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November 12, 1909

JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS
COME TO TOWN TODAY.

COMMERCIAL CLUB ROOMS DEC-
ORATED FOR RECEPTION.

Five Women Members of Party Will
Be Guests of Honor at Country
Club Luncheon -- Omaha
the Next Stop.

Kansas City will be the host today to the Honorary Commissioners of Japan, consisting of forty-three of the leading business men and educators of the Oriental empire, who, together with five Japanese women, are touring the United States. No efforts will be spared to entertain the foreign guests during their stay here, which will be from 9 o'clock in the morning until 11 o'clock at night.

Following the arrival here the party will breakfast in their special train. At 9:30 the men of the party will be met in automobiles by the members of the Commercial Club and the next hour and a half will be spent in a reception in the club rooms. The club rooms have been decorated with palms and ferns, the stars and stripes, the Japanese national flag, the mikado's coat of arms, and the Japanese man-of-war emblem. Judge W. T. Bland, president of the club, will head the receiving line, and in it will be the forty-three Japanese commissioners, the officers off the Commercial Club and all former presidents of the club.

WILL VISIT HIGH SCHOOL.

At 11 o'clock the party will be taken to the Westport high school, where Baron Kanda, head of the school of the nobility in Tokio, will make a short speech. Baron Kanda speaks English fluently and is a graduate of Amherst college. The address will be followed by a drive through Swope park and a stop at the Evanston Golf Club for a buffet luncheon.

After the luncheon the party will be driven through the city, up and down the principal streets, over the boulevards and through the leading parks.

The first place of interest to be visited will be the Bank of Commerce. This will be followed by an inspection of the Burnham-Munger overall factory. A drive to Kansas City, Kas., is next in order, where the party will be shown through the plant of the Kingman-Moore Implement Company. These will be the only places visited during the day.

While the men are being entertained by the members of the Commercial Club the five women in the party, Baroness Shibusawa, Baroness Kanda, Madame Midzuno, Madame Horikoshi and Madame Toki will not be forgotten. A committee composed of the wives of the Commercial Club directors and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Clendening will entertain them. A visit to the Westport high school, a noon lunch at the Country Club and a tea at the home of Mrs. W. R. Nelson will be the events of the day which have been mapped out for the women.

DINNER AT THE BALTIMORE.

At 6:30 o'clock in the evening a dinner will be served to the men in the banquet room at the Baltimore hotel. At the same time a dinner will be given for the women in the Japanese room of the hotel. At the conclusion of their dinner the women will repair to the banquet room, where the entire party will listen to the addresses by David R. Frances, Senator William Warner, Baron Shibusawa and Baron Kanda. Judge Bland will act as toastmaster.

This will conclude the events of the day. The visitors will be taken back to their train, and will leave for Omaha, from where they will work west to San Francisco, from which port they will sail for Japan, November 30.

LEADING FINANCIER.

The Japanese arrived in Seattle from Japan September 1, and when they leave will have spent eighty-eight days in America, visited fifty-two cities, and traveled more than 11,000 miles. During this time they have visited plants and institutions representing nearly every American industry. Many of Kansas City's leading industries will not be visited, as the party has been to similar ones in other cities.

Baron Elighi Shibusawa, who is the head of the commission, is one of the leading men of Japan, being both a statesman and a financier. His individual efforts have raised the status of business men in this country. In 1873, Baron Shibusawa organized the first national bank in Japan under the capital stock system, and has been connected since with all leading banking institutions in Japan.

One Pullman dynamo car, a baggage car, a Pullman dining car, four ten-compartment sleepers, one twelve-section drawing room car and a six-compartment observation car comprise the equipment of the special train that will bring the Japanese to Kansas City over the Burlington railroad. The train will be in charge of W. A. Lalor, assistant general passenger agent for the Burlington at St. Louis.

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October 25, 1909

OFF FOR TAFT RIVER TRIP.

Deep Waterways Cheered as Party of
Kansas City Men Leave for Alton
and St. Louis.

More than a half hundred prominent Kansas City men, comprising the delegation that is to go down the river on the steamboat Gray Eagle in the presidential party, departed last night over the Chicago & Alton railroad on a special train consisting of five sleepers and a baggage car for Alton, Ill., where they will arrive this morning.

Decorators who were sent to Alton in advance, reported last evening to Secretary Cledening of the Commercial Club that the boat will be one of the handsomest in appearance in the big fleet.

It was a merry party which met at the Union depot last evening and as the train pulled out cheer after cheer was heard for the deep waterways convention which will be held in New Orleans Saturday of this week and Monday and Tuesday of next week.

The delegates expect that President Taft will breakfast with them on their boat Tuesday morning either at Cape Girardeau, which will be the first stop after the fleet leaves St. Louis, or between the Cape and Cairo.

The Kansas Cityans will arrive in Alton this morning in time to board the Grey Eagle and be landed at the levee in St. Louis at 9 a. m. They will go to the Coliseum, where President Taft will speak at 11 a. m. The trip down the river will begin at 5 p. m.

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October 24, 1909

FOR TAFT BOAT TRIP
DOWN MISSISSIPPI.

KANSAS CITY DELEGATION
WILL LEAVE TONIGHT.

Will Travel to Alton on Four Spe-
cial Cars -- Decorations for the
"Gray Eagle" Sent
Ahead.

Imbued with the "Kansas City Spirit" and a determination to impress upon the big waterways convention at New Orleans the need of improving the Missouri river, the Kansas City delegation will leave for Alton, Ill., at 9 o'clock tonight on four special Pullman cars by way of the Chicago & Alton railway. Decorators were sent to Alton Friday night and by the time the Kansas City delegation arrives tomorrow morning the Gray Eagle, the boat on which the Kansas City delegation will ride, will be one of the gayest in the fleet. At least that was the declaration last night of E. M. Clendening, secretary of the Commercial Club, who has made all of the arrangements for the trip.

Yesterday it seemed very unlikely that President Taft would be able to accept the invitation of the Kansas City delegation to ride at least part of the way down the river on the Gray Eagle. More than a dozen telegrams were exchanged with the management of President Taft's itinerary, but late last night Secretary Clendening was informed that it would be practically impossible. He still hopes that the president will find time to visit the Kansas City boat and take breakfast on the steamer Tuesday morning.

LEAVE ST. LOUIS MONDAY.

The "Gray Eagle" will reach St. Louis at 9 o'clock Monday morning. President Taft will speak in the Coliseum at 11 o'clock. The party will embark at 4 o'clock in the afternoon for the great trip down the river. The fleet arrives at Cape Girardeau at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning, Cairo, Ill., at noon, and Hickman, Ky., at 4 o'clock. Memphis, Tenn., and Helena, Ark., will be the principal stops on Wednesday. Vicksburg will be the only stop of importance on Thursday with Natchez and Baton Rouge on Friday.

The fleet will arrive in New Orleans early Saturday morning and until the following Tuesday night there will be a continuous round of convention work and receptions in the southern city. Grand opera, addresses by the governors of the different states, inspection of the city, and attendance at the convention will take up about all of the time of the Kansas City delegation. The party will leave New Orleans at 6:20 o'clock Tuesday night.

Besides Secretary Clendening, members of the delegation of seventy include Jerome Twitchell, J. H. Neff, Hon. Edgar C. Ellis, C. S. Jobes, H. F. Lang, W. B. C. Brown, C. D. Carlisle, W. G. Mellier and Hon. W. P. Borland.

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July 29, 1909

A NEW TELEPHONE DIRECTORY.

Bell Company's New Booklet Is Re-
plete With Information.

The July issue of the Missouri & Kansas (Bell) Telephone Company's Kansas City directory is now being delivered to subscribers. The directory appears in an entirely new form, made necessary by the large increase in the number of subscribers. The old style cover which persisted in rolling up and breaking, has been replaced by a handsome, index bristol cover. The front section of the directory contains several pages of useful information, including a page write-up of Kansas City, compiled by E. M. Clendening, Secretary of the Commercial Club, postal information, office buildings, directory of both Kansas Cities, street directory of both Kansas Cities, libraries and reading rooms, theaters, table of weights and measures, information for taxpayers, street car routings, railroad time tables, carriage and automobile rates and a two year calendar. Subscribers' names are listed double column in new style type. The classified business directory is printed on yellow paper. The listing therein now includes business addresses. This section of the directory contains a goodly showing of classified advertising of a varied nature.

In speaking of the new directory, Homer Montfort, Advertising agent of the company, said: "The telephone directory of today has many uses aside form that for which it was originally intended. Its value as a social and business directory is beyond question. We have added the new features at considerable expense, with a view of making the directory more valuable to our patrons, and we will gladly receive suggestions as to other useful features that might be added. Our Kansas City directory is used for various purposes approximately 250,000 per day or 91,000,000 times per year."

The new directory is said by telephone men to be the handsomest ever issued for the purpose. There are 30,000 directories in this issue.

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June 4, 1909

JOHN W. SPEAS, LONG
ILL, KILLS HIMSELF.

With Pistol and Poison Makes Sure
of Death After Writing a
Farewell Note.
John W. Speas, Victim of Suicide.
JOHN W. SPEAS.

After writing a brief farewell note to his family, John W. Speas committed suicide yesterday morning at 6:30 o'clock in a bedroom at his home, 1028 Summit street, by drinking carbolic acid and shooting himself.

Mrs. Speas, who was in the dining room downstairs, hurried to the bedroom when she heard the report of the revolver, and found Mr. Speas prostrate upon the floor. She summoned the family physican, Dr. R. T. Sloan, who said death had been instantaneous. Before firing the fatal shot, it is believed that Mr. Speas swallowed the carbolic acid. According to the deputy coroner either method would have resulted in death.

Mr. Speas has been an active member of the Commercial Club for a longer period probably than any other man in it, and once refused the presidency. He was active in the building of the first Convention hall, and also was conspicuous in the work of reconstructing it after the fire. As a member of the Commercial Club he was looked upon as the most popular active worker. He was president several years of the Priests of Pallas, and a member of the board of directors.

Mr. Speas was a native of Missouri. He came to Kansas City at the age of 10 years, and for several years sold papers, and later carried a paper route. He studied bookkeeping at Spalding's Business college, and then allied himself with the Kansas City Distilling Company. Much of his business career was interwoven with that of E. L. Martin, president of the distilling company. Later Mr. Speas became interested in the Monarch Vinegar company, and eventually became the sole owner.

An enthusiastic baseball fan, he identified himself with National League in the '90s, and for three or four years owned or controlled the franchise in Kansas City. He was a member of the Masons, Elks and Mystic Shrine.

Mr. Speas was born on a farm near Kansas city, October 18, 1862. In 1884 he married Miss Evelyn Southworth. Besides his widow he leaves one son, Victor Speas. Continued ill health of three years' duration is believed to explain his suicide.

The pallbearers for the Speas funeral, which will be held Saturday morning, are F. A. Faxon, L. W. Shouse, E. M. Clendening, William Barton, J. C. Schmelzer, D. P. Thompson, F. S. Doggett and W. H. Holmes.

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April 6, 1909

MONUMENT TO A. R. MEYER.

Sculptor Here to Discuss Unveiling,
Which May Take Place May 7.

Daniel Chester French, sculptor and designer of the monument to be erected to the memory of A. R. Meyer, first president of the park board, on the Paseo near Twelfth street, was here yesterday to consult with the committee of the Commercial club in regard to the unveiling. The members. The members of the committee are: E. M. Clendening, Frank A. Faxon, William Barton, H. D. Ashley, C. J. Schmelzer and George Kessler. The committee and Mr. French visited the site of the memorial and practically decided on May 7 as the date of the unveiling.

The sculptor said that the bronze statue was about finished and would be here in about two weeks. It will be seven and a half feet in height and will be supported by a bronze background.

Mr. French said that it was his second visit to Kansas city and he spoke in admiration of the parks and boulevards. He left for New York last night.

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May 24, 1908

MINISTERS SOAKED
DURING AUTO RIDE.

Not Enough Cars to Carry
All the Presbyterians.

Three hundred ministers and commissioners to the 120th general assembly of the Presbyterian church got a soaking yesterday afternoon that was unorthodox to say the least. In less than an hour after they has started on a two-hour automobile ride over the boulevards and through the parks of Kansas City, the rain suddenly fell in torrents and it continued falling for nearly an hour.

This feature of the ride was not according to schedule and neither was that contingency looked for when the start was made from Convention hall. The ministers and commissioners started out without umbrellas or raincoats and many of the automobiles were without hoods so they got a genuine soaking. When the rain first began falling, many of the automobiles deserted the line and made straightway for Convention hall or for the hotel of the commissioners. Others stayed in the line and completed the ride.

On the whole, the plans and arrangements for the automobile ride did not work out as well as the committee had expected. While more than 100 automobiles had been promised, not more than fifty showed up at Convention hall at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. These were speedily filled by the waiting commissioners. Enough tickets had been distributed to fill the number of automobiles expected and consequently there were many disappointed commissioners. Those who were unable to secure seats returned to their hotels.

THESE KEPT DRY.

The "Seeing Kansas City" cars took care of a great number of the commissioners and their wives. Some preferred this ride to the automobiles because of the fact that they were allowed to take the women with them. The cars were sent over the usual route. The automobiles were sent over the most advantageous route in the city. They were headed by guides on motor cycles.

The start was made from Convention hall promptly at 2:30 o'clock. E. M. Clendening was master of ceremonies.

"Are you all ready?" he called down the line.

Shouts assured him they were. The sharp pop-pop of starting motors and the pungent smell of burning gasoline next greeted the ears and nostrils of the ministers and commissioners. Then slowly the line started down Thirteenth street to Grand avenue. The ministers joked each other and the good natured taunts of those left behind were directed at those in automobiles.

"You needn't hold your head so high just because it is your first ride in an automobile," yelled one as a friend disappeared down the street in one of the six cylinder cars.

"Did you never see an automobile before?" asked one commissioner of another who was examining the steering gear of one of the machines.

"I see plenty of them now, if I have never seen them before," returned the friend.

Altogether, it was a good natured and happy bunch of ministers, elders and commissioners that took that ride. They had had two days of strenuous work in the sessions of the assembly, and the afternoon gave opportunity for a general laxity from those arduous duties. William Henry Roberts, the former moderator and now stated clerk; the Rev. B. P. Fullerton and E. M. Clendening occupied the first automobiles.

PICTURE CARDS AND BOOKS.

Post card souvenirs and souvenir books illustrating the parks and boulevards of Kansas City were handed to the commissioners before they stepped into the automobiles. The booklets were given by the park board and besides the illustrations of the parks and boulevards contained some facts and figures concerning the city. These facts and figures were prepared by the Manufacturer's and Merchants' Association. This is the first opportunity that the park board has had of giving these booklets away. The post cards contained this printed message which the recipients were directed to send to their home folks:

Dear Home Folks: Having an enjoyable visit here. Am an honorary member of the Commercial Club's Prosperity Club. The motto is "Look Pleasant, Be Cheerful, Talk Prosperity. Yours --"

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April 25, 1908

MEYER STATUE WILL
STAND ON PASEO.

SITE IS CHOSEN BETWEEN NINTH
AND TENTH STREETS.
Statue of the late A. R. Meyer
BRONZE STATUE TO BE ERECTED TO THE MEMORY OF A. R. MEYER ON THE PASEO, BETWEEN NINTH AND TENTH STREETS.

After spending almost the entire day yesterday going over the boulevards and through the parks of the city, the members of the Meyer statue committee, together with Daniel Chester French, the sculptor, late yesterday agreed upon a point on the Paseo between Ninth and Tenth streets, for the location of the bronze statue to be erected of the late A. R. Meyer, first president of the park board. The statue will be near the south end of the block and will face toward the south. The immediate surroundings for the statue will be decided upon by the park board.

This will be the first public statue to be erected in Kansas City, and will be in honor of the man to whom perhaps more credit is due for the splendid park and boulevard system for which Kansas City is now noted, than any other.

The model for the monument was sent ahead by Mr. French with the request that it not be opened until his arrival. It was first opened at 10 o'clock yesterday morning in the Commercial Club rooms, in the presence of Mr. French and the members of the statue committee. The model was unanimously accepted by the committee and, on recommendation of that body, was later accepted by the city art committees. A committee composed of E. M. Clendening, H. D. Ashley and Frank A. Faxon was named to frame a suitable inscription for the base of the monument.

The monument consists of a main structure of Knoxville marble fifteen feet in height, about seven feet in width and two feet in depth from front to back, resting on a base of the same material about ten by six feet.

The monument is surrounded by an ornamental cap, and the main stone, containing the portrait of Mr. Meyer, is supported by an ornamental stone, resting on the base proper. The portrait of Mr. Meyer will be in bronze, let into the main stone of the monument, and will show a figure seven and a half feet in height. It has been the endeavor of the sculptor to suggest Mr. Meyer as the originator of the park system, and he is represented as standing out of doors with his right hand resting on an open map, which lies upon a marble Pompeian table. The left hand holds a pair of field glasses, and a tree under which he is standing is introduced at the right.

Mr. French will remain in Kansas City until tonight. He expects to have the statue finished in about a year.

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