement:

"I was in the office when I heard the first shot, and ran out at once. The shooting was going on in front of Probasco's saloon. About that time I saw Eve running along Fourth street toward Delaware, with the three children. Inspector Ryan and I ran after her. She turned north on Delaware, and we caught up with her at the corner of that street and Second, where she had climbed a hill on the east side of Delaware.

"As she stood on top of the hill she drew her revolver and said she would kill the first man who came up. I picked up a brick, but changed my mind and, instead of using it, I ran up the hill with Mr. Ryan and as we grabbed her, all three of us rolled down the twelve-foot incline. At any rate, we got hold of her revolver and wrenched it away, then we took her on up to headquarters."

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September 20, 1908

HUMANE MAN WAS SLUGGED.

Got a Bruised Head for Interfering
With a Farmer.

A. R. Young, an employe at the Fulton transfer barn, 121 East Fourth street, last night was standing in front of the barn when a farmer boy rode up on a horse. The boy's father at once flew into him and began to whip him severely for riding the horse.

After the farmer had finished whipping the boy he attempted to handle the horse, which made some objections. Then he began whipping the horse. At that juncture Young took a hand and stated in stentorian tones what he intended to do. Just then something happened. A half brick was cast through the air. It may have been aimlessly or otherwise but nevertheless Young stopped it with the upper, southeast corner of his head. A gash several inches in length and a bump the size of a baseball was the result. Dr. J. Park Neal attended Young at the emergency hospital.

"Do you know who hit you?" the doctor asked Young.

"I don't know his name, no, but I know the man by sight. I am making no howl for police protection. All I have got to say is, hold this dump in readiness for an ambulance call at an early date. I have been slugged, ruthlessly pasted by a member of the horny headed Romanry and---"

"You mean horny handed yoemanry, don't you?" was asked.

"Maybe so. Anyway I was close. 'Get even' is to be the password from now on so clean up this place and get ready for work."

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September 12, 1908

HANGED HERSELF, BUT LIVES.

Mrs. Harry Woodruff Made a Rope
of Police Station Bedding.

Frustrated in her attempt to throw herself into the Missouri river early Friday morning, Mrs. Harry Woodruff, Fourth street and Broadway, hanged herself in the cell in the matron's room at police headquarters four hours later. Mike Mullane, a patrolman, saw the woman running toward the river in an excited manner. He gave chase and caught her. While taking her to Second and Main streets the woman broke from him and tried to throw herself in front of a passing freight train. Again the patrolman rescued her and called the patrol wagon from police headquarters. It took four officers to put the maniacal woman in the wagon.

All the way to the station the woman said that she would not live for twelve hours and she defied the officers to save her life. After she had been locked in the matron's office it was thought she was quieted. At 7 o'clock yesterday morning a passing officer heard strange sounds coming from the cell in the matron's room. Entering the room he saw the woman hanging by a cloth rope from the bars. She was taken down almost unconscious and later sent to the Door of Hope.

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July 26, 1908

USED VINEGAR, BEER AND LARD.

Sidewalk Restoratives Applied to Fit
Sufferer in the North End.

Little Alphonso Baker, a 10-year-old negro boy from Pine Bluff, Ark., fell on the sidewalk at Fourth and Holmes streets yesterday afternoon in a fit. The Italians ran out of the stores nearby and endeavored to revive him. One man poured vinegar over the boy, while another emptied a bottle of beer in his face. An old woman greased his lips with lard. Somebody thought of the emergency hospital and had the ambulance called. Alphonso was treated by Dr. J. Park Neal at the emergency hospital.

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July 9, 1908

REPORTER VICTIM
OF BRUTAL ATTACK.

ALBERT H. KING ASSAULTED BY
JACK GALLAGHER.

IN FRONT OF
CENTRAL STATION.

THE ATTACK IS COWARDLY AND
ENTIRELY UNPROVOKED.

King's Injuries Are Serious and Sa-
loonkeeper's Case Will Be Pre-
sented to Grand Jury -- Was
Struck From Behind.

Jack Gallagher, Democratic politician, former policeman and saloonist, assaulted Albert H. King, a reporter for The Journal, while the two were in friendly conversation in the street in front of police headquarters late yesterday afternoon. Frank Frost a reporter for the Kansas City Star, who Gallagher says was scheduled for a like assault, escaped the brute strength of the big saloonkeeper by rushing into the police station to call out officers to ave King.

Gallagher was arrested, but immediately began a legal battle to gain his freedom. Milton J. Oldham, a lawyer hurried to the holdover from the police board rooms but his efforts to get the prisoner released were fruitless. Mr. King was taken to the emergency hospital, where the surgeons in attendance declined to examine him until the shock he had sustained had worn off. His injuries were later discovered to be serious, and John W. Hogan, an assistant prosecuting attorney, was called to take the injured man's statement. The assistant prosecutor at once placed a bar against the release of Gallagher by stating that he would prepare a serious charge against him, to be served immediately if political friends of the saloonist politician should succeed in getting the police department to accept a bond.

Mr. King, who is a reporter for The Journal assigned to police duty, is still at the emergency hospital. He is not an able-bodied man because of injuries received in the Spanish-American war, and the attending physicians fear his injuries may prove permanent.


BOARD EASY WITH HIM.

Yesterday afternoon, Mr. King attended a meeting of the board of police commissioners The board had before it charges against Gallagher for selling liquor on Sunday at 8 East Fourth street, directly across the street from the entrance to Central police station, and operating a crap game at his other saloon, 310 Independence avenue. The charges regarding the last named place were postponed until the next meeting, but the board closed the Fourth street place. Milton J. Oldham, attorney for Gallagher, stated last night that the board promised him they would give Gallagher a chance and let his Independence avenue saloon run, but that the Sunday selling at 8 East Fourth street has been so flagrant a violation of the board's orders that the license would have to be forfeited.

Gallagher and Mr. King have been acquaintances for some time, and, immediately after the court meeting Gallagher invited Mr. King to go across the street and take a drink before the police closed his place. Mr. King declined, stating that he was too busy at that time. On the stairs a few minutes later Gallagher again extended the invitation and again Mr. King, who was busy about his day's work, declined.

In the press room on the main floor of the city hall Mr. King and Frank Frost, a reporter for the Kansas City Star, were discussing various orders made by the police board a few minutes later when Gallagher opened the door and with a smile, asked the two across to his place.

"I guess we had better go," said Frost.

"Cheer up," said Gallagher to Mr. King, and the latter reached for his cane and the three went into the street.

Gallagher's place, the one soon to be closed by the board's order, made earlier in the afternoon, is immediately across Fourth street from the main entrance to the Central police station. It was there that Gallagher, growing reckless in his prosperity as a saloonkeeper, had openly sold liquor on Sundays until the place was raided by the police from the Walnut street station a week ago last Sunday. It was the evidence secured in this raid which the police board considered sufficient for revoking the license.


A COWARDLY ASSAULT.

As Mr. King, who, on account of former injuries, must carry a cane to steady himself, stepped from the curb into the street, Gallagher fell back a step between Mr. King and Mr. Frost. Just as they reached the center of the narrow street Gallagher took a hurried step forward and struck Mr. King in the forehead. The reporter fell to the pavement.

Mr. Frost immediately hurried back into the police station door and called to the assembled officers and men:

"Jack Gallagher is killing King."

Knowing Gallagher as a "bad" man, every police officer in the station was alert in an instant. Patrolman John J. Crane hurriedly took a pistol from the desk and Captain Walter Whitsett and Detective Inspector Charles Ryan, both shut off from the main lobby of the station, hurried to the door. Patrolman Joseph Welsh followed.

In the meantime in the street Mr. King was at the mercy of the brutal saloonkeeper. Gallagher struck him again as he tried to get up , and then kicked him in the back. Mr. King rolled over, and the big saloonkeeper brought his heel down on the right side of the reporter's face, cutting a jagged wound across the face. As he kicked Mr. King in the ribs Patrolman Patrick Boyle grappled with him. He had reached the street ahead of Captian Whitsett, Inspector Ryan and Patrolman Crane, the latter being the only armed man in the crowd.

CARRIED TO HOSPITAL.

Gallagher did not resist arrest, as the police had expected, and was led into the station door, but a few feet away, by Boyle, while Captain Whitsett, Inspector Ryan and newspaper reporters who had hurried from the press room at the head of the stairs, picked up the inured man Gallagher, was locked up, charged with investigation, and Mr.King was carried around the corner of the building to the emergency hospital.

Upstairs in the police board rooms Commissioners A. E. Gallagher and Elliot H. Jones were just leaving their chairs. They heard the commotion in the central station below and went down to investigate. When they learned the circumstances of the assault, both commissioners became agitated. Commissioner Galagher went to the commanding officer's desk and admonished those in charge to hold Jack Gallagher, the saloonkeeper, unless a heavy bond was furnished.

"I don't think he ought to be released uner any circumstances," said Commissioner Jones.

The assault was considered unusually brutal by police officers and other witnesses, and the story soon reached the office of R. L. Gregory, acting mayor, Gus Pearson, city comptroller, and John Murray, formerly a newspaper reporter, saw the assault from the corner of Fourth and Main sterets as they were boarding a street car. They went at once to the emergency hospital and soon were joined by Mr. Gregory.

HELD HIM WITHOUT BOND.

The acting mayor asked Mr. King about the assault and then went at once to police headquarters, where he gave orders that Gallagher be held without bond. Mr. Gregory was closeted with Captain Walter Whitsett for several minutes and, when he emerged from the captain's office, assured those outside that the prisoner would be held for the customary twenty-four hours, when a charge must be placed against him. Assistant Prosecutor Hogan had taken Mr. Kin's statement by that time, and stated that if Gallagher's attorney saw fit to sue out a writ of habeas corpus he would have the prisoner held for the prosecutor. Mr. Hogan said he would call the assault to the attention of the grand jury this morning.

Immediately after Attorney Oldham appeared, Jack Spillane and Patrick Larkin, the latter a Sixth ward politician, were called tot he station to furnish bond.

When told that no bond would be accepted Oldham demanded that a charge be placed against Gallagher. He boasted that he would clear the saloonkeeper of any charge which would be brought Spillane, a sidewalk inspector for the city, was very angry when he found he not furnish a bond big enough to get his slugger friend out of the holdover. Thoroughly baffled, the trio later telephoned for a dinner to be served the prisoner and left the station.

Mr. Oldham and Gallagher told him that he had intended to assault Frank Frost, the Kansas City STar reporter, who went into the street with him and Mr. King, but failed because the police got action too quickly for him.

"He told me," said Mr. Oldham, "that King had double-crossed him and was responsible for his Fourth street pace being raided."

Mr. King, who knew of the flagrant violation of the Sunday law by Gallagher, did not have anything to do with the raid. He had not written a line about the place for the paper which employs him and had told Tom Gallagher as much when the latter, a week ago, asked him why he was "sore at his brother Jack.

"Jack is my friend," was the reply Mr. King made to Tom Gallagher.

INJURED IN PHILIPPINES.

Previous to his career as a newspaper reporter Albert King had been an invalid for many months. He had received injuries in the Philippine islands while in the army and had wlaked on crutches a long time after being mustered out of the service. Mr. King was enlisted in the army here as a private in the Thirty-second United States infantry in July, 1899. He sailed for the Philippines in September the same year. In the islands he became regimental sergeant major.

On the night of August 5, 1900, while the building where he was quartered was under fire, he fell down a flight of stone steps while attempting, in pajamas and cartridge belt, to get to the first floor to consult with his superior officer. He was an invalid in a Manila hospital and later at the Presidio, San Francisco. December 28, 1900, he was mustered out of service and sent to his home, 3031 Wabash avenue, Kansas City.

Mr. Kings injuries from the assault include an injured spine and a severe shock to his legs, which were so long paralyzed. The right side of his face is cut and bruised and the attending physician, Dr. J. Park Neal, feared last night that blood poisoning might result from the jagged wound in his face. His ribs on both sides are injured, but the physician had not discovered if any were fractured because the injured man was in too great pain to permit a thorough examination.

JONES "LACKS INFORMATION."

In regard to the standing of Jack Gallagher as a saloonkeeper, Commissiner Elliott H. Jones last night said:

"It was reported to the police commissioners taht Gallagher's place on East Fourth street was open on Sunday and after closing h ours. For this reason the board refused to grant him a renewal of his license to operate that saloon."

Mr. Jones was asked if he thought Gallagher a fit man to run a saloon or if he deemed him worthy of the privelge after having made such a brutal attack upon a man as he had done upon Albert King. Mr. Jones said he could not answer that question without going into the case to greater extent than he had already done.

Commissioner Jones was then asked: "If any manmakes an attack on another while walking on the street while the victim is under the impression that there is no feeling of hostility between them; if the attack be sudden and unexpected and very brutal in its nature, should such a man be granted the privelege of owning and operating a saloon?"

The commissioner refused to answer the question.

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