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EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

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July 5, 1909

QUIET FOURTH, BUT
MANY ACCIDENTS.

TWO KANSAS CITYS HAVE LONG
LIST OF CASUALTIES.

Big Demand for Tetanus Anti-Toxin
at Emergency Hospital -- Four
Boys Hurt in One Explosion.

It was one of the quietest Fourths of July the two Kansas City's ever experienced. But the real test will come today. Many minor accidents were reported yesterday, and there were a number of applications to Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital for injections of tetanus anti-toxin to ward off the possibility of lockjaw from injuries.

Victim No. 1 to ask for aid at the dispensary was Willie Parrish, 9 years old, 1230 Drury avenue. Willie was playing with a friend named Clarence Cott, who was handling a pistol. It was accidentally discharged and a piece of the gun wad entered the palm of Willie's left hand.

A blank cartridge which S. Stern, 10 years old, 571 Campbell street, accidentally discharged, injured his right hand. He went to the emergency hospital and Dr. Gist cauterized the wound and gave him an injection of tetanus anti-toxin.

CHILD MAY LOSE EYE.

William Meyer, 14 years old, 2108 West Prospect avenue, was wounded yesterday afternoon while playing with a 22-caliber pistol. A wad struck him on the left hand, which was dressed in the emergency hospital. The surgeon made use of 1,5000 units of the anti-toxin which Dr. W. S. Wheeler secured to prevent tetanus infection.

Powder burns, suffered when his brother, John, snapped a toy pistol containing a blank cartridge, probably will cost Charles Grube, aged 6 years, 838 South Pyle street, Armourdale, the sight of his right eye.

Only a few boys and no grown-ups were arrested yesterday for noisy celebration of the Fourth. One boy was taken in at Central police station during the forenoon for exploding a cannon cracker on West Fifth street. His father appeared in a few minutes. Only $4 was necessary too get this juvenile lawbreaker from behind the bars. Police station Nos. 9, 5, 4 and 6 also made an arrest apiece, all the boys being released on minimum bonds.

Thomas Rogers, a negro 14 years old, applied at the emergency hospital last night for treatment, saying he feared he was suffering from lockjaw. Thomas shot himself in the hand with a toy pistol July 2. A piece of the cap was imbedded in the skin. One thousand five hundred units of anti-toxin was administered, and the boy sent home. He was instructed to keep his hand in hot water during the night.

Probably the most serious accident in Kansas City, Kas., was the injury sustained by S. A. Brophy, a street car conductor, living at 332 North Tenth street. The wadding from a blank cartridge entered his left thigh on the inside of the leg and caused a wound which Dr. W. R. Palmer, the attending physician, said last night might prove serious. Brophy was talking to a fellow street car conductor, L. J. Clark, when the latter pointed a gun at him and pulled the trigger.

BOY MAY LOSE HAND.

Roy Irvine, 5 years old, was injured by a piece of tin which flew from a torpedo and buried itself in the third finger of his left hand. He was treated at the home of his father, R. W. Irvine, 727 Central avenue.

Herman Fielder, 11 years old, was shot through the palm of his left hand by the wadding from a blank cartridge. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis, and removed to his home, 940 Ohio avenue. Charles Orr, 931 Tenney avenue, held a firecracker in his left hand while it exploded and may lose the index finger of his left hand as a result. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis. Mrs. M. Westerman, 318 North Tenth street, fell and dislocated her left shoulder while attempting to get away from a bunch of firecrackers which had been thrown near her. Mrs. Westerman is 62 years old, and was suffering great pain last night. She was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis.

Nathan Spicer, a merchant at 40 North James street, shot himself through the palm of the right hand while explaining the mechanism of a revolver to a prospective customer. He was attended by Dr. C. H. Brown, assistant police surgeon. James Whipple, 20 North James street, was struck by a flying particle during an explosion near his home and was burned on the left hand.

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May 14, 1909

DEATH BY CARBOLIC ACID.

Unidentified Man Commits Suicide
Near Centropolis.

The body of an unidentified man was found in a lot between Drury and Hardesty avenues on Fifteenth street yesterday morning by Mrs. Della Morris, who lives in the vicinity. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, said death was due to carbolic acid poising.

The name Henry Patterson was found on a piece of paper in the man's pocket. The underclothing bore the letters J. E. C. and the initials J. C. were upon a signet ring which he wore. H e was about 50 years old, five feet five inches in height, weighed 140 pounds and wore a dark suit, patent leather shoes and a soft hat. His eyes were gray and his hair brown.

ENDED LIFE WITH SHOTGUN.

Morgan Jones, a farmer who lives near Dallas, Mo., killed himself with a shotgun early yesterday morning. He had been ill for a number of years and it is thought by his friends that it caused despondency. He was 30 years old and unmarried. He had been formerly employed as a bookkeeper in Kansas City.

TRIED TO DIE, BUT FAILED.

In a saloon at 1025 East Nineteenth street F. D. Miskelly of Excelsior Springs attempted to kill himself by drinking chloroform. He was taken to the general hospital. He is in precarious condition.

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October 2, 1908

PUBLICITY CURE FOR NEIGH-
BORHOOD ROWS, SAYS
JUDGE KYLE.

Declares He Will Set Aside
Afternoon Each Week for
Spite Cases and In-
vite Public.

The publicity cure for neighborhood fights is to be adopted by Judge Harry Kyle in the police court, unless this character of cases becomes less frequent.

The city officials have been imposed upon to the extent of exasperation by a dozen women appearing in police court to air their personal quarrels and tongue lashings.

"If these cases do not quit coming in I am going to set aside one afternoon of each week which will be made an open court day," said Judge Kyle this morning, when impressing upon the women residents of a neighborhood on Drury avenue how foolish they were to bring their trivial affairs into court.

"I will make the afternoon session a public affair, so that everybody can get in on the entertainment and see what fools people will make of themselves. Now here is a case where two women had a little hair-pulling contest, which did not settle their differences so they employed counsel, one to prosecute and the other to defend, to come into this court and tell just what this woman said about the other's husband. If drastic measures are resorted to I think this character of cases will be less frequent."

After Mrs. Addie Shearer, 419 Drury avenue, and Mrs. Olive Garnett, 423 Drury avenue, had pulled each other's hair, trampled down the grass and slapped each other for ten minutes, they decided their difference would have to be decided by Judge Kyle in the police court. Mrs. Garnett preferred charges against Mrs. Shearer, charging her with assault and battery. A physician testified that Mrs. Garnett' face bore evidence of having been slapped as, when he examined her, he found several red marks. Mrs. Shearer assaulted her because, as she said, Mrs. Garnett was an aristocrat, a hypocritical church-goer and had told some of the neighbors that her husband was a chicken thief.

Both women had their little band of witnesses, who declared each lady to be a perfect lady and was entirely right in this affair. The trial of the case lasted an hour. Mrs. Shearer was fined $1, after which the women who favored her raised their heads in the air and fairly sailed from the court room. The opposing witnesses were equally as indignant because Mrs. Shearer had not been fined $500 instead of $1, and followed the first band from the room.

When a neighborhood case of this nature was being heard Tuesday morning before Judge Kyle, and after one woman had declared that the statement made by a witness was an infamous lie, about four square feet of plastering, directly over the witnesses, fell with a crash on the heads and shoulder of the parties lined along the bar. At that time Judge Kyle declared that it would not surprise him in the least if the entire city hall did not fall down some time when one of the family affairs was being tried.

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