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February 8, 1910

MONSTER STADIUM
WILL BE BUILT.

TEN-ACRE TRACT BOUGHT NEAR
ELECTRIC PARK FOR AN
ATHLETIC FIELD.

Kansas and Missouri Uni-
versities Offered Use of
Park for Football.

A monster stadium which will seat 30,000 people, and an athletic field large enough for football games, track meets and baseball will be constructed on a ten-acre tract of ground within two blocks of Electric park by the Gordon & Koppel Clothing Company within the next six months. The ground was purchased yesterday for $30,000 and work on the stadium will start immediately.

The land is located between Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth streets and Lydia and Tracy avenue. It is on two car lines and crowds can be handled as well as they are handled at Electric park. The stadium will be of wooden construction, and it will be an up-to-date athletic field, such as has been proposed in the many stadium propositions talked of recently for football games between Kansas and Missouri universities. It will be known as the Gordon & Koppel Athletic field and will be under the management of George C. Lowe, a member of the firm.

TO VISIT M. S. U. TODAY.

This project is the result of the talk of erecting a stadium for university football, although the management has made no proposition to the universities to date and has not been promised the annual Thanksgiving day game. Mr. Lowe will go to Columbia, Mo., today to put the proposition before the athletic management of the university. He will then outline his plans to the Kansas university management. He will offer the field to those institutions for 10 per cent of the gross receipts of the annual game, but says that no matter whether those schools can be interested in it or not his plans will be carried out because football is but one of the many athletic events this stadium will be used for.

This is a private enterprise. For more than two months the backers have been trying to purchase the ground, but did not agree to terms until yesterday, when the transfer was made. The ground belongs to the Davis estate and the sale was made by G. E. Bowling & Co. The stadium will be built on ground 500 by 600 feet, the rest of the tract of ground to be used for other purposes. The inside of the field will be large enough to allow a quarter of a mile track to be built, which will be outside of the baseball diamond, and football gridiron.

MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT.

There will be bath rooms and lockers for the players. The stadium will be so constructed that there will be five entrances in front of it and as patrons of the park enter they will go up incline walks to the top of the seats, as they do in Convention hall. A walk will be built around the top. A grandstand will be constructed on each side of the athletic field and the ends will be bleachers. A row of boxes will be constructed around the entire field. The field will be laid out so that in case football crowds are more than 30,000 people, about 5,000 can be seated in chairs on track.

This field will be open to the public for use for all athletic evens and the management announced last night that in case a circus or anything of that nature could be put in the inclosure it will be rented for such purposes. Director Barnes of the Y. M. C. A. favors the enterprise for athletic events in which his men take part. City League baseball will be played there and Sunday School Athletic League and ward and high school athletic meets will have the privilege of using this ground.

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January 20, 1908

RAN AROUND IN SCANT ATTIRE.

Peter Mettlach Raced the Streets in
Unseasonable Raiment.

Running races with automobiles and street cars in his underclothes was the strange pastime of Peter Mettlach of 901 East Eighteenth street last night. Mettlach was placed in a sanitarium at Thirty-first street and Euclid avenue about two weeks ago.

Last night about 7 o'clock he told a nurse that he wanted to go home. She refused to give him his clothes, telling him that he was not in condition to go home yet. Mettlach, however, took a different view of the situation and went on back into his room on the second floor of the house, opened up a window and climbed down the fire escape and to freedom. He then entered his wild gambols over the southeast part of the city.

Patrolmen from No. 9 and No. 5 police stations were detailed to pick him up. After several hours he was seen by the motorman of a Swope park car, running by the side fo the car. Seeing the man in his underclothes, bareheaded and barefooted, the motorman stopped the car and urged the man to get in the car. When the car arrived at Forty-eighth and Harrison streets two policemen took the man on up to Thirty-first and Troost avenue, where his relatives met him with some clothes and took him home.

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March 31, 1907

OPEN CARS READY FOR SUNDAY.

New Service Today Also on the
Rockhill Extension.

If everything is lovely -- including the weather and it stoops raining long enough to make Easter bonnets possible, open cars will be run on some of the suburban street car lines today. Swope park cars were run through the city yesterday from the shops on East Ninth street to the Forty-eighth street barns, to have them in readiness for to-day's business.

It is expected that even though it remains nasty there will be enough courageous ones to swell the street car business beyond ordinary proportions, and if the sun shines every available car will be put into service.

Commencing today every other Rockhill car will be run through to Fifty-first street. The fare is a nickel, and from Waldo to Dodson a nickel.

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