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February 8, 1910

MONSTER STADIUM
WILL BE BUILT.

TEN-ACRE TRACT BOUGHT NEAR
ELECTRIC PARK FOR AN
ATHLETIC FIELD.

Kansas and Missouri Uni-
versities Offered Use of
Park for Football.

A monster stadium which will seat 30,000 people, and an athletic field large enough for football games, track meets and baseball will be constructed on a ten-acre tract of ground within two blocks of Electric park by the Gordon & Koppel Clothing Company within the next six months. The ground was purchased yesterday for $30,000 and work on the stadium will start immediately.

The land is located between Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth streets and Lydia and Tracy avenue. It is on two car lines and crowds can be handled as well as they are handled at Electric park. The stadium will be of wooden construction, and it will be an up-to-date athletic field, such as has been proposed in the many stadium propositions talked of recently for football games between Kansas and Missouri universities. It will be known as the Gordon & Koppel Athletic field and will be under the management of George C. Lowe, a member of the firm.

TO VISIT M. S. U. TODAY.

This project is the result of the talk of erecting a stadium for university football, although the management has made no proposition to the universities to date and has not been promised the annual Thanksgiving day game. Mr. Lowe will go to Columbia, Mo., today to put the proposition before the athletic management of the university. He will then outline his plans to the Kansas university management. He will offer the field to those institutions for 10 per cent of the gross receipts of the annual game, but says that no matter whether those schools can be interested in it or not his plans will be carried out because football is but one of the many athletic events this stadium will be used for.

This is a private enterprise. For more than two months the backers have been trying to purchase the ground, but did not agree to terms until yesterday, when the transfer was made. The ground belongs to the Davis estate and the sale was made by G. E. Bowling & Co. The stadium will be built on ground 500 by 600 feet, the rest of the tract of ground to be used for other purposes. The inside of the field will be large enough to allow a quarter of a mile track to be built, which will be outside of the baseball diamond, and football gridiron.

MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT.

There will be bath rooms and lockers for the players. The stadium will be so constructed that there will be five entrances in front of it and as patrons of the park enter they will go up incline walks to the top of the seats, as they do in Convention hall. A walk will be built around the top. A grandstand will be constructed on each side of the athletic field and the ends will be bleachers. A row of boxes will be constructed around the entire field. The field will be laid out so that in case football crowds are more than 30,000 people, about 5,000 can be seated in chairs on track.

This field will be open to the public for use for all athletic evens and the management announced last night that in case a circus or anything of that nature could be put in the inclosure it will be rented for such purposes. Director Barnes of the Y. M. C. A. favors the enterprise for athletic events in which his men take part. City League baseball will be played there and Sunday School Athletic League and ward and high school athletic meets will have the privilege of using this ground.

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January 20, 1910

TWO SERGEANTS STEP UP.

Commissions as Lieutenants for
James and Anderson.

The first promotion of any moment to be made by the present police board took place nar the close of the meeting yesterday when Sergeants Robert E. L. James and Frank H. Anderson, who have given the better parts of their lives to the service, were made lieutenants. Anderson is said to be a Republican and James is a Democrat. Neither man got much encouragement from former boards though their records are both clean.

Anderson, now assigned to desk work at No. 3 station on the Southwest boulevard, went on the force November 9, 1889. On account of his intelligence and adaptability for the work he was assigned for m any eyars to duty in the city clerk's office where he served papers in condemnation suits and did clerical work. On January 9, 1907, while H. M. Beardsley was mayor, Anderson was made a sergeant by a Democratic board. His promtion is said to have been due to former Mayor Beardsley's efforts.

Lieutenant James went on the department as a probationary officer July 22, 1889, a few months before Lieutenant Anderson. As a patrolman James has walked every beat in Kansas City. On July 22, 1902, he was promoted to sergeant.

James early showed particular efficiency in handling large crowds. While outside sergeant at No. 2 station in the West Bottoms during the destructive flood of June, 1903, James distinguished himself.

Last July, when still a sergeant, James was assigned by the police board to Convention hall as instructor in the matter of police duty. This pertained to the old men, already on the force as well as new recruits. In all 241 policemen were instructed in groups of from twenty-five to seventy and their instruction lasted from seventy-two to ninety hours per group. Lieutenant James also had charge of the initial opening of Electric park a few years ago. For two weeks he has had charge of the desk at No. 7 station in Sheffield. Lieutenant James was born at Tipton, Cooper county, Mo., October 17, 1867. His father, Dr. P. T. James, was assistant surgeon general to General Sterling Price of the Confederate army. Some time after the war the family moved to Holden, Mo.. Lieutenant James is married and has four children. He is a brother of Dr. Samuel C. James, a member of the general hospital staff of visiting surgeons and physicians.

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October 6, 1909

INJUNS TACKLE THE TICKLER.

Apaches Exhibiting at Electric Park
Take in the Thrillers.

Not even the stolidity of an Apache Indian could withstand the whoop-compelling thrills of the scenic railway, dip coaster and tickler at Electric park last night. At the invitation of the management the thirty aborigines from the Dulce reservation in New Mexico, exhibiting at the Missouri Valley fair and exposition, took a chance on, in and through the various concessions.

The tickler didn't take their breath. Quite the contrary. Their lung power was in no way impaired. Tubful after tubful of the original Americans rolled down the course through the winding alleys on the polished incline. Their yells were a menace to every eardrum within several blocks.

Mr. Heim treated the Apaches to every thrill to be experienced in his big collection of amusements. To show their appreciation or to open a safety valve as an outlet for some of their pent-up exuberance, the Indians in turn treated the management and the crowd to their repertory of snake dance, bear dance, fish dance, lizard dance, and other zoological "hops."

Two of the warriors have records. Washington, who is 97 years old, was a scout with Kit Carson, and Julian, 93 years old, fought with Geronimo. A week ago in Pueblo, Col., Peafalo, one of the young braves, married Juanita, a young woman of the party. She is a daughter of one of the warriors named Alaska.

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October 5, 1909

SAURIANS WELCOMED
THE BRIDE.

WEDDING MARCH BLARED BY
TWO BRASS BANDS.

Thousands of Strangers in Line to
Congratulate Mr. and Mrs. "Al-
ligator Joe," -- "She's My
Peaches Now," Said Groom.

It's an unusual privilege for guests at a wedding to be able to buy young alligators from the bride. It was not only possible last night at Electric park but was done. It was one of the many features of the wedding of "Alligator Joe," who figured in the marriage license as Warren B. Frazee, and Miss Cleopatra N. Croff. The ceremony was witnessed by many thousand persons. The wedding was perfect in every way. From the moment the bridal party entered the gates of the park until the finish there was but the main hitch. The wedding principals entered the gates in t his order:

Michael G. Heim, manager of Electric park.
J. A. Wilson, secretary of the Missouri valley fair.
Platoon of police.
Hiner's band.
Two flower girls.
The wedding party in an auto.
The Independence, Kas., band.

A complete circuit of the colonnade at the park was made with either of the bands tooting away on a wedding strain. Reaching the entrance to the alligator farm, the bands and autos deployed. The wedding party was marched up the center aisle. On either side of the aisle, crocodiles and alligators splashed in the water or spread their leathery lengths on the sand. But "Alligator Joe" ignored for once the presence of the saurians.

WEDDING BELL OF ALFALFA.

It was an exclusive affair, an admission being charged, but several thousand guests were in the enclosure while hundreds more hung by their elbows on the fence. Outside thousands of persons stood. The marriage was celebrated on a raised dais. Overhead there were rafters of wheat straw and grasses. A wedding bell built of alfalfa and crimson tissue paper was suspended over the couples' head. James A. Finley was best man and Miss Genevieve Johnson the bridesmaid. The Rev. Wallace M. Short performed the ceremony.

A slight inadvertence on the part of "Alligator Joe" marred the occasion somewhat. When it became necessary for "Alligator Joe" to produce the ring, he could not. Never before had eh ever tried to reach gloved fingers into his vest pocket and hold a brand new hat in the other hand. So he clapped his had on his head. Mr. Finlay removed it. "Alligator Joe" dug and dug until he got the ring. Some of the guests snickered, even those who had paid to get in joining in the laughter. The man with the searchlight took pity on "Alligator Joe" and switched off the intense gleam.

After the ceremony "Alligator Joe" reached over and smacked "Mrs. Alligator Joe" heartily. The crowd cheered. Then Mr. Finley essayed to kiss her. "Alligator Joe" gave him the throttle clutch with his four fingers spread under Mr. Finley's chin.

"Quit," "Alligator Joe" said. "This is my peaches now."

"Mrs. Alligator Joe" protested. Then "Alligator Joe" relented and Mr. Finley was allowed to kiss the bride. Afterwards 1,000 persons filed by to congratulate the couple.

ALLIGATORS FOR SOUVENIRS.

The bride was dressed in white and wore the conventional veil and orange blossoms. "Alligator Joe" was in black, his only ornament being a shark's tooth, worn pendant as a watch charm and an exquisite scarf pin fashioned of a fish fin.

"Lad--ies and gentle--men--n-n-n," "Alligator Joe" announced after the reception, through a megaphone, "we are about to give you one of the grandest exhibitions of alligator charming and hypnotism it ever will be your good fortune to see in the wide world. I have in my hand the crocodile Hiki-Kiki, which I will hypnotize before you all-l-l-l. It is simply a sample of the grand-est-t-t-t ex-hi-bi-tion within the park. Inside we will give the performance in a few minutes. All who wish to see it may buy their tickets now. The bride will give to each visitor-r-r-r who wishes them, a souvenir-r-r-r of the occasion."

Which she did, for a consideration. Arrayed in her white dress en train, the infant alligators were sold by the bride. "Alligator Joe," showman that he is, put in a stock of 800 of the tiny saurians.

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October 4, 1909

SHOWS NEEDLE WORK
BY WOMEN CONVICTS.

Both are Serving Sentences in Kan-
sas Prison for Murder -- Exposi-
tion at Electric Park Is
in Full Swing.

The attendance at the Missouri Valley Fair and Exposition in Electric park increased from 8,000 Saturday to more than 20,000 yesterday. Nearly all of the visitors in the afternoon were from out-of-town, while the city folk predominated last night. All of the exhibits are in place, including the chickens, of which there are more than 400 coops.

Several attractions were added yesterday. The exhibit of the Kansas state prison was opened. It shows the binder twine made at the prison and some needle work by women prisoners. Among that class of work is a piece of work completed by Jessie Morrison, who is serving a life sentence for the killing of Mrs. Olin Castle of Eldorado, Kas. Another bit of fancy work made by a noted woman prisoner in the Kansas penitentiary is a pillow cushion cover finished by Molly Stewart, convicted of the Schneck murder at Ottawa.

The dog show will open Wednesday, as will the flower show. In order to protect the exhibits,a fire engine station has been installed in front of the German village. Joe, the Kansas City fire horse which won first place, with Dan, another Kansas City product, at the international fire congress under direction of George C. Hale, former fire chief, is on exhibition. The animal is now 32 years old.

At 8:45 o'clock tonight "Alligator Joe" is to be married. His real name is Warren B. Frazee. The bride-to-be is Miss Cleopatra N. Croff. The marriage is to take place in the alligator farm. It will be public.

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October 3, 1909

ALLIGATOR JOE TO WED.

Public Ceremony at Electric Park
Next Monday Night.

Warren Baxter Frazee, professionally known as "Alligator Joe," of Palm Beach, Fla., and Miss Cleopatra Nancy Croff of Carthage, Mo., yesterday obtained a marriage license and will be married publicly Monday night before the throng attending the Missouri Valley fair at Electric park. The prospective bridegroom gave his age as 34 and the bride-to-be 19. When she becomes Mrs. "Alligator Joe" it is said that the bride will act as her husband's helpmate by selling infant alligators as souvenirs.

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August 19, 1909

PYROTECHNICS AT ELECTRIC.

"The Burning of Moscow" and Rus-
sian Dances Featured.

So successful has been "The Fall of Messina" at Electric park that the management has arranged for and prepared another immense and impressive pyrotechnical spectacle. This will be known as "The Burning of Moscow," and will represent the great conflagration which destroyed the Russian city incident to the invasion of Napoleon Bonaparte and his troops in 1812. The fireworks that will accompany "The Burning of Moscow" will be even more spectacular than those used in "The Fall of Messina."

The first performance of "The Burning of Moscow" will be given Sunday night, and the last performance of "The Fall of Messina" will be given Saturday night. Don Philippini's Band will play a programme tonight.

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July 26, 1909

STRANGE ADVENTURES
OF TWO SMALL BOYS.

SAW SIGHTS AND FRIGHTENED
THEIR PARENTS.

Johnny and Tommy, 10 and 8 Years
Old, Respectively, Had High
Time While Folks Had
Visions of Kidnaping.

TOMMY BEELS.

Without permission of their respective parents, Johnny Sinclair, 10, and Tommy Beels, 8 years old, took a day off from home and spent the whole of Saturday night and Sunday in wandering about the towns and parks surrounding Kansas City, much to the consternation, grief and anxiety of their families.

When the boys were missed Saturday night it was learned that they had gone with an employe of Electric park. Mont Shirley, 29 years of age, who has a longing for the companionship of small boys, being evidenced by his having led other urchins on several days' tours of the surrounding country on previous occasions.

Johnny Sinclair is the only son of Aaron Sinclair, janitor of the Boston flats, 3808 Main street. Johnny's father gave him a dollar Saturday noon and told him to do what as he wanted with the money.

BOYS WENT TO PARK.

Barefooted and without his coat, Johnny looked up his younger friend, Tommy, youngest son of H. T. Beels, 107 East Thirty-ninth street, and proposed a trip to Electric park. Tommy was willing and thought it best not to go into the house for his hat and coat, for his mother might thwart their schemes. So the boys left the Beels home about 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

When 5 o'clock came Mrs. Beels missed her son. Within a few minutes, however, he telephoned his mother that they were at Electric park and were going to take a boat ride with a man whom they had found congenial. Mrs. Beels told the boy to come home immediately.

Tommy had other views in the matter and when Shirley suggested an extensive tour of the city, to include Kansas City, Kas., Lansing, Leavenworth, Forest, Fairmount, Swope and Budd parks and all at his own expense, the boy readily fell in with the plan. Mothers were not interviewed.

Dire thoughts of drowning, kidnaping and disaster beset Mrs. Beels when her boy did not materialize at supper time. Persons in charge of the park were questioned and it was learned that the two boys had gone away from the park with Shirley. None knew where.

SEARCH PARTIES ORGANIZED.

Mrs. Beels, at midnight, went to the Sinclair home and inquired there for her son and learned that Johnny Sinclair was also missing. That was the first idea of Johnny's whereabouts which the Sinclairs had. Search parties were organized and the park secured.

Yesterday morning a young man went to the Sinclair home and told that he had seen the two boys and Shirley at the Union depot and that they were going to St. Joseph and H. L. Ashton, a friend of the Beels family, who is well acquainted with the mayor of that city, called him over long distance 'phone and had the town searched for the runaways. Then came a telegram that the three had been seen early Sunday in Leavenworth.

Meanwhile Mrs. Sinclair and Mrs. Beels were beside themselves with fear and anxiety for their children. They secured the promise of the park authorities to drag the lake in the park this morning, and the search for the missing increased in strength and vigilance each hour.

Shirley's family had been notified of the disappearance, and Charles J. Blevins, Shirley's brother-in-law, hastened to Leavenworth, hot on the trail. He returned empty-handed.

TELL OF JOLLY TIME.

About 11 o'clock last night the boys returned home, dusty, wet and tired. They had a wonderful story to tell of their trip and adventures. They had been through every park in the city, and seen the National cemetery and Soldiers' home at Leavenworth from a car and had a jolly time in general. Saturday night was spent in Kansas City, so Tommy Beels says, and the three went to a rooming house. He did not know the location. Late last night Shirley gave the two boys their carfare and put them on a Rockhill car at Eighth and Walnut streets and left them.

Shirley is said to have a habit of giving young boys a good time at his own expense. Two years ago, it is claimed, he took two boys to Leavenworth and stayed there for three days, after which the boys returned safe and sound.

Shirley works in the park and every Saturday he has been in the habit of spending his week's wages upon some boys whom he might meet. His brother-in-0law, Mr. Blevins, said that Shirley is nothing but a boy himself. When he was 4 years of age, according to relatives, Shirley fell upon his head, and he has remained stunted, mentally, ever since. Shirley longs for the companionship of children, and he is attractive to them since he plays with them and talks with them as though he were 9 rather than 29 years of age.

INTERVIEW CUT SHORT.

Johnny Sinclair, nervous, excited, scared and tired, last night told a clear and fairly consistent story of how Shirley and Tommy Beels and he passed the time between Saturday at 2 p. m. and 11 o'clock last night, when the boys returned home.

In the main details Johnny clung to his story. He fell asleep while being questioned by his father, and that ended the questioning. In substance, he says:

"Shirley invited Tommy and me to go to Swope park, while were were at Electric park, where he was working. We went to Swope park with him and in the evening we went down town and went to several nickel shows.

"Then we went out to Swope park again, but late that night. Shirley wanted to go down town to cash a check. When we got down town the saloons were all closed, and we finally went to bed at a place near Eighth and Main streets.

SAW LEAVENWORTH SIGHTS.

"The next morning we had a nice breakfast of beefsteak and potatoes and coffee, and then we went over to Kansas City, Kas., and there we took a car for Leavenworth. We saw the penitentiary and the Soldiers' Home from the car, and the National cemetery, but we didn't stop there.

We went to Leavenworth and spent the time just running around. That's all we did. I was never there before, and it was fun. We had a dinner of bologna sausage and cheese, and about 8 o'clock we started for home."

Besides the fright which was occasioned the two families of the boys no harm was done, except one of the boys was forced to take a hot bath and swallow a dose of quinine after he reached home. Johnny's original $1, which started the trouble, remains intact. Shirley stood the expense on his pay of $12, which he drew from the park on Saturday afternoon.

Shirley lives one block southeast of the park.

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July 19, 1909

WRESTLES WITH CROCODILE.

"Alligator Joe" Gives a Novel Act
at Electric Park.

An attractive programme of amusements is offered by Electric Park this week. Perhaps the most noteworthy is Gargiulo's Italian band which has been engaged to prolong its engagement until next Sunday. Of the new things, however, the one that will probably attract the most interest is the nightly wrestling match between "Alligator Joe," proprietor of the alligator farm and one of the largest crocodiles in his collection. Costumed in a bathing suit "Joe" plunges into a tank of water and mounting the crocodile's back fights with it until it is sufficiently subdued to be led from the pool.

There is a new vaudeville show in the German village. The bill contains a wide variety of entertainment. The programme includes Kelly and Lewis in a novelty balancing and juggling act, Ethel Hunter, a Kansas City violinist, who has made a pronounced hit with music lovers; Murill Window, a singing comedian; the Hamlins, who dance, sing and play a variety of instruments and the American Singing Four, a splendid male quartet.

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July 6, 1909

SERVED SANDWICHES AND TEA.

Street Car Men Were Too Busy to
Lay Off for Supper.

Twelve hundred ham sandwiches were distributed among the employes of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company at supper time last evening, and each man had copious draughts of iced tea to wash down the food.

The lunching places were Fairmount park, where 500 sandwiches were distributed; Electric park, where an additional 500 sandwiches were given the men, and Forest park, where 200 were eaten. The lunches were in lieu of supper.

The company found employment for all of their men yesterday, and as none were left for relief work, it was found necessary to furnish them with lunch. This was done through the office of General Manager W. W. Wheatley.

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July 5, 1909

ESCORTS RAN FROM
HOWARD'S REVOLVER.

BOTH LEFT THEIR COATS AT
THE AMBERSON HOME.

Alone, Clara Amberson and Her
Sister Fought a Losing Fight
With Murderer -- Girl Dies
After Four Hours.
Alfred Howard, Who Shot Miss Clara Amberson and Took His Own Life.
ALFRED HOWARD.

Miss Clara Amberson, who was shot in the right temple by Alfred Howard, a rejected suitor, in the dining room of her home, 735 Kensington avenue, just before midnight Saturday, died at 4:20 a. m. yesterday. She did not regain consciousness.

In an unlighted room, and deserted by the young men who escorted them home, and who fled when Howard appeared with his revolver, Miss Amberson, assisted by her sister, Mrs. Mamie Barringer, battled in vain with Howard for possession of the weapon. Finally throwing Miss Amberson to the floor, Howard jumped on her, and then, as Mrs. Barringer seized him about the neck, he pulled the trigger.

The bullet struck Miss Amberson just back of the right temple and she collapsed. Believing that he had killed her, Howard turned the weapon on himself and sent the second shot through his own brain, and fell lifeless beside her. Surrounded by her mother, sister and friends, sthe wounded girl passed away four hours later.

In the light of subsequent events, it is believed that Howard contemplated the murder and suicide Saturday afternoon. It is known that he saw the young women at Forest park in the evening in company with young men, when he had been denied the privilege of escorting them or even calling at their home, and it is believed that the sight of the girl who was all the world to him, encircled in the arms of another man on the dancing floor, maddened him.

Four years ago Alfred Howard, then 22 years old, came to Kansas City from Iola, Kas. He secured a position in a railroad freight office, and roomed and boarded with Mrs. Anna Amberson, mother of the girl he killed. Miss Amberson was then a child of 13.

WANTED TO MARRY HER.

They were together a great deal. Howard assisted her with her studies, and when she was graduated from high school last year he declared his love for her, and asked her to be his wife. This was objected to by her sister and her mother because of her youth.

Six months ago Howard left their house, and shortly afterward went to Hot Springs, Ark. In the meantime Miss Amberson entered a wholesale millinery establishment and was rapidly perfecting herself in that line when he returned three weeks ago.

Howard had been in poor health since his return, but this did not deter him from declaring his ardent love for the girl whom, he told his friends, no other could replace. Miss Amberson found many excuses for not making engagements. Thursday he called her on the telephone and to his several requests for an evening she replied that she had previous engagements.

Saturday evening he called at the Amberson home and asked Miss Amberson to accompany him to a park or that she spend the evening with him as she chose. Miss Amerson smilingly told him that she had an engagement for the evening and that she was sorry. During the conversation he showed the sisters the revolver which he later used. No thought of violence crossed the minds of either girl.

SHADOWED TO FOREST PARK.

Miss Amberson and Mrs. Barringer were unaccompanied when they walked to Forest park, a short distance from their home. There they met several friends, among them Orville Remmick of 5212 Independence avenue, and Ed Doerefull of 4621 East Seventh street.

It is believed that Howard shadowed the sisters to the park. H e arrived at the Ambrose home shortly before 10 o'clock in the evening. The noise he made when he withdrew a screen from a window in the kitchen of the Amberson home and clambered in was heard by Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wharton, roomers on the second floor, but they ascribed it to a parrot. For almost two hours Howard lay in wait. He chose as his hiding place the bedroom of the sisters, which opens from the dining room to the north.

On their way home, Deorfull, who escorted Miss Amberson, and Remmick, who escorted Mrs. Barringer, suggested that they eat some ice cream. They stopped at the Forest Park pharmacy and chatted for a few moments with O. Chaney, the druggist.

RAN FROM REVOLVER.

It was warm and the young men carried their coats over their arms. When they arrived at the Amberson home, they conversed for a few moments on the porch just outside the dining room, when the suggestion that they get a drink of water was made. the quartet entered the dining room. Miss Amberson and Doerfull going to one window seat while Mr. Remmick took a chair. Mrs. Barringer went into the kitchen for the water, when suddenly Howard sprang out of the bedroom.

Holding a revolver which he pointed at Miss Amberson, he cried:

"Throw up your hands and don't scream!"

"It's Alf! Help!" cried Miss Amberson.

Doerfull was first to see the revolver and the first to get out of the room. He was closely followed by Remmick. Both left their coats and hats. The cry for help brought Mrs. Barringer back to the room. By this time Miss Amberson had grappled with Howard and had clutched the revolver. Then began the battle for possession of the weapon and the shooting.

HAD PLANNED THE CRIME.

Screaming for help, Mrs. Barringer, after the shooting, fled to the sidewalk. Neighbors hastened to the scene. Doctors declared Miss Amberson fatally wounded, and said that Howard's self-inflicted wound had caused instant death.

The police who searched his clothing found the note which he had evidently written some time during the evening in which he declared that "Mamie" (Mrs. Barringer) was the cause of the anticipated double tragedy, and asked that Miss Clara and he be buried side by side.

ESCORTS DIDN'T WAIT.

Ed Doerfull, the escort of Miss Amberson, told a reporter for The Journal last evening that he had never been frightened as badly in his life as he was when he looked at that shiny steel barrel and heard the command to throw up his hands.

"I didn't wait to learn any more about who the fellow with the revolver was," said Mr. Doerfull. "Mr. Remmick and I had escorted the girls home and stepped inside the house to get a drink of water. I was close to the door and when I heard the command to throw up my hands and I saw that shiny steel barrel of the revolver, I concluded that I had better play checkers and move.

"I did not stop to grab my coat or hat, but ran. I don't know how I got home, for I was badly frightened. I lay awake all night and got up around 6 o'clock and went over to Remmick's house to see if he got home all right.

"I did not know until then that anyone had been shot, as I was too far away from the house when the shots were fired to hear the noise of the reports.

"I don't know why I ran away and did not notify the police about the man with the gun, but I guess most anybody would act the same as I did if they looked into the business end of a revolver and were ordered to throw up their hands.

GOT THEIR COATS SUNDAY.

"I got my coat and hat this morning at the same time Mr. Remmick got his. We saw Miss Amberson's body then and we will probably go to the funeral together.

"I did not know the young lady very well, having only met her a few times at the park. I did not go back to the house today, as I had an engagement to go to a picnic at Swope park, and it was too late when I got back this evening."

Orville Remmick, who was with Doerfull when Howard entered the room with the revolver in hand, told his parents that he was taken by surprise, and that when he heard the command to throw up his hands and he saw the revolver, his first thought was for his personal safety. He said that he ran for the door and ran home.

REMMICK HEARD REPORTS.

Half a block away he heard the muffled reports, and when he got home he telephoned to the Amberson home and learned of the double tragedy. He feared for a while, he said, that his companion, Doerfull, had been shot. Remmick left his coat and hat at the Amberson home and called for them yesterday morning. He spent yesterday afternoon at Forest park and yesterday evening at Electrick park.

Miss Amberson was 17 years old. She was the youngest of three children. Besides her sister, Mrs. Barringer, and her mother, she leaves a brother, Will, who is in the navy. An effort was being made yesterday to notify him by wire and hold the funeral until his arrival, if possible. The Ambersons came to Kansas City from Salida, Col., six years ago.

Howard had been rooming for the last two weeks at the home of Mrs. Ellen Harper, at No. 801 Cypress avenue, just a block from the Amberson home. That he planned the murder and suicide is believed by Mrs. Harper, as his trunk was locked and contained all of the small articles which he kept about his room.

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June 10, 1909

NEW BAND AT ELECTRIC.

Twelve Soloists and 43 Other Musi-
cians in Conway's Band.

Electric park is to have a brand new band next Sunday -- one that has never visited Kansas City before. It is the band of Patrick Conway, successor to the famous Gilmore. It comprises fifty-five pieces and will be accompanied by twelve soloists, one of whom is a vocalist. Conway is recognized as one of the most efficient of the American leaders.

Saturday night of this week a novel exhibition will take place in the Alligator village. It will consist in giving the alligators their first meal since they arrived in Kansas City. More than 500 pounds of raw beef has been ordered for the orgie. Alligators are fed only once in every several months and when the time comes around they are extremely voracious and show energy that is in direct contrast with their accustomed lethargy.

Only five more concerts will be played at the park by Ferullo's band. The farewell programmes are especially interesting.

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June 7, 1909

ITALIANS' FOURTH OF JULY.

"Festa Dello Statuto" Was Appropri-
ately Celebrated Yesterday.

Yesterday was the "Festa Dello Statuto," which to the Italians is as the Fourth of July is to Americans, and was appropriately celebrated. It is the anniversary of the granting of a constitution to the people by King Carlo Alberto in 1848.

Ferullo's band at Electric park, which is made up almost entirely of Italians, played the "Marcia Reale," the Italian national air, as a number of its programme. Pietro Isnardi, the Italian consul, held a reception yesterday afternoon and at night Ferullo's band went to his residence at 503 Cherry street and gave a concert for the Italian residents who were present en masse.

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May 23, 1909

ELECTRIC PARK OPENING.

South Side Amusement Resort Be-
gins Its Season Today.

Among the offerings for the first week is Ferullo's band, that splendid organization which has won enduring popularity in Kansas City, whose music is as distinctive as is the conducting of its gesticulating leader, Francesco Ferullo. And then there are the sea cows. Unless you have lived on the coast of Florida you have never seen one of these monsters, whose heads are like that of a gentle bovine and whose tails can kill a shark with one stroke. Alligator Joe is as proud of his sea cows as he is of his hoary alligators.

The tickler, the dip coaster and the scenic railway have been so extensively improved that each will provide even more sensations than formerly. A swim in filtered water can be enjoyed in the big tank at the north end of the park together with a sand bath in the recently built beach.

The German village and its vaudeville will be as interesting as ever. The bill for the first week includes: The Gafney troupe, singing and dancing; Anna L. Scannell, toe dancer; Dick and Barney Ferguson, comedy singing and dancing; Grace Passmore, the woman with the baritone voice; and the Iskawa troupe of Japanese acrobats.

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August 22, 1908

ELECTRIC HAS AN AIRSHIP.

Man Named Mars, but From Omaha,
Is Inventor and Navigator.

For the last three days patrons of Electric park wondered what was in a large tent that was pitched near the monkey cage. Even the park employes couldn't guess what was in it. Yesterday afternoon, without any announcement, Charles Baysdorfer and George E. Yager opened up the front of the tent and helpers carried out a lemon-shaped gas bag to which was hung a light frame, carrying a small gasoline engine.

Baysdorfer climbed on the frame, started the engine and sailed away.

Then M. G. Heim and his able corps of press agents heaved a sigh of relief. The thing really flew.

It gyrated around over the park, then started for nowhere in particular, landing at Thirty-seventh street and Brooklyn avenue when a battery went wrong. A new batter was procured and the airship sailed back to the park and to its tent. A flight lasting half an hour was staged yesterday evening. J. C. Mars -- fine name for an airshipper -- sailed the thing on this flight.

The airship is called the Baysdorfer-Yager "Comet." The men whose name it bears made it in Omaha, their home.

They will attempt to sail twice a day, but the park management promises nothing. Baysdorfer will attempt to come down town with the ship this noon.

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June 18, 1908

MAN FROM DEADWOOD
WAS AN EASY MARK.

Went for Ride With a Stranger, Who
Borrowed His Money and Also
His Purse to Hold It.

John Martin, a young farmer who arrived here yesterday from Deadwood, S. D., bound for Voland, Kas., is the easiest picking a confidence man ever had. He was not only "trimmed to a finish" by a "con" man yesterday, but was left at Thirty-fifth street and Troost avenue with a broken buggy belonging to E. Landis, 415 Wyandotte street. After "holding the bag" from 4 until 8 o'clock waiting for his new found friend to appear in another rig, John walked clear to police headquarters and led the horse.

Martin is 33 years old. When he arrived here he had $11.70 and a ticket to his Kansas home. While wandering about in the North End, he met a man who told him he was a horse trader, with a valuable string of ponies and he hired Martin to work for him. The man gave martin the lovable name of "Darling Smith," but said that he used the name of Milligan, after his stepfather.

After hiring Martin, "Darling's first move was to take his railroad ticket and leave it. John did not know where -- "but I was to get the money on it next week," he said. Just before noon Smith borrowed $5 of Martin's $11.70. After lunch they met by appointment and Smith had a rig in which he invited Martin for a ride, saying that it was "one of many." They drove to Electric park and on the way Smith informed Martin that he would have to use another $5 bill until tomorrow. That left Martin $1.70. In the park they took in all the concessions and John Martin was introduced to wonders he never believed existed -- the merry-go-round, shoot-the-chutes, the tickler, scenic railway and all.

Before they had proceeded far, in fact, just after they had had their pictures taken with "Darling Smith" on a burro and Martin by his side, Smith touched Martin for $1 more, leaving him with 70 cents.

"After he'd done that," said John Martin at police headquarters last night, "He borrowed my pocketbook with the 70 cents in it, saying he wanted to use it to carry his change. He was afraid he'd lose it, he said."

That last touch left John Martin of Deadwood, bound for Voland, completely strapped.

"And," Martin said, "I had a quart of good whisky, which I bought in Deadwood to take home to Pa -- paid $1.25 for it, too -- and when that feller Smith found I had it he said we'd better drink it. We did, or rather, he did, as he got the most of it."

On the way home from the park Smith was giving Martin an exhibition of fancy driving with one of his "trained" horses. He collided with a large wagon and smashed the right front wheel. Martin was left to watch the rig, while Smith returned to the city to get another vehicle. It was not until he had held the bag or rather the nag four hours that Martin began to wake up and take notice. He put the buggy by the roadside and started to town, asking all whom he met if they knew "Darling Smith."

The police have a good description of Mr. Smith and are looking for him. Mr. Landis, whose rig the "con" man had, took pity on Martin last night, and took him to his barn where he was given a bunk for the night. Landis said he might give Martin a job "until he gets on his feet and becomes a little wiser."

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May 6, 1908

FIRE DAMAGES
ELECTRIC PARK.

BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN IN-
CENDIARY -- LOSS $20,000.

MUSIC PAVILION IS BURNED.

OPENING OF PARK WILL
NOT BE DELAYED.

Indications Point to a Deliberate At-
tempt to Burn the Buildings.
Oil Used to Start
the Fire.


Fire, supposed to be of incendiary origin, completely destroyed the music pavilion, one side of the German village and part of the promenade at Electric park, Forty-sixth street and Tracy avenue, last night about 9:30 o'clock. The damage is estimated at $20,000.

Flames were first seen pouring out of the northwest corner of the music pavilion and it is believed the fire was started in that vicinity. Harry Alexander, who lives at Forty-sixth street and Virginia avenue, was one of the first to discover the fire and turned in an alarm. He stated that within twenty minutes after he first discovered the fire the music pavilion was a mass of flames, and in a few minutes more was burned to the ground. The roof fell within fifteen minutes after the fire was discovered.

As soon as the fire was discovered the Electric Park fire department, members of which live near the park, turned out and made an attempt to subdue the fire, but it was beyond their control. Jack Hutson, a watchman at the park and one of the firemen, was overcome by smoke and had to be carried to the office. He recovered in a short time.

OTHER BUILDINGS SAVED.

Firemen from No. 22 hose house were the first to arrive, and by fast work managed to get the flames under control before they spread to the other buildings. They were assisted by several other companies which arrived later The music pavilion was completely demolished. It is next to the German village, and the side wall connecting them was destroyed. Part of the promenade in front of the building was destroyed.

That the fire was of incendiary origin is the belief of the fire department, M. G. Heim, one of the owners of the park, who arrived soon after the fire started, and the watchmen. The park has a private electric plant, and all currents were turned off the buildings so that the fire could not have originated from that source. No workmen have been in the pavilion or adjoining buildings for weeks, and nothing was in the pavilion to have caused the fire.

George Barker, a laborer living at 4501 Tracy avenue, made a statement at the park that he saw two negroes running from the scene of the fire shortly after the flames were discovered, but later stated that two children claimed they saw the negroes. He did not know the children's names.

HEIM SAYS "INCENDIARY."

M. G. Heim stated that he believed the fire must have been of incendiary origin. "There was no current on the electric wires in the music pavilion and nothing that could have caused a fire there," said Mr. Heim. "The saloon is to be established in another building, not far from the music ha, and it may have been the intention to destroy that building, but the attempt was not a success. The damage is about $20,000."

A squad of police was sent to the park after the fire and ordered to watch the buildings until morning to see that no further attempts were made to burn the buildings.

A score of workmen will be put to work early this morning clearing away the debris and preparing the music hall for the opening which will take place May 17. Mr. Heim stated that the fire will not postpone the opening of the park. A temporary open air shell will be erected for the band and the wall on the side of the German village will be rebuilt.

SAYS OIL WAS USED.

Jacob Baas, night watchman for the south side of the park, is positive in his belief that the fire was not only incendiary, but that a good quantity of oil was used in starting it. At 8:45 o'clock he made his rounds with a lantern, and there was perfect stillness and darkness all over the grounds. Being chilly, Baas went into his shack on the south and to the rear of the "boat tours" concession. He barely had time to light a fire and remove his shoes when a sheet of flame across the grounds above the music pavilion caught his attention.

When he rushed out there was far more smoke than flame -- great clouds of blackness that seemed to suggest that much of the interior was burning before the flames showed on the outside. Baas's immediate decision then was that "a plenty of oil must have been used to get that kind of a quick start."

His belief is that the start was below the German village back of the band stand, though when he got close the fire was spread so generally that there was nothing about the fire itself to suggest where it started.

Manager Rohrer of the People's Amusement Company, who lives at 4507 Tracy avenue, came upon the grounds soon after this, and with Jack Hutson, head night watchman, whose station is in the office near the gate, did what could be done to manipulate the company's fireplugs and hose. Hutson was practically overcome by getting into the thick of the smoke.

H. Smith and B. C. Smith, brothers, who work at the park days and board at 4619 Tracy avenue, saw Edward Solberg, park electrician, shut off all electricity early in the evening as he was leaving the park, and there is no possibility that the fire could have started from the electric wiring.

CHILDREN IN PERIL.

Sam Benjamin, the park manager, who lives in the clubhouse on the grounds was with his wife at the Majestic theater when told of the fire. An old negro servant had been left alone with the two small children of the family. All were in bed and the woman being hard of hearing, it was some time before she and her charges were aroused. Early in the fire the roof of the clubhouse caught, but a sudden downpour of rain quenched the blaze before it had a good start. Had it been a dry evening the clubhouse, starting to burn at this time, would probably have been in ashes before the intervening structures, and have rendered the rescue of the nurse and children difficult.

THEY CLIMBED THE FENCE.

After midnight last night M. G. Heim and the park manager, Sam Benjamin, discovered what they believed to be proof that incendiaries caused the fire. Two men had climbed the eight-foot board fence in the rear of the pavilion, using a large overhanging elm tree to aid in scaling the wall. Barbed wires along the boards had been cut and the footprints of the two men were plain, leading from the foot of the tree to the northwest corner of the pavilion, where Baas, the watchman, thought the fire must have started. The footprints were measured and watchmen left to guard them until morning, when the police will have opportunity to make minute observations of the prints.

Electric park, at its present location, was opened only a year ago this month. It comprises twenty-eight and one-half acres in extent, and represents an investment, M. G. Heim said last night, of $500,000.

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April 25, 1908

THREE PARKS WANT LICENSES.

Electric, Fairmount and Forest Desire
to Sell Liquor.

Petitions for county licenses to sell ber in Electric, Fairmount and Forest parks were filed yesterday with the county court. It was the last day for filing petitions to be acted on during May, and no more parks are expected to ask for licenses. The court will take the petitions up for discussion on May 1, but may continue the final hearing until later in the month. The Electric park petition was filed by Gilbert E. Martin, Fairmount by W. F. Smith and Forest by J. T. Tippett.

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September 30, 1907

2 BALLOONS COLLIDE.

IMPACT COMES 500 FEET ABOVE
THE EARTH.

AERONAUTS' NARROW ESCAPE.


WIRES PREVENT POSSIBLE FA-
TAL FALL TO GROUND.

Exciting Terminus of a Race Through
the Air That Was Watched
by Hundreds of People
at Electric Park.

A collision of balloons 500 feet above solid ground was viewed by hundreds of people at Electric park last night, when the race between five balloons, which is the feature of the Corn Carnival, had only well begun. A stiff breeze was blowing out of the east, and the balloons were carried rapidly away from the park.

When the balloons reached a point nearly above Forty-third and Main streets, it was seen to be inevitable that two of them would collide. Fireworks were being set off in the air, and the people at the park could watch the course of the aeronauts clearly.

A scream of fear arose from the spectators when it was seen that a collision was almost inevitable. Just when it seemed the balloons would surely dash against one another, the two aeronauts cut their parachutes loose, and started to descend.

The parachute of Lee Planet, of one of the balloons, for some reason refused to work, and Planet fell rapidly. It seemed that he must be dashed to death, and the crowd of watchers turned away their eyes when he had disappeared from sight, believing him dead.

But luck was with Planet, and he lit upon a row of telephone wires, and from there dropped to the ground. His right hip was fractured, and he was rendered unconscious. Dr. Carl Bates, of No. 4 police station, treated him, and had him taken to his home. Planet is 24 years old, and is living at 1639 Broadway. Warren Redwine, the other aeronaut, escaped uninjured.

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June 30, 1907

FIRST OF SWING SUITS.

Boy Hurt at Electric Park is Asking
for $4,500.


Dana Sturtz, who was injured in the collapse of the circular swing at Electric Park on June 11, filed suit in the circuit court yesterday afternoon by Decatur C. Sturtz, his father, for $4,500 damages. He is 16 years old and lives with his parents at 227 North Seventeenth street, Kansas City, Kas. The suit is brought against the Electric Park Amusement Company, the People's Amusement Company and Frederick Ingersoll.

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June 22, 1907

ANSWER OF CITY OFFICIALS.

Contended That Music in a Park Bars
Sale of Liquor There.

D. V. Kent, city auditor, and A. E. Holmes, city treasurer, who were served with an alternative writ of mandamus from the circuit court to compel them to issue a dramshop license to J. J. Norton at the new Electric park, filed their answer yesterday. They contend that the board of police commissioners has authority to refuse to issue dramshop licenses and to decide whether the owner of a license may change the location of his drinking place. The point of the mandamas suit was that such power lay in the mayor and council.

The city offices also contend that a license cannot be legally issued to J. J. Norton because he is the agent of a brewery; because he plans to allow music within hearing distance of the drinking place, and because he does not define the portion of the park in which the intoxicating liquor is to be served.

They further claim that the board of police commissioners does right in refusing to issue dramshop permits for places in the residence section of the city.

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June 19, 1907

NEW STREET CARS ARE HERE.

"Blind" On One Side and Open on
the Other.

New style street cars are arriving for the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, the first six of a consignment of twenty-five arriving yesterday. The cars are coming without electrical equipment, to be used first as trailers. They will be lopsided in appearance and will seat sixty passengers. One side will look like the standard coach now running, with the exception that there will be no door at the vestibules. The other side will be open from one end to the other, with the old-style running footboard. The first of the cars will be tried out in the Electric park service. The side entrance is adopted to accelerate the loading and unloading of passengers, while the idea of the blind side is to prevent the impetuous from getting run over by cars running on the other tracks in opposite directions. The color of the new cars is the regulation green.

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April 29, 1907

FOR CHILDREN WHO DANCE.

Two Afternoons to Be Given Them at
Electric Park.

It has been decided to devote two afternoons of each week to children's parties to be given in the fine new ball room at Electric park. Miss Gertrude Wagner, a dancing teacher, has been engaged to oversee these parties, and there will be free dancing lessons for all children who come to them. Until school is out the childrens' parties will be given on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons, but when the school year is over the parties may be more frequent. The instruction in dancing is to be entirely free to juvenile pupils. After the little people get to dancing, there will be more childrens' cotillions, and masquerade parties. Miss Wagner, will, of course, be the superintendent of these parties though the children's parents may come as spectators.

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January 5, 1907

PROSPECT LINE TO 37TH ST.

Extension Will Not Take It to the
Swope Park Connection

With the announcement that in extending the Prospect avenue line this year the Metropolitan Street Railway Company will take it no further south than Thrity-seventh street, there will be disappointment along Troost avenue. The expectation that big crowds will go to Electric park every night, and many thousands on Sunday, most of them using the Troose avenue line, has distrubed Troost residents for a long time. In addition, the Troost avenue people realize that there will be thousands going over their line to Swope park. A negro park was started last summer just beyond the new Electric park and hundreds of negroes went nightly out on Troost aveune.

The negroes will still have to use the Troost avenue line to reach their new park. The Woodland avenue line is to be extended to Electric park, but will go no further south than Forty-fifth street. General Manager C. N. Black said yesterday that the Metropolitan would make ample arrangements for handling the crowds which will patronize Electric and Swope parks. "They will have," he said, "the Rockhill, the Troost, and the Woodland avenue lines. This will be good service. I do not think it will crowd the Troost avenue line."

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