Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

Like Vintage Kansas City on Facebook

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

November 12, 1909

JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS
COME TO TOWN TODAY.

COMMERCIAL CLUB ROOMS DEC-
ORATED FOR RECEPTION.

Five Women Members of Party Will
Be Guests of Honor at Country
Club Luncheon -- Omaha
the Next Stop.

Kansas City will be the host today to the Honorary Commissioners of Japan, consisting of forty-three of the leading business men and educators of the Oriental empire, who, together with five Japanese women, are touring the United States. No efforts will be spared to entertain the foreign guests during their stay here, which will be from 9 o'clock in the morning until 11 o'clock at night.

Following the arrival here the party will breakfast in their special train. At 9:30 the men of the party will be met in automobiles by the members of the Commercial Club and the next hour and a half will be spent in a reception in the club rooms. The club rooms have been decorated with palms and ferns, the stars and stripes, the Japanese national flag, the mikado's coat of arms, and the Japanese man-of-war emblem. Judge W. T. Bland, president of the club, will head the receiving line, and in it will be the forty-three Japanese commissioners, the officers off the Commercial Club and all former presidents of the club.

WILL VISIT HIGH SCHOOL.

At 11 o'clock the party will be taken to the Westport high school, where Baron Kanda, head of the school of the nobility in Tokio, will make a short speech. Baron Kanda speaks English fluently and is a graduate of Amherst college. The address will be followed by a drive through Swope park and a stop at the Evanston Golf Club for a buffet luncheon.

After the luncheon the party will be driven through the city, up and down the principal streets, over the boulevards and through the leading parks.

The first place of interest to be visited will be the Bank of Commerce. This will be followed by an inspection of the Burnham-Munger overall factory. A drive to Kansas City, Kas., is next in order, where the party will be shown through the plant of the Kingman-Moore Implement Company. These will be the only places visited during the day.

While the men are being entertained by the members of the Commercial Club the five women in the party, Baroness Shibusawa, Baroness Kanda, Madame Midzuno, Madame Horikoshi and Madame Toki will not be forgotten. A committee composed of the wives of the Commercial Club directors and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Clendening will entertain them. A visit to the Westport high school, a noon lunch at the Country Club and a tea at the home of Mrs. W. R. Nelson will be the events of the day which have been mapped out for the women.

DINNER AT THE BALTIMORE.

At 6:30 o'clock in the evening a dinner will be served to the men in the banquet room at the Baltimore hotel. At the same time a dinner will be given for the women in the Japanese room of the hotel. At the conclusion of their dinner the women will repair to the banquet room, where the entire party will listen to the addresses by David R. Frances, Senator William Warner, Baron Shibusawa and Baron Kanda. Judge Bland will act as toastmaster.

This will conclude the events of the day. The visitors will be taken back to their train, and will leave for Omaha, from where they will work west to San Francisco, from which port they will sail for Japan, November 30.

LEADING FINANCIER.

The Japanese arrived in Seattle from Japan September 1, and when they leave will have spent eighty-eight days in America, visited fifty-two cities, and traveled more than 11,000 miles. During this time they have visited plants and institutions representing nearly every American industry. Many of Kansas City's leading industries will not be visited, as the party has been to similar ones in other cities.

Baron Elighi Shibusawa, who is the head of the commission, is one of the leading men of Japan, being both a statesman and a financier. His individual efforts have raised the status of business men in this country. In 1873, Baron Shibusawa organized the first national bank in Japan under the capital stock system, and has been connected since with all leading banking institutions in Japan.

One Pullman dynamo car, a baggage car, a Pullman dining car, four ten-compartment sleepers, one twelve-section drawing room car and a six-compartment observation car comprise the equipment of the special train that will bring the Japanese to Kansas City over the Burlington railroad. The train will be in charge of W. A. Lalor, assistant general passenger agent for the Burlington at St. Louis.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 10, 1909

COLONEL SWOPE LEFT AN
ESTATE OF $3,000,000.

ENTIRE INSTRUMENT WRITTEN
IN HIS OWN HAND JUNE 15, '05.

Full Text of the Paper as Filed in
Independence Shows the Wide
Extent of Kansas City's
Benefactor's Holdings.

An estate of $3,000,000, by the provisions of the will filed yesterday in the Independence division of the probate court was left by Colonel Thomas H. Swope to his near relatives, friends and to charity. The greater part of his property is bequeathed direct to his blood relations. City lots left to the Humane Society is the largest gift to charity.

The will was filed for probate by J. G. Paxton, an attorney of Independence, Mo., who framed it June 17, 1905. Mr. Paxton since has been its custodian. In filing the will, Mr. Paxton was accompanied by Stuart S. Fleming, Mr. Swope's nephew, who lives in Maury county, Tenn.

Colonel Swope named Mr. Paxton, Mr. Fleming and James M. Hunton of Independence his executors, and requested that they be allowed to serve without bond. George B. Harrison, Arthur F. Day and F. T. Childs, all of whom live here, signed as witnesses. The three men were present yesterday morning in court to attest their signatures.

A "HOLOGRAPHIC WILL."

The instrument states that "this is my holographic will." This is to indicate that it was written by Col. Swope. There were no changes in the instrument as written by him.

The bequests to charity are as follows: To Humane Society, two lots in Turner Company's addition; to Park College, two lots in West Kansas addition; to the Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Men's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to the Provident Association, $25,000 cash.

After providing for charity and making specific bequests to his near relatives and friends, the balance is left to his nephews and nieces, to be divided share alike.

S. W. Spangler, attorney for Mr. Swope, has prepared a conservative estimate of the values of some of the real estate bequests made in the will. The values are as follows:

One-half of the two story building at 1017-1019 Main street, left to Ella J. Plunket, $75,000; the other half of the same property, left to Gertrude Plunket, $75,000; the undivided half of lots Nos. 10 and 12 on East Fourth street, left to Felix Swope, $13,250; the northeast corner of Hickory and Joy streets, now occupied by the John Deere Plow Company's warehouse, left to James Hunton, $40,000; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut streets, 85-115 feet, left to Margaret Swope's five unmarried children, $400,000; 1112-1114 Walnut street, left to the same children, $190,000; 916-918 1/2 Main street, to the same children, $120,000; the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh streets, to the same five children, $50,000; the southeast corner of Twelfth and Campbell streets, left to the five children, $60,000; 915 Walnut street, left to Frances Swope, $87,500; 120 acres, to the south half of the ground occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, to Thomas H. Swope, Jr., $240,000; the eight-story building at the southeast corner of Eleventh street and Grand avenue, to his nine nephews and nieces, $400,000.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

October 4, 1909

ESTATE WORTH $3,000,000.

Much in Kansas City and Nearby
Realty -- Gifts to City More Than
$1,500,000.

It is conservatively estimated that Colonel Thomas Swope's estate amounts to more than $3,000,000. With keen foresight he acquired many years ago lands in what is now the heart of the business section of Kansas City, and it is in such properties that the greater part of his fortune was made and is now invested.

Some of the more important properties included in the estate are:

The lot and block at the southeast corner of Eleventh and Grand, occupied by the Keith Furniture Company; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut, occupied by McClintock's restaurant and other business firms; the Majestic theater building; the three-story building at 915 Walnut, the two-story building at 1017-1019 Main street, occupied by the Carey Clothing Company and other firms. The business blocks at 916-918-918 1/2 Main, occupied by the Snyder Dry Goods Company and the Seigelbohm Jewelry Company; the seven-story building at the southeast corner of Eighth and May, occupied by the Burnham, Hanna, Munger Company, the three-story building at 419 Walnut, occupied by a commission firm; the two-story building at 1012 East Fourth street, occupied by a commission company; the building at the southeast corner of Union avenue and Mulberry streets, occupied by the Union Avenue bank; the five-story warehouse at the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh; the two-story brick building at the southeast corner of Twelfth and Hickory, used as a warehouse.

OUT OF TOWN REALTY.

There are other and less important properties in various parts of the city, beautiful family homes at Independence, Mo.

The out-of-town property owned by Colonel Swope consists of the 240-acre tract occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, bounded on the east by Swope parkway, the north by Sixty-third street, the west by Prospect avenue and the south by Sixty-seventh street, a 320-acre tract east of and adjoining Swope park, a 50-acre tract on the north of the park, a 400-acre farm near Columbia, Tenn., improved property in Knoxville, Tenn. and Middleboro, Ky, and vacant property in Syracuse, N. Y., Lawrence, Kas. and Topeka, Kas.

Colonel Swope also owned some mining claims near Butte, Mont., the value of which cannot be estimated. He recently said that if he were a young man, he could take one of the claims and dig a fortune out of it. He evidently believed that the claims were very valuable.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

October 4, 1908

THINK OUR PARK SYS-
TEM "UNEXCELLED."

Mayors and Aldermen of Other
Cities Pleased with
Treatment.

"An unqualified success."

"The finest ever."

"Best time ever had in my life."

"A great city, with great people."

Those were some of the expressions of the visiting municipal officials yesterday evening after a day which was devoted to nothing else but showing the mayors, aldermen, comptrollers, statisticians and other representatives of some of the greatest cities in the country a good time.

First there was an auto ride over seventy miles of the most beautiful boulevards and parkways in the United States. Then there was lunch at the Evanston Golf club.

After this came the visit to the fire department, the exhibition hitch and fire call.

"Why, we've had more fun, instruction and good times in your beautiful city this day than we had in Omaha all the time we were there," was the way Statistician Hugo L. . Grosser of Chicago put it.

"Never was such another city in the country," said Dr. Arthur Evans of Columbus, O. "Why, you've got the finest people, the most able officials, beautiful parks and the most perfect system of boulevards I ever saw."

"Truly, this has been more like a convention in which the delegates were royally entertained than the Omaha affair was."

"Best time I ever had in my life," said Dr. Wm. C. Heintz of Columbus, "and the only thing I regret is that Columbus cannot have the system of boulevards, parks, prosperity and hospitality that is to be found in Kansas City."

"Honest, our friends at home would think we were the greatest potentates of the earth instead of mere city officials from the 'Buckeye' state if they knew how we have been entertained."

"Believe me when I say that you have the great combination here which means municipal success, that of civic beauty and hospitality which surpasses anything I have ever met up with in my whole experience."

"Never saw anything like it in my life," was the way Alderman Rohland of Indianapolis put it. "I thought we had a great city, but we must take off our hats to you in this Western metropolis."

Nearly every delegate paid a tribute to Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., for the foresight, energy and enterprise in inviting the convention to Kansas City. It was agreed by everyone, local officials and visitors alike, that today's session was more like a real convention than the entire three days at Omaha.

Labels: , , , ,

June 28, 1908

SEAVER IS THE
GOLF CHAMPION.

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI CONTEST TO
EVANSTON MAN.

PLAYS IN SPLENDID FORM.

GREATEST FINAL ROUND IN AS-
SOCIATION'S HISTORY
.

Defeats Harry Legg of Minneapolis,
One Up on 37 Holes -- Evanston
Makes a Fine Record
in the Contest.

In the greatest final round that the association has ever seen, Everett H. Seaver of the Evanston Golf Club, Kansas City, defeated Harry Legg of Minneapolis, 1 up on 37 holes, yesterday and won the Trans-Mississippi golf championship after a struggle that was a hair raiser from the first tee.

It was the steady plugging of Legg that made him almost win the Trans-Mississippi championship yesterday. A lucky stymie on the sixteenth hole on the second round by Seaver, that gave him the hole, was the only thing that gave the Evanston Club the championship. The sixteenth hole of the afternoon round was the turning point. They came to this hole with Seaver 1 down and 2 to go. Legg had a splendid chance to halve the hole, but Seaver's put got in the way and Legg couldn't hone in, giving the hole to the Kansas City boy, making it even up at the sixteenth.

Seaver dubbed his drive on the way to the seventeenth, and it looked all off for Evanston when Legg won the hole in 5. It was dormie one when they started for eighteen. Both drives were good. On the second shot Seaver got on the green, while Legg's iron shot was short. Legg's approach was good and he seemed to have a chance to halve the hole and win the match, but Seaver made a splendid twelve-foot put, holing out in 3, two under bogie, and winning the hole.

This made it even up on 36 holes and the men had to play an extra hole to decide which would take the Trans-Mississippi championship.

ON THE DECIDING HOLE.

On the deciding hole, both drives were good, but Legg topped his second shot. His third put him over the green in the high grass. Seaver was almost on the green in two and making a nice approach, holed in in 4, one under bogie, winning the hole, match, and championship.

The Evanston Golf Club made a record in this tournament that will not be equalled in many, many years. A member of the club won the championship, Paul R. Talbot, a member of the club, won the consolation prize, and the Evanston team won the Brock cup for the team championship. The prizes the club didn't take were those that went to the men who made the lower scores in the qualifying round.

Labels: ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com


Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories



Early Kansas City, Missouri


>>More KC Books<<

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory