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February 2, 1910

BOY AFRAID OF AUTOS
KILLED BY BIG CAR.

Frank Smoot, 15, Crushed Under
Overturned Delivery Van --
Had Premonition of
Disaster.
Frank Smoot, Who Was Killed Under a Delivery Van.
FRANK SMOOT.

Frank Smoot, 15 years old, delivery boy for the John Taylor Dry Goods Company, was instantly killed at 7:20 o'clock last night when a new twenty-four horsepower delivery wagon in which he was riding struck a pile of bricks on Baltimore avenue between Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth streets and turned over, crushing him.

Frank Limpus, who was driving, works for the company which sold the car and was teaching a man to drive it.

They were just finished making deliveries and were returning when the accident happened. Limpus and J. J. Emmert, who had charge of the deliveries, were on the seat and young Smoot was seated on Emmert's lap.

"We were going north on Baltimore about six or seven miles an hour," said Limpus. "It was rather dark and we did not see the pile of bricks until we were almost upon them. I tried to pull away from them, but did not have time and our right front wheel hit with a crash. The bricks were piled about seven feet high and when the car, which weighs about 3,500 pounds, struck them the corner of the pile was torn away. The force of the collision did not stop us and the wheels on the right side ran up onto the pile until the car was overbalanced and turned over. The three of us were thrown out, young Smoot falling beneath the heavy car, the weight of which crushed his life out, almost instantly.

"It all happened so quickly that we did not realize he was hurt until Emmert and I had picked ourselves up. I saw that the boy was caught under the car and tried to remove him, but was not able to lift the car off him. A crowd of people came up and several men helped me lift the car and we pulled him out."

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, had the body removed to the Freeman & Marshall undertaking rooms.

The victim of the accident was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Smoot, 19 East Thirty-first street. Mrs. Smoot was at home preparing supper for her son when she was informed of his death.

"I knew something would happen," she said. "He did not want to go to work this morning. He is not used to automobiles and does not like to be around them. Just before he left for work he said to me, "Mamma, I expect John Taylor's will be getting air ships before long and deliver the packages with a long rope down the chimneys."

Mr. Taylor was notified of the accident and called at the undertaking rooms last night.

The dead boy had had been working for the dry goods company for the past year. He was born in Chicago, but was brought to Kansas City when he was six months old. The father of the boy runs a dress goods sample room at 406 East Eleventh street. Besides the parents, two little sisters, Addie and Edna, survive.

No one responsible for the bricks being piled in the street could be located last night, but several persons who live in the immediate neighborhood of the accident assert that no warning lights were placed.

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January 24, 1910

DEAD MAN'S HOARD
HIS LAST PILLOW.

FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS
IN SECURITIES IN CASHBOX
UNDER HIS HEAD.

Body of Oscar Schoen, Aged
70, Found Amid His
Savings.

With his head pillowed on a cash box containing $15,000 worth of negotiable securities, mostly government bonds and money orders, Oscar Schoen, a retired shoemaker, 70 years old, was found dead in bed in a squalid room at Missouri avenue and Main streets yesterday morning.

The old man's hand clutched a half emptied phial of morphine tablets while at his side lay a loaded 38-caliber revolver. One of the cartridges had been snapped but had failed to ignite.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky, who was summoned, stated that death was due to morphine poisoning, whether taken as an overdose or with suicidal intent he was unable to state. He ordered the body taken to Freeman & Marshall's undertaking establishment.

MONEY ALSO IN ROOM.

Although Schoen had occupied the same room in which he was found for over two years, little or nothing was known about him by the owner of the rooming house. He was last seen alive on Thursday morning by Guy Holmes, the janitor of the premises. He told Holmes that he was feeling sick and that if it were not for the expense he would visit a doctor. He used to retire regularly at 6 o'clock every evening and rise at 8 in the morning, when he would go out and buy the daily papers, return and stay in his room. Rarely he made trips up to town.

Police headquarters was notified of the old man's death and Patrolman John P. McCauley, who was sent to investigate, made a further search of the room. Concealed behind an old stove in which Schoen had done his cooking was found $60 in bills and silver, and in an old carpetbag apparently discarded and thrown under the bed, the officer located several abstracts and deeds to Kansas City property in the vicinity of Thirty-first and Troost avenue, which are supposedly of considerable value.

WILL IN POCKETBOOK.

Schoen's last will and testament was also found in an old pocketbook. By its provisions all his property is bequeathed to relatives by the name of Goetz living in Kempsvile, Ill. Charles A. Schoen, a brother at Darlington, Ind., was named as executor. The police have telegraphed to all parties concerned.

One of the witnesses of the will was the manager of a local real estate firm, through whom Schoen had conducted his business. He stated that he know that the old man owned a great deal of property. Schoen at one time conducted a cobbler's shop at 2442 Broadway, but left there about four years ago, giving his reason for selling out and moving the fact that robberies were too common in that part of town.

Naturalization papers dated 1872 and taken out at Darlington, Ind., were found among Schoen's effects, together with several applications to different German provident associations.

Schoen had lived in Kansas City about twenty-two years. He has a sister, Mrs. Bertha H. Goetz, at Kempsville, Ill., and a niece, Mrs. Agnes Yak Shan, residing in Alaska.

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December 30, 1909

FOUND DEAD IN A CELLAR.

George Dixon Stricken While at
Work Cultivating Mushrooms.

George Dixon, 66 years old, living in the Metropolitan hotel, was found dead in a cellar under the Last Chance saloon, Bridge street and Broadway, yesterday morning. Dixon, who cultivated mushrooms in the cellar, did not return to his home on Tuesday night, and his wife requested the police to make a search.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and after pronouncing death to be due to heart failure, ordered the body sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms.

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December 10, 1909

HUNDREDS AT SCENE
OF ROSEDALE KILLING.

DEPUTY'S MURDERER HAD BEEN
DRINKING AND DANGEROUS.

Compelled Two Men at Point of Re-
volver to Imbibe, Then Carry
Suit Case of Ammunition --
No Funeral Arrangements.

Hundreds of persons yesterday afternoon in Rosedale went over the route of the running fight of Wednesday night which resulted in the murder of C. Q. Lukens, a Wyandotte county deputy sheriff, and the subsequent killing of Charles T. Galloway, the slayer. The home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., where the besieged man was finally captured after a desperate battle with Missouri and Kansas officers, came in for a good share of attention.

In the investigation yesterday circumstances came to light which, had they been known at the time by Lukens, probably would have prevented the double killing. From many sources it was found that Galloway had been drinking heavily preceding the shooting, and was in a dangerous mood during the day. He had made numerous attempts to find his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway, with the avowed intention of taking her life. At the point of a revolver he forced W. E. Tompkins and James Creason to drink with him and later to assist in carrying a suitcase full of ammunition.

ENTERED THE LAWYER'S HOME.

About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning he entered the home of Rush L. Fisette, the attorney who had brought divorce proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Galloway. the half crazed man insisted on searching every room in the house in the hopes of finding his wife. He left without causing any trouble, but with threats that he would kill his wife. It was Mr. Fisette who notified the sheriff's office in Kansas City, Kas.

Mrs. Galloway was prostrated yesterday by the events of the night before. The story of her fourteen years of married life included threats by her husband, who beat her and drove her from the house. Always following a hard drinking spell the man became half crazed and in this condition seized a gun or any weapon and attacked his wife. At other times he spoke in the most endearing terms to her. Mrs. Galloway remained yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James L. Connor, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale.

LUKENS WELL LIKED.

In Kansas City, Kas., and Argentine, where Lukens had been known for years, the man was respected and liked. At the home of his widowed mother in Argentine the aged woman refused to be comforted.

The body of Lukens had been removed to Simmons's undertaking rooms in Argentine. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Charles Quincy Lukens was a member of the Brother hood of Railway Trainmen in Argentine and also was a member of Aerie No. 87, Fraternal Order of Eagles, in Kansas City, Kas.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.

A post-mortem examination of the body of Galloway, conducted by Coroner Harry Czarlinsky yesterday morning at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, showed that the bullet entered his right side and taking a downward course pierced the liver and passed out the left side. A coroner's inquest will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

In a letter received by Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday afternoon from Chief of Police Wiley W. Cook of Kansas City, Kas., the chief said:

"Especially do I wish to express my highest commendation of Detectives Ralph Truman and J. W. Wilkens, who at the risk of their lives led the attack that effected Galloway's capture."

WANTED HIM TO DRINK.

W. E. Tompkins, employed at the Gates undertaking establishment in Rosedale and who lives at 505 Southwest boulevard, Rosedale, said he was passing in front of Galloway's home at 428 College avenue shortly after noon on the day of the double tragedy when he was accosted by Galloway and told to hold up his hands. At the same time Galloway pointed two large revolvers in the face of Tompkins and told him to follow him into the house. Tompkins followed.

When they reached the inside of the house James Creason, an electrician who helped Galloway on electrical work, was sitting there. Galloway insisted that Tompkins take a drink from a large quart bottle of whisky.

FEARED FOR HIS LIFE.

"I finally talked him out of that," Tompkins said, "but during the two hours he kept Creason and me imprisoned in the house Galloway drank at least three-fourths of the quart of whisky. He sowed us a Winchester shotgun and a Winchester rifle and a suitcase full of ammunition. He said to us: 'Do you know what I am going to do with these,' and when we answered negatively he said he was going to 'raise hell tonight.'

"We pleaded with him to let us go, as I was afraid every minute that he would get wild and kill both of us. He finally agreed to let us go if we would carry the guns and ammunition down to Creason's home on Bell street. Creason led two bird dogs and carried the guns, and I carried a heavy coil wire belonging to Galloway, and the suit case fu ll of ammunition. My load got heavy, though, and I left all of the stuff at Young's store at College avenue and Oak street. Creason, I suppose, took his stuff on down to his place, and then Galloway came back up and got what I had left."

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November 17, 1909

BODY ON STOVE EIGHT HOURS.

Stone Mason Found Dead Where He
Had Prepared to Cook Noon Meal.

Peter Gilberg, a stone mason, was found dead in his home, 815 East Twenty-second street at 8 o'clock last night by Matt Gleason, proprietor of a saloon at 921 East Twenty-first street, who sent Gilberg home ill yesterday morning. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, found that a hemorrhage killed Gilberg.

Gilberg lived alone. He evidently was preparing to cook his noon day meal when he was stricken as uncooked fish and some potatoes were on the kitchen table. One side of the body was cooked from the heat of the gas stove, which had been burning for probably eight hours.

Mr. Gilberg was a member of the Woodmen of the World and carried $1,000 insurance. The secretary of the lodge was called last night but was unable to tell who the insurance was made out to. Mr. Gleason's niece was married about two months ago to a union tailor but whose name was unknown to the uncle. The niece was married in Westport. The body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms, Fourteenth street and Grand avenue.

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November 10, 1909

BOYS CHEERED AS
THEY RODE TO DEATH.

MISUNDERSTOOD WARNINGS OF
HORRIFIED PEDESTRIANS.

Coaster Wagon in Which Kelly and
Eugene Clemonds Were Riding
Hits Street Car -- One Boy
Dead, Other Dying.

Death ended a coasting ride which Kelly C. Clemonds, 15, and his brother, Eugene, 11, were enjoying when their little express wagon glided into the path of a streetcar yesterday evening. The boys received injuries, from which Kelly died an hour later, while but little hope is entertained for the recovery of Eugene.

Both boys resided at Grand Summit, Kas., and were here on a visit at the home of Mrs. James W. Roark, 2919 Flora avenue.

The accident occurred a few minutes before 6 o'clock at the intersection of Twenty-ninth street and Lynn avenue.

The boys had a small coaster express and had been running down the grade on Twenty-ninth street west from Woodland. They had made a number of trips and were laughing and shouting.

When they trudged up the hill when darkness was falling one of the boys suggested that they had had enough fun.

"Let's have just one more," said the other, and turning the wagon at the top of the slope they gave a run and boarding it whirled down at a rapid rate.

As they neared Lynn avenue car No. 555 of the Vine street line, in charge of Motorman Powers and Conductor Everhart, northbound, was approaching.

Pedestrians, attracted by the cheers of the boys, gave a warning cry. the boys, however, did not understand and the wagon kept ahead on its deadly course.

Not until they saw the car loom up before them did they realize their danger. They made a futile effort to swerve the wagon from its path, but were struck with terrific force.

An ambulance was summoned from No. 4 police station and hurried them to the general hospital.

Kelly died at 1:30 o'clock from internal injuries. Eugene, the younger brother, suffered a fracture of the skull, a fracture of the left arm and cuts and bruises. An operation was performed on the skull and the boy rallied, but the physicians have doubts about his recovery.

Dr. Czarlinsky will hold an inquest today.

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November 7, 1909

BLED TO DEATH WHILE ALONE.

Tries to Scrawl Note, but Strength
Ebbs Away Too Soon.

An autopsy held yesterday on the body of William O. Thornton, found dead in a pool of blood in a room in the Occidental hotel, 24 East Third street, late Friday night, and who was at first supposed to have been a victim of foul play, showed that death was due to the bursting of an artery in the left leg.

Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky made the investigation, and said that the man had bled to death after the artery, which had been wasted by disease, burst.

How long it required for Thornton to die is not known, but investigation at the rooming house disclosed the fact that the man realized when the artery burst that he was on the precipice of eternity and beyond aid of any kind.

A pencil and a small piece of paper which were found in the room yesterday showed that he had attempted to scrawl a note. Finding his strength was waning too fast with the ebbing of his life blood to accomplish this task, Thornton turned to the squalid cot, for which a few hours before he paid 10 cents for the purpose of sleeping on, and in the grimy darkness of the room he knelt and began to offer a prayer.

The body was found in this kneeling posture. Whether the prayer was completed or whether he died while his mind was trying to form words will never be known.

Thornton has a son living at Greenville, Mo., and a sister at Southwest City, Mo. The son called at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms yesterday and said he would probably take charge of the remains, but has as yet made no definite arrangements for the funeral.

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October 23, 1909

BOY-HUSBAND OF 19
CRUSHED BY A CAR.

Clyde Bailey, Married But Two
Months, Is Instantly Killed at
Eighteenth and Indiana.

Clyde Bailey, a carpenter, and a bridegroom of two months, who lived with his father-in-law, Andrew Curtis, 2811 Bales avenue, was killed by a southbound Indiana car between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets at 6:18 o'clock last evening.

Young Bailey, who was only 19 years old, had been working all day with his father and brother on a building at Overland park, and at 5:30 in the evening left them at Thirty-ninth and State line with the words: "Well I'll see you in the morning, kid." He changed cars at that point and eventually transferred to the Indiana avenue car which would take him to his home and supper.

Charles L. Bowman, proprietor of a night lunch wagon at Eighteenth and Indiana, who was a passenger on the car with Bailey, said they got off at Eighteenth. Bailey walked south on Indiana to the center of the block, said Bowman, and seeing a northbound car coming, crossed the west track and tried to catch the car on the inside. He was thrown back on the west track in the path from the southbound car from which he had just stepped and which by that time was going very rapidly. the top of Bailey's head struck the inside rail of the west track and was crushed by the wheels, the motorman being unable to stop the car until it had entirely passed over the body.

Fifteen minutes after the accident Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky had the body removed to the Carrol-Davidson undertaking rooms, where it was identified by a book of Overland Park line tickets which he had purchased yesterday morning. His father, Nathan H. Bailey, 4435 Madison street, was notified, and his son, Cal W. Bailey, a brother of Clyde, was the first to arrive at the undertaking rooms.

The streetcar conductor, Jerome Moore, 835 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., and the motorman, William Erickson of 1049 Ann avenue, were arrested by Officer Fields and taken to police headquarters where Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Norman Woodson released them on their personal recognizance for their appearance this morning.

It was at first thought Bailey was Roland Allshire, son of Roy B. Allshire, a contractor living at 2421 Indiana avenue, as Bailey had one of Allshire's cards in his pocket. A verdant young man immediately repaired to the Allshire home, where he threw the family into hysterics with the news. They telephoned to the Loose-Wiles factory, where young Allshire works nights, and he soon appeared on the scene to contradict the story.

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October 22, 1909

BOY KILLED BY CAR;
MILK BOTTLE SAVED.

HE RUNS BEHIND TROLLEY AND
DIES BENEATH ANOTHER.

Stopped Work on Essay With "And
Then I Prepared to Take Some
Rest" to Go on Errand to
Grocery for Mother.

While "running" an errand for his mother, Sidney Crawford, 16 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Crawford, 8247 East Twenty-eighth street, met death beneath the wheels of an Indiana avenue street car, between Twenty-eighth street and Victor avenue, at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Crawford had sent Sidney with an empty bottle to a grocery store for milk.

As the boy reached a point on Twenty-eighth street where he might cross directly over to the store, a southbound car obstructed his path for a moment. When it had passed Sidney ran quickly behind it, and encountered a northbound car.

The momentum of the car carried it about thirty feet before it could be stopped and the body could be extricated from beneath the rear trucks, where it was wedged tightly.

When it was disengaged by a wrecking crew thirty minutes after the accident, the half-pint milk bottle remained unbroken.

The boy was the oldest son of the Crawford family and a junior in Manual Training high school. In the library of the home yesterday afternoon he was writing an essay when his mother sent him on the fatal trip to the store. The title of the thesis was "A Halloween Prank."

As Sidney arose to go he bent over his paper and in a thin, boyish scribble added the sentence: "And then I prepared to take some rest." In less than five minutes a neighbor came running to the Crawford doorstep with news of the accident.

Mrs. Crawford was overcome with grief too acute for tears and medical attention was necessary. Mrs. August Nuss, 3233 East Twenty-eighth street, whose husband is a partner with Mr. Crawford in a trunk store at 425-27 West Sixth street, called the latter over the telephone.

The body of the boy was examined by Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky immediately after the accident. An inquest will be held this afternoon. The motorman and conductor of the Indiana avenue street car which killed him were arrested by Patrolman Joseph Morris and taken to the county prosecutor's office but later were released on their personal bonds.

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October 19, 1909

SLUGGER WALKS AWAY
AS CATTLE MAN DIES.

ONE BLOW KILLS MARK DUN-
LAP OF DALHART, TEX.

Only Identification Is Three-Car
Shipment Receipt Signed by
Commission Company -- No
Arrest is Made.

The identity of the mysterious slugger who struck a man supposed to be Mark Dunlap, a Dalhart, Tex., stockman, who came here from Maple Hill, Kas., at Sixth and Main streets, killing him instantly about 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon, is still a mystery. Though the incident was witnessed by a half dozen persons and a good description was furnished the police department, not a single arrest was made yesterday afternoon.

It is believed that the man escaped on one of the late trains last night.

The man who is supposed to have been Dunlap, from a receipt of a three-car cattle shipment in his pockets, signed by the Fowler-Todd Commission Company, first was noticed near Sixth and Delaware streets. Two men were talking with him at the time and as the three walked east, their conversation drifted into an argument. On the corner, the largest of the two men, who was dressed in gray trousers, dark coat and black slouch hat, reached in his trousers pocket and struck Dunlap a terrific blow.

SLUGGER WALKS AWAY.

He then turned away slowly with his companion, while the victim staggered and fell to the sidewalk.

A half dozen men lifted the injured man from the sidewalk and found that he was bleeding from the contact with the sidewalk or from a pair of "knuckles." The police are inclined to think it was the latter. None of the spectators paid any attention to the slugger and his companion who were soon lost in the crowd at Fifth street.

The ambulance arrived fifteen minutes later with Dr. George Ringle in charge. He pronounced the man dead and notified Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, county coroner, who directed the body be sent to a local undertaker's establishment.

BODY LEFT ON WALK.

The ambulance left before the arrival of the undertaker and the body was left on the sidewalk surrounded by a morbid crowd. It took several policemen to restrain the curious ones from trampling on the body.

The police rounded up the witnesses of the killing and attempted to get information on the whereabouts of the slugger. Van Stillwell, 23 West Missouri avenue; Clarence Brume, 1706 Bristol avenue; Alfred Freeman, 907 Forest avenue; William Single, 544 1/2 Main street; W. G. Smith, 511 1/2 Campbell street; Fred Murray, 517 Delaware street; Peter Stalzer, Sixth and Main streets, were all sent out with different detectives to help in the search.

Dunlap was about 50 years old. When searched by the coroner it was found that he had no money in his pockets.

WAS A COOK.

ALMA, KAS., Oct. 18. -- Mark Dunlap came from Dalhart, Tex., Saturday with cattle for W. J. Todd. He had been a cook at Dalhart and was not known at Maple Hill.

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October 12, 1909

JANITOR WORRY KILLS HIM.

Real Estate Man Falls Dead Upon
Inspecting Apartment House
Employes Had Neglected.

Heart disease made acute by worry over the janitor service in an apartment house on West Thirty-fourth street, for which he was the agent, is said to have caused the death of Dr. Ammon Kuns, a real estate man of 805 East Fourteenth street, who expired suddenly in front of the apartments at 6 o'clock last night.

Dr. Kuns, who seven years ago retired from dentistry in order to handle realty, had been suffering from pulmonary trouble for more than a year. He left his home yesterday morning in good spirit and apparently in excellent health, remarking to his wife that he would go to the flat on Thirty-fourth street before supper and see about hiring a new janitor.

"Everyone leaves the rooms in a worse condition than the last," he said. "It is about the only worry I have."

Mrs. Kuns said last night that she had learned that conditions at the apartments were not even as good as her husband had expected when he arrived there. She believed that his dismay at finding that some of his instructions had been neglected caused the undue excitement that hastened his end.

Mr. Kuns was 57 years old. He was born in Illinois, went to Jewell City, Kas., 27 years ago to practice dentistry, and lived there continuously up to seven years ago when he moved to Los Angeles, Cal. Four years ago he came to Kansas City.

Besides the widow, he is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Stella Mayhue, San Francisco; Mrs. Theodore Conley, Los Angeles; Mrs. O. E. White, of Jewell City, and Miss Helen, living at the home.

Kuns was a member of the Odd Fellows, Masonic and Woodmen of the World, local lodges. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky ordered the body sent to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

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September 25, 1909

CATTLEMAN KILLS
PARTER IN HOTEL.

SEXTON BAR TRAGEDY FOL-
LOWS QUARREL OVER RANCH.

Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., Puts
Three Bullets Into Brain of
Edward Hayes of Paw-
huska, Ok.
Eugene Hayes, Kansas Cattleman Accused of Murder.
EUGENE HAYES.
Kansas Cattleman Who Killed Edward
Hayes, His Partner, in the Barroom
of the Sexton Hotel Last Night.

Following a quarrel concerning the affairs of their 40,000 acre ranch in Osage county, Oklahoma, Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., a cattleman reputed to be worth half a million dollars, shot and killed his partner, Edward Hayes of Pawhuksa, Ok., in the bar of the Hotel Sexton at 7:45 o'clock last night.

Edward Hayes was shot three times, almost in the center of the forehead. He died instantly Eugene Hayes, who is held at police headquarters, says he shot in self defense.

The shooting was witnessed by Edward Lewis, and Lewis Weisenbacher, bartenders; Lee Russell, a millionaire cattleman from Ft. Worth and Lee Rogers, a Kansas City real estate dealer who is an ex-cowman.

L. C. Thompson, another Kansas City real estate man and former cattle raiser, was in the crowd, but says he did not see the shooting.

The five men entered the hotel together about 7:30 o'clock last night, and sat around a table in the front end of the saloon. About fifteen minutes later Eugene and Edward Hayes went to a table in the rear and against the wall opposite the bar.

THREE BULLETS INTO BRAIN.

Before dinner was served they began quarrelling about business affairs, but the conversation was not overheard by anyone unless it was Lee Russell, who is said to have been standing near the small table at which the partners were sitting.

Suddenly Eugene Hayes, who was facing north, leaped from his chair and running around the end of the table began firing. The first shot struck Edward Hayes in the forehead. Two more were effective, almost in the same spot.

Edward Hayes fell back in his chair, dead, and Eugene, taken in charge by a friend, walked towards the front door after placing his pistol, an automatic gun, in his hip pocket. As he rounded the glass screen at the end of the bar Patrolman Arthur Kennard arrested him.

Edward Lewis, the bartender who saw the shooting, said Edward Hayes reached towards his hip pocket first. As he did so, Lewis said, Eugene got up and pulled his pistol, and began firing as he stepped toward Edward. Edward Hayes did not succeed in getting his revolver out of his pocket. The coroner removed it, and took charge of it until an inquest is held. It was a Luger rapid fire gun, the magazine holding seven cartridges.

"I BEAT YOU TO IT."

"I beat you to it," the witness declared Eugene Hayes said as he put away his revolver.

Inspector E. P. Boyle sent Detectives Ralph Trueman and Denver D. Mitchell to the hotel as soon as he was informed of the killing. Detectives Keshlear and McGraw followed.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified, and after viewing the body had it removed to Stewart's undertaking rooms, where he performed a post mortem.

Immediately after the shooting the hotel management called Dr. A. L. Porter, who lifted the dead man out of the chair and laid him on the floor.

Eugene Hayes was taken to police headquarters by Patrolman Kennard. He gave the patrolman his pistol while on the street car.

When taken before Lieutenant James Morris to be booked for investigation Hayes was recognized by Patrolman "Jack" McCauley, who asked him what he was arrested for.

"Just killed my partner, Ed Hayes, up at the Sexton hotel.

"What for?" asked Lieutenant Morris.

QUARREL OVER RANCH AFFAIRS.

"Well, he was going to kill me if I didn't. I had to do it. That's all."

To Captain Walter Whitsett, and Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Hayes made no attempt to conceal anything except details of the shooting. He refused to say anything more until he could see John Hayes, former chief of police.

"He's a relative of mine, you know," he kept saying during the conversation. "I'm a ranch owner in Oklahoma," began Hayes. "I'm a pretty well known man, and John Hayes, who was formerly chief of police, is a cousin of mine, and he comes down to the Territory and hunts on my place. This man Ed Hayes is no kin of mine. I simply took him into a partnership wit me and he owes me $5,000. He didn't pay anything into the place.

At police headquarters last night the police took off of Eugene Hayes a diamond ring which is valued at $1,000. Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky took possession of a gold watch, a gold pen, $5.50 in money, and a a revolver taken from Edward Hayes. He wore a Knights of Pythias watch charm.

Ex-Chief John Hayes denied last night that he was any relative of the prisoner. "He is not even distantly related," Hayes said. "I have known him for years and have hunted on his place down in Oklahoma. I don't know why he should claim to be some relative of mine."

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September 18, 1909

KILLS SELF ON "HOBO HILL."

Jesse Skarling, Despondent Because
of His Wife's Illness.

Under a tree on "Hobo Hill," an elevation overlooking the Missouri river near the foot of Main street, Jesse M. Skarling, a painter, killed himself yesterday afternoon by swallowing about four ounces of carbolic acid. Depression on account of his wife's illness is thought to be the cause. Beside him was a note which furnished the only identification.

"My name is Jesse Skarling," the note read. "My dear wife's name is Ida Skarling. My mother lives at Muskogee, Ok. Goodby, friends."

The man evidently had thought about committing suicide for several hours. Beside his body were dozens of cigarette stubs and the grass indicated that he had moved several tim es as the sun shifted. There was no label on the bottle and no indication where the acid was purchased.

After viewing the body, Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky ordered it sent to O'Donnell's undertaking rooms.

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September 14, 1909

KANSAN SUICIDE IN
KANSAS CITY HOTEL.

ALBERT SARBACH OF HOLTON
FOUND DEAD IN ROOM.

Killed Himself With Chloroform,
But Had Acid in Reserve -- Pros-
perous Merchant and Mason --
Motive Unknown.

With an uncorked chloroform bottle fastened to the bed in such a manner that every drop fell on a towel laid over his face, Albert Sarbach, a prosperous merchant of Holton, Kas., was found dead in his room in the Baltimore hotel at 8 o'clock yesterday morning.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky said Sarbach probably had been dead two days.

No motive for the suicide could be found yesterday. The only thing that could be found of a significant nature was a bottle of carbolic acid, possibly to have been used had the chloroform failed.

That Sarbach contemplated suicide, though no motive was given, is the opinion of officers who investigated the matter. In one of his pockets was a will which was made out on April 20. The writing was identified as that of Sarbach.

MAID THOUGHT HIM ASLEEP.

Mr. Sarbach is supposed to have gone to his room some time around midnight Saturday. He took the key out of the door, evidently knowing that the maid would use the master key to open the door, and find his body.

The maid opened the door Sunday morning and saw Mr. Sarbach's body lying across the bed. She th ought that he was asleep, probably suffering from the effects of a bad night, and as he was dressed and the bed was made she hurriedly closed the door and went about her work. She returned to the room in the afternoon and when she saw the body was unmoved she concluded that he had not awakened.

Yesterday morning when the housemaid found his body in the same position as the day before she summoned the housekeeper and it was discovered that he was dead.

HIGH IN HIS FRATERNITY.

Sarbach was a member of a prominent family of Holton, and was unmarried. He was a thirty-second degree Mason, and had held various offices in the order. At the time of his death he was grand treasurer for the order in Kansas. At one time he was mayor of Holton, and until his death was a member of the board of regents of Campbell university, located there.

He was elected to the Kansas legislature in 1900 on the Republican ticket. He is survived by a brother, Max Sarbach, and two sisters, Carrie Sarbach and Mrs. Sarah Lehman.

The body was taken to Stewart's undertaking rooms. Dr. Czarlinsky said no autopsy would be held.

Mr. Sarbach's uncle, W. W. Nailer, called at Leo J. Stewart's undertaking rooms and identified the body, which will be sent to Holton for burial.

Samuel B. Strother, public administrator, was yesterday afternoon appointed by the probate court to take charge of Albert Sarbach's estate. This move was made so that the coroner may turn over to Mr. Strother any personal property Mr. Sarbach may have had in this state at the time of his death.

When told of the suicide of his brother Albert at Kansas City, Max Sarbach collapsed. The Sarbach store was closed. No probable cause for the act is known to members of the family.

Sarbach is reputed to have been wealthy. He operated grain elevators in Holton and at Della, Winchester, Boyle, Half Monn, Larkin and Circleville, Kas., in addition to his mercantile establishment. No financial losses sufficient to cause suicide are known.

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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July 10, 1909

DROWNS IN THE BLUE.

Current Too Swift for Charles
Knapp, a Sheffield Laborer.

While swimming in the Blue river yesterday afternoon below the Kansas City Southern bridge, Charles Knapp, a laborer for the Kansas City Bolt and Nut Company, was drowned. The body was quickly recovered.

Knapp was accompanied by E. J. Slaughter of 3006 East Twenty-fifth street, who was barely able to swim, and could render no assistance to the drowning man. Knapp climbed on a girder and dived out as far as possible. The current was swifter than he calculated and after a few struggles to get to the bridge he gave up and sank.

Slaughter telephoned the Sheffield police station but help arrived too late. The body was taken to Blackman & Carson's undertaking rooms in Shefffield by Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky. Knapp's mother, Mrs. William Brown, lives near St. Clair on the Independence line.

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July 10, 1909

CUT IN TWO ON CAR TRACK.

Body of Unidentified Man Discov-
ered at Walnut and Second.

While rounding the curve in the old Holmes street cut on Second street between Walnut street and Grand avenue at midnight last night, J. A. Franklin, the motorman of a Vine street car, noticed that his car bumped slightly at one particular place. He stopped the car, got off and went back to investigate.

In the middle of the track was the body of a man which had evidently been lying there for several hours. More than a dozen cars had passed over the body before any one noticed it. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered it taken to an undertaker.

From papers found in the dead man's pockets it was presumed that his name is Walter A. Rosh of Enid, Ok.

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July 2, 1909

VICTIM OF BUSHWHACKERS?

Skeleton Unearthed on the Old Judge
Shouse Farm.

While excavating for a basement in a house going up at 1611 Elmwood avenue at noon yesterday workmen unearthed the skeleton of a man. A few minutes after the original discovery Arthur Williams, a boy living at 1530 Elmwood, while prodding around in the basement for a stick found a rotten board of a box and several old-fashioned square nails.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky ordered the bones taken to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking establishment, from whence they probably will be taken to the potter's field for burial.

"The basement is located on the old William Shouse farm, near where a house belonging to him was burned by bushwhackers during the fore part of the civil war," said E. M. Bradley, and employe of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, who was born near the place in 1852, and has resided at Sixteenth street and Kensington avenue ever since.

"Mr. Shouse used to be county judge of Jackson county," continued Mr. Bradley. "He was a Southern man, but very outspoken against the bushwhackers. One day they raided and burned his place. It is just possible that some dark deed of the bushwhackers was covered up."

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June 27, 1909

BOY DROWNS IN THE BLUE.

Fell From a Skiff and Came Up Be-
neath a Barge.

John Palmer, 14 years old, fell from a skiff into the Blue river near the Independence road yesterday morning and was drowned. Marion Bullinger, proprietor of boathouse at that point, and several others saw the boy fall over the side of the skiff, which was near a barge anchored close to the bridge. The body did not rise again until the barge was moved, when the body was found beneath it.

The boy and his father room at the home of Jack Thomas, 415 Douglas avenue. Until recently he had been working at the Kansas City Nut and Bolt factory at Sheffield. Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky viewed the body and had it sent to Blackburn & Carson's undertaking rooms.

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May 14, 1909

DEATH BY CARBOLIC ACID.

Unidentified Man Commits Suicide
Near Centropolis.

The body of an unidentified man was found in a lot between Drury and Hardesty avenues on Fifteenth street yesterday morning by Mrs. Della Morris, who lives in the vicinity. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, said death was due to carbolic acid poising.

The name Henry Patterson was found on a piece of paper in the man's pocket. The underclothing bore the letters J. E. C. and the initials J. C. were upon a signet ring which he wore. H e was about 50 years old, five feet five inches in height, weighed 140 pounds and wore a dark suit, patent leather shoes and a soft hat. His eyes were gray and his hair brown.

ENDED LIFE WITH SHOTGUN.

Morgan Jones, a farmer who lives near Dallas, Mo., killed himself with a shotgun early yesterday morning. He had been ill for a number of years and it is thought by his friends that it caused despondency. He was 30 years old and unmarried. He had been formerly employed as a bookkeeper in Kansas City.

TRIED TO DIE, BUT FAILED.

In a saloon at 1025 East Nineteenth street F. D. Miskelly of Excelsior Springs attempted to kill himself by drinking chloroform. He was taken to the general hospital. He is in precarious condition.

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May 10, 1909

GOT OFF CAR BACKWARDS.

T. J. Kennedy of Le Loup, Kas.,
Killed by Fall on the Asphalt.

Stepping from a moving car between Tenth and Eleventh street in Grand avenue, T. J. Kennedy, 55 years old, a farmer from Le Loup, Kas., fell with the back of his head on the asphalt yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and was killed. Kennedy had attempted to alight from the car with his back in the direction it was going.

The old man was on his way to surprise his only son, Rufus Kennedy, who lives at 109 East Sixteenth street, with a visit, the first one he had paid him since December 22, 1908. The son did not know of his intention, the first news of it coming with the announcement of his death.

Kennedy had lived in the vicinity of Le Loup for twenty-seven years, being the owner of a farm one and one-half miles east of that place. His wife is dead, but his daughter, Victoria, kept house for him. The son is a wagon driver for the City Ice Company.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered the body taken to Carroll-Davidson's undertaking rooms. A post-mortem examination will be held this morning.

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May 6, 1909

FOUND DEAD IN BATHTUB.

Charles Butler's Body Submerged,
and Hot Water Running.

Charles Butler, 35 years old, was found dead in a bathtub at his rooming house, 1520 Cherry street, last night about 6:30 o'clock. Butler was employed in a pool hall at Fifteenth and Cherry streets, but had formerly been a boilermaker, a prize fighter and a trapeze performer.

J. D. Locke, also a roomer, found the body. He was attracted to the bathroom by the smell of burning wood, burst in the door and found the body of Butler covered with water and in the tub, curled up as though asleep. Hot water from the gas heater was still running and had almost filled the tub. The smell of burning wood came from the wall at the side of the heater, which had become scorched.

Butler was troubled with an affliction of the heart. Death may have been due to this cause.

A letter dated September 25, 1907, was found in his pockets. It was addressed to "My Husband" and signed Myrtle Butler, his wife, to whom he had been married three years previously. Six months ago they separated. Last month she married a man named Harry Thompson and moved away from the city. Butler was seen frequently in the company of a young woman, and two days ago told his landlady that he was about to be married.

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky vivewed the body, but will make a further examination. A brother lives in this city.

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April 19, 1909

SUICIDE IN SWOPE PARK.

Virne Willard, Despondent Through
Ill Health, Makes Good His
Threat to Die.

With a revolver in the right hand and a bullet hole in the head, the badly decomposed body of Eugene Virne Willard, 417 Lawton place, was found yesterday afternoon in a ditch about a mile east of the main entrance to Swope park, by two small boys, who notified park authorities.

Two patrolmen were sent from No 9 district, and Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, notified. In the man's coat pocket they found a small memorandum book containing a sh ort note, asking anyone who found the body to notify his wife. It was signed, "Eugene Willard, 417 Lawton place."

The park employes did not remember having seen the man, and it could not be determined just when the suicide was committed, but he evidently had been dead several days.

Mrs. Susie Willard, wife of the suicide, when seen in their apartments at 417 Lawton place, last night, said that her husband had been afflicted for some time with tuberculosis and heart disease, and that he complained of his head.

"My husband was about 33 years old. We had been married five years," she said. "He was very nervous, and the fact that of late he was unable to attend to his duties at the stock yards about made him insane.

"Three weeks ago Virne came home and told us all he would kill himself. Later he told my mother, Mrs. Sarah Powell, that he went one time to the Kaw river to jump in, but that he found the water too shallow and too muddy for the plunge and changed his mind. By a statagem we succeeded in getting a hold of his revolver and hiding it under some papers on the cupboard. Last Wednesday we found the weapon missing.

"Thursday morning I asked Virne to go to the store and purchase some ribbon from a sample I gave him. By night he had not returned, so I notified the police. Since then my brother has tramped the outskirts of the city trying to find the body, confident that my husband had killed himself.

When ill health drove the husband to despondency, Mrs. Willard penned the note and placed it in his pocket, giving her address and asking that in case of accident she be notified.

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March 2, 1909

AGED COUPLE KILLED
BY ESCAPING GAS.

FOUND IN THEIR HOME 36
HOURS AFTER DEATH.

Bodies of A. H. Tuttle, Civil War
Veteran, and His Wife, Discovered
in Residence -- Grate and
Heater Burning.

Last night, when Captain Jack Burns of fire company No. 18 entered the house of A. H. Tuttle, 2617 East Twenty-fifth street, and found an aged man and his wife both dead, Tuttle lying on his side on the floor and his wife sitting in a chair in the front room of the house. A gas grate and an overhead gas heater in the room were burning.

The first intimation of a tragedy was discovered by A. M. Weed, a solicitor for the Wells-Fargo Express Company. Captain Tuttle, as he was familiarly called, has been an employe of the express company for the past twenty-five years. When he failed to appear at the depot yesterday morning, for the first time in years, it was thought he was ill. Mr. Weed called at the house about 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and failing to get a response to repeated ringing of the door bell, walked around the house. He questioned a little girl playing in the yard as to whether Tuttle lived the4re, and if she had seen either of them that day. The girl replied that she had not seen either of them since Sunday morning. Weed found the milk on the back porch and the morning papers on the front porch.

FILLED WITH GAS FUMES.

Mr. Weed returned to the office and reported to H. B. Jeffereies, assistant agent, that he suspected something wrong. Mr. Jefferies visited the house at 6 o'clock and after investigating saw the blue flame of the gas heater, which is attached to the gas jet, through a side window. He went to the front porch and putting his hand on the large plate glass window found it to be hot. He called W. W. Hunt, who lives at 2619 East Twenty-fifth street, and after a consultation sent a boy to No. 18 fire station for a ladder. Captain Burns and one of his men responded and entered the house through an upstairs window.

"As soon as I opened the window I could smell the gas fumes and the still more horrible odor of decaying human flesh," said Captain Burns. "It was necessary to light matches to see in the ho use as most of the curtains were drawn. The heat was intense. Coming down the stairs the heat was more noticeable and gas fumes made breathing difficult. In the parlor, off the reception hall, we found the old couple; Captain Tuttle lying on the floor and Mrs. Tuttle sitting in her Morris chair in front of the burning grate, her head over on her breast as if in sleep."

DEAD THIRTY-SIX HOURS.

Mr. Jefferies and Mr. Hunt went into the house and opened the doors and windows. Coroner's physician, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, was called and declared that the death had occurred thirty-six hours earlier. He said that asphyxiation from inhaling carbon monoxide was the cause of death. Carbon monoxide is the fumes from imperfect combustion of natural gas, and is similar to that given off my burning anthracite coal.

Before noon Sunday morning Mrs. Tuttle went to a neighbor, Mrs. Jackson, at 2515 East Twenty-fifth street, and borrowed a cupful of sugar, saying she was going to make a custard pie. This was the last time she was seen alive. Other neighbors had seen the couple earlier in the day.

From the appearance of the house, those acquainted with Captain and Mrs. Tuttle declared that they had evidently just gotten up from the breakfast table. The breakfast dishes had been washed and were on the dining table, covered with a cloth. Captain Tuttle's razor, shaving brush, mug and strop were lying on the kitchen table.

W. L. Cowing, 2506 Montgall, said that Mr. and Mrs. Tuttle were to have gone with him to Shawnee Sunday afternoon to look over some land. "I saw them yesterday morning," said Mr. Cowing last night, "and they both declared they would go. When I came to the house in the afternoon I got no response to my ringing of the doorbell and concluded they had gone ahead of me."

Rev. R. P. Witherspoon, 1601 Belmot avenue, brother of Mrs. Tuttle, was called form the Gypsy Smith meeting and arrived at the house after 9 o'clock. He was shocked at the news. He said that he had never known a happier or more devoted couple.

"My sister and her husband have led an ideal life," he said, "and had it not been for neighbors and friends this thing might have gone unnoticed for days. They loved each other and everyone around them, and were loved by them in turn."

CIVIL WAR VETERAN.

Captain Tuttle served in the Sixteenth Ohio regiment of infantry in the civil war. Shortly after the war he became a director in the Missouri penitentiary at Jefferson City, where he remained several years. He afterwards went to Warrensburg, Mo., and engaged in business. Twenty-five years ago he joined the messenger service of the Wells Fargo Express Company and remained with them until his death.

Promotions came one after another, until he became money deliverer and one of the most trusted employes of the company. His superiors and associates declare that his word was as good as a bond. It is said that the company has offered several times to retire him on a pension, but that he has steadily refused, saying that he must be around and doing something or he couldn't feel right. He drew $36 a month as pension from the government.

Three sons survive the couple. They are Lloyd Tuttle, a salesman for the Ferguson-McKinney Dry Goods Company in St. Louis; Charles P. Tuttle of Coalinga, Cal., and Harry Tuttle of St. Paul, Minn. Mr. Tuttle has a brother living in Creston, O., and Mrs. Tuttle has a sister, Mrs. T. J. Claggett, Marshall, Mo., and two brothers, Charles Witherspoon, Mansfield, Tex., and the Rev. R. P. Witherspoon of this city.

The bodies were taken to Carroll-Davidson's undertaking rooms on Grand avenue. News of the deaths has been telegraphed to the sons and the funeral arrangements will await their arrival in this city.

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January 8, 1909

DEATH PACT IN
DOUBLE KILLING?

BODIES OF MAN AND WOMAN
FOUND IN ROOM.

POISON PROBABLY WAS USED.

NO SIGNS OF VIOLENCE, BUT
MARKED FACIAL CONTORTION.

Little Light on Mysterious Deaths of
J. W. Brault and Mrs. Julia
Kenner in Their Troost
Avenue Apartment.

With no external evidence as to how or why they came to their end, J. W. Brault and Mrs. Julia Kenner were found dead in a room at 1517 Troost avenue at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Whether it was a suicide pact between the man and Mrs. Kenner, who may be his wife, or a murder and a suicide, the police are unable to say. The woman was a baking powder demonstrator and about 38 years old. The man at one time was an agent for crayon pictures. He looked to be 45 years old. The couple evidently died yesterday morning.

They had been doing light housekeeping and when Mrs. Mary Kimmons, who conducts the apartment house where the two roomed, failed to detect the usual odor of cooking food at noon yesterday she sent W. F. Gray, who, with his wife, lives in the apartment house, to investigate. Gray found the door locked. He climbed up and looked over the transom. He saw the two bodies lying on the bed. That of the man was on its back; that of the woman was lying across him, the hands clasped as if in agony, the face contorted.

MAN DIED FIRST.

The police and coroner were united. Two detectives and Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky broke in the door. From the position of the bodies, the detectives were led to believe that the man died first. There were no marks of violence on either body. Poison probably caused the death of both, but only a postmortem examination, which will be made this morning, will establish the fact.

When Mr. Gray looked over the transom, he said he smelled chloroform, but no trace of the drug was found. There was a small vial of laudanum on the dresser, but Dr. Czarlinsky said that there was no evidence of laudanum poisoning.

Mrs. Gray, wife of the man who made the discovery, said that about 3 o'clock yesterday morning she heard Mrs. Kenner rush across the floor screaming "Help," and "Lord have mercy!" She paid little attention to the cries then, as she and Mr. Gray had often heard the couple quarreling. However, she told Mrs. Kimmons of it just before noon.

The dead man and woman came to the apartment house a week ago and registered as man and wife.

SAID THEY WERE MARRIED.

Many letters addressed to Mrs. Julia Kenner were found, but there was only one that might have belonged to Brault. This one was to the Egg Baking Powder Company of New York and applied for a position as agent. It set forth that Brault had married Mrs. Kenner, alluded to as "one of the company's best demonstrators." It was evidently a copy of a letter Brault had sent to the company.

In the meagerly furnished room was a bed, a center table on which was a pan of biscuits,, a dressing table crowded with bottles of various descriptions, and a trunk, the property of Mrs. Kenner. On top of some articles of woman's wear in the trunk was a telegram addressed to "Mrs. Kenner, 132 West Court street, Cincinnati, O." It read:

"Letter mailed today. Am well. Lots of love. -- Your Harry."

The searchers could find no other indication that a man whose first name was Harry had ever written the woman. Another letter from the Egg Baking Powder Company of New York was addressed to the woman at 1512 Biddle street, St. Louis.

NO LACK OF MONEY.

The theory the police first entertained was that lack of money had brought on despondency which had occasioned the double tragedy. This was given up when a certificate of deposit for $50 on the Exchange Bank of Kansas City was discovered in the trunk.

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, the assistant coroner, said last night he was entirely at sea as to the method used in bringing death to the couple. He was sure neither gas nor chloroform was used.

"My opinion is that the woman killed the man and the in her desperation put an end to herself," said he. "From the appearance of the room and of the bodies I do not consider it possible that some one could have entered the room and murdered the couple."

That was also the opinion of Lieutenant W. J. Carroll of No. 6 police station, to whom the tragedy was first reported.

The bodies were ordered taken to the Leo J. Stewart undertaking establishment.

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December 25, 1908

BUSINESS WORRIES DROVE
HOTEL WOMAN TO SUICIDE.

Mrs. Alvina Morrell, of the Mon-
damin, Left a Note Saying,
"I Am So Tired."

Worry because her business was losing money caused Mrs. Alvina Morrell, 38 years old, the owner of the Mondamin hotel at Twelfth and Washington streets, to commit suicide last night by taking bichloride of mercury. Mrs. Morrell came here last August and assumed charge of the hotel, and had been losing money steadily ever since.

A note hastily scribbled on a piece of cardboard, probably after the poison had been swallowed, read as follows:

"Let me sleep. I am so tired. Give all I have to mother. Lillie, by-by, I am sick. ALVINA."

The Lillie referred to is her sister, who lives in St. Louis. A telegram from her was received in the afternoon my Mrs. Morrell, saying that the former could not come to this city for Christmas, but would be here the next day. Mrs. Morrell's mother also lives in St. Louis and is very ill. Mrs. Morrell was a widow.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and made an examination. The body was removed to O'Donnell's undertaking rooms.

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December 23, 1908

KILLS HUSBAND IN STREET.

Mrs. Rosa Peterson Resents Charges
and Shoots Him With Revolver
at Eighteenth and Askew.

Because he accused her of familiarity with other men, Mrs. Rosa Peterson, who lives with her widowed mother at 3505 East Eighteen street, shot and killed her husband, Fred Peterson, at the corner of Eighteenth street and Askew avenue, at 12:20 o'clock last night. A revolver was the weapon used. The woman fired five shots, every one taking effect. The first one, supposed to have been fired point blank at the head, caused instantaneous death, according to Assistant county Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, who examined the body.

According to the story of Mrs. Peterson, her husband had been separated from her the past two years, but they had occasionally kept company together. Last night they went to a dance. On the way to Peterson's home at 3810 East Eighteenth street words passed between them. Mrs. Peterson alleges her husband slapped her as they got off the car at Eighteenth street and Askew avenue. She then drew the revolver and killed him.

Peterson was a plumber's helper and worked for A. Schreidner at 7223 East Eighth street. Mrs. Peterson feeds a press at the plant of the Masterson Printing Company, 414 East Ninth street.

She was arrested by Policeman Patrick Coon and taken to No. 6 police station.

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December 19, 1908

FAMILY REUNITED BY RIOT.

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky Meets Relative
Through Publicity Given Him.

The appearance of the name of Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, in the local papers following the riot of religious fanatics on December 8 brought about a reunion of half brothers and sisters who had known nothing of of each other for thirty-eight years. A week ago yesterday, three days after the riot, Mrs. Pearl Wheeler of 16 South Bellaire avenue appeared at Dr. Czarlinsky's office in the Commerce building and asked:

"Did you ever know a man named Herman Czarlinsky?"

When the doctor informed Mrs. Wheeler that the man mentioned, who died here January 27, 1899, was his father, he was informed that Herman Czarlinsky was her father also. She said that her brother, William Whippell, who took the name of his stepfather, lived in Englewood station. A meeting was arranged for last Sunday and an impromptu reunion was held at Dr. Czarlinsky's home, 3510 Vine street.

"Shortly after the war," said Dr. Czarlinsky yesterday, "my father married a Miss Goode in New Orleans. She was a Gentile and, on account of religious differences, they separated in 1870. My father came West and settled at Warsaw, Mo., with three of the children, Fannie, G. A. and Charles. Fannie, who is now Mrs. McCubbin, lives at 1625 Jackson avenue. G. A. Czarlinsky lives here and Charles in St. Louis. Two of the children remained with their mother. They were William and Pearl, now Mrs.Wheeler. Father's first wife married again and Will took his stepfather's name of Whippell. Father moved here in 1889.

"Nothing was ever known of the other two children and their mother until Mrs. Wheeler appeared at my office last Friday. She said her mother died January 18, 1899, at Monett, Mo., fourteen days before my father's death.

"By my father's second marriage there were three children, Mrs. Esther Morris, 3517 Vine street; Maud Czarlinsky, who lives with her and myself. We were, of course, reared with the three children who came West with my father, but neither they nor us knew that the other two were living so close at hand. The mention of my name in the papers as deputy coroner in the handling of the riot victims brought about the reunion."

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