Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

January 17, 1910

DABNEY WAITS TO GET EVEN.

Wouldn't Trust His Temper After
Christmas Treat from Bartender.

Dabney had not been seen around the saloon near Eighth street and Grand avenue since Christmas. His absence was noticed by his friends, who asked the reason. Squires, the big, genial bartender, only smiled when anyone asked. "What's become of Dabney? I haven't seen him lately."

A few nights ago Dabney dropped in. He looked at Squires, and it plainly was evident that Dabney had something serious on his mind.

"I'll get even with you," he said, between clenched teeth, "if it takes the rest of my natural life and part of the hereafter."

The the cat was let out of the bag. It appears that the evil day for Dabney was Christmas night. He stood about the saloon most of the evening suggesting, "Most saloonkeepers give patrons a present on Christmas."

The proprietor was away, and Squires spoke of him as being the one to make gifts. Dabney persisted, however. It so happened that while he was making one of his curt suggestions Squires spied an empty whisky bottle beneath the bar. It was a dark red bottle and still had the "bottled in bond" stamp partly intact. The big bartender quietly filled the bottle from the water faucet. He replaced the cork and the stamp without being detected.

"Here," he said, as he wrapped up the bottle of water. "I will break the rules of the house in your case. Here is a quart of as fine a whisky as you ever tasted. Compliments of the house."

Dabney was delighted, for he recognized the brand. The following day was Sunday, and, being so well supplied, he did not take home is customary "life saver."

"Come up, boys," he said, inviting the house to the bar. "I will treat back when I get a quart of good booze like that."

He not only treated once, but twice. Carefully stowing the bottle of water away in his overcoat pocket, he set out for home. He is a bachelor, and a friend who was invited the next morning "to have a nip at some of the best stuff you ever tasted" told the rest.

"Dabney loves his hot toddy," said the friend. "He especially likes it on Sunday, because everything is closed tightly. On this day he called me and two others into his quarters to 'have a toddy' out of his Christmas present from 'Tom.'

"With great care he got his hot water, sugar and lemon all ready. The proper amount was pured into each glass. While the water was steaming and the smell of lemon was perfuming the air Dabney, with a great show of pride in his gift, unwrapped his bottle of 'whisky.' When the cork came out with a 'thop' Dabney smiled and said: 'Get ready for the big treat, boys.'

"After all that preliminary, what was our surprise when the contents of the bottle proved to be plain, old Missouri river water. We had no toddy, as hot and cold water, lemon and sugar make a very insipid drink. Dabney frothed at the mouth, he was so mad. He swore vengeance, for he had to wait until midnight before he could get a real drink -- but he never went to call on Squires that night. He said he feared he might lose his temper and spill blood."

Dabney is patiently waiting on his opportunity to "play even" with Squires. He swears he will "make somebody feel as they made me feel -- Sunday, the day after Christmas, and not a drop to drink."

Labels: , , , , ,

January 16, 1910

KYLE RENTS HEADQUARTERS.

Candidate Will Erect Electric Sign
at Eighth and Walnut.

The Kyle canvass for mayor promises to take on a spectacular hue. The entire second floor of the Gumbel building, Eighth and Walnut streets, has been leased as campaign headquarters and they will be opened Wednesday night with music, song and oratory.

An immense electric sign of red, white and blue lights, having in the center a profile of Judge Kyle, is to be strung across Walnut street. Beneath the picture of the candidate will be the words, "The Man of the People -- Harry G. Kyle, Republican Candidate for Mayor."

Labels: , , ,

January 7, 1910

CURED OF ILLS
OVER THE PHONE?

ABSENT TREATMENT PUT MRS.
MOSTOW UNDER SPELL,
WITNESSES SAY.

Spiritualist Seeks to Prevent
Heirs From Depriving
Him of Bequests.

That by giving her absent treatment over the telephone for rheumatism and in other ways, John H. Lee, said to be a spiritualist, won the confidence of wealthy Mrs. Victoria Mostow, 71 years old, and thus influenced her to bequeath him property worth $35,000, was the substance of testimony given yesterday in Judge J. G. Park's division of the circuit court.

The occasion was the trial of a suit by which Lee seeks to have set aside deeds transferring to James P. Richardson, principal of the Prosso school, and nephew of Mrs. Mostow, the property left to Lee by will. The heirs have a suit pending to set aside the will.

The story told by witnesses in substance follows:

Mrs. Mostow was the wife of the late Randolph Mostow, and a sister of the late Dr. De Estaing Dickerson. From the latter she inherited a large amount of property. Mr. Mostow died in the summer of 1908. During his last illness, he summoned Lee and was given treatment. In this way Mrs. Mostow became acquainted with the spiritualist.

TREATED BY PHONE.

After her husband's death, Mrs. Mostow became a believer in spiritualism. Through the medium of spirits and mesmeric powers Lee claimed that he could cure every known ill. Mrs. Mostow put in a telephone at her home, at Thirty-fourth and Wyandotte streets, and when she became troubled with rheumatism, Lee would give her absent treatment over the phone. At this time he lived near 4800 East Eighth street, several miles across the city from his patient.

In January, 1908, Mrs. Mostow made deeds to property at 817 Main street, and her home on Wyandotte, to her only surviving heir in Kansas City, James P. Richardson, owner of the Prosso Preparatory school. This was done to escape the payment of the collateral inheritance tax, and to prevent the heirs in Chicago from securing any of her property. The deeds were not to be recorded until after her death.

LIVED WITH HER.

In the summer of 1908, it is charged, Lee secured so great an influence over Mrs. Mostow that he secured permission to move himself and family into her home. Here they have lived since. The taxes are said to have been paid by the Mostow estate, and during her lifetime all the household expenses were met by Mrs. Mostow.

After Lee had been living in the Mostow home a few months, it is charged, it was seen that he gained an influence over the aged woman, and she began deeding small pieces of property to him.

Mr. Richardson, seeing the trend of affairs and fearing that he might lose the property that was to be his at the death of his aunt, immediately recorded the two deeds. When Mrs. Mostow died, it was found that she had bequeathed the same two pieces of property to Lee.

Suit was brought in the circuit court by Lee to set aside the deeds, charging undue influence. A similar suit was also brought by Richardson and the Chicago heirs to set aside the will.

The evidence was all submitted yesterday in Judge Park's court. The final arguments will be heard some time next week.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

January 1, 1910

DREAMS OF HIS MISSING SON.

Stone Mason Believes This Story
Will Bring Back Show Boy.

After six years of fruitless effort on the part of Guss Solomon, a stone mason living at 805 East Eighth street, to find his son, who disappeared from their home in St. Louis during the world's fair, visions of the lost boy have appeared to him in dreams the last four nights, and it is his belief that the boy will be returned to him through this story:

"We were living in St. Louis during the fair," said Mr. Solomon, "and my boy, then 11 years old, was employed in the picture show in the entrance of the Broken Heart saloon on Broadway. Near the close of the fair he came to me one day and asked permission to leave the next day with a show which had been playing at the fair grounds. I told him that he better stay with his mother and me and took him up to town and bought him a new suit of clothes.

Around 8 o'clock that morning he went out to play with some of the boys in the neighborhood, and I never heard of him since. The show he desired to leave with went East that same night, but I was unable to trace it. I wrote to the chief of police in all the large Eastern cities, but they were unable to find any clew. The boy, if still alive, would be about 16 years old. He was rather tall and slim for his age was light complexioned.

Labels: , , , , ,

December 18, 1909

DIDN'T DANCE FAST ENOUGH.

So Man With Revolver Shot Robert
Kimme Through Ankle.

According to a statement made by Robert Kimme, of 912 Bellefontaine avenue, as he lay on the operating table of the emergency hospital last night with his right foot shattered from a revolver bullet, there is an armed maniac roaming the down town district of Kansas City.

Kimme was found lying in an alley near Eighth and McGee streets by Patrolman J. Keenan. He declared that he was taking a short cut downtown from his home when a man armed with a revolver walked up to him and commanded him to dance. Kimme attempted to do so, but his efforts failed to please his captor, who shot him through the right ankle.

After receiving emergency treatment Kimme was taken to the general hospital.

Labels: , , , , ,

December 14, 1909

JUDGE PORTERFIELD
RECOMMENDS COW-
HIDE FOR OBSTREP-
EROUS BOYS.

His Father Had Cowhide and
Was Not Afraid to Use It.
Juvenile Court Judge Edward Everett Porterfield
JUDGE PORTERFIELD OF THE JUVENILE COURT.

Judicial notice was taken yesterday for the first time of the cowhide, as an instrument of regeneration for obstreperous boys, when Judge E. E. Porterfiled of the juvenile court paid it the following tribute:

"If I ever amounted to anything, it's because my father kept a cowhide, and he was not afraid to use it."

This remark was occasioned by a mother's statement that she did not like to whip her children. John Morrisy of 815 East Eighth street, had been summoned into court on the complaint of the mother. She said that she could not control him.

"The only fault I have to find with him is that he does not get up in the morning," she said. "And when he drinks beer he swears at me and his grandmother so loud that he attracts the neighbors."

"Why don't you get the cowhide?" asked the judge.

"Oh, I never did believe in whipping my children."

"You make a mistake, madam. If there was ever a boy in this court who needed a cowhiding, it is your son. My suggestion to you is to get a long whip. If John doesn't get up in the morning, don't wait until he gets his clothes on. Pull him out of bed and thrash him on his bare skin. Like lots of other mothers, you have spoiled your boy by being too lenient."

John Morrisy was arrested the first time in December, 1908, and sentenced to the reform school. He was charged with cursing his mother. John agreed to sign the following pledge, on condition that the sentence would be suspended:

"I am going to get a job and I am going to keep it, give mother my money; am going to church, come in early at night; I am not going to drink whisky or beer; I will not swear any."

John broke that pledge last Thursday. He bought some beer in a livery barn. When he came home he abused his mother and cursed her. The boy was charged also with smoking cigarettes. This he admitted.

"Where did you get the papers?" asked the court.

"It's this way," explained the boy. "The merchants ain't allowed to sell or give them away. I went out to a drug store. I bought two packages of Dukes. When I told the man that the tobacco was no good without papers, he said it was against the law to give them to minors. Then he walked back of the prescription case.

"He looked at me, then at a box behind the counter, where he kept the papers. Of course, I got wise right away. I reached my hand in the box and got three packages."

"You won't smoke any more cigarettes," said Judge Porterfield, "if I don't send you to Booneville?"

"If I can't get the papers, I won't."

The question had to be repeated two or three times before the boy understood. He promised not to use tobacco in any form. If he does, Judge Porterfield ordered that he be taken immediately to reform school. John was taken to the boys' hotel. A job will be found for him, and if he lives up to his pledge, will not be ordered to the reform school.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

November 29, 1909

JAYHAWK YELL EFFECTIVE.

Early Morning Cheer of Visiting
Collegian Scares Thieves Away.

Stripped of his Kansas colors, his voice gone, money gone, Charles Stewart, a rooter for the Jayhawkers last Thursday afternoon, headed himself to his hotel at Eighth and Locust streets. It was 2:30 a. m. Friday, when he entered the lower hallway and he stopped to cogitate. He tried to talk the defeat over with himself and found his voice weak; he felt deep into his pockets and found no consolation.

Thinking it all over, Stewart said to himself, "Well I have just one more yell left in me for Kansas, poor old defeated Kansas, and now that I am safe in the hotel and not liable to be bombarded by the Missouri bunch, I am going to give it right here in the hallway."

Bracing himself against the wall he threw back his head and let go "Rock Chalk, Jay Hawk, K. U. ---Kansas!" Then he repeated it, al a head yeller style, real fast.

Being in an inclosed hallway he was surprised at the racket he made. He liked it for it made him believe he had located his lost voice. So he gave the yell again, louder than ever, and went on to his room and to bed.

"You have come here late many times," said the proprietress, the next morning, when Stewart appeared, "both late and early, and you have made divers and sundry noises on your way to your room, but this is the first time your noise has served a valuable purpose."

"What's the matter, cause some Missouri man to have a fit in his sleep?" asked Stewart.

"No," she replied, "better than that for the house. Mr. Blank and his wife room just off the hall near where you stood. Well, your yelling awoke them. Just as Mr. Blank raised up in bed to locate the noise he saw a man entering his bed room window from the porch. Rather the man was in the act of entering, but when you cut loose the second time he turned about and made frantic efforts to get out. He did get out and there was another burglar on the porch. Mr. Blank says he and his wife sleep soundly and certainly would have been robbed of all valuables in the room if it hadn't been for you waking them and scaring away the thieves.

"That's good," replied Stewart, "glad my voice was worth something. That's all I had left after the game and that was worth anything and I nearly lost that."

"But I think your noise did more," continued the woman. "For some time before you came I had been lying half asleep and imagined I could hear some one moving furniture. You know I have just finished furnishing some rooms in the new part back there. I went back to investigate and found a window out in the bathroom and all the new furniture piled near the door. It appeared to have been the intention to make a clean-up here, but your 'Rock Hawk, Jay Chalk," or whatever it is, came at a most opportune time."

Labels: , , , ,

October 31, 1909

SHIELDS AT 12th AND GRAND.

Well Known Photographer Has Dis-
play in New Studio.

C. Harrison Shields, who is well known as one of Kansas City's leading photographers, having conducted a studio at Eighth and Grand avenue for almost seven years, but now located in the Rookery building at Twelfth and Grand avenue, is displaying a collection of water colors, Vandykes, and sepia portraits. Part of this collection is his own production and some of the work of contemporary artists, friends of Mr. Shields. The occasion of the display is the recent opening of the new Shields studio.

Prior to his residence in Kansas City the name of Shields was associated with high class photography in St. Louis, where Mr. Shields engaged in the business for fourteen years.

Labels: , , , ,

September 23, 1909

SET THE HOUSE ON FIRE.

Two Small Children Then Forget to
Tell Their Mother.

Ernest Smith, 4 years old, and Lucille Smith, 2 years old, set fire to the attic of their home, 3027 East Eighth street, yesterday morning. Closing the door, the children laughed and romped downstairs to where their mother was working at her household tasks two stories below.

The children played for a few minutes on the floor of the room in which their mother was working. Neither said anything to their mother about the blazing attic they had left behind. Mrs. Smith worked for ten minutes after the children came downstairs before she noticed the smell of smoke.

Suddenly the little girl said:

"Mamma, Earnest lighted a piece of paper and couldn't blow out the fire."

Neighbors noticed the smoke and flame coming from the roof of the house as Mrs. Smith began to investigate. By the time the fire engines arrived, a great deal of the furniture on the ground floor and the rug had been removed from the living room.

Dr. Charles W. Burrill, 3124 East Ninth street, ran upstairs to locate the fire. When he threw open the door to the attic room the flame flashed out on him. His face was blistered and his hair singed by the fire. His injuries are not serious.

B. G. Smith, the father of the children, is employed in the laboratory of the Snodgrass Drug Company. His loss is about $250. The damage to the house is small.

Labels: , , , ,

September 22, 1909

LIGHTNING HITS STREET CAR.

Blows Out Controller and Gives Pas-
sengers a Scare.

A storm that broke over Kansas City shortly after 11 o'clock last night was accompanied by heavy rolling thunder and vivid lightning flashes that made timid citizens seek the center of feather beds for safety. One misdirected bolt fell into a street car at Eighth street and Woodland avenue, to the consternation of several passengers. Besides burning out the controller and extracting a series of warwhoops from a portly individual in a smoker's seat no damage was done.

Labels: , , ,

September 3, 1909

UP FIRE ESCAPE SIX STORIES.

Patrolman, Weighing 275, Rescues
Girl Locked in Factory.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, who weighs 275 pounds, climbed the fire escape of the Cluett-Peabody Shirt Company at Eighth street and Broadway and rescued Lucy Henkensmeier, 15 years old, from the sixth floor where she had accidentally been locked in at closing time.

Lucy called up police headquarters over the telephone and between sobs said taht it looked like she would have to stay there all night unless help was sent at once. She had been in and adjoining room, she said, and the floor manager concluded that all had left when he locked the door. Ivan Knuedsen, a patrolman, accompanied Hartman to the scene.

In hopes of picking the lock of the building, Hartman was equipped with burglar outfits found in the station. A "jimmy" was of no avail, he found, and no skeleton kep would work. A charge of nitroglycerine was the only alternative, the two "cops" concluded. Just then a girl's sob drifted down from an open window.

"I can't stand that," said Hartman. "I'm going in the building."

Five feet above was the fire escape, just high enough to be hard to ascend from the ground. With a cat-like spring and a twist of the body, the fat policeman managed to get on the first rung and then the ascent was easy. He soon disappeared in the building and reappeared a moment later. He helped the girl down the ladder and she jumped in safety to Knuedsen's arms at the bottom.

Hartman perspired freely when he reached the ground.

"I guess that will take the fat off me about as good as drilling in Convention hall," he said.

The girl, who lives at 1811 Charlotte street, was hardly able to talk when she reached the ground.

"I was afraid to try the fire escape," she said.

Labels: , , , , ,

August 23, 1909

TWO MORE TYPHOID VICTIMS.

Father and Son Succumb to Fever in
Stricken Neighborhood.

Two more victims of typhoid fever have been reported from the neighborhood of Eighth street and Brighton avenue, where there has been a small epidemic of that disease for the past two weeks, the last two cases being father and son, John Sheffner, 5016 East Eighth street, a carpenter 64 years old, died yesterday morning. His son, G. Blaine Sheffner, died last Thursday.

Funeral services will be in the Armour memorial chapel and burial will be in Elmwood cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , ,

August 15, 1909

ESTATE VALUED AT $250,000.

All of the Property of the Late P.
D. Ridenour Goes to Family.

By the will of the late P. D. Ridenour, pioneer merchant, the entire estate of $250,000 is left to his family. The will was filed yesterday for probate.

To Mrs. Sarah L. Ridenour, the widow, who is named as executrix, is given the home at Eighth street and the Paseo, all of the personal property and one-third of the realty. The remainder of the estate is to be divided equally between the children, who are as follows: Mrs. Kate R. Lester, Edward M. Ridenour, Mrs. Alice R. Raymond and Ethel B. Ridenour. Mr. Ridenour was president of the wholesale grocery firm bearing his name.

Labels: , , ,

August 7, 1909

HE LONGED TO BE A LOBSTER.

But When Suit Case Was Stolen, C.
W. Hawkins Changed Mind.

He longed to be a lobster and even went so far as to carry that longing in print within his suitcase, did C. W. Hawkins from Kansas, and last night his longing came to an end. Mr. Hawkins, or Squire Hawkins, struck town at supper time, carrying with him a suit case containing clothes and other things, among which was the printed legend: "I'd rather be a lobster than a wise guy."

Walking on Main street just south of Eighth street Mr. Hawkins from Kansas spied a restaurant. He entered, placed his suit case near the door and thereby had his longings gratified for within ten minutes the suit case was gone. Mr. Hawkins, greatly perturbed, reported his loss to the police last night.

Labels: , , ,

July 31, 1909

DEATH CAME SUDDENLY
TO P. D. RIDENOUR.

HEART DISEASE CLAIMED PIO-
NEER WHOLESALE GROCER.

Had Been Ill at Home About Ten
Days, but Fatal Termination
Was Not Expected by
Physicians.
P. D. Ridenour, Pioneer Kansas City Grocer.
THE LATE PETER D. RIDENOUR.

Peter D. Ridenour, pioneer wholesale grocer of Kansas City, died suddenly of heart disease at 11:00 last night at his home, 1416 East Eighth street. He was 78 years old, and as the result of complications due to old age has been kept home from the store at 933 Mulberry street, in the West Bottoms, for over a week. His fatal illness is believed to have begun ten days ago when he first complained of shooting pains in the vicinity of his heart.

At his bedside when he died were his wife, Mrs. Sarah L. Ridenour and his son, Edward M. Ridenour. The family physician, Dr. Lester Hall, and Dr. R. T. Sloane, who had been called in, were in attendance, but neither believed death would result from the indisposition.

BORN ON OHIO FARM.

Besides the widow and the son, Mr. Ridenour is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Catherine Lester, Mrs. Alice Raymond and Miss Ethel Ridenour, all of this city, the last named living at home. Four brothers are living, T. M. Ridenour in Colorado, Irving W. in Richmond, Ind.; Elisha at Liberal, Mo., and Samuel Ridenour, who through the death of his brother will become president of the Ridenour Baker Grocery Company, lives at the Washington hotel.

Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Peter D. Ridenour was born May 5, 1831, on a farm of one half mile south of the village of College Corner, O. His parents were of Dutch extraction and pioneers of the state. The town received its name form its location in the northwest corner of the land donated to the Miami university. In 1837 his father bought a store in the town and in it for the next seven or eight years young Ridenour gleaned the knowledge of the grocery business so useful to him in after years.

At the age of 26, Mr. Ridenour married Miss Sarah Louise Beatty at Xenia, O., and moved to Lawrence, Kas. Part of the trip was made in boats because there was no railroad leading into Kansas City or in fact any other town in the vicinity of the Sunflower state.

BEGAN BUSINESS IN LAWRENCE.

With his brother, Samuel, who also had left the old home in Ohio to come West, Mr. Ridenour started a small grocery store at Lawrence taking as partners in the business Harlow W. Baker of that city and later his three brothers. This was in 1858.

By the death of Mr. Ridenour last night Samuel Ridenour became the sole survivor of the original Ridenour Baker Grocer Company. This firm was incorporated thirty-one years ago when having grown to dignified proportions it was moved from Lawrence to its present ho me on Mulberry street. Such has been its progress in Kansas City that it has been able to establish branch stores at several points. Both Peter and Samuel Ridenour grew wealthy. P. D. Ridenour's estate probably amounts to about $300,000.

Mr. Ridenour was known as a public spirited citizen. Three years ago he was vice president of the Commercial Club and was offered the presidency but he refused because of his advanced age. He maintained a large farm near Dallas, twelve miles from Kansas City, where he had intended to spend the remainder of his life.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

July 30, 1909

PIONEER BLACKSMITH DIES
LEAVING $150,000 ESTATE.

Henry Nevins Came to Kansas City
in 1869, and Opened Shop
on Third Street.

Henry Nevins, pioneer horseshoer of Kansas City and in the early days a fair prototype of Longfellow's "Village Blacksmith," died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 1032 Olive street. He was 70 years old.

He was born in Tipperary county, Ireland, and came to this country when a young man, spending some years in Canada, where he learned the blacksmith trade and where he married. Later he crossed the line into the United States, settling first in Burlington, Ia., and from there removing to Kansas City in 1869.

He first opened a shop at Third street and Grand avenue and for twenty years Nevins's blacksmith shop was a landmark.

In those early days when railroads were in their infancy and mules and horses were yet the main standby for transportation, the blacksmith was a most important person.

Nevins met the situation with an energy that never seemed to tire, and it is on record that during rush seasons he has been known to stand in the smith forty-eight hours at a stretch, without sleep, eating in the shop meals brought to him by his wife.

Early in his career in Kansas City Mr. Nevins began to put his savings into real estate, and this policy he continued throughout his career. But once in his life did he part with real estate he had purchased, and that was about eight years ago, when he sold to the Armour Packing Company the property at 306 West Eighth street for $10,000, and for which he had paid $900 in early days. For an other property next to the Gillis opera house, which cost him $800 he recently refused an offer of $800 a foot.

Practically all his wealth is in inside Kansas City real estate and a conservative estimate of his estate places the figure at $150,000.

Later he moved his blacksmith shop to 512 Walnut street, and when that property became too valuable for a blacksmith shop he moved once more to 512 Grand avenue, where he continued in business until five years ago, when he retired, owing to advancing age and continued ill health.

He leaves a wife and six children, three sons and three daughters. The children are: John M., James H., William J., Elinore, Catherine Marie and Rose.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Aloysius's church, and burial will be at St. Mary's cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

July 24, 1909

STRUCK BY OUTLAW HORSE.

Former Cowboy Is Injured in
Attempting to Quiet Animal.

George Peterson, 435 Hardesty avenue, attempted to quiet an outlaw horse whch had gotten beyond control of his driver at the corner of Eighth street and Grand avenue yesterday afternoon and received a kick on the upper lip. The wound is not serious.

The horse, with its mate, was hitched to a delivery wagon when it became fractious and tangled the harness. The driver was compelled to loosen it from the wagon and then it furnished amusement for several hundred people. Peterson, who has had considerable experience with outlaw horses, grabbed the reins, but the animal reared and struck him on the face.

Labels: , , ,

July 20, 1909

BABY BITTEN BY A RAT.

Infant, 3 Weeks Old, Attacked by
Animal in Cradle.

A 3-week-old baby, whose ear and hand had been torn by a rat, was taken to the emergency hospital yesterday by the child's mother, Mrs. Anna Holland, who has rooms at 914 East Eighth street. While Mrs. Holland was busy about the place yesterday she heard the infant crying and on going to the cradle saw a big rat jump out. The baby was covered with blood and its wounds are considered very serious. Mrs. Holland came to Kansas City two or three weeks ago from Wichita, Kas., and has been looking for employment. She has two other children.

Labels: , , , , ,

July 14, 1909

PICKPOCKET ON
STREET CAR.

Takes Wallet Containing $150 Cash
From A. M. Moore.

In a jostle in the rear vestibule of a street car at Eighth street and Forest avenue, at midnight last night, A. M. Moore of 701 West Sixteenth street was relieved of a wallet containing $150 in cash and a promissory note for $140.

He was returning to his home from Forest park. Mr. Moore believed the man who robbed him was tall and slim, with a light mustache.

Labels: , , , , ,

July 13, 1909

THINKS RIVERS ARE
AT HIGHEST STAGE.

FORECASTER CONNOR NOW
LOOKS FOR FALL.

At Topeka There Was Fall of 0.7
of Foot and at St. Joseph the
Missouri Is Stationary.
Streets Flooded.
Junction of the Kaw and the Missouri Rivers, Looking Toward Kansas City, Missouri
SKETCH OF THE JUNCTION OF THE KAW AND MISSOURI RIVERS, LOOKING TOWARD KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI.

With a rise of over half a foot in the Missouri river yesterday, Forecaster Connor of the local weather bureau predicted a maximum stage of about 27.2 for this morning, which he believes from the information to hand will be the crest. Mr. Connor bases this prediction o n the assumption that there will be no more rains in the Kaw and Missouri river valleys.

The rise in the Missouri yesterday was rapid until 3 p. m. Since that hour it has remained stationary. This was taken by the observer to indicate that the mass of water due to recent rains had crested, and that now only the rise of the day before at Topeka and St. Joseph is to be felt here. At Topeka there was a fall of .7 of a foot during the day, while at St. Joseph the river was stationary.

The heavy rains at St. Joseph yesterday held the river up at that point, but the forecaster does not think they will influence the river there to any appreciable extent, and that by the evening it will show a good fall. The volume of water in the Missouri and Kaw rivers which must pass Kansas City, he asserts, will keep the river at a high stage for several days at least, although there is a possibility of a fall by this evening.

The West Bottoms are beginning to feel the flood now in earnest. The seepwater and sewage, together with the storm waters yesterday morning gave several sections of that district the appearance for awhile, at least, of being flooded by the river. In the "wettest block" several of the floors were under water for a couple of hours and many o f the business men and merchants in that neighborhood are ready to move if the water should go much higher.

Back water from the sewers yesterday covered sections of Mulberry, Hickory and Santa Fe street between Eighth and Ninth streets. Cellars in this district were all flooded.

The Cypress yards in the packing house district is a big lake. There are from two inches to several feet of water all over the railroad yards. Yesterday the Missouri Pacific had to run through eight inches of water at one place to get trains out from the Morris Packing Company plant. The railroad men say that they will run their trains until the water rises to such a height that the fires in the locomotives will be extinguished.

At the Exchange building at the stock yards several pumps were used to keep the basement free from water which started to come in Sunday night. Several of the cattle pens are flooded so they cannot be used and the Morris plant is almost surrounded by water. It is believed that at the present rate the water will be up to the sidewalks at the Morris plant this morning. It would take six feet more, however, to stop operations at this plant.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

July 6, 1909

CHILD HURT TRYING
TO SAVE HER SISTER

ETHEL AND NORINE AINS-
WORTH INJURED BY CAR.

When 6-Year-Old Girl Was Caught
by Fender, Sister, 9 Years Old,
Grabbed Her -- Both
Will Recover.

ETHEL AND NORINE AINSWORTH.

In an effort to save her sister, Norine, 6 years old, from impending death beneath the wheels of a street car at Eighth street and Tracy avenue, yesterday afternoon, Ethel Ainsworth, 9 years old, was struck by the fender and knocked several yards away on the asphalt pavement. The younger girl was rolled beneath the car, and when it was stopped was found wedged under the motor casing of the forward truck. The child was taken from beneath the car after about five minutes' hard work, during which operations were directed by T. P. Wood, a passenger.

Norine's injuries are serious. The child's head was cut, her right arm dislocated, her abdomen injured and the skin torn from her limbs. Ethel's injuries were not so serious. She suffered a slight concussion of the brain, a scalp wound and injuries to her side, arms and limbs.

TRIED TO SAVE SISTER.

Norine and Ethel are the children of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ainsworth of 1312 East Ninth street. About 5:30 o'clock they left a store at Eighth street and Tracy avenue. Ethel carried the bundles and Norine led the way.

In crossing the street they avoided a westbound street car, but Norine failed to see eastbound car No. 142 on the Independence avenue line, manned by Motorman L. A. Towhouser and Conductor W. H. Donahue. Norine did not hear the warning cry of the motorman, but her sister Ethel did. Norine was struck by the fender and felled. The fender was forced up and the child rolled beneath it. Dropping her parcels, Ethel grabbed for her sister. Just then the front end of the car struck the elder girl, hurling her unconscious into the street.

Motorman Towhouser applied the air and reversed the power, coming to a quick stop. Women in the car fainted when they heard the child's cry.

Volunteers were many in the effort to rescue the imprisoned child. She lay in one of the sunken spots in the paving and it is believed this had much to do with preventing her hips being crushed. She did not lose consciousness, and did much to assist her rescuers in extricating her. The child was seized by the frantic father and carried to her home a block away, where doctors attended her injuries.

DAZED CHILD FORGOTTEN.

Half an hour later neighbors took Ethel home. She was dazed from the shock, but the first question she asked was as to the condition of her baby sister. When told that she would recover, she smiled her satisfaction. The girl had been lost sight of in the excitement which followed the accident, and it was not until neighbors found her wandering about in a dazed condition that it became generally known she had been injured.

"I did not see the car until it was right on us," said Ethel last evening. "Sister was in front of the car, and I knew the motorman could not stop it. I tried to grab her, and then felt something strike me. I do not remember how I got home."

Motorman Towhouser declared that the accident was unavoidable. He said that if his car had not been running slowly the child probably would have been killed.

"I managed to stop the car within ten feet, and this I think saved the child's life," he said.

Labels: , , , , ,

June 20, 1909

PICKPOCKETS WERE BUSY.

List of Friday Night's Victims Re-
ported to Police.

Petty thieves and pickpockets were unusually busy Friday night and many robberies were reported to the police. In most cases, cash was taken. This list follows:

E. M. Dallas, 1026 Union avenue, lost diamond stud valued at $100 on Minnesota avenue car.

R. J. Nye's saloon, 1934 Grand avenue, cash register opened and $50 taken.

Miss Olive McCoy, 1035 Penn street, had pocketbook containing $30 stolen from her desk in the Great Western Life Insurance office.

Paul Witworth, 1111 East Eighth street, $40 taken from dresser drawer.

Samuel Levin, 1008 East Thirty-first street; dye works entered and $200 worth of clothes taken.

George Hayes, 1818 Oak street reported that he was slugged and robbed of $21 at Eighteenth and mcGee streets.

Floyd Swenson, 1810 Benton boulevard, reported that his residence was entered and money and jewelry aggregating $150 was taken.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

June 2, 1909

ELECTRICAL STORM
A VIVID SPECTACLE.

LIGHTNING STRIKES HOUSES
AND DISABLES STREET CARS.

Hundreds Drenched Before They Can
Reach Shelter -- Freak Bolt Turns
Dresser Completely Around.
Severe Shock for Woman.

Kansas City was visited by an electrical storm shortly after 8 o'clock last night which for vividness and intensity while it lasted eclipsed anything seen here in years. For three quarters of an hour almost constant lightning flashes, followed immediately by claps of thunder like a volley of rifles close at hand, made a terrifying spectacle. many houses were struck, chimneys dismantled and street cars disabled. No serious accidents were reported.

Beginning about 2 p. m. heavy showers followed one another at intervals until about 5:30 o'clock. Then the sun came out and all looked well, but both barometer and thermometer indicated there was trouble in the air, and it burst in all its fury two and one-half hours later.

When the storm arrived it came so suddenly that hundreds who had been deceived by the evening sunshine and left their umbrellas at home were drenched before they could reach shelter. Even those in street cars, where the windows were down, got their share of the rain which had no direct course, seeming to come from all directions at once.

STREET CARS SUFFER.

The street car system suffered for a time, many of the cars being put out of commission by lightning, and wires were down in several places. At Eighth street and Troost avenue cars were burned out by an electrical shock.

A Westport and a Prospect avenue car suffered similarly while in the vicinity of Fifth street and Grand avenue, an Indiana avenue car was put out of commission at Eighteenth street and Walrond avenue, and a Minnesota avenue car was treated in the same manner at Nineteenth and Walnut streets. The smoke from the burning controllers caused some excitement among the passengers.

The lightning cut some peculiar pranks, possibly the oddest being at the home of George Miller, 4100 Belleview avenue. Here a stone chimney which his built on the outside of the house was struck. Holes were torn in the chimney near the top, and the bolt passed into an upper room and had an engagement with a big dresser which had been standing with its back toward the wall.

DRESSER IS TURNED AROUND.

When the lightning left the room, breaking out a window across from where it entered, the dresser had been turned completely around and faced the wall. The mirror was shattered and scattered all over the room. The family was below when the shock came and no one was injured.

At the home of W. R. Hall, 628 Freemont avenue, Sheffield, the lightning completely dismantled a brick chimney and passed into the house. Mrs. Hall, who was standing in the room, was thrown down and severely shocked.

While the council was in session at the city hall lightning came in contact with an electric light wire supplying the upper house chamber and burned out a fuse, putting all of the wall lights out of commission. One circuit only was involved.

Labels: , , , , ,

May 23, 1909

"OLD MEN'S QUARTETTE"
BROKEN AFTER 40 YEARS.

Death of F. M. Furgason Changes
Probably Oldest Musical Organ-
ization in the City.

A new "Old Men's Quartette" will have to be organized after nearly forty years' association. When the body of the late F. M. Furgason was buried last Thursday the quartette became a trio. The G. A. R. quartette, over thirty years in commission, has just taken in a new member. The double bass singer, C. W. Whitehead, died within the year, and the famous old organization recruited Comrade Edwin Walters.

It is not often that one city can boast two quartettes, in which all the members have pulled together so long. The old soldiers were young soldiers when C. W. Whitehead, W. F. Henry, E. J. McWain and O. H. Guffin organized to sing "Tenting the Old Camp Ground," and the other army songs, and this was not much of a burg when Professor F. M. Furgason of the Franklin school, E. R. Weeks, one of his pupils, A. Holland, the shoe man, and H. J. Boyce, with C. W. Whitehead as a substitute, organized a quartette of their own. For thirty years the Whitehead-Henry-McWain-Guffin party sang at the grand army celebrations, and it looks like quartette singing was good health exercise, for Mr. Whitehead lived all these years, and his three companions are all hale and hearty, and actively in business. In the civilian quarters, Mr. Weeks, Mr. Holland and all but Mr. Furgason, who died this week, are all well.

"It seems strange that there should be any of us turn up missing," said Mr. Weeks yesterday. "We have been singing together such a long time that it does not seem natural that one of us would not be on hand for another 'sing' as we call it.

"I was only a boy, about 15, when Professor Furgason met me one day nearly forty years ago and told me he was getting up a quartette. We organized about 1870, and have pulled together ever since.

"Professor Furgason is the first to go of the regular quartette. He used to be our chorister at the Baptist church, Eighth and May, and a very good one. That was where we first started singing. We knew the G. A. R. quartette very well, for one of its members, Mr. Whitehead, used to fill out for us occasionally."

Ben Warner of the local grand army, had to think a long time before he could remember when the veterans started their quartette going.

"It has gone so long that I could not think of the posts without thinking of Charlie Whitehead and the other boys," he said. "Walters has taken Whitehead's place, so we are getting along, but it seems strange. Forty years rather makes a man accustomed to seeing a fellow, you know, and we never meet without we having our quartette along to furnish the singing."

Labels: , , , , , ,

April 30, 1909

NO. 2 STATION MOVES.

West Bottoms Police Now Located
at 1301 West Eighth Street.

The old St. Louis avenue police station, as it was generally known, exists no longer. Yesterday the members of the force in No. 2 district moved out of the old station on St. Louis avenue into the new station house at 1301 West Eighth street.

Labels: , ,

April 15, 1909

POLICEMEN MUST NOT CURSE.

Officer Cox Suspended Because He
Used Profane Language.

The fact that the complainant, J. E. Worley, 1500 St. Louis avenue, went before the police board yesterday and asked that it be lenient with Patrolman William Cox, who, on the morning of April 3, swore at him at Eighth street and Woodland avenue while learning why he was out so late, saved the officer.

Cox made a clean breast of the affair, but Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was not willing to let him off simply with a reprimand.

"There has been too much of this cursing of men under arrest by officers," he said. "It is absolutely unnecessary and must be stopped. I think the officer should be suspended for five days and that the word should go out to the rest of the force that hereafter the punishment will be more severe in cases where arresting officers use profane and obscene language."

Cox was ordered suspended for five days.

Labels: , , , , ,

April 5, 1909

CRAPS GAME IN CHURCHYARD.

Boys Who Gambled There Over
Priest's Protest Caught by Police.

Disregarding the admonitions of a priest, a crowd of boys between the ages of 12 and 18 years are congregating in the yard of St. Patrick's Catholic church, Eighth and Cherry streets, Sunday afternoons and shooting craps. Neighbors are disturbed by the riotous boys' loud talking to the dice.

While fourteen were indulging in a big game yesterday afternoon four policemen scaled the fence and suddenly dropped into the midst of the "gang." A wild scramble to escape followed by the "bluecoats" corralled all of them and the boys enjoyed a free ride to the police station where they were charged with gambling.

Parents of the youngsters began arriving a few minutes after the culprits had landed behind the bars. Each parent insisted that his boys were not "shooting craps" but the police demanded the $5 appearance bond nevertheless.

Labels: , , , ,

April 3, 1909

WOMEN FIGHT TO SEE
BOY CRUSHED BY CAR.

HYSTERICAL MOTHERS THINK
INJURED CHILD THEIR OWN.

Strong Men Weep as Jimmie
Palermo, Whose Father Saw
Him Hurt, Is Taken From
Under the Wheels.

While running across the street car tracks on Eighth street near Forest avenue about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, "Jimmie" Palermo, 5 years old, was run down by Independence avenue car 247, westbound, and injured to such an extent that both of his legs had to be amputated above the knee. The operation was performed at the general hospital immediately after the accident. Dr. J. Park Neal, who amputated the boy's legs, reported last night that he had survived the operation in a marvelous manner for one so young, and that he had a fighting chance for his life.

The boy is a son of Salvatore Palermo, an Italian grocer and butcher at 1103 East Eighth street, who lives on the second floor of 1103. The father, with Mack Carter, his butcher, saw the accident. The father ran to the scene, but became frantic when he saw his child pinned down by the front trucks of the car, and had to be taken away.

CROWD WEEPS AT SIGHT.

Two mothers, who thought that the child might be theirs, fought with tiger like ferocity with the crowd until they got to where they could get a look at the pale face of the little fellow.

The boy lay in such a position that he could not be moved until the car was "jacked up." The wrecking crew arrived in a few minutes, and with the aid of volunteers, the car tracks were elevated sufficiently. The boy's arm slipped to his side, and three marbles fell from his nerveless grasp.

"Take hold gently, men, and lift the boy out," said the foreman of the wrecking crew as the ambulance stretcher arrived.

"I just can't do it. I have seen enough to break my heart," said a big workman with sleeves rolled to the elbows, exposing a pair of muscular brown arms. He leaned against a trolley pole and wept bitterly.

As the ambulance was leaving another mother of the neighborhood arrived and battled with the dense crowd to get a look at the injured boy. Every woman in the crowd was crying, as were some of the men, and little brothers and sisters and playmates of the boy screamed with fright and grief.

FATHER SAW THE ACCIDENT.

"Mr. Palermo and I were standing in the door of his store when the accident happened," said Mack Carter, the butcher at the store. "We saw little Jimmie as he started to cross the street from the north to the south side about half way between the alley and Forest avenue. When he saw the car he made a motion as if to turn back. The motorman had slowed down at first, but put on speed again. It looked as if he calculated for the boy to cross the tracks before the car reached him, but Jimmie became confused and was struck by the fender and knocked across the track. It looked like an accident to me."

The grief in the Palermo home was tragic. Between sobs, prayers were said in Italian, and supplication made to Heaven to preserve the boy's life.

SNITCH LATE, BUT THERE.

While the family was in the midst of its grief a stranger appeared. Taking a card from his pocket he said, giving his name:

"Here is my card. I am a lawyer, but I got here a too late to see the accident. Send someone out into the street and get the boy's cap and those marbles. They are excellent evidence before a jury. Get the exact time of the accident , the number of the car and all the witnesses you can. I would like to handle this case for you."

Later in the evening Patrolmen William L. Cox and W. H. Schickhardt boarded car 247 and after riding to the end of the line arrested the conductor, H. E. Stoutz, 4100 East Ninth street, and the motorman, J. E. Warnike, 4600 Independence avenue. At police headquarters they made no statement and were ordered held for investigation, without bond, by Captain Walter Whitsett.

Representatives of the street car company insisted that a charge be placed against their men. Later in the evening an information was secured charging them with manslaughter in the fourth degree, a rather unusual charge while the boy was still living. They were taken to the home of Justice James H. Richardson, 2117 Prospect avenue, and arraigned on that charge. The men were then released on bond signed by representatives of their company. Their preliminary will be later. If the boy does not die, the charge will have to be changed.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 28, 1909

PURSE SNATCHER REAPPEARS.

Mrs. Arthur Hunt Robbed by Well
Dressed Youth.

The purse snatcher was again in evidence last night when Mrs. Arthur Hunt of 1317 Locust street was robbed in front of Teck's restaurant at Eighth and Main streets. Mrs. Hunt was waiting for her husband, who had crossed the street, when she noticed a young man pass her. A moment later he approached, and grabbing the purse, ran north on Main street. The woman screamed, but none of the spectators chased the thief. Mrs. Hunt says the purse snatcher did not appear to be more than 19 years old and that he was well dressed. The purse contained $3 in cash.

Labels: , , , ,

March 22, 1909

INJURED WIFE'S MOTHER
DOESN'T BLAME HUNTER.

MRS. SCANLON TELLS SON-IN-
LAW SHE IS HIS FRIEND.

Husband Declares Reform School
Was Suggested as Place for
Girl -- Tells Story of
Marital Troubles.

Charles Hunter, 19 years old, who shot and dangerously injured his wife, Myrtle Hunter, Friday morning, yesterday told visitors of the trouble that led up to his crime, and which is causing his detention at police headquarters. He said he loved his wife, but her waywardness caused the trouble.

When the boy and his child wife were married by Michael Ross, J. P., the mothers went to the court house with them to give consent. The girl's mother called at police headquarters yesterday afternoon to see Hunter. She told him she was still his friend and would do all she could for him.

"Even if Myrtle dies, Charles, we won't blame you," the prisoner was told.

The reform school was suggested by Mrs. Scanlon as the best place for the girl wife. Hunter informed a visitor yesterday. But he said he loved her and wanted to keep her at home if possible.

THREAT OF REFORM SCHOOL.

She left home one day and the mother announced her intention of having the police find the girl and sending her to reform school according to the story Hunter tells. Instead he asked her to wait and allow him to give her another trial. Hunter promised to find her and keep her at home.

After four days' search he declares he found her at a house on East Eighth street in company with another young woman and two men. While Hunter was in the room a rambler placed his arm around his wife and caressed her, which made him frantic with shame and anger. From there he took his wife home and she promised him she would remain away from her former haunts.

Then he says a clerk in a clothing store began to pay her attentions. Hunter said this clerk went to the Scanlon home last Thursday and asked for Myrtle. He made a second trip to the house in the afternoon. Mrs. Hunter opened the door, but refused to allow him to come in. Hunter said he was at the head of the stairs on the second floor and upon asking who the visitor was started down. The man left and his wife and Mrs. Scanlon prevented Hunter from following him.

WAS DRIVEN TO DESPERATION.

From the trials he had with his endeavors to keep his wife at home and the attempts by the clerk to take her away, Hunter claims that he was made desperate and driven mad. The climax was reached Wednesday night when the man is said to have collected a gang and announced his intention of going to the Hippodrome and going home with Mrs. Hunter.

Hunter and his wife were standing near the skating rink when the persistent admirer came up and spoke to the wife. She tried to avoid him and when she was unable to do so Hunter says he objected.

"I'll take her home if you have to go home in the undertaker's wagon," Hunter said he was told.

According to Hunter, his uncle, Claude Rider, 1728 Troost avenue, stepped up and said he was going to take a hand in the affair. As his uncle came up Hunter declares friends grabbed him and took him across the street while the other men fought. The police arrested them and took them to No. 4 police station where they were charged with disturbing the peace.

"I believe my mother-in-law was trying to arrange to send Myrtle to the reform school when I shot her," Hunter remarked.

He said he got the pistol at the Scanlon house and that it belonged to his wife's father. The condition of Mrs. Hunter was worse yesterday, but it was said that she still has a chance to recover.

Of late years Hunter has been following the skating rinks and in the summer has had charge of the rink at Fairmount park. At one time Hunter was an office boy for an afternoon newspaper and later became an advertising solicitor.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

March 20, 1909

THE SUGAR KING IN TOWN.

Henry Havemeyer Here to Sell the
Quinlan Flats.

The sugar king is in Kansas City.

Henry Havemeyer, who controls the sugar trade of the world, as John D. Rockerfeller does the oil business, has been here since Wednesday afternoon, when he arrived from his home in Yonkers, N. Y., on a special train.

"My visit to Kansas City is for the purpose of transacting some business," said Mr. Havemeyer at the Hotel Baltimore last night. "I will return to the East tomorrow. I have nothing to say about sugar."

Mr. Havenmeyer's business in Kansas City was to disperse of the Quinlan flats, Eighth street and Woodland avenue, wihich he has owned for many years. The property, it is said, was sold yesterday for $50,000.. The name of the purchaser was not made public last night.

Labels: , , , , ,

March 10, 1909

BLAMES ACT OF PROVIDENCE.

Barber Asphalt Company Still Inter-
poses Plea Touching Repairs.

Property owners on Eight street, between Santa Fe and Hickory, are going to have a conference with the attorney of the Barber Asphalt Paving company with a view to compromising with the company which has raised the point that the washing away of the asphalt in the flood of 1903 was "an act of God."

The company has all these years resisted restoration of the pavement, although it agreed to maintain it for ten years, always interposing when called upon to comply with its contract that it did not consider itself responsible for something over which it had no control.

The questions involved in the argument were thrashed out before the board of public works yesterday.

Labels: , , , ,

February 18, 1909

STREET CAR HITS AUTO.

Dr. Shirk's Runabout Is Damaged at
Missouri and Grand.

When Dr. William Shirk's motor run-about collided with a Westport car at Missouri and Grand avenues shortly before 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon, the automobile proved the chief sufferer. Two wheels were smashed. Nobody was hurt.

The motor car, with Dr. Shirk, who has an office in the Commerce building, and Dr. G. A. Graham of 1101 East Eighth street, was eastward bound on Missouri avenue. A car had just passed going south on Grand. Dr. Shirk, as he explained afterwards, was of the impression that street cars did not run north on Grand at that intersection. So, when the southbound car had cleared the crossing, he made the dash for it, only to be caught by the Westport car.

Labels: , , , , , ,

January 27, 1909

RAN OFF WITH A CHINAMAN?

Mrs. Charles Wilson of Kansas City
Arrested in Chicago.

CHICAGO, Jan. 26. -- (Special.) A well dressed young woman who says she is Mrs. Charles Wilson of Kansas City, was arrested at Clark and Harrison streets this afternoon by Detective Russell of the Harrison street station while in the company of G. H. Wing, a Chinaman.

When questioned at the station Wing, who has been employed by Louis Sing, another Chinaman, who has a store on Clark street between Harrison and Van Buren streets, declared that Mrs. Wilson was his wife.

Mrs. Wilson at first corroborated the Chinaman's story, but upon being questioned closely, broke down and admitted, the police declare, that she deserted her husband in Kansas City and came to Chicago with the Chinaman, bringing her 3-year-old daughter with them.


Gaw Wing and Mrs. Wilson, who are being held in Chicago by the police, are well known to the Kansas City police. Wing, a laundryman, has been living with Mrs. Wilson for more than a year, the police claim, on the second floor of a flat at Eighth and Charlotte streets. The woman's lawful husband is not known here.

Two months ago Wing entered police headquarters one night carrying Mrs. Wilson's baby, which is 2 years old. He was crying and exhibited a picture of the baby's mother. "Poor baby's m other run off, leave baby and Gaw Wing alone," he kept repeating. Wing informed the officers that Mrs. Wilson was hiding in a rooming house at 127 West Sixth street. John McCall and Ben Goode, plain clothes patrolmen, arrested the woman, but Wing refused to prosecute her, and she returned to him.

Henry Sing and his American wife introduced the Wilson woman to Gaw Wing. Sing is now in Hot Springs, Ark., for his health, and has his wife and 14-year-old boy with him.

Labels: , , , ,

December 30, 1908

ITALIANS WILL HOLD A
MASS MEETING SUNDAY.

To Raise Money for Relief of Stricken
People -- Many Have Rela-
tives in Sicily.


Local Little Italy, which might more specifically be called Lesser Sicily, since most of its residents come from that stricken island, received the news of the earthquake that killed scores of thousands with an expectant stoicism that utterly belies what books say about the volatile Italian nature. It was expectant, in that the Sicilians and Calabrians of Kansas City are bravely awaiting the horrible details which only days can bring forth. Accounts at best are but meager and the fate of the members of their families cannot be known for a fortnight.

They are not wringing their hands in anguish. Instead, they are occupied with a demonstration much more to the purpose.

"We must get together and raise some money for them," said Dr. L. Laurenzana of 522 East Fifth street, last night. With that he stepped to the telephone and called up the Italian consul, Pietro Isnardi. A business-like conversation in Italian ensued.

MASS MEETING CALLED.

"A mass meeting of all Italians in Kansas City will be held at the hall adjoining the Church of the Holy Rosary at Missouri avenue and Campbell street, Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock," said the doctor as he turned away from the telephone. "We raised nearly $400 for the earthquake sufferers in Calabria, three years ago, and we ought to do better than that this time."

Dr. Laurenzana has a cousin, Anello Alfano by name, who is a railroad contractor at Pizzo on the Calabrian toe of the Italian boot, only four miles and a half from Reggio, where so many thousands were killed Monday.

Walter Randazzo of 104 East Fifth street, too, has a cousin, Cologero Randazzo, who held a government position at Messina, where 12,000 people are said to have lost their lives.

"I came from Palermo," said Mr.Randazzo, "and, as I understand it, the western part of the island, where the city is located, was not badly affected by the quake. Palermo is a long way from Messina. You leave there on the train at night and don't reach Messina until the next morning."

MANY OF THEM HERE.

S. J. Tremonte, proprietor of the Italian Castle cafe at Fifth and Oak streets, comes from Gibbellins, a town of about 15,000 inhabitants, lying forty-four miles from Palermo. His parents and brothers still live there, but he is not apprehensive, as they are not in the affected district.

Pietro Berbiglia, who operates the Milano restaurant at 7 East Eighth street, has been in this country for ten years, and comes from Piggioreallia in Trapani province, not far from Palermo. He served in the Italian army and in 1898 was stationed at Catania, which is almost at the very foot of Mount Aetna, and which with Messina and Reggio suffered perhaps more heavily thatn any of the other cities.

"Catania is a beautiful place," he said last night, "and carries on a large shipping trade with Malta and other points on the Mediterranean. It has about 150,000 inhabitants and the Universita di Catania, with many students, is located there. It has a long and beautiful street which I think is more magnificent than anything even in Rome, called the Corso Garibaldi, running for about four miles along the seashore from Catania proper to Porto Garibaldi. There is also a large garden or park called the Villa Stema d'Italia, that is one of the prettiest in Italy."

Labels: , , , , , , ,

December 27, 1908

DID ROSE PETERSON
WRITE THIS LETTER?

ACCUSED OF IT BY DEAD HUS-
BAND'S RELATIVES.

Prosecution Will Try to Show That
Woman Had Written Threatening
Letter to Husband Short Time
Before She Shot Him.

At the trial of Rose Peterson, the following letter purporting to be written by Mrs. Peterson to her husband will be introduced:

"It's a good thing you ran today or I would have got you. I would have got you anyway if so many people had not been around. Don't go any place where I may see you! I'll get you if I ever see you, no mater if it's ten years from now. If you ever try to get it I'll follow you, no matter where you go."

This letter was received by Fred Peterson two weeks ago. It was unsigned, but, it was alleged, was in Rose Peterson's handwriting and he showed it to his brother, Frank, saying that his wife had written it. Then Fred told how that very morning as he was passing Eighth and Cherry streets, Rose met him and pointed a revolver at him, but he dodged behind a corner so quickly that she had no opportunity to fire.

MRS. PETERSON WILL NOT TALK.

Mrs. Peterson was seen at the county jail last night and the letter alleged to have been written by her to Fred Peterson was red. "Did you write that letter?" she was asked.

"I don't know" she answered. "I don't remember whether I did or not."

"Did you and your husband ever have a quarrel about dry goods and did he accuse you with having unlawfully obtained them? Was that your first misunderstanding?"

"I don't know that, either," she said.

"Did you ever point a revolver at your husband on the street; in other words, did you ever attempt to shoot him?"

"You ain't talking to me, I guess."

"How did you happen to have a revolver on the night he was shot on the street? Was it your habit to carry a revolver when attending dances?"

"I won't talk to you. See my lawyer. He will tell you all I've got to say."

The Petersons were married three years ago, when he was 19 years old and she was 16. He was a plumber and earned $13 a week. They lived at the house of Peterson's mother and were apparently very happy until they had a dispute about some dry good that the wife had brought into the house and which the husband insisted that she ought to return. After being married nine months they separated and Peterson moved to California, where he remained until last September. Then he became sick and his mother hastened to his side and brought him back to this city. He got a job here and lived at the home of his mother.

DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS BROUGHT.

Several months ago Rose Peterson came to the house and asked for her husband. They talked, and several times afterward they were seen in each other's company. Divorce proceedings were instituted by the woman, but after they had reached a certain stage she ceased to pay her lawyer his fees and Peterson, who was also anxious to get the divorce, paid the lawyer $15. At this time, says Frank Peterson, Rose had changed her mind and did not want to get the divorce. She begged her husband to contest the suit, and finally threatened to do him harm, the brother says. He knew that she carried a revolver. His brother said to him once:

"If Rose pulls that gun on you I want you to strike her." Fred replied: "No, I won't do that. I'm going to run."

He did run when she pointed the revolver at him at Eighth and Cherry streets, and after that he avoided her. On the night on which he was shot he had planned to do some Christmas shopping with his mother, but she was taken ill and he was forced to go alone. He was never seen alive again by any friends or family. Mrs. Peterson claims that on that night she went to a dance with her husband, and that he accompanied her home. She asserts that they quarreled on a street car. They left the car at Eighteenth and Askew and the quarrel was resumed on the street. The woman says the man slapped her; that then she drew a revolver and fired five shots, each of the five bullets lodging in his body and killing him instantly.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

December 26, 1908

LAUGHS WHEN SHE
SPEAKS OF GALLOWS.

ROSE PETERSON GETS GLIMPSE
OF GRIM MACHINE.

That, and a Trip to Church With a
Policeman as Guard, Filled the
Day for the Woman Who
Shot Her Husband.

Flowers from fellow employes at a printing plant, where she had worked for some time, greeted Mrs. Rose Peterson when she returned to the county jail yesterday from church. She is charged with killing her husband.

On Thursday Mrs. Peterson asked for permission to to to church and this was granted by Judge R. S. Latshaw of the criminal court. Patrolman John Coughlin took her to 8:30 o'clock mass at St. Patrick's, Eighth and Cherry. She had never missed church a single Christmas in her life.

"And to think that he was in citizen's clothes and not in uniform," said Mrs. Peterson afterwards. "We did not attract a bit of attention and I had been so afraid that the officer would wear a uniform." This bit of consideration seemed the best gift of all to the child wife.

"Since I was 14 I have been at work feeding presses," said Mrs. Peterson. "I married at 16. I can't tell why. Yes, it was young. I am only 19 now. Do you know, over at the police station they measured me -- I'm five feet one and one-half inch in my stocking feet. I weigh 123 pounds. And they measured my arms and my fingers and took finger prints and everything. Did you get my picture out of the rogues' gallery for the paper? Because the pictures they printed of me looked awful. I saw Aggie Myers's picture there."

"MY TRACKS ON THE GALLOWS."

"This morning they left the doors open and I walked around to see the gallows where they hanged Bud Taylor. Maybe I'll leave my tracks on that scaffold some time," she smiled.

"You want to know why I got married at 16? I don't know myself. We separated after a year. It will be three years next march since we were married. After the wedding I kept right on feeding the presses. My husband kept bothering me and for a long time I have been carrying a revolver." Her husband slapped her and she shot him.

"Did we run away to get married?" repeated the blue-eyed Irish girl, who seems hardly over 17. "Really, I can't remember." Which was only another way of saying that she did not want to remember.

"I'LL NEVER MARRY AGAIN."

"If I ever get out of here I'll never get married again, never, never. A woman is a man's slave after she is married. I don't believe in marriage. It hurts me to see my sister growing up and to think that she may fall in love with someone. Oh, I am going to talk her out of it if I can. There is nothing in marriage."

While Mrs. Peterson was talking, Mrs. James Sharp, one of the band of fanatics and a cellmate, walked across the room and stood behind the girl's chair.

"Ask Mrs. Sharp," was suggested.

"Do you believe in marriage?" the childwife asked.

"Yes, of course I do," said Mrs. Sharp, as she stroked the girl's brown hair. "Of course I do," s he repeated with a smile that flashed for a moment, a memory of her former attractiveness. Mrs. Sharp is a native Missourian.

"Last Christmas I was in Minnesota," added the elder woman quietly, with a touch of reminiscence in her tone.

Mrs. Peterson had stopped talking. Her brother and sister had come to see the little member of Press Assistant's Union No 20, who wants to be a linotype operator if she gains her liberty.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

December 23, 1908

KILLS HUSBAND IN STREET.

Mrs. Rosa Peterson Resents Charges
and Shoots Him With Revolver
at Eighteenth and Askew.

Because he accused her of familiarity with other men, Mrs. Rosa Peterson, who lives with her widowed mother at 3505 East Eighteen street, shot and killed her husband, Fred Peterson, at the corner of Eighteenth street and Askew avenue, at 12:20 o'clock last night. A revolver was the weapon used. The woman fired five shots, every one taking effect. The first one, supposed to have been fired point blank at the head, caused instantaneous death, according to Assistant county Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, who examined the body.

According to the story of Mrs. Peterson, her husband had been separated from her the past two years, but they had occasionally kept company together. Last night they went to a dance. On the way to Peterson's home at 3810 East Eighteenth street words passed between them. Mrs. Peterson alleges her husband slapped her as they got off the car at Eighteenth street and Askew avenue. She then drew the revolver and killed him.

Peterson was a plumber's helper and worked for A. Schreidner at 7223 East Eighth street. Mrs. Peterson feeds a press at the plant of the Masterson Printing Company, 414 East Ninth street.

She was arrested by Policeman Patrick Coon and taken to No. 6 police station.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory