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February 8, 1910

JOSEPH STEIBEL RESIGNS.

Popular Assistant Manager Quits
on Account of Ill Health.

Joseph Stiebel, the well known and popular assistant manager of the Orphem theater, has resigned, but will remain with the theater until a successor is named. For four years Mr. Stiebel has been with the Orpheum and he made a host of friends during that time. He has been under the doctor's care for more than a week and as soon as his successor is chosen will go to Excelsior Springs for a several weeks' stay.

"My health has not been the best for some time," said Mr. Stiebel yesterday, "and I felt I owed it to myself to take a vacation and get my strength back. I was unable to leave the house two days last week and the doctor says it is necessary for me to get away from hard work for a while and rest up."

No successor has been secured for Mr. Stiebel and he will remain with the Orpheum until the place is filled.

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January 30, 1910

TINGE OF JEALOUSY IN
ELTINGE GOING ALONE.

His "Hands" at the Theater and
"Loud" Type for Lauder on Bill-
ings Cause Separation Here.

Julian Eltinge and Harry Lauder came to the parting of the ways yesterday. Last night they bade one another adieu and probably will not be seen in the same company again. Mr. Lauder departed for Chicago on a late train and Mr. Eltinge will leave some time today for Excelsior Springs where he will endeavor to take off a few pounds of surplus flesh, after which he will go to New Orleans.

There has been more or less professional jealousy between Messrs. Lauder and Eltinge ever since they were together, the name of Lauder growing larger on the billings, although friends of Mr. Eltinge say that he was the man who got the greater number of "hands" during the performances. This piqued Mr. Eltinge and a couple of weeks ago stories began floating East to the effect that he had severed his connection with the Lauder company. Ted Marks, the advance man and the representative of the Morris interests, was kept busy denying these stories.

The final breach came in Kansas City. Mr. Lauder thought that Kansas City theatergoers did not appreciate his "art" as much as the people in other cities and that Mr. Eltinge got entirely too much attention. Mr. Eltinge saw his name in small type. He believed that he was doing the work that carried the show along. There was but one thing for Mr. Morris to do. That was to separate them.

Both are under contract with him, so now he is taking a chance that they will make more money for him playing individually in different sections of the country than they will together. In any event it will give the theatrical people an opportunity to determine for themselves just how strong Mr. Eltinge is with the masses.

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January 13, 1910

BIGAMIST PAROLED
FOR FAMILY'S SAKE.

Benjamin Franklin Hughes
Must Support Family and
Avoid Primrose Path.

Benjamin Franklin Hughes, 51 years old, formerly a real estate agent of this city, pleaded guilty yesterday afternoon in the criminal court to a charge of bigamy and was sentenced to six months in the county jail. Hughes was paroled on condition that he would support his wife and family and follow the straight and narrow path. He is to report April 4 to Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the criminal court.

With bowed head and trembling voice, Hughes stood before the bar of justice and told of his mishaps. He admitted that he had acted a "silly, old fool," but promised, with tears in his eyes, to reform and devote his years to his wife and children. Mr. Hughes has secured a position as a real estate salesman in Illinois. He stood alone in court, deserted by his friends and disowned by his wife and family.

"It is not for your sake, because under ordinary circumstances I would have sent you to jail, but for the sake of your wife and family that I parole you," said Judge Latshaw. "They have suffered as much as you; they are disgraced because of your foolhardiness. It was not so much for the crime of bigamy that you deserve punishment, but a far worse crime -- infidelity to your wife, and family."

Hughes's defense was that he was forced into an unfortunate alliance with Miss Vairie Wilder, aged 17 years, who lived with her mother, Mrs. Cora Westover, 1622 Madison street. The real estate agent married the girl in Kansas City, Kas., early last month when he had a wife and family living in this city.

THOUGHT HIM WEALTHY.

Hughes charged that Mrs. Westover compelled him to marry her daughter. he said she thought he was a wealthy widower. Hughes and the girl met last April, and immediately Hughes became enamored of her. Then he furnished rooms in a flat on Troost avenue and lived with her there.

"I spent hundreds of dollars," he said, buying her clothes and presents. "I was forced to pay this girl's board at home, and all her expenses. Now I am broke and have exhausted my credit.

"When I asked to take the girl to Excelsior Springs for her health, Mrs. Westovermade me deposit $15 with her. Besides that I was forced to pay all the expenses while in Excelsior Springs. We stopped at a $4 a day hotel.

"After the girl got in trouble, Mrs. Westover demanded that I marry her, thinking all the time that I was a wealthy widower. I thought Miss Wilder an innocent young girl and that I alone was responsible. I wanted to do the right thing so I decided to marry her. I thought I would be able to keep it a secret from my family. But the farther I went the more trouble I found. Then the girl faced me and my wife with her charges. I was a fool. Who knows this better than I? A silly old fool."

"Yes, you were a silly old fool," interrupted Judge Latshaw. "Your conduct is inexplainable. How could you expect to gain the love of this young girl? You, with deadened passions, shoulders bending under the weight of years, and with deep-wrinkled brow. Every furrow in your brow was an unfathomable chasm, dividing you from her. The law of nature ordained ages ago that a man of your age could not win the love of a fresh young girl, as is Miss Wilder. It would have been like the union of January and May, as impossible as the laws of nature themselves to overcome. But the fool that you are, you followed your fancies.

" 'Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive,' said the poet.

UNNATURAL ROMANCE.

"The farther you went the deeper your feet sank into the mire. Did you hope to win this girl's love? Do you think that she ever cared for you? It is natural for the young to love the young, and for both to despise the old -- the doting, old fool. With one hand she caressed you and with the other hand she was seeking to take the money from your pockets. It was not you but what your money could buy that she wanted.

"But the crime you committed against this girl and later your becoming a bigamist were the least of your offenses. You violated the trust of your wife. What could be more disgusting or inhuman than a man with a good, pure woman at home, totally forgetting his obligations and duties that marriage has brought upon him.

"When the exposure comes they must suffer the same as you. when the name of Hughes is held up for ridicule, made the subject of ribald just, not you alone suffer, but your wife and family also. No wonder the woman whom you swore to cherish and love, despises and hates you. No wonder you are a disgusting sight to her eyes.

"But I think this one experience has cured you. If you fall again you must end with a suicide's grave or the felon's cell. Go out into the world and start anew. you cannot forget the past, because with your sensitive nature and cultivated tastes, the consciousness of your wrong-doing must remain with you forever. You must retrieve your past black record. The rest of your days should be spent in working for your wife and family, the ones who have suffered so greatly because of your misdeeds. If when you come back here, I find you are not supporting your family, you will be sent to the county jail to serve the sentence just imposed on you. Go and make good."

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January 11, 1910

HELD AS SUSPECTS
IN HEIRESS CASE.

KANSAS CITY POLICE THOUGHT
THEY HAD FOUND MISS-
ING COUPLE.

Arrested as They Disem-
barked From Train From
Excelsior Springs.
Marie  Horton, Suspected of Being Henrietta Von Etten.
MARIE HORTON, ALIAS HENRIETTA VON ETTEN.
Reed's Companion and for a While Believed to Be Roberta De Janon.

While the Kansas City police were arresting a man and a woman suspected of being Ferdinand Cohen and Roberta De Janon, respectively waiter and heiress, ho eloped from Philadelphia more than one week ago, the real Cohen and De Janon were being taken into custody in Chicago.

The Kansas City suspects were arrested by plain clothes officers from Central station as they alighted from a train from Excelsior Springs at the Union depot yesterday afternoon. Information leading to the arrest was given to Captain Walter Whitsett of the Central police district by R. E. Mackey of the Pickwick apartments at Excelsior Springs by long distance telephone. Patrtolmen John Torpey and T. H. Gillespie were awaiting them at the depot.

They were taken to police headquarters and examined by Captain Walter Whitsett. The man gave his name as H. J. Reed, and address as Chicago. He said he had been for some time in the gas fixture business with offices in the Holland building in that city. On his person was found $1,200 in currency, and letters addressed to H. J. Reed and H. J. Ross. He said he was not married to the woman in whose company he was arrested. He said he had known her for eight years. He refused to make any other statement.

H. J. Reed, of Chicago or Salt Lake City.
H. J. REED.
Arrested Under Suspicion That He Might Be Ferdinand Cohen.

Men from the Pinkerton detective agency who have been working on the De Janon elopement case declare that Reed resembles the missing waiter, Ferdinand Cohen, in almost every respect, and asked that he be held until information could be secured from their Philadelphia office.

WOMAN TALKED FREELY.

Reed's companion, although visibly worried over the fact that she was detained, was willing to talk. She said she was Marie Horton of Detroit, Mick., but after cross-questioning declared taht her real name is Henriette von Etten. According to her story she was born in Vienna, Austria, and was married in that country to a man who was at one time connected with the foreign embassy at Washington, D. C. She left her husband and went to the Pacific coast eight years ago, where she met Reed, who, she stated, was at that time conducting a place in Seattle, Wash. She says Reed is suing his Seattle wife for divorce. In March, 1909, she went to Detroit, where she conducted a rooming house. She came to Kansas City two weeks ago and met Reed. They lived in a hotel on Baltimore avenue until they went to Excelsior Springs. They intended going on to Salt Lake City.

Two big trunks, a dress suit case, a valise and a handbag were brought from the baggage room at the Union depot by the police officers. The contents were emptied and examined, but no further indenifying evidence was obtained.

Pinkerton men and the police were soon convinced the woman is not Roberta De Janon. The eloping girl is only 17 years old, while the woman at present in custody appears to be 25. Marie Horton has several false teeth, while Miss De Janon has none.

SHORT STAY IN EXCELSIOR.

The man and woman had spent Thursday night at the Elms hotel. They registered as H. J. Reed and wife of Chicago, and rented rooms Friday in the Pickwick apartments, saying they would remain a month. They kept close to their room during their stay. Considerable wine was delivered to the rooms. The woman was in Kansas City Saturday.

They gave no reason for leaving here hurriedly. When asked by another guests of the apartments to show credentials as to who he was the man exhibted papers from Salt Lake City and Tacoma, Wash., but had nothing to show he was from Chicago.

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January 6, 1910

TRAINED "DAN" AND "JOE."

Mark Kesler, Former Kansas City
Fireman, Passes Through City.

Mark Kelser, formerly of the Kansas City fire department, who trained "Dan" and Joe," the famous team of fire horses which won honors at London in the international exhibit in 1893, was in Kansas City yesterday afternoon, stopping off a few minutes on his way to Excelsior Springs.

Kesler is now with the Oklahoma City fire department, where he is engaged in training eight fire horses. He was here a short time ago, having been sent with three other firemen to make a study of the departments of large cities with a view of strengthening the Oklahoma City department.

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November 18, 1909

HOTEL MEN IN ARMS
AGAINST 'DEAD BEATS.'

MAY PUT CONTRACT ON EACH
PAGE OF REGISTER.

Meeting of Association Concludes
Today With Lunch at Sexton
and Banquet Tonight at
Excelsior Springs.

If the plans of the Kansas-Missouri Hotel Men's association are carried out, it's not going to be so easy to walk up to the hotel register, sign your name, and then walk out the next morning without paying, giving the simple excuse that you are "broke." The legislators of Kansas and Missouri will be asked at the next session to allow the following brief contract to be printed at the head of each page:

"Any one signing their signature below hereby agrees to pay the bill as charged by this hotel. Failure to do so shall be a violation of this contract and party violating same will be punishable by law. The proprietor of the hotel hereby agrees to fulfill his part of the contract."

Sam B. Campbell of the Sexton Hotel.
SAM B. CAMPBELL,
Clerk at the Sexton. Oldest Clerk in Point of Service in Kansas City.

Though stringent laws have been passed in both states, they are usually evaded. The present law reads that any one securing a room "by fraud or pretext" shall be punishable. In the future, a man will be starting at a contract at the head of each page, and the hotel men think that it will be a more serious matter.

In fact, the whole session, which began yesterday afternoon in the Italian room at the Hotel Baltimore, was one of self-protection. Every speaker dwelt on the fact that the average inn keeper was the most oppressed individual in the community. Means of getting around the wily "bad check man," dead beat," "loafer," and how to get better legislation was discussed, and committees appointed to see that action is taken.

F. P. Ewins of the Savoy Hotel.
F. P. EWINS,
Hotel Savoy.

Yesterday's session was opened with an address of welcome by Mayor Crittenden. He complimented the men on their general appearance. T. L. Barnes, president of the association, made a short reply.

There was a general feeling that the meeting would like to face a hotel inspector, and Thomas L. Johnson, state hotel inspector, was asked to be present and, in fact, had agreed to come and discuss the laws regulating hotels. At the last moment Johnson failed to appear.

C. L. Wood of the Sexton.
C. L. WOOD,
Secretary of the Association and Manager of the Sexton.

Last night's gathering was purely social. A Dutch lunch was served in the grill room of the Sexton hotel, which is managed by C. L. Wood, secretary of the association. A ride over the boulevards will be taken this morning, and after the report of committees this afternoon the entire association will take the train to Excelsior Springs, where a banquet will be held tonight at the New Elms.

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November 17, 1909

HOTEL MEN'S YELL
HAS NO RAH! RAH!

"SOMETHING DIFFERENT" TO
BE HEARD IN RIDE TODAY.

Kansas-Missouri Association Mem-
bers Here for Annual Meeting.
Local Officers Elected.
Banquet Tonight.

"Kansas -Missouri hotel me are we,
Enjoying ourselves in old K. C.
Kansas Citee, in the state of old Mizzoo,
With plenty to eat, and other things, too.
How do you do, and how are you?"


To show that the collegians who come to Kansas City on Thanksgiving are not the only ones who can boast of yells, a few of the advance guard of hotel men who are assembling for the annual meeting of the Kansas-Missouri association, composed of the above yell last night at the Hotel Sexton.

"You notice that we cut out the 'Rah, Rah, Rah,'" said C. L. Wood, the secretary of the association. "We want something to distinguish it from the college yell. You will get a chance to hear its carrying power when we take our trip over the boulevards Thursday morning."

That the meeting, which commenced today at the Hotel Baltimore and ends tomorrow night with a banquet at the Elms in Excelsior Springs, is going to be the biggest in the history of the association, is the belief of the officers. More than half of the delegates were in the city last night visiting friends. When Mayor Crittenden delivers his address of welcome today, it is expected that more than 100 members will be present.

WAR ON BAD CHECK MEN.

At the two days' session especial attention will be paid to some form of mutual protection against bad check men.

C. D. Tisdale of the Western Hotel Men's Protective Association, will discuss a proposed detective agency to be established in each city and do nothing but look out for hotel "dead beats." It is estimated that there are 1,500 hotels in Missouri and Kansas, and each loses about $250 a year in bad bills. The total loss, $100,000, would maintain a fair detective agency, the hotel men say.

A meeting of the local hotel proprietors was held yesterday afternoon at the Sexton and plans for the coming interstate association were discussed. A permanent organization also was planned.

Though Kansas City has been prominent in the large gatherings, very little attention has been paid to a local association. F. P. Ewins of the Savoy was elected president and James Ketner of the Densmore was elected secretary of the local society.

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June 3, 1909

BOY KILLED BY LIGHTNING.

Many Other Clay County People
Shocked During Storm.

EXCELSIOR SPRINGS, MO., June 2 -- Russel Holt, the 16-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Holt, was killed by lightning yesterday afternoon at half past three, in the farm yard of Frank Moore, two miles west of here. Death was almost instantaneous.

With a companion he was cutting across farms when the storm came up and the two fled to the Moore home for shelter. When they reached the dooryard a bolt struck the Holt boy, and although his mate was but a few feet away he was uninjured.

A number of persons were severely shocked by lightning in Clay county, but no other persons were killed. The heaviest rainfall of the day accompanied the electric storm and all of the creeks overflowed their banks.

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May 14, 1909

DEATH BY CARBOLIC ACID.

Unidentified Man Commits Suicide
Near Centropolis.

The body of an unidentified man was found in a lot between Drury and Hardesty avenues on Fifteenth street yesterday morning by Mrs. Della Morris, who lives in the vicinity. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, said death was due to carbolic acid poising.

The name Henry Patterson was found on a piece of paper in the man's pocket. The underclothing bore the letters J. E. C. and the initials J. C. were upon a signet ring which he wore. H e was about 50 years old, five feet five inches in height, weighed 140 pounds and wore a dark suit, patent leather shoes and a soft hat. His eyes were gray and his hair brown.

ENDED LIFE WITH SHOTGUN.

Morgan Jones, a farmer who lives near Dallas, Mo., killed himself with a shotgun early yesterday morning. He had been ill for a number of years and it is thought by his friends that it caused despondency. He was 30 years old and unmarried. He had been formerly employed as a bookkeeper in Kansas City.

TRIED TO DIE, BUT FAILED.

In a saloon at 1025 East Nineteenth street F. D. Miskelly of Excelsior Springs attempted to kill himself by drinking chloroform. He was taken to the general hospital. He is in precarious condition.

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April 16, 1909

NEW ELMS HOTEL LEASED.

Excelsior Springs Hostelry Ready
for Occupancy This Summer.

The New Elms hotel of Excelsior Springs, owned by the Elms Realty Company of this city, and costing more than $250,000, has been leased, and will be ready to open, it is said, by the lessees, in six weeks or two months. The building is practically completed, except part of the interior woodwork and furnishings.

The lessees of the building, Samuel F. Dutton and A. M. Epstein, are from Denver, and own the Albany hotel there. They announced yesterday that they will spend $75,000 in furnishing the new hostelry. It will be under the management of F. W. Taget of Denver.

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November 21, 1908

NO PRESIDENT SELECTED YET.

Head of Commerce Will Be a "Good
Man," Says Dr. Woods.

Dr. W. S. Woods appeared yesterday in the managing director's room in the National Bank of Commerce, after an absence form it of nearly a year. J. J. Heim and William T. Kemper occupied the chairs of the vice presidents of the bank, the three old Commerce men succeeding W. B. Ridgely, George T. Cutts and Edward Ridgely. In the place of Cashier Edward Ridgely sat James T. Bradley, a United States bank examiner.

During the day Dr. Woods, Mr. Kemper and Mr. Heim had a conference with J. W. Perry of St. Louis National Bank of Commerce regarding the presidency of the Kansas City National Bank of Commerce, but just as he was leaving for his home in Excelsior Springs yesterday afternoon Dr. Woods said that neither Mr. Perry nor anyone else had been selected for president.

"On that point I can only say that I will not have the place. I want to spend more time in California than the duties of office would let me, and for that, if for no other reason, I cannot take the presidency."

"Who will likely get the place?" was asked.

"A good man," was the characteristic reply.

It is predicted that today will see important and most advantageous transactions in the bank, and that as chairman of the board of directors Dr. Woods will make an official announcement in detail. The presidency will go to one of two men, Mr. Perry being one of them. Mr. Bradley has forwarded to Washington his tender of resignation as bank examiner.

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August 20, 1908

ILLNESS DELAYED FAIRBANKS.

Vice President Will Speak in Excel-
sior Springs Today.

EXCELSIOR SPRINGS, August 19. -- (Special.) Charles W. Fairbanks, vice president of the United States, disappointed the biggest crowd of the Chautauqua season when he was delayed in reaching here today. Mr. Fairbanks's secretary wired Mayor J. W. McRory when Mr. Fairbanks became indisposed in Chicago last night but it was impossible for the mayor to get word to citizens who went to bed early planning to meet the vice president at the Milwaukee depot at 6:52 o'clock this morning. The United States cavalry, sent from Fort Leavenworth as an escort for Mr. Fairbanks while here, were notified and the Third Regiment band of Kansas City was instructed not to start for the Chautauqua until tonight -- but the population of the watering place flocked to the depot just the same only to be disappointed.

Mr. Fairbanks will speak at the Chautauqua grounds tomorrow afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, the secretary having received a message from Chicago that he will arrive in the morning. He will speak on "The Life and Times of William McKinley." Mr. Fairbanks's failure to be here today shook up the programme and some of the speakers had to "sit in" twice to entertain the Chautauqua guests.

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August 19, 1908

EXCELSIOR SPRINGS IS
READY FOR FAIRBANKS.

W. S. Cowherd Will Welcome
the Vice President.

EXCELSIOR SPRINGS, MO., Aug. 18. -- This town is the mecca of politicians today. They are flocking here from two states. Charles W. Fairbanks, Republican, vice president of the United States, is coming in the morning.

In the afternoon W. S. Cowherd, Democratic gubernatorial nominee in Missouri, will make an address welcoming the vice president to the state and the state's watering place -- Excelsior Springs.

The vice president will be here at 6:54 o'clock in the morning, and half the population -- Republican and Democrat -- will be out a mile form town to welcome him at the Milwaukee depot.

The United States government has sent a troop of cavalry from Fort Leavenworth to act as escort for Mr. Fairbanks from the depot to the residence of L. V. Morse, where he is to be entertained while here, and the Chautauqua Association has sent a special train to Excelsior Springs Junction to get E. M. Hiner and his Kansas City Third Regiment band to help greet him.

This afternoon, practically the beginning of the Chautauqua, Benjamin B. Lindsay, the juvenile court judge of Denver, spoke to an unusually large crowd at Superior park. Of course Judge Lindsay confirmed his remarks to the subject nearest his heart, juvenile courts, and the making of young Americans out of bad boys.

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April 11, 1908

PENDERGAST BACK IN TOWN.

Says He Has Been on His Farm and
Has Made No Slate.

"That's a joke about me going over to Excelsior Springs to confer with other Democrats on the making up of a slate for Mayor-Elect Crittenden to follow." said Alderman James Pendergast last night. "There isn't going to be any conference at the Springs, or anywhere else. Nothing will be doing in doling out patronage until Mr. Crittenden returns from Columbia, Mo., next week. Then we will all get together, and the boys who helped to bring about the victory on Tuesday can depend upon it; they will get a square deal. I was out to the farm today, and when I got home tonight everybody was asking about the conference."

The alderman said that all stories about anybody having been selected for this or that position could be put down as sheer "bunc," and that nothing definite will be known before next week.

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March 13, 1908

CHARGE HIDEOUS
DEEDS TO FRAKER

BOYS ACCUSE DOCTOR OF MOST
REVOLTING CRIMES.

HE IS ARRESTED BY POLICE.

CASE WILL BE PLACED BEFORE
GRAND JURY AT ONCE.

One Lad Escapes From a Boys' Refuge
in St. Louis and Comes Here
to Tell His Terrible
Story.

At 10 o'clock yesterday morning three boys walked into the emergency hospital. They were runaways from the House of Refuge, an Industrial home at Osage and Virginia avenues, St. Louis. At Olivette, Mo., they were chased by a bull dog and ran through a bed of lime. Their legs were badly burned.

The boys gave the name of Albert Hopper, 14; Charles Reynolds, 17, and Cyrne Enge, 16 years old. After Dr. Julius Frischer had bound up the lads' burned limbs Hopper told a story which alarmed the doctor. The three boys were taken before Captain Whitsett, where Hopper said that he had come all the way from St. Louis to tell his story to the police. He told it again

Based on the boy's statement Dr. George W. Fraker, who formerly had offices at 1209 Grand avenue, but is now located at 703 Central avenue, Kansas City, Kas., was immediately arrested by Detective James M. Orford. He is being held for investigation. Last night John W. Hogan, an assistant prosecutor, took the statements of Hopper and other boys here who have lived with Fraker. Hogan said that this morning an information charging a nameless crime would be filed against Dr. Fraker in the criminal court if the case did not go to the grand jury direct.

Twenty-five months ago Hopper, who is an orphan, said he was in an orphans' home run by the Children's Home Finding Society at Margaretta and Newstead avenues, St. Louis. From there he was sent to Dr. Fraker at 1209 Grand avenue. He remained here with the doctor three months and one month in Excelsior Springs, Mo., the doctor's old home. Hopper's statement, which is horrible in details, tells of frequent instances when he was made to submit to most unnatural abuses. He said he was often beaten with a rubber hose when he refused to submit.

CAME TO TELL POLICE.

"I came all the way here," said Hopper, "to put Dr Fraker where he belongs. After I had been with Dr. Fraker four months, we were in Excelsior Springs. One day I threatened to tell on him. I was badly beaten and the next day sent to the House of Refuge in St. Louis. I went alone and was glad to go. I told the assistant superintendent my story, but he paid no attention to me. After being there a year and nine months, I determined to run away and come here, and tell it to the police. The other boys only came along as my friends. We escaped through a coal hole last Sunday morning."

Following the arrest of Dr. Fraker, Harry Elleman, 14 years old, was taken from Dr. Fraker's office at 703 Central avenue by Detective Mansel of Kansas City, Kas., and questioned. Mansell telephoned Detective Orford and he went and got young Elleman. This boy also made a statement to Hogan accusing Fraker. His statement was almost exactly the same as that made by Hopper.

Elleman has lived with Fraker since August, 1906, with the exception of the last five months, when he was living with his mother, Mrs. Ora Nordquist, at 1903 North Tenth street, Kansas City, Kas. Five days ago his relatives moved to the country and Harry returned to the doctor. While living on this side with the doctor, Elleman went by the name of Harry Fraker at the Humboldt school.

ONE YOUNG MAN DIED.

While living with Dr. Fraker at 1209 Grand avenue Cyril O'Neal, a young Englishman, 19 years old, died in September under suspicious circumstances. Dr. Fraker signed the death certificate as "acute Bright's disease," with typhoid fever as a contributory cause. An autopsy held by Coroner Thompson proved that O'Neal died of septic poisoning. The dead boy's brother, Claud O'Neal, is said to be still living with Fraker.

Frakers apparent philanthropy in caring for O'Neal, whom he met up with as a stranger in Put-in-Bay, O., caused much comment. He cared for him constantly all the time he was ill and paid for cablegrams to his people in England. When O'Neal went to live with the doctor Elleman was sent home.

Robert McBride, 17 years old, another boy now living with Dr. Fraker at 703 Central avenue, Kansas City, Kas., called at police headquarters last night to see the doctor Just at that time the other boys were making their statements concerning Fraker's treatment of them. McBride was not allowed to see Fraker, but was detained and caused to make a statement. Little was gained from him.

ALWAYS HAS A BOY.

There has not been a time in the last twenty years, it is said, that Dr. Fraker has not had from one to two young boys living with him. Fraker created a big sensation fourteen years ago by mysteriously disappearing. He had something less than $100,000 life insurance at the time. He, a boy who was living with him, and an old negro went fishing on the Missouri river. An embankment apparently fell and the doctor with it. There was a deep eddy at that point where the water had undermined the bank. The negro and the boy told of hearing the "big splash" and later, when they ran to the scene, seeing only Dr. Fraker's hat floating away in the stiff current.

Several months afterwards detectives located Dr. Fraker living in an isolated lumber camp in the pine forests of the Northwest. He was arrested and returned home, where attempts were made by some of the insurance companies which had paid death claims on his life, to prosecute him. As it could not be proved that Fraker had in any way benefited by the ruse or received any of the money, nothing came of it.

Hopper and Elleman were detained at police headquarters last night. Assistant Prosecutor Hogan said that they, with other witnesses, would be taken before the grand jury today.

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October 21, 1907

SHE MARRIED IN HASTE.

Grace White Was Dazzled by Her
Suitor's Claims to Greatness.

On Tuesday, October 15, Fred Melleni, alias Fred Walden, met Miss Grace White, a young waitress in Clark's restaurant, 123 West Twelfth street. On the 16th and 17th he did some fast and furious courting, and on Friday, the 18th, Fred Melleni and Miss Grace White were married by Justice Michael Ross.

Three days before, Mellleni had been arrested by the police and held over night for investigation. His picture was in the rogue's gallery. He was released on the morning of October 13, upon his protestations that he was trying to live honestly. Then he met his affinity and married her. Melleni says he is an actor. He borrowed money from friends to get his marriage license.

Yesterday Sheriff King of Clay county took the groom away from his bride on a warrant charging Melleni with the theft of a suit of clothes from Fred Dunn, who keeps the Royal hotel at Excelsior Springs, and $13 in money and a gold watch from C. C. Michael of this city, who was a guest of the hotel. The thefts are alleged to have been committed about three weeks ago.

Melleni's wife says he told her that he was well connected, and that his father was owner of two opera houses in Hanover, Germany. The young wife's home is in Golden City, Mo., where her father is a structural ironworker.

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September 25, 1907

DISLIKES IDEAL LIFE.

Alta Reaves, at 18, Deserts
Her Aunt's Home.
Alta Reaves, Missing 18-year-old.
ALTA REAVES.
Disappearance of Girl 18 Years Old Causing
an Aunt Much Distress.
Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 21, 1907
My Dear Aunt Marcia: By the time you get this I will be clear away from Kansas City. I suppose you will be surprised, but I have been thinking for some time and have come to the conclusion that I simply cannot live up to your ideal of life. I know that I have caused you a great deal of trouble and have decided not to be a cause for more. I thank you very, very much for all that you have done for me and I can probably never repay you for it; but some day I will show you that I do appreciate what you have done for me.

Please don't worry about me, for you have heard that "God helps those who help themselves," and I am not only going to try, but I am going to do it. I don't feel at all afraid of anything.

I hate to leave you, Aunt Bitha, and all the folks, but I have decided that if I am ever going to do anything, now is the time. If you want to do any more for me, just pray for me.

Again thanking you for all your kindness to me I am,

Your loving niece -- ALTA. P. S. -- I would have told you that I was going and where, but I knew that you would not let me go.
When Miss Marcia Jennings, a public stenographer at 302 R. A. Long building, reached her home 608 East Thirtieth street, late Saturday evening she found the foregoing letter awaiting her. It was from her niece, Alta Reaves, and was typewritten on the paper of the Western Pump and Manufacturing Company, Ninth and Wyandotte streets, where she worked until that day. She was 18 years old July 26. She comes of one of the best families in Clay county. Her father died when she was 2 years old and her mother when she was 8. Since that time she has been reared by two aunts, Mrs. C. H. Scott, of Excelsior Springs, Mo., and Miss Marcia Jennings, of this city. Four years ago she came here and since then has been continually with Miss Jennings, who sent her to school and later educated her as a stenographer.


DISAPPEARANCE A MYSTERY.

"I can assign no reason on earth for Alta's leaving in this manner," said Miss Jennings yesterday. "She has only recently attained her majority but has never yet kept company with young men. I am confident, however, that someone is behind this resolve of hers and that she had help in leaving."

About 4:30 Saturday afternoon Miss Alta called up her aunt and asked if she had to get anything for supper. She was told to take home some meat. She made a purchase and arrived at home about 5 o'clock. The meat was found in the ice box. She was last seen about 5:30, when she returned a book to a neighbor, but said nothing about leaving.

"The girl had no suitcase," said the aunt, "but she packed clothing for the trip that I know it would take two to carry. She must have left by the rear entrance, as had she gone any other way she would surely have been seen. She is a very strong-minded girl and may have come to the conclusion that she could do better alone, I feel sure that someone has induced her to run away. Furthermore, I do not believe that she is out of this city. She didn't have money enough to get very far."


THREATENED TO LEAVE BEFORE.

When Miss Jennings returned home on Labor day she found that Miss Alta had packed her trunk and ordered an expressman to remove it to 1023 Campbell street, where she had engaged a room. It was her intention then to live there and take her meals in restaurants down-town. The aunt frustrated her plans and thought that the girl had become reconciled to live with her. She was to have taken a new and better position yesterday.

After finding the girl gone, Miss Jennings called the police and asked their assistance in locating the missing girl. Miss Alta is said to be an exceptionally attractive girl, 18 years old, 5 feet, 3 inches tall and weighing 130 pounds. She is a decided blonde, ans light blue eyes and naturally rosy cheeks. When last seen she wore a white shirtwaist, with a tan skirt, which hangs a little below her shoetops. A large white hat trimmed with cream roses topped off her toilet.

Miss Jennings is greatly worried over the girl's disappearance and her relatives in Clay county are nearly distracted over it. The police are doing all they can to locate the girl.

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September 13, 1907

SHOT DEAD BY BOY

TRAGIC DEATH OF EDNA
CALLAWAY OF KANSAS CITY.
WAS VISITING IN DENVER.

WITTE ELLIS WAS "FOOLING
WITH THE PISTOL."

In a Spirit of Playfulness He
Pulled Trigger and Bullet Passed
Through Miss Callaway's Brain.
Mother Accompanying Body
Home for Burial.
Edna Callaway, Kansas City Girl Shot and Killed in Denver, Co.
MISS EDNA CALLAWAY, A KANAS CITY GIRL, WHO WAS ACCIDENT-
ALLY SHOT AND KILLED IN DENVER BY WITTE ELLIS, A FRIEND.

Death at the hands of a cousin of her fiance was the tragic ending of a summer vacation to Miss Edna Callaway, a young Kansas City society woman, at Denver, Col., Wednesday night. Witte Ellis, formerly of Kansas City, accidentally shot and killed her with an automatic pistol at the home of his mother in the presence of her sweetheart, W. Lysle Alderson, who with his mother and Miss Callaway were visiting at the Ellis home. The tragedy occurred on the evening Miss Callaway was to start upon her return trip to Kansas City.

The shooting occurred after the return of the party, composed of Mrs. J. M. Ellis, of Denver, the hostess; Mrs. D. P. Alderson, of Kansas City; W. Lysle Alderson, Miss Callaway, and young Ellis, from a dinner at the Shirley hotel.

MOTHERS PLAY PRANKS ON BOYS.

It seems that for a prank the two women had gone into their sons' bedrooms and concealed some of their night clothing. When the boys discovered the joke they decided upon a reprisal which would turn the laugh the other way. Accordingly young Alderson produced an automatic pistol with which it was proposed to scare Miss Callaway, whom they believed responsible for the original joke.

The pistol was arranged to be loaded by placing a "clip" full of cartridges in a place provided for the insertion so that the top shell would be in position for firing. Ellis took the pistol and removed the "clip" containing the bullets.

Then the two ran into a hallway, where their mothers were awaiting the outcome of the joke. Miss Callaway,, hearing the commotion and knowing some prank was on, peeped from her door and then came out. They flourished the pistol some moments, Ellis exclaiming,

"Where's the fellow who stole my clothes? I want my clothes!"

He turned from his mother to Mrs. Alderson and then back again to his mother. At that moment Miss Callaway came out, laughing, and asked what the trouble was. Ellis told her that someone had gone into his room and stolen his night-clothes.

"HANDS UP!" CRIED ELLIS.

Then he turned to the young woman, accused her of stealing his clothes and ordered her to put up her hands. She was standing beside Mrs. Alderson, at the time, and both women raised their hands in mock terror. Ellis pulled the trigger and sent a bullet crushing into the young girl's brain. One shell had caught when the clip was removed and remained in position for its work of destruction.

Miss Callaway sank back in the arms of her sweetheart's mother. Death was instantaneous. Mrs. Alderson eased the body gently to the floor and then fainted. Mrs. Ellis also fainted, while her son stood for a moment dumbfounded. When the realization of what he had done came to him, he became frantic, sobbing and crying that he would kill himself. He was prevented from this by friends who heard the noise of the gunshot and went into the house.

ALDERSON RAN TO SWEETHEART.

When his sweetheart fell, young Alderson ran to her, took her into his arms and placed her upon a bed. It was some moments before he realized the awful truth, but when he discovered Miss Callaway was dead, his grief was pitiful In a few moments he became hysterican and had to be led away from his fiance's bedside.

Added sorrow in the tragedy comes from the fact that young Ellis' father, former Judge J. M. Ellis, perished in a hotel fire in Goldfield, Nev., less than a year ago. Mrs. Ellis' health was undermined by that occurrence and she came to Kansas City several months ago for rest and a change of climate. The visit of the party of Kansas City people to her home at this time was in return for the one Mrs. Ellis had made in Kansas City. Witte Ellis accompanied his mother while she was here in this city.

FIRST REPORT BLAMED FIANCE.

Immediately after the shooting word of the unfortunate affair was sent to Kansas City by telegraph. The first reports were badly garbled, one account having it that the shooting had been done by W. Lysle Alderson, fiance of Miss Callaway. The news created a profound sensation in social circles where both the young woman and Mr. Alderson are well known.

The body of the unfortunate young woman will be brought to Kansas City this morning, accompanied by Mrs. Alderson and her son. Mrs Robert Stone, the girl's mother, who had been spending the summer at Excelsior Springs, returned to her home at the Elsmere hotel last night. She was completely prostrated at the news of her daughter's death.

The first report was that young Alderson himself held the revolver which ended Miss Callaway's life in such a tragic manner. This report almost completely prostrated D. P. Alderson, the father of the young man, a member of the firm of Bradley-Alderson Company, but a private dispatch from young Alderson later stated that the revolver was held by Witte Ellis, the son of Mrs. J. M. Ellis, whom Mrs. Alderson and her son and Miss Callaway were visiting at the time. The knowledge that his son was not responsible for the death of his fiancee was a great relief to Mr. Alderson, and mitigated to some extent the circumstances surrounding the unfortunate affair.

Mrs. F. P. Neal, of 318 Walrond avenue, is an aunt of Miss Callaway. Mr. Neal, vice president of the Union National bank, received several telegrams during the day, one of which was from young Alderson, stating that the body of Miss Callaway would be brought to Kansas City at once. The entire party will leave Denver this morning, arriving tomorrow morning.

Mrs. L. F. Rieger, of 426 Gladstone boulevard, is a distant cousin of Miss Callaway.

Miss Callaway was the daughter of Mrs. Robert Stone, who was, before her marriage to Mr. Stone, Mrs. R. P. Callaway. The girl was 19 years old and was a graduate of the Central high school two years ago. She lived at the Elsmere hotel with her mother and stepfather, who were in Excelsior Springs yesterday when the affair occurred. Miss Callaway went to Denver last summer to visit her aunt, Mrs. J. M. Ellis. Two weeks ago young Alderson, to whom she was engaged, went to Denver with his mother to spend his vacation with his fiancee. Young Alderson is also 19 years of age and a graduate of the Central high school in the class of 1905. The two have been sweethearts for years and had been engaged for some time, though no definite time for their marriage had been set.

A specially unfortunate feature of the affair was that it occurred on the eve of the departure of the Kansas City party for home. They were expected to start last night.

D. P. Alderson received a dispatch yesterday from his son which read:

Edna shot tonight; Witte held revolver; death immediate; come at once.

Mr. Alderson had intended to leave for Denver to be with his sone but it was later decided that this would be unnecessary and the arrangements were made to bring the body to Kansas City immediately.

ELLIS HELD BLAMELESS.

The coroner's inquest was held over the body of Miss Calloway in Denver yesterday. W. W. Ellis testified that he held the automatic revolver when it was discharged.

The jury decided that the killing was entirely accidental and did not recommend any disposition of young Ellis. The district attorney was present at the hearing, but gave no indication of any intention to hold Ellis for trial.

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June 22, 1907

JEFFERSON BRUMBACK DEAD.

End Comes to Veteran and Jurist at
Excelsior Springs.

Judge Jefferson Brumback, prominently associated with the earlier history of Kansas City, died at Excelsior Springs this morning about 2 o'clock. He had shown a gain of strength within the last week and there were hopes he would recover. His advanced age of 90 years was the balance against him, and a collapse came last night.

Judge Hermann Brumback was notified by telephone of his father's death.

Because of having been on the bench in Ohio, Mr. Brumback was known as Judge Brumback, but he gained the title of general in the civil war, through which he served with distinction.

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