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February 2, 1910

WILL REBUILD AT ONCE.

First Christian Science Church Di-
rectors Authorized to Proceed.

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ninth street and Forest avenue, which was burned last Saturday night, is to be rebuilt at once. It is to be an absolutely fireproof structure, and will cost approximately $75,000. Of this amount $10,000 was contributed Sunday night and the board of directors were authorized to start the construction at once. Plans are being prepared by Edwards & Cumberson, architects.

"There will be no trouble whatever in raising the $75,000," said J. K. Stickney, president of the board of directors last night. "There is plenty of money in the congregation and all are willing to do their share.

"The congregation subscribed $42,000 in 1905 and 1906 toward the extension of the mother church in Boston, so there will be no trouble in raising all the funds we need for our own church. We expect to have the new structure completed and ready for occupancy by the first of September. In the meantime we have secured a place for our regular services. On next Sunday the afternoon services and Sunday school will be held in the Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Thirty-second street and Troost avenue, at 3 o'clock. Evening services will be held at 8 o'clock. After next Sunday services will be held at the same hours in the Jewish synagogue, Linwood boulevard and Flora avenue. Wednesday evening services will be held in the synagogue at 8 o'clock."

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January 30, 1910

SCIENTIST STONE
EDIFICE BURNED.

THE FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
REDUCED TO CHARRED
WALLS.

Building Supposed to Be
Fireproof When Con-
structed Years Ago.
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Nearly Destroyed by Fire.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST.
Beautiful House of Worship Almost Totally Destroyed Last Night by Fire.

Four charred walls is all that remains of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, at Ninth street and Forest avenue, which cost its congregation $150,000.

Fire broke out in the basement of the building, near the west end, at 8 o'clock last night. Despite the constant playing of ten streams and the concerted action of as many fire companies, it burned steadily and fiercely to the ground, furnishing one of the most spectacular fires which has occurred in Kansas City for many years. The loss is estimated by J. K. Stickney, president of the board of trustees, about $155,000. The insurance was $85,000.

The flames were first noticed by T. Russel, who owns apartments next door to the church at 912 Forest avenue, at 8:05 o'clock. At that time smoke was issuing form a window leading into the boiler rooms. The first alarm brought No. 5 and No. 8 companies.

Firemen broke into the rear of the church on the alley, but at first failed to locate the blaze. So confident were they, however, that it was already beyond control that a second alarm was turned in and companies 14, 10, 11, 25, 2 and 3 were sent. By this time a bright, red glare flamed from the second story followed by tongues of eager flame which reached from the old auditorium toward adjoining apartments.

It was stated by Chief John C. Egner last night that had the church not been located at one of the highest points of the city, where the water pressure is seldom above forty pounds, the fire might have been checked at the outset. Waiting for the heavy engines to be dragged over slippery streets probably doomed the building.

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, was built of gray stone and furnished in Flemish oak. It was considered fireproof when it was erected, thirteen years ago. Because of the many prominent names connected with its building, as well as its maintenance, the fire attracted an unusually large crowd for one so far from the business district. People came from Kansas City, Kas., Sheffield and Westport to see, and stood about, shivering, for nearly three hours.

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January 20, 1910

BABY ROUTS AN ARMED MAN.

But Child Could Not Save the
Family Diamonds.

John Church Ingles, 3 years old, son of Edward M. Ingles, 3830 Forest avenue, put to flight an armed burglar who invaded his nursery yesterday afternoon.

The man gained entrance by means of a skeleton key while Mrs. Ingles was visiting a neighbor. He made a search of the dining room and kitchen, taking two diamond bracelets and about $5 in cash, and was going up the stairs when John heard him.

The child called loudly for his mother. Mrs. Ingles came running from an adjoining house just in time to see the man dash out of the front door and across the lawn. He had a long bladed knife in his hand.

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January 4, 1910

SWOPE CISTERN IS BLAMED.

Brother-in-Law of Recent Victim
Makes Seventh Case in Family.

The typhoid fever epidemic has struck the seventh member of the Swope family, Dr. B. Clark Hyde, 3516 Forest avenue, a brother-in-law of the late William C. Swope, being the latest. Dr. Hyde has been ill for a week, but his physician, Dr. J. W. Perkins, says his condition is not serious. The fever is thought to have been caused by drinking water from a cistern at the Swope family home in Independence.

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October 10, 1909

GEO. P. OLMSTEAD
DIES AT 80 YEARS.

PASSES AWAY WHILE SEATED
AT BREAKFAST TABLE.

Was Connected With Many Promi-
nent Institutions in Kansas City
Where He Lived Nearly
Forty Years.
The Late George P. Olmstead.
GEORGE P. OLMSTEAD.

George P. Olmstead, an octogenarian, half of whose life was lived in Kansas City, died yesterday morning at the breakfast table in his home at 1311 Forest avenue. Until five years ago he was a member of the Cady & Olmstead jewelry firm at 1009-11 Walnut street, which still retains his name. Prior to that he was one of the leading lumbermen of the Missouri valley.

Mr. Olmstead had seated himself at breakfast, and was glancing over the morning paper when his daughter, Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, was about to serve the coffee. As she came in she noticed his head was bowed, but thought little of it, as he often became drowsy when sitting.

Mr. Olmstead's head fell lower and touched the paper, and Mrs. Qualtrough became alarmed. Unable to awaken him, she called her husband, but they could do nothing and he had lapsed into unconsciousness. Dr. R. T. Sloan was summoned, but when he arrived the aged man was dead.

Besides his wife he leaves a son and a daughter, C. B. Olmstead and Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, both of 1311 Forest avenue, Miss Catherine G. Olmstead, a sister, 88 years old, has been at Wesleyan hospital for three years with a fractured limb.

The funeral will be held from the hours Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Burris A. Jenkins, pastor of Linwood Boulevard Christian church, in charge. Temporary burial will be in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Mr. Olmstead was born September 17, 1829, at Little Falls, N. Y., where he grew to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade. Early he made the journey by canal, lake, river and gulf to Corpus Christi, Tex., but did not remain there long.

Later he engaged in the lumber business at Pontiac, Ill, where he was married in 1859 to Miss Cornelia E. Hunt, who survives him. He remained there for several years and again removed to Tuscola, where he lived until they came to Kansas City in 1869. Mr. Olmstead built a home at 800 Jefferson street and lived there until 1887, when he bought the present family home at 1311 Forest avenue. The Jefferson street house was sold at the time of the construction of the cable incline.

On coming to Kansas City Mr. Olmstead became a member of the lumber firm of Leach, Hall & Olmstead, all of the members of which are now dead. Their lumber yard was west of the Union depot and the site is now occupied by a number of large wholesale houses. In 1882 he became a partner of L. S. Cady in the jewelry firm of Cady & Olmstead and in 1887 the lumber firm was dissolved. Four years ago he sold his interest in the business of Cady & Olmstead. For a number of years he was identified with R. M. Snyder, now dead, in Texas and Arizona ranch properties.

Current events drew much of Mr. Olmstead's attention and he took a vivid interest in the happenings of the world at large. His large library attests that he was a wide reader and he was known as a close and intelligent student of the Bible. During the pastorate of Rev. T. P. Haley, he was an active member of the First Christian church at Eleventh and Locust streets. Mathematics and astronomy held an odd fascination for him.

Mr. Olmstead was a close friend of Col. R. T. Van Horn and frequently he would contribute keen and well-written comments on public affairs to the columns of The Journal.

Last fall he was invited to Pontiac to attend the fiftieth anniversary of the Masonic lodge there, which he founded, but he was obliged to decline.

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September 22, 1909

BODIES OF VICTIMS
TO REST IN ATCHISON.

FUNERALS OF MRS. STOLL AND
WILLIAM JACOBIA TODAY.

Interment of Principals in Monday
Night's Murder and Suicide
to be Made at Former
Residence.

With the burial in Atchison, Kas., today of the victims of the tragedy enacted Monday night at the home of S. F. Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, in which Mrs. Sadie Stoll was murdered by William Jacobia, who later committed suicide at his wife's home, the last chapter of their story will have been concluded.

Mrs. Stoll's body was taken to Atchison at 6:30 o'clock last night. It will be buried beside that of her father, who died several weeks ago.

Mrs. William Jacobia, 3235 Forest avenue, will this morning take the body of her husband to Atchison where he will be buried. The wife and child will be the beneficiaries of life insurance carried by Jacobia. The life insurance was partly placed in fraternal organizations. Jacobia carried about $5,000 insurance upon his life. The fact that he left no will gives his wife and son all of his personal property. The insurance is all he left.

That Jacobia formed the Linwood Investment company for the sole purpose of placing his property beyond the possibility of being taken from him in a suit for the alienation of the affections of Mr. Stoll's wife was denied yesterday by his attorney, W. F. Guthrie. Mr. Guthrie for a time acted as trustee of the property owned by Jacobia for the latter and his wife, and later assisted in the financial separation between them.

While Mrs. Stoll refused to give up Jacobia, and give all of her love to her husband, she is said to never have countenanced any idea of leaving her husband and children. While she informed a friend that she loved Jacobia, she said she w ould stay at home on account of her two boys. For a year she drifted along in this fashion, meeting Jacobia daily, and when suspected by her husband pacifying him.

Those persons intimate with the family relations of the Stolls said yesterday that Mr. Stoll never knew of the friendship that existed between his wife and Jacobia, though he became suspicious on many occasions. At such times he is said to have spoken to his wife regarding the rumors he heard, but she always talked him out of his suspicious mood, and it ended by Mr. Stoll apologizing for his mistake. The night of the murder and suicide Mr. Stoll told one of h is intimate friends that he had seen his wife with Jacobia on but two occasions.

The report that Mrs. Stoll's father, J. P. Brown, had assisted in meeting the expenses of the Stoll household was denied yesterday. It was admitted that he often made presents of various sums of money, but that he gave the money to his daughter because she was a favorite.

Albert Stoll, the 14-year-old son who was in the house at the time his mother was murdered, yesterday asserted that he did not know what subject was being discussed by his mother and Jacobia during the quarrel.

Albert did not inform his fatherr of the clandestine meetings because of the love for his mother. The older son, Sam, also failed to tell his father for fear he would kill either Mrs. Stoll or Jacobia and thus create a scandal that might otherwise be dept from the public.

Attorney W. F. Guthrie last night made a written statement in which he denied that Stoll had ever employed him to bring an alienation suit. Speaking for Mr. Stoll, the attorney said that the druggist had never hired detectives to shadow his wife or Jacobia. the attorney said that Mr. Stoll had accused a man of being too intimate with his wife while living in Atchison, and that it became public. The affair caused people to lose confidence in Mr. Stoll, and he was forced to seek another location.

A denial was made by the attorney, who was also attorney for Mrs. Stoll's father, that Mr. Stoll ever received or expected any sum of money from his father-in-law as the price of his continuing to live with his wife.

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September 21, 1909

FRIENDSHIP ENDS IN
MURDER AND SUICIDE.

WILLIAM JACOBIA KILLS MRS.
SADIE STOLL AND HIMSELF.

Young Son of Woman Heard Quarrel
and Shooting -- Risks Life Try-
ing to Protect His
Mother.
Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, Murdered Woman.
MRS. SADIE BROWN STOLL.
Wife of Samuel F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company.

Murder and suicide ended a close friendship last night when William Jacobia, 600 East Ninth street, shot and killed Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, during a quarrel in the front hall of the Stoll home at 9 o'clock and a few minutes later committed suicide on the veranda of his wife's residence, 3217 Forest avenue.

Mrs. Stoll was shot through the heart and died at once. Jacobia shot himself in the head.

The only person in the house at the time Mrs. Stoll was murdered was her 14-year-old son Albert. What passed between the couple before the tragedy is not known definitely, but they were quarreling for nearly a half hour before Jacobia fired the shot. Albert Stoll heard part of the conversation between his mother and Jacobia, but was sent to his room by her just before the shooting.


BOY GETS A SHOTGUN.

That the young son expected serious trouble while Jacobia was there is shown by Jacobia's actions, which Albert Stoll graphically described to the police last night. Immediately after firing the shot which killed Mrs. Stoll, Jacobia started up the stairs, threatening to kill Albert, who had provided himself with a shotgun to protect his own life.

Either the shotgun frightened him or the desire to get away from the scene of his crime, Jacobia gave up the pursuit of the boy, and ran from the house, followed by Albert, who gave the alarm by crying for help.

But few minutes elapsed between the first and second shooting. It is only five blocks from the Stoll home at 3617 Tracy avenue to Mrs. Jacobia's suite in the Alabama apartment house, 3237 Forest avenue, and Jacobia ran all the way.


"I HAVE SHOT MRS. STOLL."

A balcony with no outside steps is front of her apartment, which is on the ground floor. Jacobia made his entrance by way of this balcony and in doing so had to climb over a stone balustrade which encloses it. As he entered with much agitation he said to his wife, who had come to let him in:

"Mamma, I had to come home."

She could see that he was greatly excited, and told him to sit down while she got him a glass of cold water.

"No, no!" he protested, excitedly, "I haven't time. I have just shot Mrs. Stoll. It is awful, it is awful."
William Jacobia; Killed His Friend and Then Himself.
WILLIAM JACOBIA.
Slayer of Mrs. Samuel F. Stoll, who committed suicide when the police traced him to his wife's home at 3217 Forest avenue.

Incoherently he was trying to tell her of the shooting when he heard the sound of steps outside.

"There are the officers coming for me," he said.

"Yes, but you will have to nerve yourself and be calm," she told him.

Mrs. Jacobia went to the door to let in Sergeant M. E. Cassidy and Patrolman Isaac Hull of No. 9 station, and as she did so her husband stepped out on the balcony.

"Where is he?" asked Sergeant Cassidy.


WIFE HEARS DEATH SHOT.

Just then they heard a single shot, and the three went hurriedly to the balcony door.

"There he lies," she answered, pointing to the dead body of her husband, prostrate on the stone floor of the porch. The husband of the murdered woman is S. F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company, formerly at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and now located at 208 and 210 East Twelfth street. He was notified of the death of his wife by W. R. James, 3615 Tracy avenue. Sam Brown Stoll, 18 years old, the oldest son, was at a theater, and friends were unable to reach him by telephone.

According to the facts as told by Albert last night Jacobia telephoned yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock and asked for Mrs. Stoll. Albert answered the telephone and upon recognizing Jacobia's voice hung up the receiver. About 8 o'clock last night he again called up and was answered by Mrs. Stoll, and a half hour later appeared at the house.

Mrs. Stoll fell dead in the hallway at the foot of the stairs. Her head was lying against the bottom step, while her feet pointed to the front door. Soon after Mr. Stoll reached home he asked neighbors and friends to inform the relatives of his wife of her death. J. H. Brown, a brother, who lives in Atchison, Kas., was informed of the tragedy.

"Tell all of them to come," said Albert, who was telling his father what should be done.

The account of the shooting as told by young Albert Stoll soon after the murder, while not full in all details, shows daring in a boy so young as far as his part was concerned. He said that he and his brother did not like Jacobia, and that a week ago Sam had purchased a shotgun with the intention of killing the man who was his mother's friend. The shotgun had been kept in their room until a day or so ago, when his mother removed it to the attic.

"Yesterday afternoon when Jacobia called up and asked for mamma, I hung up the receiver," said Albert. "Then about 8 tonight he called mother, and soon afterwards he came to the house. I was in my room at the time. When I heard mamma and Jacobia fussing I decided I would get the shotgun, which I did. I took a shell and after taking out the wad and shot I went down to the first landing and stood there.

HEARD HIS MOTHER SHOT.

"I told Jacobia to leave the house, that he did not have any business here anyway. At that he got mad at me and told me to keep still or he would beat me. Then to bluff him I picked up the shotgun and put a load into it. Mamma made me go to my room, saying she would get Jacobia awa.

"I'll not let that little pup talk to me that way," Jacobia is said to have repeated to Mrs. Stoll.

"Just as I reached the upper hall I heard the shot, and then mamma say, 'Albert, he shot me.' 'Yes, and I'll shoot him, too,' I heard Jacobia say as I was hurrying back downstairs. Jacobia was coming up the stairs, and knowing my shell was not good, I ran to my room and put a loaded shell in the gun and then came downstairs.

RAN AFTER JACOBIA.

"As I reached the head of the stairway Jacobia was going out the front door, and I ran down the steps and followed into the yard. He was then going up the street. I cried 'Help, help,' and someone across the street asked, 'What is the matter, Albert?' When I said mamma is shot nearly all of the people started to the house and I came back and called up papa, but he didn't answer. Then someone told the police.

"I wish I had shot him," Albert admitted.

"Oh, God, why didn't you shoot the scoundrel, boy?" Mr. Stoll asked of his son.

Albert insisted that he did not know what his mother and Jacobia were talking about. Whenever Albert endeavored to tell the police just what occurred, and how, Mr. Stoll, who was walking the floor of the lower rooms, would tell him to keep still. Mr. Stoll refused to answer any questions immediately after the murder.

HUSBAND STILL LOVED HER.

"I loved her with every drop of blood in my body," he said, "and I will not say anything against her. I would not say a word that would reflect upon her. Oh, God, why couldn't he have shot me?"

Not until Samuel Stoll, the elder son, came home after the performance at a theater, did he learn of the tragedy. As he hurried up the steps, he was met by J. A. Guthrie, a friend of the family.

"For God's sake, what's the matter?" he said with a perplexed face.

Then he saw the white shrouded figure in the parlor with the undertaker and his assistants standing near. Mr. Stoll, who saw him, threw his arms about the boy's neck and shouted:

"Your friend killed her, that's what he did. And you knew he was coming to see her all the time."

WHEN THE TWO FIRST MET.

Then both were hurried up the stairs by friends.

"I'll kill him myself," said the youth.

"He has done that to save you the trouble," said Mr. Guthrie. "He committed suicide just after he killed your mother."

Then the father upbraided the son for several minutes, but the youth declared he knew nothing about it. Then both began weeping hysterically, and were finally reconciled. But the father could not remain seated. He walked the floor in anguish.

"I knew the first day he saw my wife," he said. "One day when he was building those flats up on Forest avenue, he came in to use the telephone, and my wife met him at the door. He introduced himself, which was the beginning of their acquaintance. I began to get suspicious when I saw him at the house several times.

WAS TOLD TO WATCH WIFE.

"Somehow I had a suspicion that all was not right, and at times I felt sick. On one occasion I asked her about it, but she became angry and upbraided me so much that I felt almost humiliated. She went on occasional visits to Atchison, and I was suspicious every time that she left home.

"On one of the visits to Atchison, I found his picture in the close, and I was so angry when she came home that I could wait no longer. She flew into a rage, and I could do nothing but submit, not wishing to make the affair public.

"My feelings were again wrought to a high pitch when I received an anonymous letter, telling me I ought to watch my wife. I then determined to hire a detective agency to watch her, but after hiring two men I thought differently and canceled my contract with the firm.

"It has been that way for months until tonight when I was called to the telephone and was told that my wife had been shot. I won't harbor any ill will against her for my boys' sake. She was their mother.

Mrs. Stoll was a large woman with a rich mass of dark brown hair. Her face was full and her eyes were dark brown, which matched her olive complexion. She was considered one of the handsomest women in the neighborhood, and always attracted attention on the street by her dignified bearing. A dimple in her cheek was heightened by an engaging smile. She always dressed in clothes of the latest fashion, which while not always expensive, always were tasteful. She was 38 years old.

Mrs. Stoll was the daughter of J. P. Brown, a wealthy man who lived at Atchison, Kas., Her father died about three weeks ago. He was well known in and around Atchison being one of the most prominent men in that community. While the Stolls lived in Atchison Mr. Stoll conducted a drug store there.

JACOBIA 46 YEARS OLD.

William Jacobia, the dead man, was 46 years old and rather stout. Those who had known him in life said last night that he was apparently of a happy disposition, with rare conversational powers. He took uniformly with women and men, the former long remembering his bright wit and ready flow of small talk.

When Mr. and Mrs. Jacobia were married October 8, 1890, he was an engineer on a Kansas branch of the Missouri Pacific railway. Later he left the railroad in favor of the banking business and founded the Farmer's state bank, the stock of which was owned mostly by farmers at Corning, Kas., which was his birthplace. Seven years ago he sold out his interest in the Farmers' bank and came to Kansas City to enter the real estate business.

POLICE "DIDN'T KNOW."

The police notified Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, of the double crime and he in turn notified Deputy Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky. The bodies of the murdered woman and suicide were sent to the Carroll - Davidson undertaking rooms by the deputy coroner.

The police who were stationed at the home of Mrs. Stoll and Mrs. Jacobia refused to give any information regarding the tragedy last night. Whenever any of them were asked who shot the woman or why he shot her or an y other question relative to the case the invariable answer was "I don't know."

One policeman was asked if the body lying in the front hall of the Stoll home was a man or woman, and he said, "I don't know."

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July 14, 1909

PICKPOCKET ON
STREET CAR.

Takes Wallet Containing $150 Cash
From A. M. Moore.

In a jostle in the rear vestibule of a street car at Eighth street and Forest avenue, at midnight last night, A. M. Moore of 701 West Sixteenth street was relieved of a wallet containing $150 in cash and a promissory note for $140.

He was returning to his home from Forest park. Mr. Moore believed the man who robbed him was tall and slim, with a light mustache.

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June 30, 1909

DOESN'T APPROVE OF
TITLE IN HIS FAMILY.

CRAIG HUNTER HEARS DAUGH-
TER WEDDED SON OF A LORD.

Post Cards Bear Announcement of
Marriage of Mrs. Adeline De
Mare to Henry Somerset
in England.
Mrs. Adeline De Mare, Widow of Professor Georges De Mare.
MRS. ADELINE DE MARE,
Who May Be Lady Somerset.

Post cards bearing the announcement of the marriage in London, England on June 16 of Mrs. Adeline De Mare of Kansas City, widow of Professor Georges De Mare, the artist who lost his life in the fire which destroyed the University building in this city in 1907, have given rise to the belief on the part of the friends and relatives of the young woman that she has wedded Henry Charles Somers Augustus Somerset, the son of Lord Henry Richard Charles Somerset, husband of Lady Henry Somerset, the famous temperance leader and suffragist.

According to the meager information conveyed by the postals, which were received from England yesterday by the father of the girl, Craig Hunter, a railway contractor with offices at 1002 Union avenue, and Mrs. Herman Lang, 3901 Forest avenue, a close friend of the family, Mrs. De Mare was married to a Henry Somerset in London on June 16. Partly through the way the announcements were worded and more through the presumption of those who received the announcements, the report was started that the Somerset in question is the son of the nobleman. Neither Mr. Hunter nor Mrs. Lang was in a position to confirm the report last night, but both were anxiously awaiting more information, which is expected to arrive by letter in a few days.

FATHER IS NOT PLEASED.

Mr. Hunter is not pleased with the thought that perhaps his daughter has become the wife of the son of an English nobleman.

"I sincerely hope that Adeline has not married into a titled family," he said yesterday. "I have always talked against such marriages, and if she has married Lord Somerset's son, she has acted directly contrary to any wish of mine. A good, plain American boy is my choice."

Mrs. De Mare, who graduated from the Central high school in the spring of 1905, married Professor Georges De Mare, head of the art department of the school, in December, 1906. Professor De Mare the following May was killed in a fire which destroyed the University building at Ninth and Locust streets. The death of her husband greatly preyed upon the mind of Mrs. De Mare and in order that she might be benefited by a change of scene she was sent to Paris to school in September, 1907.

She took up a course of study at the Sorbonne, the University of Paris. She was a proficient artist in instrumental music and completed a course in that study last spring. Last September her mother, Mrs. Hunter, went to Paris to return with Mrs. De Mare to America when her school work was completed. Mrs. Hunter and her daughter were to have sailed for America today form Naples. The plans of Mr. Hunter to meet them at New York are upset by the unexpected announcement of the daughter's marriage in London.

MARRIAGE A SURPRISE.

"Adeline's marriage was a complete surprise to me," said Mr. Hunter. "I received a letter from my wife two weeks ago in which she said that an Englishman by the name of Somerset was madly in love with the girl, but I did not think seriously of it. I did not think, either, that it might be a member of the Lord Somerset family. But now that I compare the meager descriptions I have received of the man with those of the son of the lord, I am firmly convinced that they are one and the same person.

"Mrs. Hunter said that the Mr. Somerset who was paying attention to my daughter was a widower and had a little daughter about 9 years of age. Henry Somerset, they tell me, was married in 1896 to the daughter of the Duke of St. Albans and should be at this time about the age of the man who married my daughter. He has been making his home in Paris for some time, so I guess there may be something to the report of my son-in-law being of a titled family. I hope, however, that it is not true."

Mrs. De Mare was 21 years old last September. She is a beautiful and talented woman and was very popular in the younger social set in Kansas City.

SOMERSET HISTORY EVENTFUL.
Eastnor Castle, near Ledbury in Herefordshire England
EASTNOR CASTLE, ONE OF THE FOUR HOMES OF LADY HENRY SOMERSET.

Somewhat eventful has been the history of the Somerset family. Nor has its domestic relations been of the happiest. The present Lady Somerset was married at the age of 18, after a brief season at court. The match between Lady Isobel and Lord Henry Somerset was arranged by the young girl's mother, and Lady Isobel's dowry was welcome to Lord Henry.

Two years after the wedding the only child, Henry Charles Augustus Somerset, was born. During those two years of married life there had been frequent ruptures between husband and wife with the result that divorce was frequently discussed by each. Shortly after the birth of the son the courts of England granted a divorce and gave the mother custody of the child.

For a while Lady Somerset kept up her social activities, but Queen Victoria looked into the causes of divorce and placed the social ban upon that immediate branch of the Somerset family. In June of 1902, however, King Edward, his wife and sister, Princess Beatrice, restored Lady Henry Somerset to court favor. This action on the part of King Edward occasioned favorable comment on the part of the British public and press.

RETIRED TO PRIVATE LIFE.

When Lady Henry fell into disfavor with the court she retired and lead a sequestered life, teaching her boy. Later she sent her son to Harvard university, from which institution he graduated.

Henry Somers Somerset was married in 1896 to Katherine De Vere Beaucher. There had been no news in America of a divorce or of the wife's death. She has been described as a very beautiful woman and a prime favorite of the Somerset's.

Lady Henry Somerset has been long identified with socialism and temperance work. At the present time she is the president of the world organization of the W. C. T. U. She has spent large sums of money to alleviate the distress occasioned by drink among the men and women of England. She has written many books upon the subject of temperance and has become widely known.

Lord Henry Somerset, the divorced husband, has been lost from sight and there is no record of his death.

Henry, the son, who is said to have married Mrs. De Mare, is 35 years old.

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June 10, 1909

CLAIM HE HYPNOTIZED
ATHENAEUM WOMEN.

SIX MEMBERS CAUSE ARREST OF
AFFABLE BOOK AGENT.

A. W. Johnson Alleged to Have In-
duced Them to Give Up Money
and I. O. U.'s Totaling $120.
Held by Justice.

Six members of the Athenaeum Club went to the prosecutor's office yesterday and on behalf of themselves and three others declared that A. W. Johnson, a book agent, had hypnotized them into giving up money and I. O. U.'s totaling $120.75.

The women who complained to M. M. Bogie, assistant prosecuting attorney, were the following: Mrs. Anna S. Welch, wife of a physician; Mrs. E. T. Phillips, wife of a physician, residence the Lorraine; Mrs. Paul B. Chaney, 3446 Campbell street; Mrs. George S. Millard, 4331 Harrison street; Mrs. W. W. Anderson, 2705 Linwood avenue; Dr. Eliza Mitchell, 1008 Locust street.

Besides these, the following complained of Johnson, but did not appear yesterday: Mrs. Willard Q. Church, 3325 Wyandotte street; Mrs. Wilbur Bell, 200 Olive street, and Mrs. S. S. Moorehead, 3329 Forest avenue.

The women confronted Johnson in Mr. Bogie's office. It was declared that he had exercised hypnotic power. Said Mrs. M. H. Devault, 3411 Wabash avenue, prominent in the Athenaeum:

"This man sold a set of books called 'The Authors' Digest' to these members of the Athenaeum on representation that I had purchased the volumes and had recommended them. They bought largely on this recommendation."

"Yes, and we were hypnotized," said the women.

In addition to the books, Johnson sold a membership in the "American University Association." This, the women say he told them, would enable them to buy books, and especially medical works, at less than the usual price. After correspondence it was found that the lower prices could not be secured.

From all but one woman named, except Mrs. Devault, Johnson secured $5.75 and an order for $115. From Mrs. Millard he got $20 in money.

Johnson, a well dressed, affable young man, was arraigned before Justice Theodore Remley on a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a bond of $500. He said he had an office in the Century building.

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April 21, 1909

BOY PRISONERS TELL
OF SEVEN HOLD-UPS.

IMPLICATE OTHERS IN STATE-
MENT TO INSPECTOR BOYLE.

Arrests May Lead to Breaking Up
Band of Highwaymen Which
Has Been Operating Al-
most Nightly.

FRANK M'DANIELS.

In the arrest of Joseph Tent, 20 years old, and Frank McDaniels, 18 years old, the police think that they have solved the identity of the mysterious highwaymen who have bee holding up persons almost nightly in Kansas City. The two, who are mere boys, admit that they have taken part in at least seven holdups in the last six weeks and Inspector Boyle thinks that they can be connected with several others.

For several hours yesterday afternoon, the boys were "sweated" in the inspector's office and at last were willing to make statements to the prosecuting attorney. Two or three others are implicated by the boys' confession and within the next few hours other arrests likely will follow. It is believed the boys are members of a gang of highwaymen, who prowl nightly in Kansas City.

The capture of the youthful bandits came about in a singular manner. In the reports of pawned jewelry that came into the hands of the detectives Monday afternoon was the description of a watch which had been taken from F. R. Hedges of 1004 Forest avenue on the night of April 15. It had been pawned Saturday, the pawn broker said, and a boy had left the watch at his office. Detective John Farrell stationed himself near the store and about 1 o'clock two young men entered the pawn shop and offered to redeem the watch.

PAWNBROKER GIVES TIP.

"Just wait a moment," said the pawnbroker, and he hurried outside. Farrell entered the shop and arrested both men. The younger proved to be Tent, who had secured a prospective purchase for the watch.

"I don't want to go unless you take the fellow that helped me," said Tent. "I don't want to go alone.

The chance to land another highwayman was satisfactory to the officer, and the two went to a photograph gallery at 310 East Twelfth street, where Tent admitted that Frank McDaniels, his partner, was working. The two climbed the narrow stairway and passed into the dark room of the gallery. Farrell was holding the young man to keep from losing his way. Suddenly he felt something pressing against his side, which instinctively he knew was a revolver. He jerked the revolver from the boy's hands. Tent denied that he had intended to fire.

"I was trying to get rid of it," he said to the officer, "and it was so dark that I couldn't see where I was placing it."

McDaniels was caught in the gallery and both were taken to headquarters. Both admitted that they had taken part in several robberies, but only two in each other's company. Experienced highwaymen had been their companions, the boys said, and the police are inclined to believe their story.


JOSEPH TENT.

In the inspector's office, the boys did not appear to realize the gravity of their deeds. Both admitted that older crooks had started them in the business. Both denied that they had started in the holdup business together, and claimed that they had known each other but a few days.

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April 3, 1909

WOMEN FIGHT TO SEE
BOY CRUSHED BY CAR.

HYSTERICAL MOTHERS THINK
INJURED CHILD THEIR OWN.

Strong Men Weep as Jimmie
Palermo, Whose Father Saw
Him Hurt, Is Taken From
Under the Wheels.

While running across the street car tracks on Eighth street near Forest avenue about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, "Jimmie" Palermo, 5 years old, was run down by Independence avenue car 247, westbound, and injured to such an extent that both of his legs had to be amputated above the knee. The operation was performed at the general hospital immediately after the accident. Dr. J. Park Neal, who amputated the boy's legs, reported last night that he had survived the operation in a marvelous manner for one so young, and that he had a fighting chance for his life.

The boy is a son of Salvatore Palermo, an Italian grocer and butcher at 1103 East Eighth street, who lives on the second floor of 1103. The father, with Mack Carter, his butcher, saw the accident. The father ran to the scene, but became frantic when he saw his child pinned down by the front trucks of the car, and had to be taken away.

CROWD WEEPS AT SIGHT.

Two mothers, who thought that the child might be theirs, fought with tiger like ferocity with the crowd until they got to where they could get a look at the pale face of the little fellow.

The boy lay in such a position that he could not be moved until the car was "jacked up." The wrecking crew arrived in a few minutes, and with the aid of volunteers, the car tracks were elevated sufficiently. The boy's arm slipped to his side, and three marbles fell from his nerveless grasp.

"Take hold gently, men, and lift the boy out," said the foreman of the wrecking crew as the ambulance stretcher arrived.

"I just can't do it. I have seen enough to break my heart," said a big workman with sleeves rolled to the elbows, exposing a pair of muscular brown arms. He leaned against a trolley pole and wept bitterly.

As the ambulance was leaving another mother of the neighborhood arrived and battled with the dense crowd to get a look at the injured boy. Every woman in the crowd was crying, as were some of the men, and little brothers and sisters and playmates of the boy screamed with fright and grief.

FATHER SAW THE ACCIDENT.

"Mr. Palermo and I were standing in the door of his store when the accident happened," said Mack Carter, the butcher at the store. "We saw little Jimmie as he started to cross the street from the north to the south side about half way between the alley and Forest avenue. When he saw the car he made a motion as if to turn back. The motorman had slowed down at first, but put on speed again. It looked as if he calculated for the boy to cross the tracks before the car reached him, but Jimmie became confused and was struck by the fender and knocked across the track. It looked like an accident to me."

The grief in the Palermo home was tragic. Between sobs, prayers were said in Italian, and supplication made to Heaven to preserve the boy's life.

SNITCH LATE, BUT THERE.

While the family was in the midst of its grief a stranger appeared. Taking a card from his pocket he said, giving his name:

"Here is my card. I am a lawyer, but I got here a too late to see the accident. Send someone out into the street and get the boy's cap and those marbles. They are excellent evidence before a jury. Get the exact time of the accident , the number of the car and all the witnesses you can. I would like to handle this case for you."

Later in the evening Patrolmen William L. Cox and W. H. Schickhardt boarded car 247 and after riding to the end of the line arrested the conductor, H. E. Stoutz, 4100 East Ninth street, and the motorman, J. E. Warnike, 4600 Independence avenue. At police headquarters they made no statement and were ordered held for investigation, without bond, by Captain Walter Whitsett.

Representatives of the street car company insisted that a charge be placed against their men. Later in the evening an information was secured charging them with manslaughter in the fourth degree, a rather unusual charge while the boy was still living. They were taken to the home of Justice James H. Richardson, 2117 Prospect avenue, and arraigned on that charge. The men were then released on bond signed by representatives of their company. Their preliminary will be later. If the boy does not die, the charge will have to be changed.

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March 5, 1909

CHILD OF 4 KILLED
BY NORTHEAST CAR.

MANY FRANTIC MOTHERS TRIED
TO IDENTIFY THE BOY.

Each Woman Thought Little Leo
Cassidy, Decapitated and Mangled
Beyond Immediate Recogni-
tion, Was Her Own.

Leo Cassidy, aged 4 years, was run over and instantly killed by a Northeast car yesterday afternoon while playing in the street with two other small boys. The boy lived with his aunt, Mrs. Anna Reddick, at 613 Forest avenue. Excited mothers who thought the unfortunate child might be one of their own, thronged the street, pushed and crowded each other in a mad endeavor to identify the mangled body under the trucks of the car. The accident occurred at Independence avenue and Holmes street.

Mrs. Reddick was in the habit of leaving the child with Mrs. John Davis, 557 Holmes street, during the day while she was at work in Blake's restaurant at the city market. The child slipped out of the house unnoticed. Johnny and Teddy Trent, aged 5 and 3 respectively, who live in the same house with their parents, greeted Leo with a childish welcome.

RAN IN FRONT OF CAR.

Leo ran directly across the street in front of a fast approaching car, the two Trent boys behind him. As the car struck Leo, the others turned and ran screaming to the house. Within the shortest possible time every mother in the neighborhood was on the scene of the tragedy where a crowd had gathered.

Though several persons had seen the accident, none was able to give a concise account of the tragedy. Maud Mahoney of 543 Holmes street was an eye witness. She said that she saw the three children run across the street and a moment later one was run down by the car. Mrs. Gus Berkowitz, who lives over the grocery store at 706 Independence avenue, looked out of the window in time to see the children start in their chase. She thought one of them was her own and was in the act of leaping out the window when she was caught by her husband. All the witnesses said that the car was going at a moderate rate of speed.

POLICE TO CLEAR STREET.

When Mrs. Davis reached the scene her agony knew no bounds, and her screams attracted persons for blocks. D. M. Armstrong, the motorman of the car, was leaning back in the vestibule, his face deathly pale, and Charles Perkins, the conductor, was taking down names. The trunk of the body lay under the car. The head, under the trucks, was beyond recognition.

Passengers from the blockaded cars began to alight when Sergeant John Ravenscamp arrived with a squad of policemen. It took their united efforts to clear the street. Excited mothers would rush up and try to identify the child as their own.

The scene of the accident is one of the crowded parts of the city and is within a block of the proposed North End playground. The Washington school is a block away and all motormen are supposed to run their cars slowly at that point.

Immediately after the accident, the crew of the car were placed under arrest by Detective Ben Sanderson. They were arraigned before Justice of the Peace James Richardson last night, and were released on a $500 bond, furnished by the street railway company. Neither would make a statement.

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February 23, 1909

TRYING TO WALK TO OMAHA.

Orphan Boy Nearly Starved, Wanted
to See Aunt.

A three weeks' existence in Kansas City with no food except what he was able to beg, was the experience of Henry Weatherby, 13 years old, who started last Monday to walk to Omaha, where an aunt is living. The boy was found near Wolcott, Kas., and was brought to Kansas City yesterday afternoon by John Merrett, foreman of a construction company. He was sent to the Detention home.

"My father died three weeks ago," the little fellow said. "He was a stationary engineer, and we had been in Kansas City about six weeks, when he took sick with pneumonia. We were living at Sixth street and Forest avenue, and had come from Omaha, where my mother died eight years ago. I started to attend the Woodland school, but had to stop when my father got sick.

"After his death there wasn't any money left, and I've been trying to live without letting the boys know I was in so much trouble. I tried to get work, but couldn't and at last I decided to start for Omaha. Two or three times I went over a day without anything to eat.

"Yesterday morning I started out on my journey, and was able to get as far as Wolcott, when it got dark. I was glad when I found the construction gang's boat on the river, and they took me on board and gave me something to eat."

The boy was in tears during the recital of his troubles, and no one doubted his story. Dr. E. L. Mathias of the Detention home will communicate with the boy's aunt today.

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February 10, 1909

GROOM 95 YEARS OLD;
BRIDE CLOSE SECOND.

NEARING CENTURY MARK, OLD
MAN TAKES A WIFE.

Wife Is 72 Years Old, but She
Doesn't Look It, While Biggs
Is as Youg as He
Feels.

Age hasn't a thing to do with it when Dan Cupid gets busy with his up-to-date noiseless gun. Carefully he trained his love-dealing instrument upon the hearts of Edward Biggs, 95 years old, and Mrs. Mary Adams, 72. Cupid's work began three years ago. Last night they were married at the home of the bride's son, William Adams, 2633 College avenue. Earlier in the day they had appeared at the county courthouse for a marriage license, both cold and happy. The son, Wiliam Adams, had talked with Recorder Frank Ross over the telephone and broke the news thus:

"There is an old man who wants to marry my mother and she seems to want to marry him. Can you let them have a license?"

And now the knot is tied and for the third time Biggs has "taken unto himself a wife." The ceremony was a peculiar one, performed in the presence of many close friends and relatives by Rev. J. L. Thompson, pastor of the Forest Avenue Christian church, whre the romance began.

There were no groomsmen, no bridesmaids, no ring bearer, no music, just theminister and the smiling old couple. The ceremony was short, but it was a sweet one," as Mrs. J. C. Smith, the old man's daughter, expressed it after the wedding.

Agfter the ceremony, groups of visitors gathered about the piano in the parlor and sang such songs as "God Be With You," "I Need Thee Every Hour," and "Nearer My God to Thee." Biggs and his wife sat silently in a far corner of the parlor and listened.

Both Mr. Biggs and his new wife are devoted members of the Christian church.

"I think they will be happy," said Mr. Biggs's daughter. "They are going to housekeeping right away, though the location has not been selected as yet."

Biggs was born in London, December 16, 1813. He remembers well when Queen Victoria was but a slip of a girl, and he can tell of the day on which the present King Edward was born. He came to Kansas City about thirty years ago and engaged in the hotel business. He has acquired a competence by many years of work and intends to remain out of active business life.

He is one of the oldest contiuous subscribers to The Journal. He began taking the paper in 1847.

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November 27, 1908

LEWIS NEWGASS IS DEAD.

For Seventeen Years He Was Gen-
eral Manager of S. & S.

Lewis Newgass, 60 years old, died suddenly of heart failure at his home, 3542 Forest avenue, at 5:30 o'clock last evening. Mr. Newgass was at the Progress Club yesterday afternoon. He complained of feeling ill and told some of his friends he would go home and lie down. Soon after reaching his home he sank into a stupor from which he never rallied. A doctor, who was quickly summoned pronounced his ailment as acute cardiac dilation.

Mr. Newgass was born in Darmstadt, Germany, September 15, 1848, and came to this country while a boy. He located in Chicago, and before the great fire there was part owner in a packing plant. Afterwards he became associated in a managerial capacity with Nelson Morris & Co. Seventeen years ago he came to Kansas City as general manager for the Schwarschild & Sulzberger Packing Company, which position he held at the time of his death. Mr. Newgass left a widow and a sister, Mrs. A. Ballenberg of New York city. Arrangements for the funeral will be made later.

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November 11, 1908

BABY IS BURNED TO DEATH.

Mother Left Child Alone With a
Lighted Gas Stove.

Catharine Peck, the baby daughter of Mrs. E. C. Peck, 4326 Forest avenue, died last night at 8 o'clock as a result of burns received yesterday afternoon. It is supposed that the baby, who was 19 months old, got too near a lighted gas stove in the kitchen and her dress became ignited.

When Mrs. Peck stepped into the back yard of her home about 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon, she left little Catharine, who was just learning to walk, playing with her favorite kitten on the kitchen floor. A few moments later, hearing cries of anguish from the child, the mother ran to the kitchen, where she found the baby enveloped in flames. She ran with the child to a rain barrel which stood at the rear of the house and extinguished the flames by ducking the baby in the water.

Dr. W. A. Armour, who was calling in the neighborhood, was summoned, but nothing could be done to save the child's life. The coroner took charge of the case, but it is believed that no inquest will be necessary. The child's father, E. C. Peck, is a clerk for the Wells-Fargo Express company.

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November 8, 1908

PAID A FREAK BET.

H. D. Gibson Pushed E. L Yeat
Through Streets in a Wheelbarrow.

Amid the shouts and laughter of a big crowd, H. D. Gibson, a traveling salesman for a wholesale jewelry house, last night paid off an election bet by wheeling the winner in a wheelbarrow from Twelfth street and Forest avenue to Twelfth and Harrison streets and back. The bet was made with E. L. Yeat of Twelfth street and Forest avenue, and Mr. Gibson wagered that Taft would carry Nebraska. Friends of the two men had been informed that the ride would come off last night and had gathered to witness the humiliation of the loser. A whellbarrow festooned with flags and a large banner on which was printed "I bet Taft would carry Nebraska" was teh paraphernalia used. At the starting point at Twelfth street and Forest avenue nearly 500 people had congregated. The crowd followed the principals over the coucrse. Mr. Gibson lives at 1211 Virginia avenue and tips the scales at 240 pounds. Mr. Yeat, the winner, weighs 180 pounds. Both men have red hair and the friendly crowd took advantage of that circumstance to poke fun at them.

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September 5, 1908

HELPED AVENGE CUSTER.

J. C. McLain, Retired Soldier, Dies
Suddenly in His Room.

J. C. McLain, 64 years old, who for thirty-four years was a soldier in the United States army, died yesterday afternoon at his room in the home of F. H. Hendricks, 725 Forest avenue.

McLain's life was lonely. He never married and had never seen a marriage solemnized in his life. Enlisting in the army at the close of the civil war, his years were passed in a monotonous routine, which was varied occasionally by active service. He had seen most parts of the United States, including the island possessions.

The first active service he saw was in the Sioux uprising, when he was within thirty miles of Custer when the latter was killed and came to the scene of the slaughter the next day and assisted in avenging his death. During the Spanish was he served in Cuba and also in the Philippines in a cavalry regiment and saw some lively fighting, being wounded several times. After the war he was stationed in various islands of the Pacific archipelago, helping to pacify them.

Five years ago he retired form the army on full pay and had been living in different parts of the country since. For the past ten months he had lived at the Forest avenue address, doing his own housekeeping. His erect, soldierly bearing remained with him to the last. He never spoke much about himself, but read a great deal.

His death was sudden. Yesterday morning he complained of pains in his stomach and went downtown and purchased a bottle which he said contained medicine. A few hours later he was found dead in his room. Coroner George B. Thompson was notified and viewed the body last night. He will make a thorough investigation this morning. The body is at Stine's undertaking rooms. The only surviving relatives that his is known to have are a brother in Iowa and a sister who lives somewhere in Missouri.

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July 28, 1908

NEGRO PLAYGROUND
IS THE WASHINGTON.

BUT WHETHER BOOKER T. OR
GEORGE IS NOT KNOWN.

Park Board Accepts the Council's
Recommendation for North End
Playground Sites -- Blacks and
Whites in Seperate Parks.

Booker T. or George -- that is the question. Yesterday afternoon the board of park commissioners reached an almost final conclusion in the matter of North End playgrounds, accepting the council's recommendation that two plots instead of one be set aside, one for the whites and the other for the negroes. One plot chosen is that bounded by Holmes, Cherry, Missouri avenue and Fifth street, and the other is in Belvedere hollow for the most part, and bounded by Troost, Forest, Pacific and Belevedere streets. No estimate of the cost of the two blocks was furnished and the commissioners thought that $100,000 might defray the cost.

"We will have to get a name for them to put in the ordinance," suggested one of the board clerks.

"Certainly, certainly," granted President Franklin Hudson, looking southeast to where Commissioner George T. Hall was sitting.

"To be sure we will have to name them," the commissioner said, proud to rise to the occasion. "'Black' and 'White' would do fine."

President Hudson dropped a bundle of papers he had in his hands and Commissioners George M. Fuller and A. J. Dean hopped as though they were on hot bricks.

"That would never do," came from the chair. "Never do to get names like that," bespake Commissioner Fuller, while Commissioner Dean was wagging his head to beat the band, set in his ways though he almost always is. Flocking by himself was Commissioner Fred Doggett.

"I have a name," said this member, whereupon at once he was given the center of the stage.

" 'Lincoln' and 'Washington' would be appropriate, I think," he went on.

"Had it on my tongue to suggest those self-same two men myself," declared President Hudson, while Commissioners Fuller and Dean, from across the table, glared like frizzling martyrs at Commissioner Hall, who had 'riz the row.

" 'Lincoln' and 'Washington' make it," proposed one member of the board and all the other members, including Commissioner Hall, seconded the motion.

Then there was a lull and a newspaper man naturally asked which was which.

"Mercy, man," replied President Hudson, horror stricken, "we dassent decide that. All we have to do is to furnish playgrounds for the whites and for the negroes. We dassent say which shall be which."

"But you named them," was the protest. "Are the names indices?"

"The park in Belvedere hollow is to be known as 'Washington,' " was vouchsafed, which was a surprise. Negro institutions are generally known as Lincoln, and it had been taken for granted that the custom would be adhered to in the instance of naming the only Jim Crow park Kansas City has contemplated so far.

"Belvedere hollow park will be 'Washington,' " the president insisted.

Trying to see a connection, the president was asked by a colleague if the park was to be named for Booker T. or George Washington.

"Don't let that, get out at the start," was the caution, and the laughter of the austere president of the park board was so uproarious that Commissioner Dean remarked that "that must be a devil of a funny thing Hudson has just got off."

So, after three years of maneuvering and the consideration of seven sites, the North End playground scheme has got as far as the enabling ordinance in the council. Owing to the mixed colors in the north end of the city, it was feared that there would be conflicts in a single playground, minors being unlikely to keep their heads in moments of intensity. The dual plan was proposed, and yesterday was adopted by the park board.

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May 19, 1908

"BEST CITY IN THE COUNTRY."

The Rev. Dr. Carter of New York
Praises Kansas City.

Members of the First Presbyterian church will hold a reception in the church at Tenth street and Forest avenue tonight in honor of Rev. and Mrs. William Carter of New York city. Dr. Carter was for seven years, prior to 1906, pastor of the church, and he is spending ten days with friends here. He will also attend the Presbyterian general assembly.

Dr. Carter is pastor of the Madison Avenue Reform church at New York. Because of throat trouble, he was granted a year vacation. After spending ten days here, he will leave for Switzerland. He is acompanied by his wife and three children. They will sail on May 28.

"It certainly seems like home to get back to Kansas City," said Dr. Carter, yesterday. "This is the best city in the country."

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May 15, 1908

TO CALL IT GUINOTTE SQUARE.

Mayor Recommends Purchase of
North End Playground.

Communications were sent to the lower house of the council last night by Mayor Crittenden, urging that prompt action be taken to provide a playground in the North End. Accompanying the mayor' note was an ordinance, countersigned by Alderman Lapp, providing for the condemnation of a square of ground bounded by Troost, Forest, Missouri and Pacific for the playground. If this property is finally accepted, it will be known as "Guinotte square," in honor of the mother of Judge Guinotte, who, for years, was a good Samaritan among the lowly of the North End of the city.

Alderman Lapp said that he would move for a suspension of the rules and the passage of the ordinance immediately were it not for the fact that a majority of the aldermen were new aldermen were not familiar with the locality chosen for the playground or the many fruitless efforts made in the past to secure a breathing spot for North End residents.

Speaker Hayes sent in to the committee on streets, alleys and grades.

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May 3, 1908

SHE CHASED AUTOMOBILES.

Antics of Woman on Twelfth Street
Brought Many Police.

A deranged woman chasing automobiles in the neighborhood of Twelfth street and Tracy avenue last night about 10 o'clock brought police from three districts to that vicinity. Finally she ran into a party of three bluecoats at Thirteenth street and Forest avenue. When taken to No. 6 police station she was found to be the wife of a contractor. She was evidently under the influence of liquor and some drug. She was held for safekeeping.

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April 4, 1908

"PAPA, PLEASE PUT ME OUT."

Cried Little Ethel Phipps, Whose
Clothing Was Aflame.

"Papa, please put me out," little Ethel Phipps, 4324 Forest avenue, yesterday morning at 9 o'clock called to her father, E. C. Phipps. Hearing the cry, but not understanding it, Mr. Phipps hastily went from the dining room to the kitchen of his home, there to see his 4-year-old child enveloped in flames. She had been to the basement to burn some papers, and had undertaken to light the gas in the furnace. The "flare back" had caught her clothing, and the child hurried upstairs for help. When she reached the kitchen flames were from the hem of her little dress to her neck. A coat was thrown around her and the little girl drenched with water from the kitchen faucets.

Although almost all the child's clothing was burned, the only bodily injuries incurred were burns on the back of her head and neck. Her father's hands were severely burned during the fight to extinguish the flames which threatened the life of the little girl. After Dr. W. C. West had examined the little patient, he said that there would be no permanent marks left on the child's body.

"It is almost incredible," said Dr. West, "that the child could have gone with burning clothes form the cellar to the kitchen, wait for help, and be alive."

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April 3, 1908

UNKNOWN WOMAN
KILLED BY TRAIN.

RUN DOWN ON BELT LINE NEAR
PARK AVENUE.

DIES IN GENERAL HOSPITAL.

REFUSES TO GIVE ANY INFORMA-
TION ABOUT HERSELF.

Carried Sunday School Tract With
Little Girl's Name on It, but
the Owner Does Not
Know Her.

A young woman who was crushed by the wheels of a Belt Line engine last night at 7:30 o'clock, died tow and a half hours later at the city hospital, without being identified. The scene of the accident was where the Belt tracks are fifteen feet below street level, half way between Brooklyn and Park avenues. It is near Nineteenth street.

The woman was walking eastward and must have entered the cut three blocks west, at the street level.

To avoid the Santa Fe local No. 59, westbound, she stepped upon the other main track, and a Milwaukee engine, eastbound, struck her. Pilot Al Williams was riding to work on the engine but neither he nor the engineer, James Spencer, saw her, nor did the fireman But the flagman on the freight train did.

She lay by the track, her left arm almost severed at the shoulder, and with a contusion, possibly a fracture, on each side of her head. A broad leather cushion from the car was brought and she was carried to Eighteenth street and Brooklyn avenue to the office of Dr. I. E. Ruhl, who saw that she was dying. The police ambulance from No. 4 police station, in charge of Patrolman Smith Cook and Dr. C. V. Bates, arrived and she was taken to the general hospital.

She seemed conscious, but could not be induced to talk. The only article she carried was a Sunday school quarterly bearing the name of Loretta Kurster, 1509 East Eighteenth street.

Drs. R. C. Henderson and T. B. Clayton, who operated on the woman at the hospital. said she seemed bright and could use her vocal organs, but evidently was suffering from a skull fracture so such an extent that she did not really understand what was said to her.

Asked if she knew how she had been hurt, she replied, wonderingly, "Hurt? Why, I didn't know anything was the matter." But questions as to her identity she did not attempt to answer, and there was nothing about her person to disclose this, besides the booklet.

In the meantime it had been discovered that Loretta Kursler is a 12-year-old girl who was uninjured and busy in her mother's bakery at the address given in the book. She thought it might be a Sunday school teacher she had met at Central Baptist church, Miss Blanche Wade, but Miss Wade was found safe at her home. She at once, however, went to the hospital to see if she could identify the woman. The quarterly was found to be one pushed by the Christian denomination.

The Kursler child having recently become a pupil at the Forest Avenue Christian church, Miss Wade called Rev. J. L. Thompson of the Forest Avenue church for aid in identifying the woman. Loretta Kursler said her Christian Sunday school teacher was called Grace, but she did not know her last name. The minister accounted for every Sunday school worker by the name of Grace and everyone who teaches girls of that size. Then the chance of discovering before morning who the woman was seemed very slight.

Apparently the woman was 32 to 35 years of age. She was slightly above medium height, was fairly well fleshed, was brunette with abundance of dark hair, had delicate hands, blue-set earrings worn tight to the ear, and wore a tan jacket and a fur neck piece. No hat was taken with her to the hospital. Around her waist was fastened a package containing $8.70.

Dr. Ruhl, who first saw her, thinks it possible that the woman may have been demented, or if an employed woman may have been making a short cut home from work. In the latter case he would believe her hearing defective.

The Kursler family is at a loss to know how a Sunday school book bearing the little girl's name would come to be found in the possession of anyone not her teacher.

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January 6, 1907

MAIL CLERK DRINKS ACID.

Despondent, F. A. Dunn Kills Himself
at His Forest Avenue Home.

F. A. Dunn, a railway mail clerk, 32 years old, committed suicide by drinking three ounces of carbolic acid at his home at 3417 Forest avenue yesterday noon.

His act is said to have been the result of depression following the protracted use of intoxicants. Mrs. Dunn was in the house at the time but supposed her husband had gone upstairs to lie down. Soon after he had left her she heard a heavy fall upon the floor above and and rushed to the stricken man's side, only to find him already breathing his last. Dr. J. W. Kyger was hastily summoned by the man was dead many minutes before he arrived. The body was turned over to Freeman & Marshall.

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December 22, 1907

LOST IN SHOPPING RUSH.

Police Get Reports of Losses of Money
and Valuables.

That Christmas shoppers are somewhat careless is shown by the police reports of yesterday, four persons having lost valuables in the shopping district. In one dry goods store, Mrs. Katherine M. Murley, 1209 West Fourtieth street, left her chatelaine bag, containing a gold watch with a diamond in the back, and some money. Another woman, whose description the police have, was seen to pick up the bag and package and leave the store.

In the same store, Mrs. Lucy Allen, 607 Prospect avenue, left ehr purse, containing $13 in cash and a note for $1,100. The note, made payable to Mrs. Allen, is signed by Walter Allen.

J. P. Glangles, 3220 Forest avenue, reported lost in the shopping district a gold cross three inches in length. On the back is engraved, "Zonie, June 21, 1906."

J. E. Enfield, 7124 Independence avenue, reported lost a small black pocketbook containing $55.

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October 29, 1907

TWO COPS UNDER FIRE.

SERGEANT YOUNG AND PATROL-
MAN SHINNERS ACCUSED.

Negro Keeper of Dice Game Claims to
Have Paid for Protection -- Officers
Yet to Tell Their Side
of Case.

The trial of Sergeant Alexander Young and Patrolman "Jack" Shinners on a charge of soliciting money from the keeper of a dice game on promises of police protection, was opened yesterday before the police board. The charge against the two officers was filed by "Judge" Frank L. Jackson, a negro, residing in a house at 303 Walnut street, which is on the police fine list as a disorderly place. Jackson told the board that he had paid Sergeant Young about $200 for "police protection" and made the statement that he feared he would be "beat up" for testifying.

Every Sunday, Jackson said, he paid the two officers. The amounts ranged according to the amount of "business" in the dice game. He said the first payment was $1.50, made when the sergeant approached him in a saloon and said, "I know you're crooked, but am told you are a mighty good Indian. Now either "come clean" or "close up."

Fred Urfer, attorney for the two officers, placed neither on the stand, but will do so next Wednesday when the hearing is resumed.

The witnesses used yesterday were all for the prosecution, conducted by City Counselor Meservey. The board had difficulty in securing a statement from Harry Levine, a shoemaker of 307 Independence avenue. He said he sold Sergeant Young two pairs of shoes, but that the sergeant did not pay him. He admitted, after an hour of coaxing by the board and by the city counselor and Attorney Urfer, that he had been told not to tell the board anything about the matter. Dick Stone, a negro barber next door, paid for the shoes, Levine finally testified.

Mrs. Alice Jackson, wife of "Judge" Jackson, told the board she often gave her husband money to "pay out" and said that once she saw him give $10 of this money to Sergeant Young. Jackson said he paid Shinners because the sergeant told him he must "take care of the men on the beat." Other witness were Emma King, negress, housekeeper for the Jacksons; Carrie White, a negress, who said the sergeant forbade her opening a "place" unless she "divided," and Ed Rogers, a negro, 3101 Forest avenue.

"I told Sergeant Young I wouldn't give him a cent," said Mrs. White, "and I never did give him any money. I paid my fine just like the rest do to the clerk of the police court."

Rogers testified that Shinners had him take a painting out of his house at Twentieth and Summit streets. The painting, according to the testimony, had been given to Shinners by Jackson.

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August 9, 1907

PICKS ONE PLAYGROUND.

Park Board Decides on Fourteen
Acres in North End.

At a special meeting of the board of park commissioner yesterday afternoon a resolution was unanimously adopted asking the council to proceed to have fourteen acres of ground condemned for a North end playground. The site runs from Troost to half a block beyond Forest and from First to Fifth streets. This tract is divided by a small bluff. The intention of the park board is really to make of the site two playgrounds, one for negro children and the other for whites. There will be two sets of apparatus, two instructors and two sets of custodians. The district from which the playground is to drraw is inhabited by whites and negroes.

The site agreed upon for the playground is to be known as Guinotte square, having on it the old Guinotte homestead. It is expected to cost about $120,000. For only eight acres of ground two blocks further south, which had previously been thought of, the estimated cost was put at $200,000.

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June 24, 1907

NATURAL GAS VICTIM DEAD.

Mrs. Skauv Succumbed to Injuries
Resulting From an Explosion.

Mrs. Teresa Skauv, of 4323 Forest avenue, victim of the natural gas explosion which almost wrecked her son's home last Wednesday night, died there from the effects yesterday. Her throat and both arms were severly burned. She was 65 years old, and a widow, the mother of George J. Skauv, with whom she lived. She had been in Kansas City twenty-two years.

The accident was the result of natural gas eating through a rubber tube. In the absence of the entire family leaked gas had filled the house and Mrs. Skauv, returning, struck a match for a light. The explosion that followed burst ceilings and doors. Mrs. Skauv was alone.

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June 20, 1907

IN GAS EXPLOSION

WOMAN FATALLY BURNED AND
KITCHEN WRECKED.
MRS. SKAUV STRUCK MATCH

NEIGHBOR EXTINGUISHES FLAM-
ING CLOTHES OF WOMAN.
Windows and Door Blown Out,
Ceiling Forced Up and Pictures
Torn From Wall in Resi-
dence at 4423 Forest
Avenue.

"Like a thousand cannon booming," is the phrase used by a next-door neighbor to describe the explosion wh ich took place about 10 o'clock last night in the four-room cottage of George Skauv, 4423 Forest avenue, practically wrecking the house and probably fatally burning Mrs. Teresa Skauv.

The explosion is believed to have been the result of natural gas which had collected. The family, which is composed of George Skauv, a boxmaker employed by the Kansas City Packing Box Company; his mother, Mrs. Teresa Skauv, 63 years old, and his wife, left the house shortly after 8 o'clock. Skauv and his wife had gone to visit his sister, Clara Skauv, 2325 Madison street. Shortly after Mrs. Teresa Skauv was seen to close the doors and windows and walk north on Forest avenue, presumably to visit one of the neighbors.

At 10 o'clock she returned. P. G. Stokes, an employe of the Ellis Planing Mill Company, who lives next door, saw her come into the yard and go to the back door. She unlocked the door and stepped into the kitchen. A moment later she struck a match.

"Then I heard a noise like a thousand cannons," said Stokes. "A second after I heard a woman scream at the top of her voice. I rushed to the rear door of the Skauv house.

"Just as I reached there Mrs. Skauv staggered out onto the porch, moaning and crying. Her clothing was on fire, and she was attempting to put out the flames by beating them with her hands. I took of my coat and wrapped it around her, and in a short time the fire in her clothing was extinguished."

Mrs. Skauv was then carried into the Stokes home and the physicians called.

At the sound of the explosion, which was heard for blocks around, neighbors gathered about the Skauv home. The first comers discovered that the kitchen was afire.

"Form a bucket brigade!" shouted someone, and immediately there was a rush to the neighboring houses for buckets, dish pans, cooking utinsils, anything which would hold water. But before the members of the bucket brigade were ready to get into action, someone had found a garden hose attached to the hydrant in the yard, and the flames were extinguished before any appreciable damage was done. The fire department was not notified.

An investigation of the premises after the fire was extinguished showed that the explosion was one of unusual force. Pieces of glass from the window were found in the street nearby half a block away.

The back door was blown off its hinges, and was found twenty feet away in the back yard. The pictures were blown from the walls. Both windows in the kitchen were shattered. A front window was blown out. The ceiling had apparently been raised by the force of the explosion.

A peculiar thing was that the west windows of the bedroom in the northwest corner were shattered, and pictures knocked from the walls, while not even the frailest piece of bric-a-brac was disturbed in the parlor, which is in the southwest corner with no hall between it and the bedroom. The parlor opens off the kitchen, where the explosion occurred. The only explanation which Skauv could find for this is that probably the parlor doors were both closed, while the doors of the northwest bedroom which opens into a room at the southwest corner of the house, and so to the kitchen were opened.

The explosion apparently took place close to the ceilings, which are about ten feet high. The top panes in the two kitchen windows were broken, while the lower panes remained unharmed. The ceilings everywhere seemed to have been lifted.

The kitchen where the explosion seemed to have occurred, is equipped with a gas chandelier with two jets, and a gas range. The other three rooms have gas lights. A careful search showed that all the burners were properly turned off, and it is the theory of the neighbors that one of the pipes was efective. Escaping gas could not be noticed anywhere in the house after explosion.

Mrs. Skauv was so badly burned that she was unable to talk last night. George Skauv and his wife did not know of the explosion until they returned from their visit shortly after 11 o'clock.

Dr. W. C. West and Dr. L. C. Dod, who attended Mrs. Skauv, hold out slight hope fore her recovery. She was badly burned about the neck, arms and back. It is believed that she inhaled some of the fumes.

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