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September 10, 1909

HAND CAUGHT IN A ROLLER.

Mrs. A. R. Miles Dangerously Hurt
by Laundry Machinery.

While working in the Swan laundry at 560 Walnut street last night, Mrs. A. R. Miles, 18 years old, of 893 Wayne avenue, Kansas City, Kas., was dangerously injured when her right hand was caught in a hot steam roller. Dr. Fred B. Kyger and Dr. W. L. Gist, surgeons at the Emergency hospital, treated the young woman. She was sent to her home.

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July 5, 1909

QUIET FOURTH, BUT
MANY ACCIDENTS.

TWO KANSAS CITYS HAVE LONG
LIST OF CASUALTIES.

Big Demand for Tetanus Anti-Toxin
at Emergency Hospital -- Four
Boys Hurt in One Explosion.

It was one of the quietest Fourths of July the two Kansas City's ever experienced. But the real test will come today. Many minor accidents were reported yesterday, and there were a number of applications to Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital for injections of tetanus anti-toxin to ward off the possibility of lockjaw from injuries.

Victim No. 1 to ask for aid at the dispensary was Willie Parrish, 9 years old, 1230 Drury avenue. Willie was playing with a friend named Clarence Cott, who was handling a pistol. It was accidentally discharged and a piece of the gun wad entered the palm of Willie's left hand.

A blank cartridge which S. Stern, 10 years old, 571 Campbell street, accidentally discharged, injured his right hand. He went to the emergency hospital and Dr. Gist cauterized the wound and gave him an injection of tetanus anti-toxin.

CHILD MAY LOSE EYE.

William Meyer, 14 years old, 2108 West Prospect avenue, was wounded yesterday afternoon while playing with a 22-caliber pistol. A wad struck him on the left hand, which was dressed in the emergency hospital. The surgeon made use of 1,5000 units of the anti-toxin which Dr. W. S. Wheeler secured to prevent tetanus infection.

Powder burns, suffered when his brother, John, snapped a toy pistol containing a blank cartridge, probably will cost Charles Grube, aged 6 years, 838 South Pyle street, Armourdale, the sight of his right eye.

Only a few boys and no grown-ups were arrested yesterday for noisy celebration of the Fourth. One boy was taken in at Central police station during the forenoon for exploding a cannon cracker on West Fifth street. His father appeared in a few minutes. Only $4 was necessary too get this juvenile lawbreaker from behind the bars. Police station Nos. 9, 5, 4 and 6 also made an arrest apiece, all the boys being released on minimum bonds.

Thomas Rogers, a negro 14 years old, applied at the emergency hospital last night for treatment, saying he feared he was suffering from lockjaw. Thomas shot himself in the hand with a toy pistol July 2. A piece of the cap was imbedded in the skin. One thousand five hundred units of anti-toxin was administered, and the boy sent home. He was instructed to keep his hand in hot water during the night.

Probably the most serious accident in Kansas City, Kas., was the injury sustained by S. A. Brophy, a street car conductor, living at 332 North Tenth street. The wadding from a blank cartridge entered his left thigh on the inside of the leg and caused a wound which Dr. W. R. Palmer, the attending physician, said last night might prove serious. Brophy was talking to a fellow street car conductor, L. J. Clark, when the latter pointed a gun at him and pulled the trigger.

BOY MAY LOSE HAND.

Roy Irvine, 5 years old, was injured by a piece of tin which flew from a torpedo and buried itself in the third finger of his left hand. He was treated at the home of his father, R. W. Irvine, 727 Central avenue.

Herman Fielder, 11 years old, was shot through the palm of his left hand by the wadding from a blank cartridge. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis, and removed to his home, 940 Ohio avenue. Charles Orr, 931 Tenney avenue, held a firecracker in his left hand while it exploded and may lose the index finger of his left hand as a result. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis. Mrs. M. Westerman, 318 North Tenth street, fell and dislocated her left shoulder while attempting to get away from a bunch of firecrackers which had been thrown near her. Mrs. Westerman is 62 years old, and was suffering great pain last night. She was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis.

Nathan Spicer, a merchant at 40 North James street, shot himself through the palm of the right hand while explaining the mechanism of a revolver to a prospective customer. He was attended by Dr. C. H. Brown, assistant police surgeon. James Whipple, 20 North James street, was struck by a flying particle during an explosion near his home and was burned on the left hand.

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July 3, 1909

HEAT CRAZED; RUNS AMUCK.

Right From Harvest Fields, Man
Causes Panic on City Street.

Affected by the sun of the Kansas harvest fields, Lewis Wright of Paris, Ill., ran amuck at Seventh street and Grand avenue at 8:30 yesterday morning with a pocketknife, and began slashing passersby.

Jennie Rolfe, 23 years old, a clerk, was stabbed in the left arm. She lives at 3010 Dunham avenue. Wright knocked another woman down with a brick, and ran several other persons away. Thomas Craig, an engineer, 2325 Chelsea avenue, Kansas City, Kas., was stabbed on the left hand and left shoulder. He retorted by knocking his assailant down and taking the knife away from him. A police ambulance took Wright to the emergency hospital.

When he was revived by Dr. W. L. Gist, Wright said that he could remember nothing of what had occurred, except that he thought someone had stabbed him in the leg. He said that he had been prostrated by the heat in the harvest fields. He thinks he is married.

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September 25, 1908

AN UNFORTUNATE FAT WOMAN.

Burdened by Flesh Miss Knox Be-
comes a Ward of the City.

"Suffering from an abundance of superfluous adipose tissue."

This is the diagnosis of the emergency hospital physicians in the case of Miss Mary Knox, 44 years old, five feet five inches tall, weighing 350 pounds. Miss Knox lives alone near St. Louis avenue and the State Line.

The woman's case was brought to the attention of the police at No. 2 station late yesterday afternoon. It was said that she was helpless, penniless and really a fit subject for the county home. The patrol wagon took Miss Knox to the emergency hospital, where, after a thorough examination, the foregoing diagnosis was agreed upon.

"It is an odd case," said Dr. W. L. Gist. "Miss Knox is too fat to walk without assistance, as she would fall if she encountered the least obstruction. Then when she is down she can't arise without help. The police say neighbors have been caring for the helpless woman for some time."

Her case will be referred to the Humane Society today and an effort made to get her in the county home. Ten years ago Miss Knox is said to have been as lithe and slender as a gazelle. When she began to take on flesh, no manner of dieting made any difference; she was destined to become very corpulent, and very corpulent she did become.

"This is one thing that scientists have not solved," said Dr. Gist. "People who are destined to be fat will gain weight in spite of all one can do, and, on the other hand, the slim tribe will remain shadows on a diet of fat-producing foods."

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February 19, 1908

AMBULANCES RACE FOR
A "DEAD" MAN.

Floater Taken From River
Turns Out to Be Alive.

A real "live" floater caused a neck and neck race along the river front yesterday afternoon between the emergency hospital ambulance and an undertaker's "dead wagon." The race attracted a great deal of attention and caused no end of excitement in the North End. The ambulance is painted gray and the dead wagon, of course, was black. It brought to mind the famous race between the "bob-tailed horse and the gray", but this time the "gray ambulance" won by a hame string.

The cause of the race was John Reich, 45 years old, a laborer of 1011 Cherry street. Reich was taken out of the river for dead. The emergency hospital was notified. Secretary Ebert called Coroner Thompson and the coroner detailed an undertaker to get the "dead man."

In about 20 minutes the telephone at the emergency rang again, and a trembling voice said, "Say feller, that floater ain't no floater 'tall. He's come to. That is, he's turned over onct. Better send the avalance and a doctor 'stead 'o the coroner."

It was then that the ambulance was dispatched and it was too late to call off the undertaker. That was the reason both vehicles met on the way to the river. The first one noticed of the other's presence. They were neck and neck on the river's sands and were "going some" to the east.

Undertakers have been known to race before and it may have been that this one thought a rival was after the body. The driver of the police amulance took up the race in a spirit of fun.

First one would forge ahead, then the other would come up fast and pass at a gallop. The police had the better team, however as it does nothing but run, and the driver was sport enough to win only by a hame string, when he could easily have outdistanced the dead wagon.

Lying on the bank, blue and cold, was Reich. When the undertaker's man saw the "floater" squirm and kick, he said things in "dead languages," reversed his team and slowly drove back home.

Reich was taken to the emergency hospital, where he was pumped out and artificial respiration used to get his lungs into working order. He was put to bed amid a bevy of hot water bottles and bags. In a couple of hours the "dead one" was in a condition to talk.

Reich recalled taking a drink a place down near the Winner piers. After that he said that he just "passed on" He did not know where he got into the water, how he got there, how long he was in, who got him out or where he was taken out.

"All I know is that I can't swim no more than a rock, and I got the derndest coldest duckin' a man ever got -- at least that I ever got. When I get out of this I'm goin' down there to look that ground -- or water -- over."

While Reich appears to be recuperating rapidly, Dr. W. L. Gist, who resuscitated him at the emergency hospital, said that the great danger now was pneumonia.

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October 11, 1907

SAYS HE EATS POKE ROOT.

Remarkable Habit of Man for Whom
Police are Caring.

Patrolman Hall found a man sitting on the sidewalk at Twenty-eighth street and Wabash avenue late Wednesday night. He was very weak and incoherent and the policeman sent him to headquarters for "safe keeping."

When the "safe keepers" were released early yesterday morning this man, who gave the name of Calvin A. Miller, 40 years old, was still unable to take care of himself. Dr. W. L. Gist examined him,, and Miller said he had been chewing poke root.

"I gathered the herb myself," said Miller feebly, "and became so fond of it that it became a necessity. It has undermined my constitution so that I can not work any more."

Miller had been acting as janitor of the flats near where he was found, but the eating of poke root had so incapacitated him that he could not work. Although only 40 years old, he looks and acts like an aged, broken down man. Dr. Gist sent him to the general hospital for treatment.

"I have seen and heard of many persons who use drugs," said the doctor, "but this is the first case of a person being addicted to poke root that I ever heard of."

The pokeberry plant is a common herb, of the genus phytolacca. It is non-poisonous, possessing emetic and diuretic properties. The tincture made from the root is is extensively used in the treatment of disease. Poke root may be found in profusion in all parts of Jackson county.

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October 4, 1907

ABLAZE BY ELECTRIC WIRE.

Workman on Scarritt Building Meets
With Strange Accident.

Louis Optiz, an electrician 24 years old, met with an unusual accident while working in the sub-basement of the Scarritt building yesterday. He was working with some wires when he accidentally came in contact with a live one. The wire would have caused him no trouble had it only touched his clothing, but it struck a metal fastening on his suspender.

The current consumed the metal in a flash. The blaze set fire to the man's clothing and he was severely burned along the right side, arm and shoulder. Dr. W. L. Gist, at the emergency hospital, dressed the injury and Opitz was taken home by a friend. He lives at 915 Central street.

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July 22, 1907

FROM DRINKING LEMONADE.

William Richter Becomes Suddenly
Ill at Budd Park.

William Richter, 57 years old, a chemist at Van Vleck laboratory at Independence, became violently ill yesterday afternoon after drinking lemonade at Budd park. He was seized with severe cramps, and removed from the part to the emergency hospital, where he was treated by Dr. W. L. Gist. He remained at the hospital.

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June 19, 1907

HE SLIPPED WHILE SHAVING.

Gamewell Superintendent Cuts
Gash in His Chin.

While shaving himself yesterday morning and trying to talk to his wife at the same time, A. Seeley, superintendent of the police Gamewell signal system, 1001 East Fourteenth street, slipped and cut a deep gash two inches long across his chin. Seeley went to the emergency hospital in the city hall and was treated by Dr. W. E. Gist.

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May 29, 1907

HAD A "WIRELESS PHONE".

Kansas City, Kas., Barber Who Had
a Vision at Police Station.

T. J. Shelton, 807 Cherry street, a barber with a shop at 1 1/2 Central avenue, Kansas City, Kas., walked into police headquarters early Monday morning and asked to be "detained" for a time.

"It's a good bed and the long rest is what I need," he said.

When Shelton was placed in the matron's room he immediately went into using an imaginary phone in the corner of his cell.

"It's a wireless phone," he told Dr. W. L. Gist. ""Handy things, aren't they? Wouldn't be without one."

Later Shelton called Mrs. Joan Moran, the matron, and handing her a quarter said: "I wish you'd send a meal up on the elevator there to my nurse. She's up there and hasn't had anything to eat for some time."

Shelton pointed carelessly out into space as he spoke of "the elevator there." An order was made to send him to the general hospital yesterday. In the afternoon he appeared better, however, and made many promised regarding his future conduct, so Dr. Gist allowed him to be taken in charge by a friend.

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May 17, 1907

POISONED BY PINEAPPLE.

Two Laundry Girls Unconscious
After Eating Canned Fruit.

"Pie Grated Pineapple" in a tin can came near causing the death of two young women at the Gate City laundry, 215 West Tenth street, yesterday afternoon. About 2 o'clock the ambulance was summoned from police headquarters and Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital accompanied it. Upon arrival he found Miss Myrtle Hayes, 20 years old, and Miss Blanch Steele, 21 years old, in an unconscious condition.

Dr. Gist worked with the young women for some time and succeeded in getting them beyond the danger line. They were turned over to a physician, who remained with them until late yesterday afternoon, when they were removed to their homes. Miss Hayes lives at 2915 Mersington and Miss Blanch Steele at 2919 Fairmount avenue.

The physicians were not certain whether the young women suffered from ptomaine or metallic poisoning. The can with over half of the "grated pineapple" was taken to the city hall and turned over to Dr. Walter M. Cross, city chemist. An analysis will not be made of the contents until some time today.

The young women said they bought the can from a grocery Wednesday noon for lunch. "We did not eat much of it then," one said, "and put it away for your lunch today. The can remained open during the interval. We were taken ill after partaking of the pineapple today."

The young woman cashier said, "The girls ate from the can yesterday, but did not experience any bad results. After eating from it today they also went out and ate some ice cream sodas and other truck -- I don't know what. Miss Steele seemed to be the worst affected. She did not regain consciousness until about 4 o'clock and both were still in a dazed condition late in the afternoon when taken home.

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May 1, 1907

IMAGINES HE HAS WEALTH.

Contractor Brought Back From Garnett,
Kas., Taken to Hospital.

Sheriff Babb and City Marshal Lacy from Garnett, Kas., arrived in the city yesterday afternoon with James Waymire, a sidewalk contractor, who became demented near there last Saturday and was taken into custody. Waymire lives at 106 Topping avenue and has a wife and five children whose ages range from 2 to 12 years. He was later transferred to the general hospital. Dr. W. L. Gist diagnosed the case as one of acute mania.

Waymire is the happiest insane man seen at the station in a long time, laughing and talking of great accomplishments continually. "I just made $48,000,000 out of that old bridge," he told Mrs. Moran, police matron. "If you will only wait here half an hour I will take you for a ride in a gold automobile studded with diamonds. I own everything in the world."

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April 7, 1907

MONGREL BITES A BOY.

Wounds of Clarance Logan Cauterized
at Emergency Hospital.

While running along the street in the vicinity of Eleventh and Central yesterday, Clarence Logan, 10 years old, living at 800 Penn street, was attacked and bitten on the right hand by a vicious dog. The boy was taken at once to the emergency hospital in the city hall, where Dr. W. L Gist cauterized the wound. The dog, a mongrel, ran away.

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March 18, 1907

CUT OFF HER FOOT.

LITTLE FRANCES SHAW RUN
DOWN BY ALTON TRAIN
GOT CAUGHT IN CATTLE GUARD.

"WHAT WILL MAMMA SAY!"
MOANED THE SUFFERER.
Accident Happened to the Girl While She Was
Walking Along the Track --Brother
Was Killed Years Ago by the
Metropolitan Cars.

"Oh what will mamma say? What will mamma say? I know this will kill her?"
This unselfish remark was the first to pass from the lips of Frances Shaw, 14-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Shaw, 2043 North Valley street, Kansas City, Kas., last evening after an incoming Chicago & Alton passenger train had passed over and completely severed her left foot above the ankle. The accident happened about 6 o'clock on a curve in the tracks at Mount Washington, just east of the city. Frances had been out there visiting her cousin, Minnie Eaton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Eaton. Both are about the same age. While on the way to the station to take a car for home the little girls were walking along the C. & A. tracks. In crossing over a cattle guard Frances' left foot became tightly wedged in between a rail and the guard. The children worked away casually to remove the imprisoned foot, not realizing the danger.

When a train was heard approaching, however, they were seized with fright and both girls pulled with all their mights to loosen the involved foot. All the while the puffing and steaming of the oncoming iron monster could be heard. The children could not see the train for the embankment. When all hope of freedom had fled Minnie jumped back from the tracks and Frances drew her right limb under her and laid down flat away from the track. Her presence of mind saved her life but the whole train passed over the left foot just at the shoe top and severed it as if with a cleaver.

The train was going at a rapid rate, so many witnesses said, and did not stop until several hundred yards beyond where the injured girl lay. Then it backed up and the conductor and train crew tried to do all they could for the child. Not a tear came from Frances Shaw during this terrible ordeal and her first words were of her mother -- not of herself. "What will mamma say?" she said. "What will mamma say? I know this will kill her."

It was a pretty day and many persons were out near Mount Washington. Probably a dozen persons heard the screams of the children and ran to the top of the cut in time to see the train pass over the girl's foot. Until she was reached it was thought she had been killed. Tenderly she was carried to the home of Dr. W. L. Gist, an assistant city physician, who lives nearby. There emergency treatment was given by Dr. Gist and Dr. W. L. Gillmor and when the shock of the accident was over she was removed to St. Luke's hospital, 2011 East Eleventh street. Dr. Gillmor and Dr. C. E. Nixon, whose wives are related to the injured girl, later completed the amputation, assisted by Dr. Pierce, house physician at the hospital.

This is the second serious accident to occur in the Shaw family. Fifteen years ago Newton Shaw, the 4-year-old son, was killed by a Chelsea park car at the "L" road crossing and Fifteenth street in Kansas City, Kas. It was said last night that Mrs. Shaw had never quite recovered from the shock of her little boy's death and that the accident to Frances would prostrate her. There are four children in the family, two brothers and one sister being older than Frances. The father, William Shaw, has for a long time been crippled with rheumatism and can do no manual labor. He is employed as a watchman for the Metropolitan Street Railway Company.

People living in Mount Washington have long called the place where the accident occurred as "Death Curve." The road makes a sharp curve at that point, which is right in the settlement of Mount Washington.

"It is a wonder to me," said Dr. C. E. Nixon last night, "that more accidents have not occurred there. It is almost necessary to use that portion of the tracks going to and from many of the homes across the tracks. One can see only a few yards on account of the embankment and if the train doesn't whistle as a warning it is right on you before you know it. Only a short while ago I came near getting caught there myself. It was night and I was returning from the city with my wife. Before I realized it a train had whisked around that curve and was right on me. My wife was off the track but I had to leap to save myself."

Many persons, it is said, who live out there, have similar stories of narrow escapes to tell. Few witnesses yesterday heard any whistle.

After the train had passed over Frances Shaw's limb the foot was left so tightly wedged in the cattle guard that it took a man's strength to extract it. Frances and her cousin, Minnie, said that they thougth of taking off the shoe to release the foot only when it was too late -- the train being nearly at the entrance to the cut. Those who witnessed the accident said that they never saw such presence of mind displayed by a child. Had she not laid down perfectly flat as she did she probably would have been killed by being struck by the steps of the coaches.

After the operation at St. Luke's last night the little girl was reported as doing well. The accident is not regarded as serious enough to result fatally. The girl's mother was at the hospital waiting long before the ambulance arrived. She remained all night by her daughter's bedside.

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