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February 6, 1910

HANDSOME STUDIO OPENS.

Henry Moore, Winner of Many Med-
als From Photographer's Asso-
ciations, Is Proprietor.

The well appointed photo studio at 214 East Eleventh street, opened recently by Henry Moore, twenty years a photographer and formerly with the K. C. Photo Supply Co. and a winner of many medals from the Photographer's Association, has many features of advantage in addition to the departments adapted to carry on a large volume of business. A new feature is the dressing rooms, a red room for the ladies and a green room for the gentlemen. The studio is beautifully furnished, and prominently located. Mr. Moore issued initial invitations for free sittings to visitors.

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February 2, 1910

BOY AFRAID OF AUTOS
KILLED BY BIG CAR.

Frank Smoot, 15, Crushed Under
Overturned Delivery Van --
Had Premonition of
Disaster.
Frank Smoot, Who Was Killed Under a Delivery Van.
FRANK SMOOT.

Frank Smoot, 15 years old, delivery boy for the John Taylor Dry Goods Company, was instantly killed at 7:20 o'clock last night when a new twenty-four horsepower delivery wagon in which he was riding struck a pile of bricks on Baltimore avenue between Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth streets and turned over, crushing him.

Frank Limpus, who was driving, works for the company which sold the car and was teaching a man to drive it.

They were just finished making deliveries and were returning when the accident happened. Limpus and J. J. Emmert, who had charge of the deliveries, were on the seat and young Smoot was seated on Emmert's lap.

"We were going north on Baltimore about six or seven miles an hour," said Limpus. "It was rather dark and we did not see the pile of bricks until we were almost upon them. I tried to pull away from them, but did not have time and our right front wheel hit with a crash. The bricks were piled about seven feet high and when the car, which weighs about 3,500 pounds, struck them the corner of the pile was torn away. The force of the collision did not stop us and the wheels on the right side ran up onto the pile until the car was overbalanced and turned over. The three of us were thrown out, young Smoot falling beneath the heavy car, the weight of which crushed his life out, almost instantly.

"It all happened so quickly that we did not realize he was hurt until Emmert and I had picked ourselves up. I saw that the boy was caught under the car and tried to remove him, but was not able to lift the car off him. A crowd of people came up and several men helped me lift the car and we pulled him out."

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, had the body removed to the Freeman & Marshall undertaking rooms.

The victim of the accident was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Smoot, 19 East Thirty-first street. Mrs. Smoot was at home preparing supper for her son when she was informed of his death.

"I knew something would happen," she said. "He did not want to go to work this morning. He is not used to automobiles and does not like to be around them. Just before he left for work he said to me, "Mamma, I expect John Taylor's will be getting air ships before long and deliver the packages with a long rope down the chimneys."

Mr. Taylor was notified of the accident and called at the undertaking rooms last night.

The dead boy had had been working for the dry goods company for the past year. He was born in Chicago, but was brought to Kansas City when he was six months old. The father of the boy runs a dress goods sample room at 406 East Eleventh street. Besides the parents, two little sisters, Addie and Edna, survive.

No one responsible for the bricks being piled in the street could be located last night, but several persons who live in the immediate neighborhood of the accident assert that no warning lights were placed.

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January 21, 1910

NO LOVE NOTES IN
THIS GIRL'S SUIT.

Cigar Stand Manager, Young
and Pretty, Sues Rich
Saloon Keeper.

Miss Mabel Reeder, young and pretty, manager of the cigar stand in the lobby of the Savoy hotel, yesterday filed a suit in the circuit court against John E. Johnston, a saloon keeper at 810 Main street, demanding damages in the sum of $25,000 for alleged breach of promise of marriage. Johnston is said to be well-to-do.

It was on December 1, 1905, Miss Reeder asserts in her complaint, that Johnston promised to marry her. Since then, she alleges, he has discontinued his attentions and has informed her that he does not intend to marry her.

According to the complaint, the engagement of Miss Reeder and Johnston became publicly known and, it is set forth, Johnston's failure to perform his part of the agreement embarrassed, humiliated and wounded her "in feelings, affections, womanly pride and sensibility," and, it is added, her "prospects for life and eligible marriage are blasted."

"This isn't one of those love letter cases," said Miss Reeder last night in her rooms at the Tomlinson apartments, Eleventh and Broadway, "because I haven't any love letters to present. I would just love to give you a story, but I can't for several reasons. One is that my lawyer, Frank P. Walsh, tells me not to talk.

KNEW HIM IN WICHITA.

"You see, Mr. Johnston and I are from the same town, Wichita, Kas. We have known each other a long time and it was there that we became engaged. He was the proprietor of a hotel and I was working at the cigar stand in the hotel. We both came to Kansas City a couple of years ago and Mr. Johnston started a saloon here.

"I am unable to tell you why Mr. Johnston broke off his engagement with me. I don't know whether there is another girl in the case. He has known that I contemplated bringing this suit, because he was notified. Really, now, there isn't anything sensational about this case, and I want to escape all the notoriety I can."

Johnston refused last night to discuss the action brought against him by Miss Reeder.

"Let Miss Reeder do the talking now," he said, "and I will have my say later."

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January 18, 1910

IN WAY, MAJOR'S
WIFE GETS DECREE.

Told She Hindered His Army
Progress, Returns From
Islands for Divorce.

When Mrs. Ruby B. Rutherford returned to the Philippines after a visit with her mother at Columbia, Mo., her husband, who is a major in the army, met her at the boat and frankly told her he was sorry she came back to hinder his progress as an ambitions officer. Mrs. Rutherford lost no time in returning to "the States." Yesterday a divorce was granted her by Judge Seehorn in the circuit court.

Mrs. Rutherford lives at the Brunswick hotel, at Eleventh street and Broadway. She introduced as character witness her brother, C. P. Bowling, cashier of the Exchange bank of Columbia, and Judge James E. Goodrich of the circuit court. Her daughter, Dorothy, aged 9 years, was not in court.

CALLS HIM INSOLENT.

The Rutherfords had domestic trouble before they went to the islands, and Mrs. Shepherd, wife of a captain, who often visited them at the Presidio, San Francisco, was a witness. Major Rutherford, she said, was insolent.

Mrs. Rutherford said most of her trouble had been at the Presidio, although she said the major stayed out nights after they went to the Philippines and was sorry when she returned to him after visiting at home.

A highball incident when Mrs. Rutherford gave a party at the Presidio was told in court. She said they ran out of whisky. She thought they had had enough, any way.

ANOTHER BOTTLE GOTTEN.

Another officer insisted, Mrs. Rutherford said, in going out for one more bottle. When he returned Mrs. Rutherford had her highball made "light," and Major Rutherford was angry because it wasn't the same strength as the drinks served the guests.

"When I insisted on a light drink," said Mrs. Rutherford, "my husband became angry because I did not drink as fast as he thought I should and he came and pured whisky into my glass until it ran all over me."

Mrs. Rutherford testified that while she liked to have a clean, neat house her husband, in his insolent manner, always made fun of her tidiness.

PUT FEET ON TABLE.

One of his delights, she said, was to finish his meal before his wife and then "rear" back in his chair and put his feet on the table.

When Major Rutherford, the wife testified, told her she was a "drawback," that she hindered his progress in the army and that he was downright sorry to see her back again, she left him, determined to sue for divorce.

Major Rutherford is connected with the medical corps and has an income of $4,000 yearly. They were married at Columbia, Mo., January 10, 1900, and Mrs. Rutherford left him February 14, 1909.

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December 8, 1910

SKYSCRAPER FOR
"PETTICOAT LANE."

Northeast Corner of Main
and Eleventh Leased
for 198 Years.

By the leasing of the northeast corner of Main and Eleventh streets for 198 years, plans were made yesterday of a skyscraper, twelve stories of concrete and steel, to be built on the expiration of the old lease, February 1, 1911. The consideration was $18,000 a year, a total of $5,544,000 for the entire lease.

Hoyt-Ballentine-Kelley Investment Company acted as agent. John O. Patterson of is the lessee from the May-Stern Realty Company.

The rental of the ground, although of considerable size, is in reality less, per annum, than the rentals accruing from the out-of-date improvements now on the land. The property was purchased five years ago by the May-Stern Realty Company for $325,000, and just recently the firm refused an offer of $500,000 for it. The lot faces Main street with a frontage of forty-eight feet and runs back on Eleventh street for 115 feet.

"The new building will be equal in construction to any in the city," said Mr. Patterson. "The first four or five stories will be used for retail purposes and the upper eight stories will be entirely for commercial and office use. The building will be arranged that every office room in it will be exposed to light, and air." Mr. Patterson's offices are at present diagonally across the street from this corner.

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December 26, 1909

"LEAN" CHRISTMAS FOR COPS.

Only One Exception Was Made to
Order Prohibiting Gifts.

Yesterday, in the annals of the police department, went down as a lean Christmas. It was owing to the order issued by the board of police commissioners shortly after the members went into office last April.

On the official records it reads, "No member of the police force shall give or receive presents." Short and to the point it caused clouds of gloom to settle right around the city hall. This year the patrolman on the beat was forced to wave aside all offers of boxes of cigars, black bottles, etc., and the family turkey was bought from the officer's monthly stipend.

One exception to the rigid rule of the police commissioners was made yesterday, however, and the officer in question is not likely to be called upon to answer for infringement.

On "Battle Roy," known officially as Beat 7 and the roughest beat in the central district, an old shoe string peddler plies his trade. Worn and bent, the old man walked into headquarters last night and asked for Officer Herman Hartman who, for the past five years, has patroled out of headquarters.

"Yes, he saved my life once," he stated to the desk sergeant, Robert Smith. "He pulled me out of the way of a runaway team. I haven't got any money but I would like you to give him this half dozen pair of shoe laces."

The sergeant took the gift and placed it in an envelope for the officer, who is at present a member of the traffic squad and stationed at Eleventh and Walnut streets.

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December 17, 1909

CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
CITY'S POOR HORSES.

NEGLECTED COBS AND FALLEN
THOROUGHBREDS INVITED.

Humane Society to Be Host at Con-
vention Hall Where Equine
Event Will Show Sufferings
to Local Philanthropists.

The poor horses of the city will be fed to satiety at least once this year. By arrangement with the directors of Convention hall yesterday, the Humane Society, in conjunction with Mrs. Emma W. Robinson, 3208 East Tenth street, and Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook, 3229 East Eleventh street, will give a feast of oats, bran and ground corn, with trimmings of real hay, to the neglected cobs and fallen thoroughbreds of all sections in the big Auditorium Christmas day.

"It will not be an equine quality event," Mrs. Hornbrook said yesterday, "but it will be on invitations, anyway. This is to prevent spongers from feeding a team at our expense. The money will be raised by subscription. We are asking the wholesale houses to donate enough feed for several hundred animals."

The invitations are being printed today. They read:

"Christmas dinner for the workhorse,
Given by the Humane Society,
Call at Convention hall Christmas day between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m .

The plan of giving one good meal to the horses is original with Mrs. Robinson. She always has been interested in the dumb animals, and is a member of long standing of the Humane Society. She said last night:

"Someone has got to take up the horse's end of this charity proposition. It is not right that people should go on year after year giving alms to the human derelicts and entirely ignoring man's best friend, his horse. The scheme to give old work horses at least one square meal has been carried out to perfection in Norway, and someone should try it here. I suppose it will be scoffed at by some, but that is because it is new. In a few years, when through such humble means the attention of the world is directed toward the old horse and his suffering, it will be looked upon in a different light."

Edwin R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society, is in favor of the "banquet."

"Not for itself," he said yesterday, "but merely as a means to bring the suffering of our four-footed friends before local philanthropists. The Chicago idea of tagging the horses that are misused or underfed is not a poor one, but this one will get emaciated subjects of charity together by the hundred, in one hall, and let people see them."

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December 1, 1909

CHANGE ON "TOUGHEST" BEAT.

"Hoboes' Friend" Transferred From
"Battle Row" to Traffic Squad.

"Battle Row," adjoining police headquarters and generally conceded the "toughest" beat in town, owing to the number of cheap saloons and the rough element, will be patrolled by a new man today. It is the first change in five years.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, "the hoboes' friend," has been transferred to the traffic squad and will be stationed at the intersection of Eleventh and Walnut streets. Hartman is the heaviest officer on the force, tipping the scales at 330 pounds.

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November 23, 1909

SETBACK FOR NEGRO THEATER.

Permit Denied Promoters Who In-
tended Remodeling Synagogue.

A permit was denied yesterday to the promoters of a proposed negro theater at Eleventh and Oak streets. It was the intention to remodel the old Jewish synagogue. Matt Shinnick, in charge in the absence of John T. Neill, superintendent of buildings, said no plans were submitted.

One of the main objections to the remodeling of the old synagogue is the stairway entrance from the street. The steps are only ten inches wide, and the incline is steep.

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November 20, 1909

NEGRO THEATER MANAGER
LOOKED FOR NO PROTEST.

Louis Woods Says His Company In-
vested $5,000 in Contracts for
Rebuilding Synagogue.

Louis Woods of 722 Charlotte street, owner of the Kansas City Son, a negro weekly paper, a negro who leased the Jewish Synagogue at Eleventh and Oak streets to open a theater for negroes, said last night that he was surprised at the opposition the proposed theater has received.

"For years I have been giving this matter much needed thought," he said. "I have seen white play houses in Kansas City prosper and added to every year. I noticed another thing -- that few negroes attend a white theater unless a negro troupe happened to be there. Then the first and second balconies are packed with negroes who pay nearly as much as those on the lower floor. It struck me that as all negro shows that come to Kansas City are liberally patronized by negroes, they might as do as well by a theater managed by a person of their own color.

"I talked with Sam Conkey, advance man for the Cole and Johnson show, with Bob Motts, proprietor of the Pekin, a negro theater in Chicago, and with Sir Green, supreme chancellor commander of the negro Knights of Pythias who just has completed a $100,000 negro theater in New Orleans. We combined on the project. It was our intention to have a chain of negro play houses over the country. We have been looking at a proposition in St. Louis.

"We had no idea that there would be any objection to our going by ourselves. White people usually want the negro to keep to himself, but just as soon as he attempts to do so, they object. We had no idea that we would meet the color objection with this theater.

"The theater was to be an investment. We examined the lease and found it without restrictions as to color. The building and the location were so well adapted to our needs that we put money into the business. We have let several contracts and have spent about $5,000.

"Had we known that our going there would have been offensive, it would have caused us to look for another location. So far as I am concerned I do not wish to raise any strife. I was born and reared in Missouri and expect to live and die here."

When it was known a negro theater was to be near them business men on East Eleventh street got up a petition remonstrating against the lease. It was signed by nearly every business firm near the theater.

A. P. Nichols, a real estate agent, has charge of the synagogue property for the owner who lives in Omaha. The principal objectors are D. O. Smart and the North-Mehornay Furniture Company. Mr. Smart has under erection a five-story building west of the proposed negro theater. There are many retail firms along East Eleventh street, members of all of which are opposing the lease to a negro theater.

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November 16, 1909

BOYS PICK UP LIVE WIRE.

Evidently Charged Through Damp
Pole -- Neither Hurt Seriously.

While Charles Lumble, 14 years old, of 2610 East Eleventh street, and Leo Kelley, 11 years old, were playing yesterday afternoon opposite 2508 Tenth street both boys were shocked by a telephone wire on the ground and which both seized at the same time. The wire accidentally had been charged by an electric light wire through a damp telephone pole.

The ambulance from police headquarters was called, but neither was found to be injured dangerously. Both went home without assistance.

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October 4, 1909

ESTATE WORTH $3,000,000.

Much in Kansas City and Nearby
Realty -- Gifts to City More Than
$1,500,000.

It is conservatively estimated that Colonel Thomas Swope's estate amounts to more than $3,000,000. With keen foresight he acquired many years ago lands in what is now the heart of the business section of Kansas City, and it is in such properties that the greater part of his fortune was made and is now invested.

Some of the more important properties included in the estate are:

The lot and block at the southeast corner of Eleventh and Grand, occupied by the Keith Furniture Company; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut, occupied by McClintock's restaurant and other business firms; the Majestic theater building; the three-story building at 915 Walnut, the two-story building at 1017-1019 Main street, occupied by the Carey Clothing Company and other firms. The business blocks at 916-918-918 1/2 Main, occupied by the Snyder Dry Goods Company and the Seigelbohm Jewelry Company; the seven-story building at the southeast corner of Eighth and May, occupied by the Burnham, Hanna, Munger Company, the three-story building at 419 Walnut, occupied by a commission firm; the two-story building at 1012 East Fourth street, occupied by a commission company; the building at the southeast corner of Union avenue and Mulberry streets, occupied by the Union Avenue bank; the five-story warehouse at the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh; the two-story brick building at the southeast corner of Twelfth and Hickory, used as a warehouse.

OUT OF TOWN REALTY.

There are other and less important properties in various parts of the city, beautiful family homes at Independence, Mo.

The out-of-town property owned by Colonel Swope consists of the 240-acre tract occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, bounded on the east by Swope parkway, the north by Sixty-third street, the west by Prospect avenue and the south by Sixty-seventh street, a 320-acre tract east of and adjoining Swope park, a 50-acre tract on the north of the park, a 400-acre farm near Columbia, Tenn., improved property in Knoxville, Tenn. and Middleboro, Ky, and vacant property in Syracuse, N. Y., Lawrence, Kas. and Topeka, Kas.

Colonel Swope also owned some mining claims near Butte, Mont., the value of which cannot be estimated. He recently said that if he were a young man, he could take one of the claims and dig a fortune out of it. He evidently believed that the claims were very valuable.

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September 26, 1909

FATHER O'DONNELL'S
SILVER SACERDOTAL.

LONG SERVICE IN THE PRIEST-
HOOD IN KANSAS CITY.

Friends to Commemorate the Event
on November 1 -- Came From
Tipperary to the West on
Advice of a Friend.
Roman Catholic Priest Father Patrick J. O'Donnell.
FATHER PATRICK J. O'DONNELL,
FOR 25 YEARS A PRIEST HERE.

In 1885 St. Joseph's hospital was an unpretentious structure, a building which now forms a small wing to the greater buildings constructed adjoining it. In one corner of the hospital grounds there stood a little frame building which was used by the druggist attached to the hospital.

In addition to the hospital buildings the grounds now contain a finely appointed church. The priest is the Rev. Father Patrick J. O'Donnell. He has been there twenty-four years. The church building has succeeded a modest chapel in which Father O'Donnell first celebrated mass when he was given charge of the chapel. It was his second charge in the priesthood.

On November 1, Father O'Donnell will celebrate his silver sacerdotal. At least, his friends have advised him that they will celebrate it for him. They have arranged a reception with Father O'Donnell as honor guest in the chapel hall at Eighth and Penn streets for the night of the day which will mark his twenty-fifth anniversary as a priest of the Roman Catholic church.

Father O'Donnell was born in Tipperary in May, 1862. He left Ireland when 14 years old and lived for four years with an aunt in New York. In 1880, he returned to Ireland and attended St. John's Theological seminary at Wexford. He completed the course of religious instruction there in 1884 and came direct to Kansas City.

The reason for his choosing Kansas City as a field for religious work was that a classmate in the Irish school had been ordered to the St. Joseph diocese and had written Father O'Donnell of what a fine country the Western part of the United States is. Kansas City at that time was a part of the St. Joseph diocese. The Right Reverend John J. Hogan, now bishop of Kansas City, was bishop of the St. Joseph diocese. Afterward, when the Kansas City diocese was created, Bishop Hogan became spiritual head of the Kansas City diocese and administrator for St. Joseph.

Father O'Donnell's first religious work in Kansas City was as an instructor in the parochial school of the Cathedral near Eleventh street and Broadway. He taught in the school for several months. In November, 1884, he was ordained as a priest in the Cathedral.

The first charge given Father O'Donnell was in Norborne, Mo. At the time of his ordination, Father O'Donnell was too young to be admitted to the priesthood, but a papal dispensation was granted. He remained in Norborne, Mo., until 1885, when he was appointed chaplain to St. Joseph's hospital and celebrated mass each alternate Sunday at Lee's Summit. He retained the Lee's Summit charge for two years.

Father O'Donnell was asked to build a church in Sheffield. He worked for several years to bring it about. After the church was built he celebrated mass in it. Two years ago it was made a separate charge. In the meantime, the new church at the hospital building was erected. It now serves many parishioners in addition to the convalescents at the hospital.

Father O'Donnell is of genial disposition. He is known as "a man's priest" because of the strong interest he invariably has held in athletics and his liking for the society of men. He is a member of the Kansas City lodge of the Elks, being the only member of the order among the priests of Missouri.

Father O'Donnell's family lives in Kansas City, they having removed from Ireland several years after he was assigned to the charge at Norborne. His various charges in Jackson county have given him a wide acquaintance here, while he is one of the few priests ordained at the Cathedral who has retained a parish in the city. As a result of his long residence here, the reception planned for him is to be made notable by his friends.

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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August 2, 1909

STARGAZING ON ST. TERESA'S.

That's What Peeper, Caught on Fire
Escape of Girls' School, Told
The Police.

Perched at the top of the fire escape on St. Teresa's academy, Eleventh and Washington streets, five floors from the ground, a peeper who told the police he was "star-gazing" was discovered at an early hour yesterday morning.

The noise he made in climbing awakened some of the pupils, all of whom are girls, and police headquarters was notified. Sergeant Robert Greeley and patrolmen Tim Kennedy and Ed Smith were sent.

"A man is trying to get in," said an excited voice. "Please hurry."

A hurried consultation was held under the shelter of the stone wall, which surrounds the place; and it was decided that the building should be surrounded. Flitting lights indicated agitation among the occupants.

"He's on this side," said an excited woman at an upstairs window, as Sergeant Robert Greeley approached the west side. "Do be careful, for I think he is desperate."

The other officers arrived and another council of war was held. The scampering of bare feet in the hallways alone disturbed the stillness. A passing night owl's car light showed a man perched on the topmost round of the fire escape five stories from the ground. Instantly three revolvers were pointed at him.

"Come down at once," commanded Greeley.

"I was just taking a peep at the stars," explained the man when he reached the ground.

The star-gazer was taken to police headquarters. He will explain in municipal court this morning.

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June 29, 1909

RUBY KANE D'AUDRAE DEAD.

Kansas City Vaudeville Actress a
Victim of Tuberculosis.

Mrs. Ruby Kane D'Audrae, a vaudeville actress of 3944 Woodland avenue, died of tuberculosis after a four months' illness at 1:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Her husband, Robert D'Audrae, and her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Kane, are in the amusement business, the two first named somewhere in Ohio. Mrs. Kane is in Wellington, Mo. Only the mother could be notified last night.

Mrs. D'Audrae was 23 years old. Seven years ago she graduated from the Academy of St. Aloysius at Eleventh street and Prospect avenue. Her voice, which is said to have been exceedingly strong and sweet, attracted considerable attention at school. Three years after finishing the academy she followed her father and mother to the footlights. She was heard in the Sparks theater in Kansas City, Kas., two seasons ago.

Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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June 13, 1909

KANSAS CITY'S CROSSING SQUAD.

A Fine Appearing Body of Men.

CROSSING SQUAD OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

It doesn't take the oldest inhabitant to remember the time when the crossing squad, which now numbers twenty-nine men, was limited to one or two members. At one time Sergeant James Hogan was the whole squad himself with the exception of a patrolman who has been stationed at the Junction for more than twenty years. Kansas City cannot boast of the largest squad in the country, but its members are noted for their general efficiency.

In the mind of the ordinary person the crossing man leads a life of ease. In fact, the majority of the police department envy the crossing men until they have been given a trial. Then it is found that a man must know the location and name of all the office buildings, the streets in every section of the city, the routes of the different street cars and most of the public men.

"Can you tell me the way to the depot?" is a question heard every five minutes.

"Where is the nearest shoe store?" asks a woman.

"Do you know Charley Smith?" asks a farmer who feels hurt when the crossing man shakes his head. "You see he was a great feller to make acquaintances in our town, and I was sure you would know him."

Answering questions, directing the careless drivers who persist in driving on the wrong side of the street and dodging street cars on his own account, are only mere incidents. The constant strain on the system is generally the cause for a man's departure from the squad. Some men ask to be relieved in less than a week.

When the cable cars formerly ran on Ninth street and when some one was injured nearly every week as the cars swept around the corner at high speed, a patrolman was always stationed at that particular spot. The second patrolman to be placed at a crossing was James Hogan, who commenced patrolling the corner at Eleventh and Walnut streets, just eleven years ago.

Four years ago the crossing squad was increased from eight members, who worked from 8 o'clock in the morning until about 7 o'clock in the evening. Patrolman Hogan on account of his seniority and his general knowledge was made a sergeant of the squad.

Two years ago the squad was increased to fourteen members and more crossing were included in the list. But the hours were long and the men asked to be relieved. At last the problem of long hours was solved by Sergeant Hogan, who recommended that the squad be doubled and the hours shortened. Fourteen of the men now go to work at 8 o'clock in the morning and are relieved at 1 o'clock in the afternoon by the other division. After six hours of rest they report at police headquarters and are assigned to the parks and theaters. On the following day the second squad are given the same hours and report at 8 o'clock in the morning, as did the opposite squad on the previous day.

Sergeant Hogan, who has been on the force for nineteen years, probably has a better general knowledge of Kansas City than any other man. One glance through an information guide can tell him whether the pamphlet is up to date or not.

"I don't see the name of the Sharp of finance building," he informed a book dealer the other day when his opinion was asked in regard to the reliability of a guide recently issued. He also knows the name of every street in both Kansas Citys and places of general interest. With such a leader it isn't any wonder that the crossing squad is rated as highly efficient.

Names of the officers, from left to right:

First row -- Crowley, Kennedy, Quayle, Darnell, Rogers, Kincaid.
Second row -- Kearns, Keys, Madigan, Harkenberg, Doman, Nichols.
Third Row -- Lillis, O'Roark, Noland, McCormick, Briden, Jackson.
Fourth Row -- Roach, Coffey, J. T. Rogers, Ryan, McFarland, Hoskins.
Fifth Row -- Hodges, Koger, Sergeant Hogan, Zirschky, Wilhite.

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June 6, 1909

Y. W. C. A. FUND OF
$300,000 IS RAISED.

THOMAS L. SWOPE DOUBLES
SUBSCRIPTION OF $25,000.

Other Voluntary Donations Make a
Total of $303,000, Which Is
$3,000 in Excess of the
Amount Asked.

Through the donation of $50,000, by Thomas L. Swope, the largest single gift ever made for a similar enterprise in the history of the Y . W. C. A. , a gift of $20,000 by the R. A. Long family and $10,000 from the banks of Kansas City, the hard fought battle of the Young Women's Christian Association for $300,000 to build a new home was yesterday changed from a faded hope to a joyous reality. At the close of the campaign, May 25, the sum subscribed was $37,000 short of the necessary amount.

Since the end of a most strenuous campaign, every day of which was fraught with brilliant prospects which faded, forces have been at work, and yesterday the announcement was made that the money needed had been raised and there was some to spare.

Mr. Swope, feeling the absolute need of an institution such as has been proposed for the women of Kansas City, agreed to double his first subscription, raising it from $25,000 to the magnificent sum of $50,000. The amount was given with the proviso that the donor's name be withheld from the public, but Miss Nettie E. Trimble, general secretary of the association, considered such a proposition unfair to the man through whose charity their hopes are to be realized.

SUBSCRIPTION DOUBLED.

Following the lead made by Mr. Swope, R. A. Long added another $5,000 to his already large donation, making the total $20,000. Then through the Kansas City clearing house, the various banks donated $10,000, making in all a total of $40,000 since the closing of the original campaign. This brings the subscriptions up to $303,000, $3,000 more than was originally asked. This money will be used for equipments for the new building.

A meeting of the members of the board of directors of the association will be held some day next week to decide upon the plans for the new buildings. The "Home," which is to be erected at Eleventh street and Troost avenue, will be started at the earliest moment. Plans for this building have not yet been decided upon, as the national association has agreed to furnish them, provided use can be made of some that have already been used.

"We wish to thank the public spirited people of Kansas City who have helped in this campaign and made our project possible," said Miss Trimble yesterday. "Especially do we feel indebted to the press of Kansas City for the interest it has shown in the work and the good it has done to further the interests of our cause. We feel the responsibility of our position and we will do all within our power to merit the confidence of the people who have put this great sum at our disposal."

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May 24, 1909

HE CHANGES HIS UNIFORMS.

Letter Carrier Who Believes in
Cleanliness and Neatness.

Should all of the men in the civil service of the United States follow the example of a well known mail carrier in Kansas City the work of tailors would treble and the men would gain fame for their general appearance. The man who sets the pace in neatness is found in the city directory in the following short history: "Harry Feaman, Carrier, P. O. 3217 East Eleventh Street."

This firm believer in the old proverb of "Cleanliness is next to Godliness" works for Uncle Sam for eight hours every day. He carries a mail route in the North End and the city hall. The mail bags are heavy but become burdensome when stuffed with letters and papers. A carrier is constantly waling and is compelled to climb many pairs of stairs in the course of a day.

There is considerable dust flying in the air in the neighborhood of city hall and when Carrier Feaman's work is finished he feels dirty and grimy. He changes his uniform from three to five times a day and tops each change with a cold water bath. In consequence of these many changes this mail carrier always appears neat and tidy, in fact one would believe that he had just stepped out of a band box.

When Feaman gets up in the morning he refreshes himself with a dip in a tub of cold water, dresses and goes to work. Returning home for lunch he again indulges in a plunge and dons clean clothes and a freshly pressed uniform. The work of distributing his mail in the afternoon musses up his garments and so it is bath and change of clothes No. 3 for Mr. Feaman.

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May 10, 1909

GOT OFF CAR BACKWARDS.

T. J. Kennedy of Le Loup, Kas.,
Killed by Fall on the Asphalt.

Stepping from a moving car between Tenth and Eleventh street in Grand avenue, T. J. Kennedy, 55 years old, a farmer from Le Loup, Kas., fell with the back of his head on the asphalt yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and was killed. Kennedy had attempted to alight from the car with his back in the direction it was going.

The old man was on his way to surprise his only son, Rufus Kennedy, who lives at 109 East Sixteenth street, with a visit, the first one he had paid him since December 22, 1908. The son did not know of his intention, the first news of it coming with the announcement of his death.

Kennedy had lived in the vicinity of Le Loup for twenty-seven years, being the owner of a farm one and one-half miles east of that place. His wife is dead, but his daughter, Victoria, kept house for him. The son is a wagon driver for the City Ice Company.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered the body taken to Carroll-Davidson's undertaking rooms. A post-mortem examination will be held this morning.

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May 4, 1909

MOTOR CAR ON HIS TOES.

Al S. Bright Has Close Call at
Eleventh and Walnut.

The sharp cry of a pedestrian saved Al S. Bright from being run down by a reckless chauffeur yesterday noon. Mr. Bright was crossing Walnut street at Eleventh when a rapidly moving motor car turned out of Eleventh street. It was nearly upon Mr. Bright when a man behind shouted "look out." Mr. Bright sprang backward, but not in time to clear the machine. The front wheels passed over his left foot, crushing the toes. The chauffeur did not stop to see how badly Mr. Bright was injured. The car was clearly exceeding the speed limit. Mr. Bright has offices at 317 R. A. Long Building.

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April 3, 1909

PEDESTRIAN HAS AN INNING.

Eleventh Street Gets a Bath and the
Autos Stampede.

The pedestrian -- that meek and lowly man who ducks and dodges the restless and unruly benzine buggy in Kansas City's crowded thorougfares, and who is smile upon benignly by the carefree chauffeur, had his inning yesterday, or he might have had he been along Eleventh street, between Grand and Walnut, for automobilists who attempt to frisk up and down "Petticoat lane" have their troubles.

Early yesterday afternoon the street springling brigade took special pains to give the aforementioned section of Eleventh street a good bath. They succeeded in mixing a mud that made the surface of the asphalt as slippery as the floor of the oleo room in a packing plant. And when the first autoist to attempt to perform on the slippery surface rounded the corner of Eleventh and Grand the pedestrian's fun began, for the auto refused to make a scheduled stop. In a few minutes the street was full of smoking machines that groaned and chugged to no avail. They were all stuck.

There were cross words from chauffeurs and merry "ha-has" from assembled pedestrians. As the wheels of the autos whirled about like a buzzsaw and the cars did not move an inch, the merry crowds on the sidelines offered numerous suggestions.

"Give 'er the sand, pal," suggested a man who wore the garb of a motorman.

What they did give a majority of the stubborn cars before they got them out of the trouble district was plenty of push.

And the "common people" stood by and smiled broadly.

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March 31, 1909

STABS ROBBER WITH HATPIN.

Melvina Gerard Puts Purse Snatcher
to Flight and Makes Him Can-
didate for Surgical Treatment.

The problem of coping with the purse snatcher has been solved by Miss Melvina Gerard, the proprietor of a women's tailoring establishment, who was walking from a Twelfth street car to her home at 2823 East Eleventh street late Saturday night. When a man who had followed her from the car attempted to snatch her purse she promptly began to stab him with her hat pin. The vanquished robber fled in dismay.

Miss Gerard worked late Saturday night and with her sister, Miss Ernestine Gerard, started home laden with purchases. A man who boarded the same car as the young women also alighted at Chestnut street. It was over two blocks to their home and not a person was in sight. The streets were poorly lighted and a purse snatcher could operate without much chance of being identified.

The women felt they were being followed, as the man made no attempt to pass them. Miss Ernestine Gerard slipped her purse out of sight under a package, but Miss Melvina made up her mind to cope with the footpad in a different manner should he attempt to snatch her purse. She pulled a long gold hat pin from her hat and waited. At the corner of Eleventh and Chestnut streets the man quickened his pace, and dodging between the two women made a grab for Miss Melvina's purse. He wasn't prepared for the reception in store for him.

As he grasped the purse, the hat pin was jabbed into his face and a moment later it came through his black derby hat. Clearly it was time to retreat, and it didn't take him long to come to this decision. But in his retreat he left his hat on the sidewalk. The sister had screamed for help and this accelerated his flight.

The women reached home with his hat which was turned over to the police department Sunday. At headquarters an examination showed that the hat pin had pierced the crown and it is believed the footpad must have been a candidate for a surgeon.

Miss Gerard was not inclined to talk very much on the subject last night. She didn't want the notoriety, she said.

"If every woman would draw a hat pin instead of screaming for help, there would be less purse snatching," she said. "I wasn't a bit frightened, and knew what I was doing. I must have struck him about four times."

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March 24, 1909

EPPERSON'S AUTO HITS BOY.

Chauffeur, 17 Years Old, Was
Making Trial Trip With New
Touring Car.

The trial trip of U. S. Epperson's new touring car yesterday afternoon resulted in the serious injury of Jesse Bridgeman, 13 years old, who was run over at Eleventh and Holmes streets. J. C. Collins, 17 years old, the chauffeur, was arrested. He was released at police headquarters, Mr. Epperson signing his bond.

The Bridgeman boy, who lives with his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Bridgeman, 1416 Locust street, came out of the Humbolt school, put on his roller skates and coasted down Eleventh street. A moment later, as he attempted to cross the street, he was struck by the car and hurled to the pavement. The machine passed over him, although he was untouched by the wheels.

Collins, who had thrown on the emergency brake, stopped the car and ran back. It was almost impossible for J. M. Maloney, a patrolman, to break through the hundreds of excited pupils to the spot where the child lay. Collins offered to take the boy in the motor car to the emergency hospital, but Maloney called the ambulance, which hurried to the scene. Dr. Fred B. Kryger found the child's left leg fractured in two places. He was also bruised about the head and body. He was sent to Dr. H. B. McCall's private sanitarium at 1424 Holmes street, where his condition was little improved last night.

The boy chauffeur has been in Mr. Epperson's employ about three weeks. He says the accident was unavoidable.

Mr. Epperson hurried to the emergency hospital as soon as he heard of the accident, and listened to the child's story. He said he did not believe Collins was exceeding the speed limit.

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February 19, 1909

J. C. ALTMAN TAKES BRIDE.

Was Married to Mrs. Florence Ma-
hannah in St. Joseph.

J. C. Altman and Mrs. Florence Mahannah slipped quietly away from friends and family, took a morning train for St. Joseph and were married, although the banns had been announced and Easter was set as the day for the wedding. Mr. Altman is the proprietor of the Altman Shoe Company at Eleventh and Walnut streets, and his bride was formerly employed at the Klein Jewelry Company, 1119 Main street.

The couple arrived in St. Joseph about noon time and proceeded directly to the court house where they secured the license. From there they went to St. Joseph's cathedral, where the ceremony was performed by Father Malloon. Mrs. Lou Harper, a sister of the bride, was present and W. X. Donovan of St. Joseph acted as best man. Mr. and Mrs. Altman will make their home at 1231 Holmes street. They returned to Kansas City late last night.

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February 14, 1909

STREETS COVERED WITH ICE.

Pedestrians and Horses Had Perilous
Time of It Last Evening.

Slipping, sliding, skidding, gliding horses and wagons delayed traffic, blocked the street cars, frightened pedestrians and were generally in the way of each other and everybody else in the downtown district yesterday afternoon, when, after 4 o'clock, a drizzling rain froze on the pavements and sidewalks, covering everything with a thin coating of ice. Horses and men, as well as many women, fell on the streets.

On Main street, on the grade between Tenth and Eleventh streets, and on Eleventh street from Walnut to McGee it became necessary to station extra police to assist the regular crossing policemen in handling teams. Loaded wagons were not allowed to pass up or down on these grades, the experience of a year ago, when a large wagon, heavily loaded, skidded down Eleventh street, overturning in its slide damaged obstacles in its path, and broke a plate glass window at the corner of Eleventh and Walnut streets, being sufficient warning.

There were numerous minor accidents with street cars and several collisions with wagons. At Thirteenth street and Troost avenue, a wagon skidded into a Troost car, smashing the front end of the car and delaying traffic for a while.

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January 30, 1909

MOOCHERS HERE ARE PLENTY.

They Infest Certain Streets and Con-
tinually Annoy People.

Beggars infest certain streets in Kansas City near the business districts and annoy people passing along those thoroughfares, especially at night. Along the streets where they ply their trade a policeman is rarely ever seen. Along Central avenue, between Ninth and Tenth street, and along Eleventh street from Broadway to Wyandotte, there are from six to eight beggars stationed every night.

They are a prosperous looking set of hoboes, too. Some of them are able-bodied, healthy, well-dressed young men, who evidently seek the cover of night to beg for dimes.

"Just a dime, please, to get a cheap bed," is their plea. One fellow has a story to tell about being on the way to his home in Iowa and was robbed of all his money. Now he is forced to ask assistance. He has been working the same street for three weeks. He dresses well, too, so he must be prospering.

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January 19, 1909

MONSTER CHOIR WILL SING.

2,000 Voices Training for the Com-
ing Gypsy Smith Revival.

The largest chorus ever heard in Kansas City, except the one which sang for Eva Booth here two years ago, had a rehearsal last night at the Central Methodist Episcopal church, South, at Eleventh street and the Paseo.

A thousand voices sang "Onward Christian Soldiers," "My Country, 'Tis of Thee," "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and other patriotic and devotional songs. The rehearsal last night was the third and last that will be held before the district local option meeting that will be held in Convention hall next Sunday at 3 p. m.

The chorus was organized for the purpose of singing at the two weeks' revival meeting to be held in Convention hall beginning February 13.

Professor Crosby Hopps, well known as a leader of choruses, will lead the monster choir. Four thousand dollars has been subscribed from various churches to defray the expenses of the singing. Members will get reserved seats in the hall at the Gyspy Smith meetings.

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January 7, 1909

COLD KEEPS HIM PRISONER.

John Martin Speyer, Free Man Now,
Can't Go Out of Doors.

Since leaving the Jackson county jail Tuesday morning, the case against him having been dismissed by Virgil Conkling, prosecutor, after almost seven years of trial, John Martin Speyer has been unable to spend any of his freedom out of doors. The weather has been so severe that Speyer, after six years and six months of incarceration, is afraid to step out in the open air. His physical condition is such that it makes him liable to pneumonia and unable to stand the cold.

At the present time Speyer is living with George McCabe, a friend, at 520 East Eleventh street. All of his time is being spent in preparation of the lecture upon crime and punishment.

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January 6, 1909

SPEYER, CHILD SLAYER,
IS NOW A FREE MAN.

RELEASED BY JUDGE PORTER-
FIELD OF CRIMINAL COURT.

"Realization of My Act Has Been
Greater Punishment Than Law
Could Inflict," Says the
Showman.

Six and one-half years in jail, three times convicted of the murder of his own 5-year-old son, John Martin Speyer, showman, stepped out of the county court house yesterday a free man. At 38 years of age he again faces the world, leaving on the county's books one of the most unique records ever entered opposite the name of a model prisoner.

Three times the supreme court held that Speyer was insane when he killed Fred, his child, and the prosecuting attorney, Virgil Conkling, believed a fourth trial would result in the same finding. So, when Speyer was taken before Judge E. E. Porterfield of Division 2 of the criminal court yesterday, Mr. Conkling dismissed the charge against the prisoner.

BEEN PUNISHED ENOUGH.

Judge Porterfield, in releasing Speyer, impressed upon him the fact that he was still a young man and able to make a good record in the world. The judge continued:

"I cannot believe that you were responsible for your actions when you killed your child. The supreme court has said so three times. The world, I believe, looks upon you with charity and expects of you only good conduct in the future. What you must have suffered from the realization of your act no doubt has been greater punishment than the imprisonment you have undergone. You are now free. Is there anything you wish to say to this court?"

Speyer, almost unnerved at his release after long imprisonment, rose slowly and said:

SHAKES HANDS WITH EVERYONE.

"You are right. The realization of what my act has meant has been to me far greater punishment than the law could possibly inflict. I intend to live an upright life. I was irresponsible when I committed the act which brought me to jail. By my conduct in the future I hope to make some small reparation. I thank you all for your kindness to me."

After shaking hands with everyone near, including the jailer, Speyer went to the jail and gathered up his few possessions, among them the manuscript of his lecture on prison life. As he had no money, deputies in the office of the county marshal made up a purse of about $15. Speyer said he would go to 520 East Eleventh street, the home of George McCabe, until he could find employment.

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December 16, 1908

PLANNING A NEW SKYSCRAPER.

Business Building May Be Erected
West of Shubert Theater.

On Baltimore avenue between Tenth and Eleventh streets, just south of the Dwight building, Leo N. Leslie and others will erect a ten-story fireproof building. Work will be started by the last of December. The building will be constructed at a cost of $150,000 and will be of cut stone for the first two floors and the remainder will be brick. It is contemplated to have completed the building by July 1, 1909.

It is the plan of the builders to so construct the building as to rent entire floors. The frontage will be thirty-seven, with a depth of 175 feet.

Nonresident capitalists are seeking to bargain with W. A. Rule on his own behalf and Mr. Leslie's for the erection of a large business building just west of the Shubert theater. Mr. Rule said yesterday that it was almost a certainty that the building would be erected, though as to exact nature he was not sure. It had been circulated among real estate and architectural circles that the building would be a hotel. This Mr. Rule positively denied. All of the capital, about $150,000, invested would be foreign and would bring in more revenue to Kansas City.

Martin Lehman stated yesterday that he had not settled upon any plans submitted for the new theater which the Orpheum Company will erect on the lot recently purchased at Eleventh and Central streets. It was given out that a theater to cost $350,000 would be erected there and work would be started upon it as soon as the plans were finally selected. At the present it is not the plan of the Orpheum to have any office space in the theater, but devote the whole building to the operation of the stage and seating of the audience.

"Taking it all in all," said Mr. Leslie yesterday afternoon, "it begins to look like the West Side is far from dead. Within the past three weeks movements have been started which tend to improve the site wonderfully. That district will remain important as long as Kansas City exists. It is just at the edge of the wholesale district and at the edge of the retail district. We consider it a very profitable holding and will do our best to keep its value up."

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November 29, 1908

NO POLICE DOCTOR AT
WALNUT STATION NO. 4.

AMBULANCE RESPONDS TO CALLS
WITHOUT SURGEON.

Room and Meals Constitute Salary
Attached, and the Job Has
Been Shunned for
a Week.

For the past week there has been no doctor at the Walnut street police station. The ambulance from this station, which is supposed to take care of every case of injury where the services of the police department are needed in the district south of Eleventh street, has been forced to respond to calls without any doctor in charge. Whether the call comes from Fifteenth street and the Blue or from Southwest boulevard and state line, all that the officers in charge of the ambulance can do is to make a run as fast as they can to the general hospital.

The cases on which the services of the police ambulance are called for are too frequently those in which a delay may mean the loss of human life. A man or a woman may take carbolic acid several miles from the general hospital. If medical treatment can be administered in fifteen minutes the person might, under ordinary conditions, recover. If, however, the treatment is delayed a few minutes, death is sure to result.

At any moment in the day or night such a case may be telephoned into the Walnut street station, which does almost as much ambulance work as the central police station.

Two years ago the appointment of ambulance and emergency surgeons was taken out of the hands of the police department and placed under the control of the health and hospital board. Under the new charter the same arrangement obtains. The reason given at the time of making the change was that the power of appointment was being used for political purposes.

However, under the old arrangement the police surgeons were paid a so-called salary of $30 a month. When the health and hospital board took charge it fixed a salary for the three doctors at the central police station, but appointed a man to work without pay at the Walnut street station. Internes at the city hospital did the work,, receiving therefor the same salary that they got for their work at the hospital, namely, their room and meals. Strange to say, several young doctors were glad to avail themselves of the opportunity to get a more complete knowledge of their profession by sewing up wounds and coaxing would-be suicides to live. Until last week the station has never been without a surgeon, and they have given excellent services, on the whole. Now no one can be persuaded to take the job.

"Only a few dollars paid to these young doctors every month would settle the whole question," said Captain Thomas P. Flahive last night. "To prevent the loss of human life something must be done at once."

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November 20, 1908

WARNING BY ELECTRIC GONG.

Alarms to Be Placed at Prominent
Intersections.

Electric gongs are to be installed at Eleventh and main, Eleventh and Walnut and Eleventh and Grand avenue by the fire and water board. These will be operated from fire headquarters to warn crossing policemen and pedestrians of the approach of fire wagons

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November 4, 1908

STAYED UP NEARLY ALL
NIGHT TO READ RETURNS

Great Crowds in Front of Newspaper
Offices -- Returns at the
Clubs.

Republicans and Democrats alike, not to mention members of the lesser parties, stood cheek by jowl for hours last night -- not in beatific political harmony -- but in a common desire to rubber over the other fellow's shoulder and catch the flashes of election news that were thrown on canvass screens by the stereopticon in many parts of the city. Everybody jostled and laughed and gently roasted each other, and when the returns suited them yelled approval, but never was an ugly bit of temper put on unpleasant display.

Kansas City stayed up late enough to learn the approximate fate of its favorite candidate, and then went to bed with a fair assurance that it would awaken in the land of the free whether Taft, Bryan, or somebody else were elected. For once in the year at least, Papa Casey had a healthy excuse to present to Mamma Casey for staying out so late, but for the fact that in many cases that she was out with him and all the little Caseys.

HOW IT WAS DONE.

Most of the crowd didn't see the men behind the stereopticon, seated at tables and busily transcribing telegrams to the little glass slides in black drawing ink. They had to write minutely so as to get all of a telegram on one of the three by four panes of glass, but the phonographs and cartoons kept the people standing until another fresh slide was ready to put in.

The adding machine was in much demand and whole batteries of them did nocturnal duty in the various newspaper offices, with experts from the banks who knew how to punch the keys properly. Though serpentine in name, the adders produced some straight figures that won't miss the official returns very far, for the benefit of the multitude.

AT THE CLUBS.

In the lodge room of the Elk's Club the furniture was swathed in roughing-it covering and the members held forth for the night, as was true at the Commercial Club, where the attaches of the club and transportation bureau were enlisted in the work of handling the returns.

At the Y. M. C. A. a wire was cut in and between telegrams the waiters were entertained by a stereopticon lecture on California by Aldred Foster of New Zealand.

Members of the Railroad Club heard the returns at the club rooms in Walnut street and after the theaters closed Thespians came up to join them.

Federal officers and employes for the most part heard the returns in the federal court room on the third floor of the postoffice building, and in Convention hall and at the corners of Eighth and McGee, Tenth and McGee and Eleventh and Grand great crowds stood far into the night to get the returns as they came in.

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October 30. 1908

TWO BIG ADVANCE SALES.

Long Lines for "Ben Hur" and War-
field Seats.

When the hour of 9 o'clock arrived yesterday morning and the ticket sellers at the Willis Wood and Shubert opened their windows for the "Ben Hur" and David Warfield engagements next week, a long line of eager theatergoers stretched away from the box office at each theater. At the Willis Wood the line reached from the box office to the corner of Eleventh and Baltimore and thence to the stage door on Eleventh street. All through the morning the line remained unbroken and the advance sale for "Ben Hur ranked well with any which had preceded it. When the fact that two attractions of such magnitude are coming the same week is taken into consideration, the double sale broke all records. Down at the Shubert there was a line of Warfield enthusiasts reaching from the box office to the corner of Tenth and Baltimore and thence to the alley on Baltimore.

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September 28, 1908


COWHERD WINNER
OF LONG AUTO RUN.

FINISHES FIRST IN CORBIN CAR,
PERFECT SCORE.

E. J. ANDERSON IS SECOND.

HE RODE A RAMBLER AND HAD
994 POINTS.

Dispute Among Two of the Partici-
pants as to the Corbin's Score
Wound Up With Fisticuff
Fight on the Paseo.


Fletcher Cowherd's Corbin car was last night awarded a perfect score by the executive committee in charge of the endurance test. Because of allegations which are said to have been made by other participants reflecting on the genuineness of the score, a severe test was given the car at the Hotel Inez last night, but it was found to be in perfect condition.

Amid cheers issuing from hundreds of throats, din of auto horns and clanging of trolley bells, the automobile endurance run for 1908 came to an end at Eleventh street and Grand avenue, at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The Corbin car, driven by Fletcher Cowherd, Jr., was the only contestant with a perfect score, and was placed first in the list of contestants.

With the crowd the fact that one of the cars was the winner of the first contest of the kind ever held from here seemed to make little difference. When Mrs. Kirkland, in her Overland, which she piloted over the entire course, turned into Grand avenue, there went up a cheer which lasted until that plucky little woman had passed from sight on her way to the Paseo, where the autos taking part in the run were inspected.

TWENTY-ONE FINISHED.

Then, too, the cars which carried the most mud in their wheels and on guards seemed to enthuse the spectators to a considerable extent. Therefore, as there were plenty of cars and plenty of mud the cheering was continued until the arrival of the last car. Of the forty-one cars which started in the run but twenty-one finished. This, however, is considered a wonderful record and goes to show the admirable quality of the "staying powers" possessed by the respective drivers and their passengers. All who took the trip said they would not have missed it. The last day's run, from Iola, Kas., 125 miles, was started at 6:15 o'clock yesterday morning. The schedule allowed of easy running time and by the time Paola was reached, at noon, all of the contesting cars were in good condition.

Leaving Paola, the remaining fifty miles were clipped off in good time, and finally when the end was reached the cars were hugging each other in single file, engines running admirably, occupants tired but happy, and everything in readiness to check in.

Probably the hardest luck encountered by any of the contestants yesterday befell Carl Muehlebach and his Pope-Hartford. This car, with its crew, was ready for departure from Iola when the signal was given, but had progressed but a few feet when one of the front tires blew up. This accident having been repaired, another start was made, when another tire blew. After this the two other tires, which had seen duty during most of the trip, collapsed almost simultaneously, with the result that 11:30 found the Pope-Hartford occupants but two miles from their starting point.

After that, however, good time was made, and the car, although about an hour late in arriving, checked in in good shape. Several other cars had slight mishaps, but none of them compared with the downright hard luck encountered by No. 7

FINISH WITH FIST FIGHT.


After the cars had reached the Paseo an incident took place which, although of short duration, caused considerable excitement. During the trip yesterday the correctness of the Corbin car's perfect score was under discussion in a somewhat heated manner by owners of other cars which had been penalized a point or two, and is said to have its culmination in a fistic encounter during the Paseo inspection.

Who the participants were could not be learned, as the race officials exerted every effort to suppress their identity and were quite successful. It remains, however, that during the brief course of the melee there was considerable excitement for all. It is expected that the question will be taken up by the executive committee.

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September 15, 1908

THEY WOULD LIGHT ELEVENTH.

Business Men Make Plans From Bal-
timore to McGee.

If the plans of the men representing the business houses on Eleventh street, between McGee street and Baltimore avenue, materialize, Eleveth street within those limits will be the mo st artistically lighted street in Kansas City. A committee of six of these business men met at the Hotel Baltimore last night and discussed the plans. They will meet again next Monday at 12:15 o'clock at the Hotel Baltimore when plans and bids will be submitted.

There being an absence of poles on Eleventh street, a different plan from that which obtains in other districts is necessitated. The committee is unanimous in the belief that there must be a uniformity in the lighting of htis street, and that the lights must be artistic. From the discussion last night it is probable that a combined light and pole will be secured at a cost of not less than $50 each. It is estimated that there should be no fewer than three lights on each side of the street.

These men were in the conference last night: C. C. Peters of Emery, Bird, Thayer & Co.,; H. C. Lambert, president of the German-American bank; D. M. Bone, secretary of the Business Mens's League; C. M. Boley, John D. Howe, secretary and treasurer of the Robert Keith Furniture Company, and J. W. Wagner.

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August 13, 1908

NEWSBOYS MOURN FOR LEE.

They Gather About the Bier of a
Victim of a Street Car Accident.

Accompanied by many newsboys with whom he associated in life, the body of William A. Lee, Jr., the newsboy who was killed by being crushed between a streetcar and a beer van at Eleventh and Main streets, last Monday, was taken to the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street, where funeral services were conducted at 2 o'clock p. m. yesterday afternoon.

Charles W. Moore, founder of the Institutional church, delivered the eulogy, and before he had concluded the audience was visibly affected. Mr. Moore dwelt at considerable length of the excellent qualities of the dead newsboy.

Young Lee had been a member of the Light Bearers' Club for some time, and had been considered one of its most ardent workers. Newsboys of the city contributed toward defraying the funeral expenses. William A. Lee, the father, who had been released from jail by order of the court sufficiently long to attend the funeral, accompanied the grief stricken mother to the church and cemetery. Owing to the circumstances it is now thought that Lee will be permanently released with the understanding that he secure employment at once and care for his wife.

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