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November 5, 1909

MAY DIVORCE JESSE JAMES.

Mrs. Stella S. James Files Suit --
Friends Think James May Re-
Enter the Tobacco Business.
Jesse James, Jr., Kansas City Attorney.
JESSE JAMES.

Jesse James, lawyer, son of the famous bandit, and one of the best known men in Kansas City, was made defendant in a divorce suit filed yesterday by Stella J. James, who says they were married January 24, 1900.

Jesse and his wife were married while he was running a cigar store in the Junction building at Ninth and Main streets. It was not long after his celebrated trial in which he was acquitted of a charge of complicity in the Blue Cut train robbery. Jesse was one of the most talked of men in all the country in those days, and his cigar business prospered.

That he and his wife led a happy married life was the general opinion of their friends. In her petition, however, Mrs. James says that her husband has been getting homo late at night, and on these occasions has refused to tell his wife where he had been. The wife says that she is ill and under a doctor's care and without means of support. Their home is at 809 Elmwood avenue.

Friends of Jesse James have noted a change in his demeanor within the last few days. That he was troubled was apparent. Long ago he quit the cigar business, and for a time was the proprietor of a pawn shop. Then he began to study law, and after his graduation he began to practice in local courts and gave evidence of doing well. He devoted his attention largely to criminal business.

Only a few days ago Jesse confided to friends that he had decided to quit the law and intended to go on the road for the American Tobacco Company. It was Jesse's first intimation that he was not satisfied with the legal profession.

Jesse James was not at the Elmwood avenue address last night, and persons at the house said that Mrs. James was sick in bed and could not discuss the case.

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July 2, 1909

VICTIM OF BUSHWHACKERS?

Skeleton Unearthed on the Old Judge
Shouse Farm.

While excavating for a basement in a house going up at 1611 Elmwood avenue at noon yesterday workmen unearthed the skeleton of a man. A few minutes after the original discovery Arthur Williams, a boy living at 1530 Elmwood, while prodding around in the basement for a stick found a rotten board of a box and several old-fashioned square nails.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky ordered the bones taken to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking establishment, from whence they probably will be taken to the potter's field for burial.

"The basement is located on the old William Shouse farm, near where a house belonging to him was burned by bushwhackers during the fore part of the civil war," said E. M. Bradley, and employe of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, who was born near the place in 1852, and has resided at Sixteenth street and Kensington avenue ever since.

"Mr. Shouse used to be county judge of Jackson county," continued Mr. Bradley. "He was a Southern man, but very outspoken against the bushwhackers. One day they raided and burned his place. It is just possible that some dark deed of the bushwhackers was covered up."

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June 25, 1909

KILLED BY A GUN HE
SAID WAS UNLOADED.

WILLIAM CLARK, 18, SHOT DEAD
IN DOORYARD.

Pistol in Hands of Younger Com-
paion, Whom He Told It Con-
tained No Cartridges, Just
Before Discharge.

William Clark, 18 years old of 2610 Lister avenue, was accidentally shot through the right eye by a playmate, and almost instantly killed, in the dooryard of Mrs. J. A. Avery at 2617 Lawn avenue at 8 o'clock last night.

"I did not know it was loaded," said Clem Burns, 14 years old, to his mother, Mrs. D. R. Webb, a moment later, as he threw the smoking revolver from him and burst into tears.

Clem lives with his mother and stepfather at 2625 Lawn, right next door to where the shooting occurred.

According to young Burns, the two boys, who were the best of friends, were sent by his mother to the grocery store of the Worries Bros. at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue for a box of matches. Before leaving the house Clark drew aside his coat and showed his companion that he had a cheap 38-caliber revolver in each hip pocket.

"He told me one of them was empty but that the other had one load in it," Clem told the police last night. "I asked him why he had the guns and he said he had been trying to kill a cat which had been killing chickens belonging to Mrs. Avery.

"As he turned to lead the way to the grocery I reached under his coat tails and got a revolver.

SAID WEAPON WASN'T LOADED.

" 'Oh, now I've got your revolver and I am as big a man as you are,' I said, but he laughed at me and replied:

" 'You're not so big as you think you are; that gun isn't loaded.'

"I began snapping the revolver at him at that. He didn't wince and I snapped three times. Suddenly there was an explosion from the weapon.

"William sank down on the lawn. I knew at once what I had done and called to my mother:

" 'Oh, mother,' I cried, 'I've killed Willie.' Then I threw away the gun. I don't know why I did this, but I wanted to get the nasty thing away and out of my hands as quick as I could."

The boy's cries and protestations of innocence of any intent to commit murder as he was taken to No. 6 police station after the accident brought tears of sympathy to the eyes of neighbors, many of whom had known both boys for several years.

Ray Hodgson of 2608 Lawn, who was the only person besides Clem who saw the shooting, says he saw the two boys playing about Mrs. Avery's yard.

"They were always good boys, but full of pranks," said Mr. Hodgson. "However, Clark had a mania for carrying guns. He was seldom seen without one or more. Ususally the weapons were the kind which policemen call 'pot metal.' "

The story of the shooting told by Mr. Hodgson agrees in every particular with that given by the boy himself.

Young Clark was an orphan and lived at the house on Lister avenue with G. M. and J. P. Farnswowrth, brothers, for four years past. As the Farnsworths are unmarried and have work to do in the daytime, and Clark was out of a job, he was allowed to keep up the home in the way of a general housekeeper.

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April 20, 1909

STREET CAR A DAY NURSERY.

Unusual Duties Devolve Upon Mem-
bers of Twelfth Street Crew.

T. J. Randall, 522 Elmwood avenue, a conductor on the Twelfth street line of the Metropolitan street railway, and his motorman, were yesterday forced into temporary custodianship of a 2-year-old baby girl.

"When I helped a number of women to alight from my car at Twelfth street and Grand avenue about noon yesterday I didn't know that one of them was making a nursemaid of me," said Randall last night, "or I would surely have set up a longer and larger howl than the baby did a few minutes later.

"About the time I jingled the bell to get away from McGee street, and began to feel good about the light load I had aboard, with lunch looking strong at me after the next trip, I heard that wail. It was long and plaintive. At first I paid no attention to it, and as it persisted I looked into the car and saw the youngster was alone.

"I went to the little one and asked what was the matter. 'Mamma,' was all the answer I could get. 'Where is your mama?" I asked her, and the saddest, sorriest, most doleful and altogether hopeless 'gone,' from the baby, told the story. It was up to me and I made the best of it. I rocked her and talked to her and carried her up and down the car in an effort to quell the riot that was evidently going on within the breast of my diminutive and unwilling passenger.

"At the end of the line I made Allen, my motorman, take the kid, and he had his troubles for about five minutes while I got some candy. The trap back was really pleasant. The candy was good and the kiddy was better. Not another sound aside from the occasional smacking of tiny lips was heard all the way in. At Grand avenue, where the mother got off, there was a delegation waiting for me; mamma remembered her baby, and say, she was tickled to get that kid back in her arms again. But she wasn't any more tickled to get her than I was to get rid of her. Babies are all right at home, but a conductor's job was never calculated to include nursing."

Crossing Patrolman Heckenburg got the story a few minutes after the car left Grand avenue. The mother was almost frantic for nearly an hour, and stayed close to the bluecoat, anxiously inspecting every car that passed the corner until the right one came along.

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August 25, 1908

ASHLAND CORNERSTONE LAID.

School Building Will Be One of
The Best in the City.

Accompanied by appropriate ceremonies the cornerstone for the new Ashland school, in course of construction at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue, was laid yesterday afternoon.

Joseph L. Norman, president of the board of education, who was to have delivered the principal address, was unable to attend the ceremonies because of illness, his place being taken by Hale H. Cook, a member of the board. Mr. Cook, during the course of his remarks explained that when the new school, when completed, would be one of the best in the city, and that he was of the opinion that within the course of a short time an addition would become necessary.

A. C. Wright, who was acquainted with the school in its earlier days, delivered an interesting address. Mr. Wright said that he could remember when the school was a small one-story frame, a considerable distance out in the country. He read some interesting documents having to do with transfers of the property when the first permanent building was erected. Ex-Mayor H. M. Beardsley also was one of the speakers.

Before the stone was placed in position a box containing the superintendent's last annual report, documents having to do with the history of the school, coins contributed by pupils and other articles were deposited in it by Mrs. Gertrude Edmondson, principal of the school.

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July 7, 1907

HEADACHE SUFFERER DEAD.

Miner Retired at Night Showing No
Serious Symptoms.

Thomas J. Flynn, Fifty-third and Elmwood, worked all day Friday in the Brush creek coal mines, and when he retired said he felt as well as ever he had. At 4 o'clock yesterday morning his labored breathing attracted attention, and it was discovered that he was unconscious. Dr. F. L. Dod was called, but Flynn died an hour later.

Dr. George B. Thompson, coroner, held an augopsy at Freeman & Marshall's morgue in the afternoon and found death to have been due to paralysis of the heart. "I understand Flynn suffered greatly from headaches," said the coroner. "His death could have been caused by overdoses of acetanelid, phenacetine or anti-kamnia, all used as headache powders, but they are great heart depressents. His clothing and house will be searched for such drugs. The heart paralysis could also have been from the inhalation of fumes contained in dynamite smoke while blasting in the mines."

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April 10, 1907

WRONG BOY FIRST

TWO ATTEMPTS IN ABDUCTION
OF LITTLE CHARLES M'NEESE.
GRANDMOTHER UNDER ARREST.

REFUSED TO STATE WHEN LAST
SHE SAW DAUGHTER.
Theory of Police That Lad Was Kid-
naped Grows Stronger as Evidence
of Hack Drivers Is Brought to
Their Notice -- Three Persons
Said to Be Involved.

Mrs. Annie L. Sadlier, grandmother of Charles H. McNeese, 2305 Brighton avenue, who disappeared on his way to the Ashland school last Friday, was arrested at her home, 1522 McGee street, by Detective W. H. Bates and Thomas Hayde yesterday afternoon. Though Mrs. Sadlier denies any part in the affair, she was positively identified yesterday afternoon by two hack drivers, one of whom said he hauled her twice while looking for the child and another one who says he drove the very carriage in which little Charles was taken away and that Mrs. Sadlier was a passenger as far as the Ashland school. Charles M. Howell, attorney for Mr. McNeese, said last night that an information would be filed against Mrs. Sadlier this morning, charging her with kidnaping.

There is still another hack driver in the case who has not been located and the police think that he will come forward and assist in identifying the woman under arrest when he learns that no charge will be placed against him. This is the man who drove the hack to the Irving school Twenty-fourth and Prospect, a week ago today, when Garrell Ash, the 6-year-old son of Mrs. Lou Ash, 2413 East Twenty-third street, was taken away protesting. Charles McNeeese used to attend that school and the kidnapers evidently made a mistake. Garrell was taken to a house at 1522 McGee street, questioned for a long time and then sent home on a car. It was this incident, given the detectives yesterday, which led to the first clue, as at that number lives the missing child's grandmother -- mother of McNees's divorced wife. Ash pointed out the house and will be given a chance to see Mrs. Sadler today.

MRS. SADLIER IDENTIFIED.
"Tink" Williams, a driver from the Jackson livery barn, 1309 Walnut street, at once identified Mrs. Sadlier. He told the detectives that he had hauled Mrs. Sadlier and a younger woman with a baby on two occasions and that both times they drove out around the schools on the East side when the children were going to school.
Charles Burch, a negro driver for the Eylar Bros.' livery barn, who also identified Mrs. Sadlier readily, said that it was he who drove the carriage the day young McNeese was stolen. He told of the same two women, one elderly, the other young and with her a baby. He drove them last Friday morning to the Ashland school, Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue.
"I was told to wait about a block form the school," said Burch, "as both women got out. Presently the younger woman and a man returned, leading and dragging a little boy, who didn't seem to want to go. This woman was still carrying her baby. I never saw the older woman until today at police headquarters."
When they got in the cab again Burch was told to drive post-haste to Armourdale, where he was dismissed as the quartette boarded an electric car. They are believed to have transferred so as to reach the Leavenworth electric line in Kansas City, Kas.
Mrs. Sadlier, when first arrested, told Detective Bates that she had seen her daughter, the former Mrs. McNeese, only last week. At the station she denied the statement and said she had not seen her in three years, but heard from her eight months ago in Montreal, Canada. She then said one of her nieces was at her house last week and followed that with a denial, saying that she had seen none of them for eight months.
WOMAN MAKES STATEMENT.
Her statement, taken later in the day, reads in part:
My name is Annie L. Sadlier. My daughter's name now is Mrs. Annie Evans. She married Charles C. McNeese eleven years ago and they had one child, Charles Hiram McNeese. She and McNeese were divorced about four years ago and he given the custody of the child for one year by Judge Gibson, when it was to be given to its mother if she proved herself worthy. She married Bruce Evans afterwards and on March 1 three years ago moved away from here. Don't care to say when I last saw my daughter, if not compelled to answer now. Was home all day Friday, April 5, and not out of the house from 1 to 4 p. m. Don't remember anyone that day at all and don't remember when my brother got home. I am not going to answer the
question whether I saw my daughter Friday and will say no more until the
proper time. I positively declare that I was not in a hack last week at any time. Was not at any liver barn last week, either. I positively declare that I had noting to do with the kidnaping of Charles McNeese last week.

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April 10, 1907

FOR MORE SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

Board of Education Wants $600,000
in Bonds Issued.

The board of education held a special meeting yesterday and adopted a resolution unanimously ordering a special election to be held in the school district of Kansas City May 4, at which a proposition will be voted upon to issue $600,000 in school bonds, to meet the growing needs of the district.

Of this amount, about $200,000 will be needed to complete the new Westport high school and the rest will be spent as needed in additions to present building and in new buildings in crowded or newly established sections. There is an urgent need for a new building in the vicinity of the Ashland school, which is at Twenty-fourth and Elmwood. This district is growing very rapidly and the Ashland school is already badly overcrowded. A new building would relieve this congestion.

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April 8, 1907

NO TRACE OF MISSING BOY.

Police Unable to Locate Charles
McNeese Who Disappeared Friday.

As yet the police have been unable to locate Charles H. McNeese, the 6-year-old son of C. C. McNeese, 2305 Brighton avenue. The lad has not been heard from since he left home Friday morning to go to the Ashland school at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue. The suspicion that the boy was kidnaped by two women who appeared near the school house in a closed carriage both Thursday and Friday mornings, was substantiated by a man who saw them talking to the boy just before they drove away Friday morning. That was the last seen of him in the neighborhood of his home or the school.

A description of one of the women in the carriage tallies with that of the boy's mother, from whom his father secured a divorce about three years ago. The police are searching for the missing boy, and descriptions of him have been sent out to police departments of other cities.

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