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December 29, 1909

DIES IN GROCERY STORE.

Nebraska Visitor Had Just Pur-
chased Cigars When Stricken.

While handing the clerk a dollar to pay for some cigars he had just purchased, Isaac N. Mothershead, 57 years old, a farmer of Niponee, Neb., died of heart disease in Edward Kendall's grocery store, at Fourteenth and Harrison streets, yesterday morning. Mr. Mothershead and his wife had been spending the Christmas holidays at the home of their daughter, Mrs. O. P. Haslett, 1420 Tracy avenue.

The body was taken to the Stine undertaking rooms in the police ambulance. A widow and five daughters survive him.

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November 28, 1909

WOLFERMAN LEASES CORNER.

Six-Story Building to Be Erected at
Fourteenth and Walnut.

A 50 x 115 foot tract on the northeast corner of Fourteenth and Walnut streets was leased for 99 years yesterday afternoon by O. H. Dean to Fred Wolferman of the Fred Wolferman Grocery Company, 1108-10 Walnut. The terms of rental are: $2,500 for the first year, $3,000 for the second, $3,500 for the third, $4,000 for the fourth, $5,000 for the fifth, $5,500 for the next five years and $6,000 a year until the expiration of the contract.

Mr. Wolferman is allowed five years in which to erect a six-story fireproof building which he will probably occupy with his store. The Walnut street property was purchased by Mr. Dean four years ago for $27,500. He is now leasing it on a basis of $100,000.

"I am renting the property with an eye to insuring a place for my store in the future when space becomes cramped," said Mr. Wolferman yesterday. "I have plenty of time to build, but will probably begin within a year. I may build a larger building than required by the contract. It is doubtful whether I will move into the building with my store for years yet as my lease at 1108-10 has a long time to run and the location with a little economy will supply my present needs."

The deal yesterday was through Charles E. Forgy of the Junction Realty Company.

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November 17, 1909

BODY ON STOVE EIGHT HOURS.

Stone Mason Found Dead Where He
Had Prepared to Cook Noon Meal.

Peter Gilberg, a stone mason, was found dead in his home, 815 East Twenty-second street at 8 o'clock last night by Matt Gleason, proprietor of a saloon at 921 East Twenty-first street, who sent Gilberg home ill yesterday morning. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, found that a hemorrhage killed Gilberg.

Gilberg lived alone. He evidently was preparing to cook his noon day meal when he was stricken as uncooked fish and some potatoes were on the kitchen table. One side of the body was cooked from the heat of the gas stove, which had been burning for probably eight hours.

Mr. Gilberg was a member of the Woodmen of the World and carried $1,000 insurance. The secretary of the lodge was called last night but was unable to tell who the insurance was made out to. Mr. Gleason's niece was married about two months ago to a union tailor but whose name was unknown to the uncle. The niece was married in Westport. The body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms, Fourteenth street and Grand avenue.

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October 12, 1909

JANITOR WORRY KILLS HIM.

Real Estate Man Falls Dead Upon
Inspecting Apartment House
Employes Had Neglected.

Heart disease made acute by worry over the janitor service in an apartment house on West Thirty-fourth street, for which he was the agent, is said to have caused the death of Dr. Ammon Kuns, a real estate man of 805 East Fourteenth street, who expired suddenly in front of the apartments at 6 o'clock last night.

Dr. Kuns, who seven years ago retired from dentistry in order to handle realty, had been suffering from pulmonary trouble for more than a year. He left his home yesterday morning in good spirit and apparently in excellent health, remarking to his wife that he would go to the flat on Thirty-fourth street before supper and see about hiring a new janitor.

"Everyone leaves the rooms in a worse condition than the last," he said. "It is about the only worry I have."

Mrs. Kuns said last night that she had learned that conditions at the apartments were not even as good as her husband had expected when he arrived there. She believed that his dismay at finding that some of his instructions had been neglected caused the undue excitement that hastened his end.

Mr. Kuns was 57 years old. He was born in Illinois, went to Jewell City, Kas., 27 years ago to practice dentistry, and lived there continuously up to seven years ago when he moved to Los Angeles, Cal. Four years ago he came to Kansas City.

Besides the widow, he is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Stella Mayhue, San Francisco; Mrs. Theodore Conley, Los Angeles; Mrs. O. E. White, of Jewell City, and Miss Helen, living at the home.

Kuns was a member of the Odd Fellows, Masonic and Woodmen of the World, local lodges. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky ordered the body sent to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

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August 25, 1909

BANK'S 25TH ANNIVERSARY.

Reception Today from 10 to 3 at
German American.

Officers and directors of the German-American bank at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue will hold a reception today. The reception will mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the bank. Special decorations have been arranged and visitors will be entertained from 10 o'clock until 3. The bank was instituted by Louis A. Lambert and his five sons, one of whom, Henry C. Lambert, is cashier.

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July 19, 1909

LURE OF THE CIRCUS
AS STRONG AS EVER.

CROWDS STREAMED THROUGH
SHOW GROUNDS YESTERDAY.

Performers Were Not in Evidence,
as It Was a Day of Rest.
Parade in Downtown
Section.
The Circus Makes Everyone Feel Young Again.
WE ARE ALL "SMALL BOYS" TODAY.

PARADE STARTS AT 9:30

The route is north from the grounds, on Indiana avenue to Fifteenth street, west of Fifteenth to Walnut street, north on Walnut to Fifth street, west on Fifth to Main street, south on Main to Fourteenth street, east on Fourteenth to Grand avenue, south on Grand to Fifteenth street, east on Fifteenth to Indiana avenue, south on Indiana to the circus grounds.


You have heard people say that the circus is no longer the magnet it once was, but if you were able to persuade yourself into this opinion, take a car out to Seventeenth street and Indiana avenue, where Ringling's circus city is encamped, and behold your mistake; for it's dollars to dill pickles that you'll suddenly be bereft of your enthusiasm.

Crowds streamed through the grounds all day yesterday just because it was a circus that held all the charm that circuses have always held in the popular heart. Big red wagons; forests of pegs and guy ropes; great hollow mountains of belying canvas; roustabouts seeking a minimum of warmth in the scant shade of the vans; squads of cooks and scullions making the next meal ready for the circus army vendors of cool drinks and hot meats, barking their wares; the merry-go-round, grinding out its burden of popular airs, all these things to be seen and heard constituted the lure that drew perspiring thousands to the show grounds, even though no performance was given Sunday.

PERFORMERS' REST DAY.

It was remarked that few of the performers could be seen on the grounds.

"That's because it is their day off," said one who has eleven years of circus experience behind him. "They're at all the parks and other places of interest. More of them are in church than you would guess, too."

No one was allowed in the menagerie yesterday and the animals had the big tent largely to themselves and their keepers. Beasts ranging in disposition from mild to fearsome, crouched, paced and slept behind the bars. A large herd of elephants was lined up on one side of the tent and the huge pachyderms stood quietly swaying their trunks, and munching the wisps of hay they would now and then tuck under their proboscises.

Jerry, the Royal Bengal tiger. lay peacefully asleep in his cage. He is the Apollo Belvedere of the feline species. Out of all tigers and near-tigers in captivity, he was chosen as a model of his kind for the two bronze guardians of the entrance of old Nassau hall, Princeton.

TIGER AS A MODEL.

Jerry was chosen as a model by A. Phimister Proctor, the sculptor, who was commissioned by the class of '79 to replace the two lions that now stand before the famous old hall.

Weather and undergraduate ebullience made their marks on the lions and the class of '79 decided to have them replaced by two bronze tigers which will not only be more durable but more emblematic. They will be presented to the university by the class next commencement week.

Two performances will be given today, the first at 2 o'clock in the afternoon and the second at 8 o'clock at night. The parade will start at 9:30 a. m. The circus will give two performances at Manhattan, Kas., Tuesday.

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July 19, 1909

SIX MEN HELD UP
IN A SINGLE NIGHT.

IN EVERY INSTANCE ROBBERS
SECURE MONEY AND ESCAPE.

Five Highwaymen With Revolvers
Get Dollar Apiece From One Vic-
tim -- Diamonds and Watches
Among the Loot.

Six holdups occurred in Kansas City Saturday night and Sunday morning. In every case the robbers succeeded in getting money, and some of the victims gave up their watches.

Frank Serrett, 829 South Valley street, Kansas City, Kas., the first victim to complain to the police, reported that two men held him up in the alley between Main and Walnut on Ninth street. While one of the highwaymen searched his pockets, the other man kept him covered with a pistol A watch and $10 comprised the booty.

At 10 o'clock Saturday night George Mangoe, 115 1/2 Central street, Kansas City, Kas., reported that he had been robbed by two men, and his watch stolen. The robbery occurred at Ninth and Wyoming streets.

It took five men to stop and rob James Bone, 4413 Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue. According to Bone, all of the robbers were armed with revolvers and held them in sight. He gave up $5 to the brigands.

A watch at $7 were taken from J. W. Brown, 1326 Grand avenue, at Thirteenth and Franklin streets by two men.

H. A. Lucius, 215 West Fourteenth street, reported to the police that he had been robbed or $50 near 2854 Southwest boulevard.

G. W. Shaw, Strong City, Kas., entered police headquarters early Sunday morning and informed the police that he had been robbed in front of a saloon near McGee and Third streets. He reported the loss of an Elk's tooth and two unset diamonds.

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July 6, 1909

TURNS A SOMERSAULT AT 80.

Grandpa Brueckmann's July 4th
Antics Amused the Children.

The German Baptist Sunday school, Seventeenth and Tracy, held its annual basket picnic at Budd park yesterday. A crowd of children, with hands joined, danced in a ring, while a man stood in the center and sang a German holiday song. At the end of each verse he would do something and each one in the circle had to imitate him.

With the children, and apparently enjoying himself as much as they, was Henry Brueckmann, 80 years old. He made faces, clapped his hands, pulled his neighbor's hair and did everything suggested by the leader, until the latter turned a somersault. The children all went over in a hurry, and then besieged "grandpa" to turn one. And Grandpa Breuckmann, 80 years old, did turn a somersault -- a good one, too -- much to the delight of the children. There were 140 at this picnic.

The Swedish Methodist church Sunday school, 1664 Madison street, headed by O. J. Lundberg, pastor, and the Swedish mission at Fortieth and Genessee streets, held a big basket dinner in the east end of Budd park. About 150 enjoyed themselves.

Not far from them the Swedish Baptist church Sunday school, 416 West Fourteenth street, with Rev. P. Schwartz and a delegation from a Swedish church in Kansas City, Kas., headed by Rev. Carl Sugrstrom, was holding forth about 300 strong.

There were many family and neighborhood picnics in the park.

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May 28, 1909

BOUNDARIES FOR TENDERLOIN.

Tenement Commission's Advice Con-
cerning "Red Light" Districts.

In a letter to the board of police commissioners yesterday the tenement commission advised the board that conditions on Twelfth street in the neighborhood of Central high school were not ideal, and that many hotels and rooming houses in that neighborhood were frequented by an undesirable class of inmates.

The commission also advised that the "red light" district be segregated to definite boundaries, south of Twelfth street. The letter advised that the boundaries of the district be fixed at Main street on the west, McGee street on the east, Eighteenth street on the south and Fourteenth street on the north. The district in the North End should be bounded on the north by Second street, on the east by Wyandotte street, on the south by Fifth street and on the west by Broadway.

Commissioner Marks was delegated to make an investigation of the matter, and report at the next meeting.

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May 19, 1909

THIRD PARALYTIC
STROKE WAS FATAL.

FRANCIS M. FURGASON WAS ILL
THREE WEEKS.

Seventy-Six Years Old, Mr. Furgason
Had Long Been Active in
the Charities of
the City.

As the result of a paralytic stroke which came to him over three weeks ago, Francis M. Furgason, president of the Furgason & Tabb Underwriting Company, with offices in the Dwight building, and a pioneer among the progressive men of this city, died quietly at his home, 1006 East Thirty-third street, at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. He was 76 years old.

Until a few days ago it was hoped that the stricken man might partially recover, although it was conceded by family physicians that a third stroke would cause his death. At times there seemed to be even chances that the third stroke would not come, for the patient and frequent rallies and the advantage of a hardy physique. Monday, however, he began to fail and early yesterday morning it was known that there was no hope for him. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from Calvary Baptist church. Dr. F. C. McConnell, Rev. J. M. Cromer and Rev. H. T. Ford will officiate in the services. The deacons of the church will act as active pallbearers. Interment will be in Elmwood cemetery.

WAS ONCE Y. M. C. A. PRESIDENT.

Mr. Furgason was born near Indianapolis, Ind., April 1, 1833. His father was a pioneer of sturdy Scotch extraction, who had pushed west to the Hoosier state when it was yet a wilderness and staked out a farm at what is now the very center of Indianapolis. Mr. Furgason spent his first years on the farm, but at 18 his father sent him to Franklin college.

Mr. Furgason was graduated at Franklin when he was 22 years old, at the head of a large class for that time. The following year he was made a teacher at the college, and three years later elected to the presidency, which place hie filled, it is said, with credit to himself and the institution until the year 1867, when he gave up his collegiate work and came to Kansas City, where he became involved in the insurance trade.

In 1861 the Y. M. C. A., which was then only an infant organization, was in bad financial straits and temporarily suspended. The war, which had been the cause of the trouble, was now over and many members had returned and were anxious to revive the association on a more active basis than ever before. The board met and Mr. Furgason was elected president of the Y. M. C. A. D. A. Williams, an electrician, was made secretary. The move proved a fortunate one for the associaton.

Under Mr. Furgason's management headquarters and a reading room were established on the south side of Missouri avenue on Delaware. Rent was obtained free from the late D. L. Shouse, then a banker, and the four years of the Furgason administration saw the Y. M. C. A. on an improved financial basis, with a membership that was twice as large as it had been at any previous period. Mr. Furgason never gave up his interest in the Y. M. C. A. and other organizations for the benefit of the younger element of the city.

Soon after his connection with Y. M. C. A., Mr. Furgson was hired as a teacher in the Franklin school at Fourteenth and Washington streets, and served in this capacity eight years. After this he resumed his former occupation of insurance agent and followed it until his retirement from active business a few years ago.

MEN RESPECTED HIM.

"He was one of the kindest and gentlest old men I have ever had the pleasure of knowing," said the Rev. F. C. McConnell of the Calvary Baptist church recently. "I knew Mr. Furgason for thirty-five years," said George Peake, a veteran accountant, who has offices in the First National bank building. "It seemed as if he had the perpetual desire to extend sunshine in all directions."

Mr. Furgason was married twice, once in the early 50s, the last time to Mrs. Laura Branham in 1858. His widow and one son, Frank, who has taken his place in the firm of Furgason & Tabb, survive him. A son, Arthur, and a daughter, Emma, died within a few months of each other three years ago.

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May 6, 1909

WILL GET $80,000
WHEN HE MARRIES.

PAUL GARVIN, 25 YEARS OLD,
LOOKING FOR WIFE.

Millionaire Uncle in Denver Be-
queaths Fortune to Young Chem-
ist Upon Condition Which He
is Anxious to Fulfill.

Paul Garvin, 25 years old and good looking, who lives at the northwest corner of Fourteenth and Oak streets, yesterday received word of an inheritance of $80,000 from a rich uncle in Denver, who has recently died, but to this fortune is attached the string of matrimony. Mr. Garvin, by the conditions of the will, must marry and settle down before the inheritance is handed over to him. No particular girl was named in the will, and now Mr. Garvin is "setting his cap."

INTENDS TO MARRY.

"Sure, I am going to marry," said he last night while discussing the condition imposed. "Not that I am going to marry for the money alone, but I am about to become 'one of our respected and influential citizens.' There's one drawback, however. I don't know any girl who would have me. I am perfectly 'heart whole and fancy free.' Until now I never had enough money on hand to think of getting married, and girls have not attracted me. But I am looking for 'her' now, and I am going to look fast, too."

Mr. Garvin is wholly at sea in regard to his future wife. He has never had an ideal.

"I don't want to advertise for a wife. I guess I will have to wait until the grand passion seizes me and then I will know all about it."

UNCLE WAS PECULIAR.

Mr. Garvin's uncle was a resident of Denver, having large mining interests. His estate is said to be worth $1,000,000. His name also was Paul Garvin. The will made by Mr. Garvin gives all of his property to his son, with the exception of the bequest made to his namesake. Should Mr. Garvin die, unmarried, the money is to go towards the establishment of a free health resort in Colorado Springs.

"Uncle Paul was peculiar," said Mr. Garvin. "Every time I saw him he would urge me to get married and quit roving. I am a chemist, when there is any desire to work on my part, and he wanted me to take charge of his assaying work for him. But I like to travel, and so I have been doing. I guess he was afraid to give me this money outright, thinking that I might blow it all in traveling.

Mr. Garvin will remain in Kansas City indefinitely.

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April 18, 1909

OLD SOLDIER SAVES
LIFE OF A WOMAN.

KNOCKED DOWN MAN WHO
STABBED MRS. ETHEL GRAY.

George Ripley, in Mad Fit, Was
Using Knife on Keeper of Room-
ing House When Charles
Hendrickson Interfered.

The strong right arm of Charles Hendrickson, 68 years old and a member of Fighting Joe Hooker's command during the civil war, saved the life of Mrs. Ethel Gray, 25 years old, last night at 9 o'clock. Hendrickson knocked down George Ripley, an admirer of Mrs. Gray's, after he had stabbed her in the back with a dirk.

Mrs. Gray, whose husband is out of town, bought a building at 215 East Fourteenth street last week and opened it as a rooming house for men only. Hendrickson, who is a carpenter, and W. T. Huddleston, a druggist, were among the roomers.

"I have known George Ripley only a week," she said at the general hospital last night. "He made my acquaintance in a restaurant and walked home with me. He called two or three times but never made love to me until last night. When he came into the room I saw that he had been drinking and it was not long before he began making love to me in the presence of Mr. Hendrickson. I am a married woman and, of course, I paid no attention to him. Then he got angry and struck me."

Hendrickson caught the man's arm after he had landed several blows on Mrs. Gray's face. Huddleston heard the noise and came to the old soldier's assistance. Between them they quieted the man and locked him in a rear room, while Mrs. Gray ran to the drug store of Adolph Lahme at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and telephoned the Walnut street police station for an officer.

While she was away Ripley escaped from the house by opening a window, but Hendrickson and Huddleston almost immediately discovered his absence and went to the front door to prevent him from waylaying their landlady on her return. Ripley sprang out of the alley between Grand avenue and McGee streets and Huddleston attempted to prevent him from reaching Mrs. Gray.

"This isn't your butt-in," said Ripley. Huddleston gave way and Ripley ran after Mrs. Gray. At her own doorstep he caught her and stabbed her once in the back. Then the old soldier, who was standing on the steps, stepped down and struck the would-be assassin in the face. Ripley was knocked down, but arose and rushed at the woman again. Hendrickson struck again and knocked the knife out of his hand. Then Ripley fled.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called and Dr. H. A. Hamilton dressed the cut, which was in the middle of the back. The knife penetrated to the vertebra. While the physician was at work the woman told the story to officers J. S. Scott and E. M. Wallace and furnished them with a description and a picture of her assailant. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where it was said that she would recover. Ripley has not been arrested. He is about 25 years old and rooms at 1322 Wyandotte street.

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April 12, 1909

SOLDIERS GO TO CHURCH.

Third Regiment Attends Services at
Central Methodist Episcopal.

Following its annual custom, the Third regiment of the Missouri national guard attended the morning Easter services at Central Methodist Episcopal church, south, Eleventh street and the Paseo. They turned out about 350 strong under command of Colonel Cusil Lechtman and the regimental and company officers. Dr. G. M. Gibson, president of the Central College for Young Women at Lexington, delivered the sermon.

After the services the regiment paraded in full dress north on the Paseo to Ninth street, west on Ninth to Grand avenue, south on Grand to Fourteenth street and east on Fourteenth street to the armory at Fourteenth street and Michigan avenue.

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February 27, 1909

WELL, WELL, IT WAS
THE OLD TOWN WELL.

ACCIDENT TO WAGON REVEALS
LONG-HIDDEN LANDMARK.

Supplied Part of Kansas City With
Water 44 Years Ago, When
There Were No Meters
to Watch.

When a heavily-laden wagon broke through the asphalt paving at the corner of Tenth and McGee streets yesterday afternoon and the rear wheels sank into a hole to the hubs little damage resulted. There was a general outpouring of reminiscences, however, from old-timers who witnessed the accident that made the incident an interesting story, for the hole into which the wheels sank is what remains of a well from which the pioneers of Kansas City obtained their drinking water in the early '70s.

Of the history of the old well, J. F. Spalding, president of the Spalding Commercial college and a pioneer of Kansas City, said:

"That hole is the old well which was sunk by Thomas Smart forty-four years ago. Smart purchased the forty acres of Ninth and Fourteenth streets and laid out an addition to Kansas City. There was a lack of good drinking water on the hill and Colonel Smart dug the well at the corner of Tenth and McGee. It was eighty feet deep and contained the finest of water. The settlers of the new addition used the water from the well for years. Finally it was abandoned and partly filled. Later it was cut down when the hill was graded for the old Tenth street cable line. Still later it was covered with an old stone slab and the pavers went right over it. I had almost forgotten about it until I saw that wagon break through there and then I recalled it at once. It was one of the city's landmarks in her infant days."

The hole caused by the wagon disclosed the walls of the old well. The pavement covering it was not more than three-quarters of an inch thick and the wonder is that it did not give away under heavy traffic before.

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December 11, 1908

THIS MAN CALLED
THE POLICE.

Sherman Short, an Evangelist, Ap-
pears at Headquarters and Tells
How the Trouble Began.

Ever since the riot of fanatics Tuesday afternoon the police have been searching for the man who, greatly excited, ran into the station just after George M. Holt and told his story and cried, "Some of you had better come out here and see to these people. There are a lot of men and women over there on the corner, crazy as loons and all have guns. Even the children have guns. Somebody will be killed, sure. Hurry.

It was just at that juncture that Sergeant Patrick Clark said to A. O. Dalbow, "shortstop" at headquarters, "Go out there, 'Dol,' and see what's the matter." With a smile on his face Dalbow followed the excited man out of the door. Three minutes later he staggered into the door of the emergency hospital, fell on the steps as his revolver dropped from his nerveless grasp. He spoke but once and died. Then followed the bloody fight in which Michael Mullane lost his life and Sergeant Clark was so dangerously wounded.

Yesterday afternoon the much sought for man walked calmly into headquarters and announced that he had been a witness of the affair from its beginning at the Poor Man's mission, 309 Main street. John W. Hogan, an assistant prosecutor, was at the station and he took the man's statement.

THE PREACHER'S STATEMENT.

The witness, who is an evangelist, gave the name of Sherman Short. His home is now near Clarence, Mo., but he once lived here. His statement follows:

Tuesday afternoon I happened to be at Fifth and Main streets. There I saw Mrs. Sharp and Pratt's children holding a street meeting. She seemed frantic about something, fanatical, in fact. I heard her say, "If any one can convince us that we are not right we'd like to have them do it for we are awfully in earnest."

Then Mrs. Sharp said something about adjourning to the mission where the prophet would speak. I was interested and wanted to see this man spoken of as a prophet so I went on ahead, knowing where the mission was she had spoken of. When I got there I introduced myself to the prophet, who proved to be Sharp. He was talking to J. C. Creighton, who ran the mission.

When he began to talk to me he said, "My earthly name is Sharp. I am King David in the spirit -- the Lord of the vineyard. The spirit of King David is in me. Should it prove that I am the Lord of the vineyard I am going to reorganize things on this old earth."

Just then the woman and children came in. The children spoke to a man standing by the stove -- Pratt I learned later -- called him "Pa" and said "the Humane officer is after us." Right then Mr. Holt came to the door and addressing Sharp said, "Are you the father of these children?" He said, "I am," and Mr. Holt asked why they were not in school and added, "You'll have to keep these children off the streets anyway."

CHILDREN SAID "AMEN."

Sharp then began another harangue about being King David, the lord of the vineyard. Mr. Holt paid little attention to him but said, "If you don't properly care for these children we will have to do it." While Mr. Holt was talking Mr. Pratt and his children stuck their tongues out at him and called him names, at the same time saying "Amen" to everything Sharp would say.

Holt showed Sharp his star, at which the fanatic said, "I don't pay attention to such as that. God's got no policemen, no jails, no officers." Then Sharp began to curse in the vilest language at Mr. Holt, shoved him towards the door and said he'd fix him for that. There was some excitement in there and I did not see him strike Mr. Holt. I heard him declare that he'd preach right in front of the station and no one could stop him.

When Mr. Holt had gone Sharp took out a big knife and gun, flourished them and said, "Come on children; we'll show 'em what we'll do." The women and larger girls drew guns as they went out the door and marched toward police headquarters. He announced that he would hold a meeting with the children right in front of the station and would not be stopped either.

PRATT FIRED FIRST.

Mr. Short then told of the riot, saying that Pratt was the first man to fire a shot. His account differs little from that of other eye witnesses. Short said he had known J. C. Creighton and wife, who conducted the Poor Man's mission for eight years. Eight years ago, he said, he was in a meeting at Fourteenth and Baltimore which Creighton was conducting. "The night I speak of Creighton went into a trance, or appeared to do so, and scared a whole lot of people. He was taken to police headquarters and treated. He has always been a visionary man."

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December 9, 1908

HORSE KILLED IN THE FIGHT.

Driver of the Unfortunate Beast Had
a Narrow Escape.

One horse was killed in the fray. It was attached to a delivery wagon of the National Paper Box Company and driven by C. D. Woodey.

"I was driving down Fourth street from Wyandotte," said Woodey, "and got into the crowd just as the shooting began. One bullet grazed my cap and I whipped up. The horse was excited and prancing. When I got through the whizzing bullets and was down almost to the market, a shot struck my horse and it fell. Then I made tracks."

The horse was the property of Clark Wix, who has a transfer barn at Fourteenth and Walnut. It was rented to the box company.

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November 8, 1908

SOLDIER WHO SHOUTED
"REMEMBER CUSTER"
IS DEAD.

Heart Disease Claims As a Victim
David H. Pingree at the
Age of 56.

You remember the story in the history books about the massacre of General Custer in the Bad Lands of South Dakota, do you not? Especially you remember the stirring incident of the time when the troops who had been sent to revenge the death of the gallant leader and capture the redskin chief, Sitting Bull, wavered and were about to retreat before the withering fire poured out upon them from ambush, a soldier rose in his saddle and cried aloud:

"Remember Custer."

Only two words, but they made history. The soldiers rallied, taking those words for their battlecry and charged, inflicting the most decisive defeat upon the Indian warriors ever suffered in the history of the race.

The man who spoke those words is dead. David H. Pingree, 56 years old, formerly member of the Seventh United States cavalry, dropped dead of heart trouble last Friday morning. He had been honorably discharged from the army with the mark of "excellent" in 1891, after a service of six years. He came to Kansas City, where he remained a short time, but soon went to Iola, Kas., where he went into the hotel business, but for the past two years has been living in this city. A wife, who lives in Rich Hill, Mo., survives.

Besides turning the tide of the battle by giving his comrades a slogan to fight for at the psychological moment Pingree contributed largely to the victory in another way. A party of Indians were hidden behind a tent close to the regiment and they were picking off a cavalryman at every opportunity. Pingree and another soldier loosened up a Hotchkiss gun and trained it on the tent. In a few moments there was no tent left and the Indians were forced to seek another cover.

Pingree was an Elk. The lodge will have charge of the funeral services at 2:30 this afternoon from Eylar Bros. chapel, Fourteenth and Main streets. Burial will be in Mount Washington cemetery.

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October 9, 1908

MUSICIANS PARADED STREETS.

Theatrical Employes Rode Behind
Them in Carriages.

There was music if nothing else in the musicians' parade yesterday morning. At 11 o'clock the crowd of 125 musicians left Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and immediately set out on their parade through the downtown streets, blowing the brass noise makers for the entertainment of the hundreds of spectators who had lined the sidewalks.

Closely following the music makers were representatives from the local theaters, riding in automobiles and carriages. Yesterday's showing was the largest ever made by the Musicians' Protective union in Kansas City.

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October 6, 1907

TAFT SCORNED AT ARMORY.

3,000 Listen to Democratic Speakers.

Enthusiasm reached a high state at the opening of the Democratic campaign in Kansas City last night. Four thousand people crowded into the Armory at Fourteenth street and Michgan avenue to hear the issues and principles of the Democratic platform discussed by Ward Headley of Kentucky; Frank S. Monnett of Ohio, and James A. Reed and William P. Borland.

William T. Kemper acted as chairman of the meeting. At 8 o'clock the speakers had not arrived and he introduced William P. Borland.

"The Democratic party is the only party which is running its own candidate and he is running against two men," he said. "Taft is the proxy of Roosevelt; Higsen the proxy of Hearst. The antics of the Republican campaign would be good food for the humorists."

Ward Headley of Kentucky made good with the crowd. He is an interesting talker. He articulates well, speaks fluently and mixed just enough humor with his talk to keep the closest attention of his audience.

"There is only one great issue in this campaign," he began. "That is whether the Americans shall control their government or whether the trusts and corporations shall govern it. The Democracy is united this year for the first time in many campaigns. It isn't harmony from inactivity, but it is the desire to again gain control of our government."

Frank S. Monnett of Ohio, who led the oil fight in that state on the Standard Oil company, used many figures in his speech. He confined himself mostly to the various monopolies with which he had dealt and produced figures to show the falsity of Taft's statements in Kansas last week when Taft said that the price of corn was higher during Republican administrations than during the Democratic administrations.

The speech of James A. Reed brought cheer after cheer. The crowd had listened to other orators for two hours, but they were as eager to hear the Kansas City man as they were the first speaker. His speech was confined mostly to state politics. He also took a gentle jab at Taft's religious zeal.

"So Taft came to town Sunday and went to church three times?" he asked, beginning his talk. "And to think that he never was in a church in his life until he entered this campaign. They told us he was Unitarian and that he believed in neither hell nor heaven. Why, he hadn't been in town fifteen minutes until he began to feel the holy thrill of religion. Who knew our atmosphere affected strangers so queerly?

"Then he went to church looking for salvation. It was only the religious fervor and zeal which took him there. Nothing else could have induced him to go. Once wasn't enough so he tried it twice more in the same day. Then, in order that he could be baptized in every kind of religion he went to the church of the colored brethren to be anointed therein. Let us rise in prayer with Mr. Taft."

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September 26, 1908

BOY OF 4 FOUND DRUNK.

Probation Officer Saw Father Give
Beer to the Child.

Judge, probation officers and spectators were shocked at the evidence produced in the juvenile court yesterday in the case of Floyd Hardman. Floyd is a yellow haired youngster of four summers whom Probation Officer William Emmett found at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue in a drunken stupor. Emmett informed the court that the Humane Society had been told about the boy and one day he sat in an office window and watched the father and two other men buy beer in a bucket and give it to the baby to drink from first. He said the boy spent his time on the corner cursing people who passed. The father was fined $5 in police court for giving the boy beer to drink.

Mrs. Hardman said she was married in 1902 and did not know her husband drank or allowed the boy to drink. She said she allowed the boy to go on the moving van with his father becasue she believed it to be healthful for the child. She was ordered to keep him at home. Judge McCune informed her that small children were like sponges and absorbed everything around tehm and that her child evidently absorbed too much beer.

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September 13, 1908

SQUARED HIMSELF WITH LODGE.

George Runtz Left Money to the Odd
Fellows Club By His Will.

George Runtz, 35 years old, who came to this city a month ago sufferieng form consumption and apparently penniless, will be buried from Eylar's chapel, Fourteenth and Main streets, this afternoon. After his death Runtz was found to have $340 in a bag around his neck. By his will, which was written shortly before his death, most of this money is given to the local lodges of Odd Fellows, who cared for him throughout his illness when he was thought to be indigent.

What disposition he made of his property at his home in Cincinatti, O., is not known. The Odd Fellows will conduct the services. Burial will be in the Odd Fellows' lot in Union cemetery.

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August 30, 1908

HAMILTON IS SOUGHT
IN WESTERN STATES.

REWARD OFFERED FOR ESCAPED
MURDERER.

May Have Been Aided, Is the Belief
of the Police, -- Good
Description Is
Given.

All the Western states are being flooded with cards containing a picture and full description of Ira Earl Hamilton, a deserter from the United States army, suspected of the murder here of George W. Pickle, a 17-year-old boy, June 20.

Hamilton is 28 years old, 5 feet 10 1/2 inches tall, and weighs 155 or 160 pounds. He has dark brown hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. A distinctive feature in identifying him would be his slightly stooped position when walking. His neck is slightly "duked," and to add to the intensity of the stooped position, he has an unusually broad and long chin.

As soon as Detectives J. L. Ghent and "Lum" Wilson were put on the case, July 4, they arrested Hamilton. He remained in jail here ten days, but had to be released because the body of Pickle had not at that time been found. He was turned over to the military authorities at Ft. Leavenworth as a deserter and succeeded in making his escape from there in about two weeks.

While in the prison there Hamilton wrote to his aunt, Mrs. Lizzie Brownell, 103 West Fourteenth street, and upbraided her for making a statement in the Pickle case which was clearly against him. His letters, two of them, were threatening and he stated in one of them: "Remember this -- I can get away from this place any day I want to. The police have reason to believe that he was aided in his escape. It was Mrs. Brownell's aged mother who recently identified the piece of iron pipe found near where Pickle's body was discovered as having once been the property of Hamilton. He was a structural iron worker, and she said she saw it in his tool chest.

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July 27, 1908

FLED IN HER NIGHT ROBES.

Essie Waldron Ran From Rough Hus-
band and Was Arrested.

A clerk named Shields and two women were the only ones in Bolen's candy store at 112 East Twelfth street last night about 10 o'clock when the rear door opened and a young woman, clad only in a nightdress, rushed in calling for help. Her feet were bleeding and her arms were begrimed from climbing over the roofs. Mr. Shields promptly blushed and turned his back, and the women took off some of their own clothing and gave it to the woman. Then she explained.

Her name is Essie Waldron, and she is the wife of Vergil Waldron, a cook in the Saffire restaurant. They have been married three years, but separated three weeks ago. Mrs. Waldron first moved to 311 East Fourteenth street, but when her husband found that she was there, she moved to the Canadian hotel, Twelfth street and Grand avenue. There her husband found her yesterday and went up to her room last night and hid behind a curtain. Then, according to the story Mrs. Waldron tells, he waited until she had disrobed and then jumped out and choked her. She broke away from him and leaped out of an open window, landing on a rear porch. Crazed with fear she made her way to the ground in some manner she cannot explain and ran into the nearest doorway, which happened to be that of the candy shop.

A patrolman arrested both the husband and the wife and took them to the Walnut street police station, where the man was locked up and the woman released on bond. A charge of disturbing the peace will be placed against them in police court this morning.

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July 24, 1908

PLAYED 'JOKE' ON A PHYSICIAN.

Dr. C. A. Ritter Was Included in the
Telephone User's List.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., and a few others were not the only ones upon whom practical jokers operated Wednesday night. Dr. C. A. Ritter, who lives at 302 West Fourteenth street, was called up about 11:30 p. m. His wife answered the telephone, but the person speaking insisted that he must speak to the doctor.

"But the doctor has just gone to bed. He has not had a wink of sleep in twenty-four hours," said Mrs. Ritter.

"Well, he is wanted at once at the Baltimore hotel," replied the voice. "Mr. Crethington has just been injured in an accident in the elevator and must have attention at once."

The doctor hurriedly dressed and took the receiver. The message was repeated to him. He had never heard of Mr. Crethington before, and he was unable to recognize the voice, but he rushed over to the hotel.

There all was peace and content. No one had been injured in an elevator accident, there was no man with a name like Crethington in the hotel. Dr. Ritter's number had not been called from any telephone in the hotel that night. The doctor went home sleepy and mystified.

"In the light of the hoaxes that were pulled off on others last night," said the doctor yesterday afternoon, "I think it was a practical joker who played the trick. However, I do not know anyone of my acquaintance who would be both so foolish and so unthoughtful as to get a man out of bed to play a joke on him when he hadn't had any sleep for twenty-four hours."

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July 4, 1908

MAYOR COULDN'T
REMOVE "SPELL."

STROUD STILL UNDER INFLU-
ENCE OF THE "EVIL EYE."

SEEKS A REAL HYPNOTIST

K. U. GRADUATE STILL BEING
HELD BY POLICE.

Will Not Be Given Liberty, as They
Fear He May Be Seized at
Any Moment by Homi-
cidal Mania.
John Earl Stroud, Man Under a Hypnotic Spell
JOHN EARL STROUD, A. B.
Kansas University graduate whose mind
is deranged and is being detained
by the police.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., put aside everything for a time yesterday and repaired to the police matron's room, where, with mystic signs, a few words, a wrinkled brow and a queer look in his eye, he attempted to remove a hypnotic spell which John E. Stroud of Howard, Kas., says has been upon him for now just three months and six days.

Stroud called on the mayor Thursday afternoon and insisted on having an audience with him at once. He said that he was laboring under the spell of a "snake-eyed hypnotist," which might cause him to jump in front of a street car at any moment, and that he had made a special pilgrimage here to see the mayor, believing that only he could undo the spell. The mayor called Captain Walter Whitsett to his office and Stroud was placed in limbo.

There was a brief session of the police board yesterday, and at its close Stroud's case came up for discussion. "Why don't you go in and remove the spell then?" the mayor was asked. "If the man believes you can, it might help him."

"I have never been a success at removing spells," said his honor, "but I'm game to try my hand at it."

The police board adjournd to the matron's room and Mayor Crittenden was formally introduced to Stroud, who sat with bowed head in a cell. He seemed pleased when told that the mayor had come to cast off the spell and shook hands cordially.


IT PLEASED THE VICTIM.

"All but myself and the doctors will please leave the room," said the mayor in a commanding voice. When the room was cleared the cell door was unlocked and the mayor entered with Dr. J. P. Neal. Taking Stroud by the right hand, placing the left upon the man's brow and looking as much like a real spell-removing wizard as possible, the mayor said in a slow, firm voice:

"By the authority vested in me by the great state of Missouri and this beautiful city, I here and now peremptorily command the hypnotic spell which has been upon you be permanently removed."

The mayor finished his solemn duty with a motion of the hands as if flinging something from the ends of his fingers. Stroud grinned and looked as if he felt better.

"You'll be all right now," said the mayor on leaving. "I have called the spell all off."

The unusual duty was performed at just 4:13 o'clock. Two hours later Stroud was asked if he didn't feel better and if the spell had been cast off.


"SEND ON A HYPNOTIST."

"I guess I was wrong in my surmises," he said dolefully. "It will undoubtedly take a hypnotist to undo the work of one of his kind. Send on a good one and I think he can do it."

"How do you know the spell has not been removed by the mayor?" he was asked. "He has removed hypnotic spells before and should not have failed in your case."

"Because I can hear the hypnotist talking to me," was the reply. Then he cocked his head to one side to listen. "I didn't quite catch what he said then," he said. Once more he took a listening attitude and laughed. "He says, 'You can do as you please.' Now that isn't true, for my whole life is guided by his suggestions. I see it now in everything I do. I may be looking at a person passing along the street there and want to change and look at someone else, but I can't. Again, when I feel like looking at an object a long time, the hypnotist compells me to change and look at something else."

Dr. Neal said yesterday that Stroud's condition is much worse than when he was first detained. Then he was only receiving suggestions at intervals, but now he regards every move he makes a coming from the mysterious person whom the thinks has him in his power.


DANGEROUSLY INSANE.

"That class of insanity is the most dangerous kind," said Dr. Neal. "Suppose the suggestion to kill should come to him and he believed that he had to act on it? What would be the result?"

Thursday night Captian Whitsett wired the unfortunate man's father, R. L. Stroud, the proprietor of the Stroud hotel, Howard, Kas., and the reply said, "Have written by this mail." The letter had not ben received last night Colonel Greenman notified the father again yesterday. Stroud said he had been here since June 15 and had been stopping at 314 West Fourteenth street. He will not be released except to relatives who can care for him, as he is now regarded as a dangerous man to be at large.

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July 4, 1908

FOURTH BEGAN MORE
NOISY THAN EVER.

BEFORE MIDNIGHT, EVEN, THE
NOISE WAS UNBEARABLE.

No "Quiet Zone" Around Hospitals or
Anything Else -- Giant Crackers
and Torpedoes on the
Car Tracks.

"The racket and noise made by the Fourth of July eve celebrations is something awful, and we are going to call up the police to see if it can't be stopped," said one of the sisters at St. Joseph's hospital at 11 o'clock last night. "There has been loud and disturbing noises all the evening and just now one fanfare was finished up that was incessant for fifteen minutes. It is awfully trying on the patients."

"The annoyance from the discharge of nerve wrecking contrivances is becoming unbearable and our patients are complaining," was the report from Agnew hospital.

"Men and boys have been putting torpedoes on the tracks of the Holmes street car line all night long, and the whole neighborhood seems to be well supplied with dynamite fire crackers," reported the general hospital.

"We have one patient who has become hysterical from the din that is being created in the vicinity of the hospital building. Men and boys are putting something on the car tracks that, when it explodes, shakes the windows," was the report from the South Side hospital.

"The noise is awful and there seems to be no end to it. We wish the police would get around here and put a stop to it," was the complaint from University hospital.

Other hospitals reported like disturbing conditions, and the quiet zones which the police promised were not within the limits of Kansas City last night. Soon after sunset the booming of big and little fire crackers, the placing of the nerve-wrecking torpedoes on street car tracks were of common occurrence and there was not a section of the city that was free from the din and disturbance of the noise creators. Down town streets which in past years were as quiet on the eve of the national holiday as a Sunday, were particularly in a state of turmoil and deafening noises, and no apparent effort was made on part of the police to put a stop to it. From the river front to the limits south, east and west, the roar of all descriptions of fireworks was continuous, and in the residence districts sleep was out of the question.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern had made promises that there was to be a sane 3rd and Fourth of July, and he issued orders to his command to arrest all persons that discharged or set off firecrackers, torpedoes or anything of the like within the vicinity of hospitals or interfered with the peace and quiet of any neighborhood. How well Chief Ahern's subordinates paid attention to instructions can be inferred by reports from the hospitals and the experiences of citizens all over the city.

The first to make history by celebrating too soon was Joseph Randazzo, and Italian boy 17 years old. He had reached a revolver with a barrel eighteen inches long. At Fifth street and Grand avenue Randazzo was having a good time chasing barefoot boys and shooting blank cartridges at their feet. After he had terrorized a whole neighborhood William Emmett, a probation officer, took him in tow and had him locked up. That was at 9:45 p. m. When he had a taste of the city bastile he was released on his promise to be good. But he has yet to appear before Judge Harry G. Kyle in police court.

Nearly an hour after this the police of No. 6 were called upon to get busy. A negro named L. W. Fitzpatrick, who lives near Fourteenth and Highland, moved his base of operations from near home and began to bombard Fifteenth and Montgall and vicinity with cannon crackers varying in length from twelve to eighteen inches. Just as he had set off one which caused a miniature earthquake he was swooped down upon by the police and he did not get home until $10 was left as a guarantee that he would appear in court and explain himself.

Probably the greatest surprise came to Otto Smith and Edward Meyers, 14 years old. Armed with 25-cent cap pistols they were having a jolly time near Nineteenth and Vine when a rude and heartless policeman took them to No. 6 station.

They were "armed," and it was against the law to go armed. On account of the extreme youth of the lads they were lectured and let go home.

Mrs. Mary Murphy, 65 years old, who lives at 2025 Charlotte street, was standing on the corner of Twenty-first and Charlotte streets last night when a groceryman who conducts a store on the corner offered her a large cannon cracker to fire off. Thinking it was a Roman candle, the old lady lighted the cracker and held it in her hand.

She was taken to the general hospital, where it was found that her hand had been badly burned. The hand was dressed and she was taken to her home.

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June 30, 1908

TWO MEN TAKE CARBOLIC ACID.

One Because He's Asked to Pay a
Debt; Other's Reason Unknown.

Roy Kirk, 31 years old, a contracting plasterer, who gave his residence as 407 West Fourteenth street, was taken to the emergency hospital about 5 o'clock last evening to be treated for carbolic acid poisoning. When Dr. J. P. Neal examined Kirk he found that there was more of the acid on his face than inside the mouth. Joseph Blake and Kirk, who had been friends for a long time, had quarreled because Blake had asked Kirk to pay a debt. They entered a saloon at 903 Wyandotte street and drank together. Then Kirk is said to have left suddenly and returned with an ounce of carbolic acid.

"If you don't forgive me for what I've done I'll call it all off and take this," he said.

Then Kirk attempted to drink the acid. Blake struck the bottle from his hand, spilling the acid over Kirk's face.

About 9 o'clock last night an old man was found breathing heavily in a bunk at the Helping Hand Institute, 406 Main street. Dr. J. P. Neal was called from the emergency hospital across the street. Strong antidotes were at once administered and after an hour's hard work the old man was declared out of danger. By his bunk was found a bottle that had contained carbolic acid. On the books of the institution the old man was registered as Jeff Smith but that is not thought to be correct. The man's throat was so badly corroded that last night he was not able to talk.

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June 14, 1908

CAUGHT A "PEEPING TOM."

Broke Away From Police, but Was
Caught After Exciting Chase.

The family of E. C. Miller, livintg at 221 East Fourteenth street, was annoyed for several days by a "peeping Tom," and Mr. Miller complained to the police. A. B. Cummins and John Rooth, plain clothes men, were detailed on the case. Last nigth they caught a man peering into a rear window of the house and arrested him. They started down Fourteenth street with the prisoner between them, but at the alley between McGee and Grand avenue the man broke away from the officers, knocking down a passing pedestrian and throwing Officer Rooth, who tried to hold him by the coat, to the ground. Officer Cummings immediately drew his revolver and shot at the man, but missed. He then took up the chase, but was losing ground when, after they had run a block, the man stumbled on a heap of old iron and fell. Even then he showed fight, and Cummins was compelled to hit h im with the butt end of his gun before he submitted.

When taken to the Walnut street police station the prisoner gave the name of Thomas Randolph, and said he was a paper carrier. His wounds were dressed by Dr. Carl V. Bates and he was locked up . A charge of disturbing the peace was placed against him.

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June 5, 1908

MASON'S MURDER
CHARGED TO WIX.

PAWNED DEAD MAN'S WATCHES
AND DIAMONDS.

MASON WAS IN WIX'S BARN.

ACCUSED MAN ALSO SUSPECTED
OF FANNING MURDER.

Was Once Before the Prosecutor to
Explain His Sudden Wealth
Shortly After Fanning
Was Slain.

At 11 o'clock last night Clark Wix was formally charged with the murder of John ("Dutch") Mason, the horse trader who disappeared from here January 26 last. Mrs. Lizzie Mason, the murdered man's widow, and Maud Wilson, with whom he had lived, both went to Camden, Mo., yesterday and identified the body.

It was after hearing statements made by the women, after they had identified property pawned by Wix, that John W. Hogan, assistant prosecutor, concluded to charge Wix with murder in the first degree. The information was drawn and sworn to by Mrs. Lizzie Mason. Then it was filed with Justice Michael Ross and a warrant issued on which Wix will be arrested this morning. His statement is to be taken at police headquarters this morning. His arraignment will be later.

The body of Mason arrived in the city yesterday afternoon and was sent to the morgue of Freeman and Marshall, 3015 Main street. There is a large hole in Mason's skull on the right side at the base, and another behind the left ear. A deep fracture connects both holes. It is the opinion of Detectives Charles Halderman and James Fox, who have developed he case, that the murder was committed with a hammer. A search will be made for the weapon.

In looking over his pawn slips Fred Bailey, secretary to the inspector, found where Clark Wix had pawned two watches and, as Mason had a watch when he disappeared, Detective Ralph Trueman was sent to Silverman's pawn shop, 1215 Grand avenue, after the property. He came back with a man's hunting case watch and a woman's watch with a diamond in the back. He also got a diamond ring and an Elk ring from the same shop.

IT WAS HER WATCH.

Both Mrs. Mason and Maud Wilson quickly identified the man's watch as having been Mason's. They were not told of the other watch, and Mrs. Mason was asked if she ever possessed a watch.

"Yes," she said, "a small watch with a diamond in the back of the case." When shown the other watch which had been in pawn in Wix's name both women identified it immediately as Mrs. Mason's, and the Wilson woman said that Mason had the watch with him when he left that fatal Sunday, January 26.

According to the pawn sheets Wix pawned Mason's watch on February 10 and not until May 6 was Mrs. Mason's watch pledged. The police think that the diamonds in the Elk ring and other ring originally were part of Mason's horseshoe pin in which were fifteen stones, three large ones at the top and six smaller ones on each side.

John Hogan spent most of the night taking statements in the Wix case. Miss Wilson in her statement said that on April 26 last, her birthday, Clark Wix made her a present of a diamond ring. At the same time he had a stone set into a stud for himself. L. L. Goldman of 1307 Grand avenue, who set the two stones for Wix, also made a statement. Both persons said that the jewels were of almost the exact size of the three large stones in Mason's horseshoe pin. Miss Wilson said that when Wix gave h er the ring he said: "Now, if my wife ever finds out that I gave you this ring you must tell her that you bought it from me."

The third stone thought to have come from Mason's pin is believed now to be in an Elk charm worn my Wix when he was arrested.

CALLED FROM WIX'S BARN.

W. A. Marshall, a liveryman, said in his statement that on the Sunday Mason disappeared he called up from Wix's transfer barn, 1406 Walnut street, and said: "I'll be over with Wix to see you in a little while about buying that horse." But, though that was about 1 p. m., Mason never came.

James Conely and John Lewis, horseshoers at Fourteenth and Walnut streets, stated that they often saw John Mason about Wix's barn, which was directly across the street from them.

It was the intention to question Wix last night, but that had to be abandoned until today. Wix has not yet been informed that he is charged with murder. When arrested he asked no explanation, though it was 1 o'clock Wednesday morning, and since he has been held in the matron's room at headquarters he has taken no apparent interest in why he was locked up and no one allowed to see him.

QUESTIONED IN FANNING MURDER.

It developed yesterday that two months ago, on information furnished Detectives "Lum" Wilson and J. L. Ghent, Wix was taken before Prosecutor Kimbrell to be questioned in regard to the murder of Thomas W. Fanning, the aged recluse who was brutally killed with a hammer in his home, 1818 Olive street, December 31, 1906.

He was known to have hauled Mrs. Fanning to the general hospital, and it was reported that he said later: "Somebody is going to have to kill that old guy, Fanning, living all alone out there with all that coin." It was shortly after the Fanning murder that Wix went into business for himself, but in his statement at that time he said that his uncle, Clark Wix, postmaster of Butler, Mo., had furnished him the money. That matter will be reopened now.

Police Judge Harry G Kyle was yesterday retained by relatives to defend Clark Wix. Kyle comes from the same county, Bates, in which the Wix family live. All sorts of influence was brought to bear yesterday to get to see and talk to the prisoner, but Captain Walter Whitsett would not permit it.

THREATENED HABEAS CORPUS.

Thomas W. Wix, a farmer from near Yates Center, Kas., arrived yesterday and it was he and Clark Wix, the uncle from Butler, who retained Judge Kyle. Rush C. Lake, assistant attorney general, went to the station and, according to Captain Whitsett, threatened to sue out a writ of habeas corpus if not allowed to see Wix. He was told that such action would mean in immediate charge of murder and there it ceased. Then other lawyers tried the same tactics and failed.

In June, 1906, Clark Wix was married to Miss Harriet Way, a nurse at the general hospital, who had served barely one of her two years.. At that time Wix was driving an ambulance for the Carroll-Davidson Undertaking Company, which handled all the city dead from the hospital, and it was his frequent trips there that brought him in contact with his wife.

Miss Way lived near Shelbina, Mo., and it was reported soon after her marriage that her family came near ostracising her for what she had done. In about a year, however, Wix had diamonds of all kinds and frequently gave his wife gems until she was the envy of her nurse friends at the hospital. Mrs. Wix was not informed last night that her husband had been charged with murder.

When Clark Wix was examined by County Prosecutor I. B. Kimrell and City Detectives Lum Wilson and J. L. Ghent, shortly after the murder of Thomas Fanning in his home at 1818 Olive street, on New Year's eve, 1906, Wix was not plainly told what charge might be placed against him. No person, outside of Chief of Police John Hayes, Wix's wife, the detectives and the prosecutor knew that Wix was under arrest. None of Wix's political friends knew of it or made any effort to secure his release. In recalling the questioning of Wix at that time Mr. Kimbrell said last evening:

"We asked Wix how he came by diamonds he was wearing and how he found the wherewithal to purchase his teams and wagons. He showed us that the original story about his owning many large diamonds was an exaggeration and that he possessed only two small ones, and he proved that he held title to only three teams and a wagon or two. He told us the size of his salary and how much he had been saving out of it each week. We corroborated his explanation by his wife and the neighbors. We never told him he was held for the Fanning murder. We discovered that we had no case against him and dropped the matter without letting his name be connected with the murder."

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May 3, 1908

SAYS POLICEMAN HIT HIM.

Ernest Hiatt Had Cuts on the
Back of His Head.

Ernest Hiatt, 19 years old, of 1215 Jefferson street was playing ball in the street near Fourteenth and Jefferson streets yesterday afternoon, when a park policeman ordered him to stop. The boy was sent to the Walnut street station later with two cuts on the back of his head. He said that the policeman had hit him with his club as he was about to recover the ball when the game was ordered stopped. Alderman James Pendergast was a witness, and has interested himself in the affair.

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April 14, 1908

BURNED CHILDREN WITH ACID.

Boys Rubbed It on Their Faces, Caus-
ing Them Much Pain.

Four boys, living in the neighborhood of Fourteenth and Campbell streets, last night took a bottle of carbolic acid and a medicine syringe and spread terror among the girls and smaller children of that section. An alarm reached No. 4 police station and Patrolman T. M. Scott captured one of the boys, Tony Hanson, 1320 Campbell street. His is 11 years old and his companions were about the same age. The names of the others said to have taken part were Chester Cheney, 910 East Fourteenth street; Harry Wintermute, 912 East Fourteenth street and Chester Northfleet, 914 East Fourteenth street.

The boys claimed they secured the bottle in or behind a barn and that they did not know what it contained. Many children were burned by the acid. While one boy used the medicine syringe the others, it is said, would saturate pieces of rag and rub the necks and faces of children they could catch. Ugly burns and much pain followed. Lieutenant Hammil in charge of No. 4 police station did not want to place boys so young in the holdover, so he merely left their names, addresses and other information for Captain Flahive to act upon as he chooses today. Some of the children who were most burned are Florence David, 1431 Campbell street; Winnie Austin, 914 East Fourteenth street, and Edna Barnes, 1425 Campbell street.

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March 28, 1908

WAS THE OPERATOR'S FRIEND.

Mrs. Mary Jane Lambert, Honorary
Member of Union, Dies.

Mrs. Mary Jane Lambert, 63 years of age, died at her home, 818 East Fourteenth street, last night, after several months' illness. Mrs. Lambert was the widow of Benjamin Lambert, who, with Charles Dickens, invented linen paper. Shortly before their marriage, Mr. Lambert was the manager of the Ottoman bank of Constantinople, Turkey.

Mrs. Lambert was born in Liverpool, England, in 1845. At the age of 28 years she married Mr. Lambert, and, on account of the failure of the Overmann & Gurney bank in Liverpool, the couple immediately came to America. For twenty-three years Mrs. Lambert had been a resident of Kansas City.

Two of her sons, G. W. and H. Y. Lambert, were telegraph operators and held positions of influence in the Telegraphers' union. On this account Mrs. Lambert became greatly interested in the work of the union and because of her interest she was made an honorary member. At the time of the strike last summer, Mrs. Lambert went among the strikers, cheering them and offering encouragement to those who needed it. When the strike had reached the stage that many of the strikers were out of money and food, they always found a welcome in Mrs. Lambert's house.

Mrs. Lambert was the mother of twelve children, four of whom are still living. They are her two sons, Mrs. R. F. Ferguson and Mrs. A. C. Preston. The funeral services will be held from the home at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial is to be in Elmwood Cemetery.

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February 27, 1908

HE USED A NOTARY'S SEAL.

As Well as Several Stars to Arrest a
Sober Man.

Armed with a deputy marshal's star, a Missouri Pacific special policeman's badge and a notary public seal, George Miller tried to arrest a man in a saloon at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue last night. Miller walked up to the man and, showing his different badges, told him he was under arrest. Naturally the man arrested wanted to know why, and a series of questioning took place during the course of which Miller told his prisoner that he was charged with having done a "stick-up" two nights before.

Miller insisted that the man go to No. 4 police station with him and there be locked up for further investigation. When they arrived there the prisoner told his story to Lieutenant Hammill, who immediately ordered the man with the badges locked up for safe keeping and teleponed to Marshal Sam McGee at the jail to ascertain whether or not Miller was what he represented. McGee told the officer that no man whose name was George Miller had ever been commissioned by the county, but as for the special policeman's star and the notary's seal, the marshal could not say. The man whom Miller arrested was released.

Miller, who lives at 113 West Fourteenth street, was sent to police headquarters, charged with drinking and impersonating an officer.

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February 7, 1908

JEALOUS RIVAL STABBED HIM.

Matt Rech Suffers Because Girl Re-
fuses to Wed Another Man.

Lola Ealy's refusal yesterday morning to marry Clyde Duncan, a boarder whom she had known only three weeks, resulted in the stabbing of Matt Rech, another boarder, last evening at 6 o'clock. The affair was at Mrs. Elizabeth Ealy's boarding house, 802 East Fourteenth street. After her refusal the girl said Duncan threatened to kill her. Then the mother ordered him to move from the house, which he did. But at supper time he entered the dining room, where Rech, of whom he was supposed to be jealous, was seated at the table. Duncan says he had been drinking heavily. He had an open knife in his hand and made for Rech, whose back was turned. Mrs. Ealy, hoping to save a life, raised a chair and struck Duncan over the head just as he reached around Rech and plunged in the knife over the victim's heart.

Rech was taken to McCall's sanitarium with a wound that it was said late last night would probably prove fatal. Drs. E. L. Rubel and H. B. McCall attended him.

Duncan was arrested at 11 o'clock and spent the night at No. 4 police station. He said he had been very drunk and had no clear recollection of the affair. Rech is a cable man for the Home Telephone Company and Duncan is a laborer.

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February 5, 1908

HUMILIATES THE MOTORMAN.

To Hit an Automobile and Not Even
Scratch the Paint.

A new way for the motor car driver to confound and humiliate the helpless street car motorman came out last night at 11 o'clock when Holmes street car 443 on Walnut at Fourteenth street stuck its nose into the touring car of W. C. Goffe, only to lay itself out without so much as scarring teh automobile or spilling any of the five occupants.

Mr. Goffe, family and negro chauffeur were spinning homeward on Fourteenth street when the street car loomed up hard aport and took its medicine.

"Was running slow, and always run slow, crossing the car lines, so I can stop," explained Mr. Goffe to the crowd that gathered.

"Yes, and that's what was the matter. You did stop," put in the street car motorman, L. Hayter, not concealing his animosity for automobiles. "I didn't hit you till you'd stopped. That's the way you chauffeurs have got to doing -- running onto our tracks and stopping, and we go back to the barn with our fenders on the platform."

A close examination of Mr. Goffe's car failed to reveal any damage done. The family was driven to the home, 2125 Brooklyn avenue, without dismounting.

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